How Physics Took Nicholas Kurth to Switzerland To Work With CERN

Nicholas stands outside the science building wearing a lab coat.

A Dive Into the Physics Major at Rowan University With a Graduating Senior Tell us more about your CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) experience. “I knew about this opportunity at CERN for over a year before I applied because when I was applying to LSU to go do research work for them, I saw […]

Behind the Lens: Our Favorite Summer Shots

Dramatic sunset photo over the athletic field with the marching band on the field at Rowan University.

We’re lonely in the summer without you, Profs. Welcome home! Here are our photographers’ and videographers’ favorite shots, stories and moments from this summer:

Four Rowan University alumni stand holding a Rowan flag on a rock in Delta Lake in the Grand Tetons.
#RowanEverywhere, a few Rowan alumni shared this pic with us from Delta Lake in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Go Profs!
Rowan University marching band with a dramatic sunset behind the drum.
Introducing Pride of the Profs, Rowan’s new marching band. This no-filter sunset was from just last night.
Three Rowan University students work in the community garden.
Fighting food insecurity with homegrown produce, the Community Garden is for all! They donated 75 pounds of produce to the on campus food pantry, The Shop, this summer. Story here.
A Rowan University student engrossed in work, with a line of toy dinosaurs in front of him.
Dinosaurs aren’t just for kids. In this story and video on the class Breathing Life Into Fossils, Thomas talks about paleoart.
A Rowan University faculty and student work in a blueberry field for research.
Blueberry fields forever … using math to predict crop yields for farmers, this video highlights hands-on student research.
A full half-circle rainbow over Engineering Hall at Rowan University.
Rainbows for dayssssss after summer storms behind Engineering Hall and Rowan Hall. (Notice the reflection creating a full-circle rainbow.)
A Rowan student wraps each of his arms around one parent and pulls them in for a hug.
How adorable is this family? We’re launching a parent portal with helpful info for new college parents, and a Rowan blog series just for parents and families.
A Rowan University student intern at NASA standing with his arms folded across his chest with the NASA building behind him.
It isn’t rocket science … until it is. Benjamin landed an internship with NASA and our team traveled to Washington, DC to put together this video on his experience. How cool is that?
Bunce Hall at Rowan University with the 100 banner in between each column to celebrate the university's centennial.
Celebrating Rowan’s centennial. Happy 100th birthday to us!

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Beyond the Classroom: Graduate Student Jon Witkowski Puts Data Science Studies to Work in Cooper University Healthcare Internship

Jon stands in front of a chalkboard inside a a classroom on campus.

Today we speak to Jon Witkowski of Ocean County, N.J. on his internship with Cooper University Healthcare. Jon is a Rowan Global student pursuing a master’s degree in Data Science through Rowan’s accelerated CADP 4+1 program. He recently graduated with degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics. While an undergraduate student, Jon was a member of Rowan’s chapter of the Upsilon Pi Epsilon honor society and worked as a peer tutor

Can you tell us more about data science?

Data science is an interdisciplinary field between computer science and statistics, leveraging technology and utilizing computer science and high-level math to transform data and draw a useful output for informed, analytical decision making.

Jon smiles and stands on a walking path on campus.

What is your day-to-day like at your internship with Cooper University Healthcare?

The first project I was assigned was to make a dashboard for different health systems’ market shares in the general South Jersey region over the past four years. Other departments source the data and hand it to me, and basically, I built a dashboard to whatever their specifications are.

I’ll either be doing something like preparing the data and wrangling it to get it in a state that I want for the databases, or I’ll be trying to figure out how to format my dashboards and what kind of layout to do. Maybe I’ll be thinking about what types of different visualizations I can use. One of the things that we use are interactive, graphical filters. So instead of just having a drop down for selecting things, maybe you format your filter as a bar chart with the labels on it, so you can just click it, and it filters by that.

Getting the data and the results is the easy part. It’s putting it in a way that you can show as much as you can, without it being crowded — that’s really the hard part.

The best part was being able to experiment with new visualizations. I got hands-on experience in the software I had only gone over in class last semester.

Jon sits at a desktop computer station against a blue wall.

One of the more interesting things I’ve done was writing complex table queries that made the data look good, show the visualizations I wanted, and are efficient. An example of that: One of my proudest achievements is we have a map, and it’s colored by zip code. The intensity of the color represents Cooper’s market share in that region. So how many of the inpatient discharges in that region were Cooper’s and a lower volume or market share will be a yellow color, and it’ll get darker red for the higher color. Figuring that out was really fun to try to do.

How did you discover your internship?

It’s very hard to get an internship in the tech field as a college student. You would think it’s easy because it’s such a necessary field. I read online that the unemployment rate in the tech field like computer science and programming is less than 2%, so you’d imagine that many people are getting jobs. I applied for anything I could find, and I happened to get this one.

It actually worked out in the end. The work I do at Cooper is similar to work I did in a class I took last semester, which just happened to turn out to be important to me if I am working in that field, but it really is my favorite class that I ever took at Rowan called Visual Analytics. [The course] involves data visualization and analytics. You’re basically performing analysis on your data and coming out with any results you’re looking for. It’s all about the visualization of set results in an effective way. I really loved it. 

Jon stands inside a stairwell in an academic building.

Will your internship help you inside and outside of your master’s program?

I think so. The internship also focused on the back end of data visualization for you actually get the data. Before you have the data the way you want it for the visualizations, you have to prepare it and model it. My next project is for social determinants of health. I’m on the data modeling part of that. That is definitely not something I have a ton of experience in, so it’s going to be massively valuable during my career.

What advice would you offer to your peers?

To discover an internship, think about what keywords you should put in a job search. Look at LinkedIn, Indeed, Monster Jobs, Zip Recruiter, or anything. Just apply for as many internships as you can, because the more you apply, the more options you have. It might seem really annoying and stressful to be applying for hundreds of internships, but that just gives you more options to choose what you actually want. It will give you a better chance of finding something you like in the long run.

If you don’t know what you want to do in any degree program, I would look at the different course descriptions for the different courses in that major and the topics of the different concentrations. Also, I didn’t get to use LinkedIn Learning until my fifth semester here, but I would absolutely use LinkedIn Learning. If I could just go back to my freshman year, I would have used LinkedIn learning. I would have looked up all the computer science concentrations and started doing independent learning through that. It’s a resource that Rowan provides with countless hours of coursework. It’s incredibly useful. I think everyone should use it, and it’s definitely something that Rowan doesn’t emphasize enough.

How did you choose your majors in Computer Science and Mathematics?

I guess I got lucky with computer science because it’s what I always knew I wanted to do. I can remember as far back as like seven or eight in elementary school. When I was a kid, I wanted to do stuff with computers. Then, I learned what programming was. I just knew that’s what was in store for me.

Jon sits in the Wilson amphitheater.

Math was always my best subject in school. I initially had it as a minor coming in because the computer science degree is most of the math minor. It’s two extra classes to get the minor. Then, I found out there was another minor in the math department called Applied Math. That was three more classes, so I figured, “Why not tack that on?” Then, I found out that the math department had the Bachelor of Arts, which was maybe three or four more classes to tack on. So I figured, “Why not?”

Can you tell us about any faculty who have particularly impacted your college career?

Three professors who stand out most for me are Dr. H. [Dr. Gabriela Hristescu] and Professor [Jack] Myers from the computer science department and Dr. [Charalampos] Papachristou from the math department. I had three different classes with Dr. H, and I was also a learning assistant in one of her classes last semester. She was also one professor in charge of the Computer Science Honor Society, Upsilon Pi Epsilon, which I was a member of for three semesters, and was also on the e-board for. Dr. H has been a very huge part of my entire college career. She wrote me a recommendation for the master’s program.

I had Professor Myers for two classes, and I’m taking another class of his this upcoming fall. He is one of the best people I know. I took his database class back in the spring of 2020. Without that class, I wouldn’t be in data science. I just absolutely loved it. I’ve had a couple of classes in college that I would consider to be my favorites. Database was my first favorite class. I told him I loved the class, and he recommended data science to me. So I looked into it, and I saw that it aligned with what I wanted to do. He also wrote me a recommendation for the data science master’s program. Without either of these professors, I wouldn’t be in the field. 

Dr. Papachristou (or Babis for short) is a statistics professor whom I’ve taken three classes with. It was the first stat class with him that made me decide to concentrate my math degree in statistics, which was instrumental in me choosing to go into data science.

Jon works on his laptop inside a classroom.

What are your career goals or outcomes after having obtained the 4+1 degree?

My department at Cooper was pleased with my work this summer and has asked me to continue working with them part-time during the semester. I was also planning on being an adjunct professor in the computer science department. I think it’d be a great way to give back to the people who helped me get where I am.

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Edited by:
Rachel Rumsby, senior communication studies and public relations major

Photos by:
Ashley Craven, junior sports communication and media major

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming College of Science and Mathematics Students

Exterior shot of Science Hall.

Today we feature incoming first year students Ariana Benitez, Soorya B., Abby Titus (she/they), Leila Underwood (she/her), and Dallas Hainsworth (she/her). Ariana is from Bergen County, NJ and will be living on campus as a Psychology and Exercise Science major. Soorya is from Princeton, NJ (Mercer County) and will be living on campus as a […]

Moods: Where To Go On Campus When You Feel A Certain Way

Rowan Boulevard and the Glassblower statue.

Rowan students and alumni reveal popular spots to eat, hang out and socialize on campus.

Where to go on campus when you want to socialize with friends

“When I want to socialize with my friends on campus, I like to go downtown to different restaurants like Playa Bowls and LaScala’s Fire.” – junior Supply Chain & Logistics and Marketing major Jenna Scarpa

“When I am on campus, I love going to sporting events and the Student Center to get together and socialize with my friends!” – senior Psychology major Lucille Villani

Richard Wackar Stadium where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track events take place.
Richard Wackar Stadium, where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track and field events take place

“I enjoy going to Holly Pointe Cafe to socialize with friends because the atmosphere gives off very welcoming vibes through the music and staff. Plus who doesn’t love to get something to eat while they are chatting?” – senior Math Education major CJ Barrett

As you can see above, Rowan offers many different places to socialize with your friends. From sporting events and walkable restaurants to Holly Pointe Commons Cafe, there are so many communal spaces to sit back and enjoy quality time with friends. 

Holly Pointe Cafe.
Glassworks Cafe located in Holly Pointe Commons

Where to go on campus when you want to study/sit in a quiet space

“Whenever I need a place to study or somewhere quiet, I love going to the Campbell Library on campus or Barnes and Noble. It helps me focus and I find that I get a lot more work done when I’m there!” – sophomore Athletic Training major Hannah Lombardo

Outside of Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard.
Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard

“Being a commuter, I would sit in my car and study in between classes. The best lot is by Bunce Hall because it’s small, less traffic, and there’s a nice view while working.” – senior Theatre and Advertising major Nick Flagg 

“If I have a lot of work to get done or need to study for a test, I usually go to Campbell Library or a study pod in the Science [Hall] building. I work really productively in places that are quiet and aren’t that busy!” – junior Biological Sciences major Harley Rosenzweig 

Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library.
Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library

Rowan has many options when seeking out a quiet place to study or have some alone time. Many students enjoy the library or Barnes and Noble downtown to tackle some work, and students can even find a good spot to relax on the lawn chairs in front of Robinson Hall and next to Wilson Hall. 

Where to go on campus when you want to grab a bite to eat

“Freshens was always a go to spot. Being able to customize a healthy option along with the convenience of being able to order on my phone made it a staple.” – alumnus and Liberal Studies major Daniel Corvo

Student Center Cafeteria.
Student Center Cafe

“Freshens in the Student Center is my go-to place for food in between classes or after practice! The food is SO good and filling!! LaScala’s on Rowan Boulevard is also really good.” – senior Elementary Education and Biological Sciences major Johanna Diehl

Lascala's Fire on Rowan Boulevard.
Lascala’s Fire on Rowan Boulevard.

“Whenever I need a healthier option I love going to Fresh off the Grill [Grill Nation] and ordering grilled chicken sandwiches. They have a ton of topping options so you can really make it yours.” – alumnus and Mechanical Engineering graduate Frank Cianciotta

“The Boulevard has so many options of different restaurants to choose from! There’s such a great range of different kinds of food, no matter what I’m in the mood for they have it!” – senior Finance major Bethany Sansone

Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard.
Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard, a local favorite for breakfast, lunch and dinner

There are many options available when students are looking for a bite to eat. Students can use a meal swipe at Glassworks Dining Hall located in Holly Pointe Commons, the Student Center, or Rowan Boulevard to restaurants like LaScala’s Fire, Dawn to Dusk, El Mariachi and more. 

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Story By:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Select photos by:
RJ Wentzell, senior exercise science major

Finally Face to Face!

Three friends pose in front of Bunce Hall.

Today, we speak to Rowan students who are excited about being physically present in class when we return to campus in the fall. 

Rachel sitting outside the Rec Center.

“I’m really looking forward to going to more in-person classes and looking to join clubs. It’s been hard to get involved and talk to people in my classes because everyone is behind a screen. In the few classes that I have in person, I’ve already made connections, and it makes a huge difference. I can’t wait to make more friends next fall!” says Rachel Bonhomme, a Math and Education major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

Bri poses at the gazebo by Bunce Hall.

“I would really love to join a sorority next year. Just being part of a sisterhood sounds amazing!! I am really excited to open that chapter of my life at Rowan,” says Bri Solomon, a Biochemistry major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

Tammy posing for a picture in front of a city landscape.

“I’m currently in the Vietnamese Student Association at Rowan. I encourage people who’s interested in learning the culture/language or anyone down to have a good time to join. I really enjoyed being in this club so far,” says Tammy Nguyen, a first-generation college student and Early Childhood Education major from Lawnside, NJ (Camden County).

Jayshalie leaning and sitting by the Engineering fountain.

“I am most looking forward to being able to have classes and more activities in person. As a current [first year], I am really looking forward to in-person activities to be able to get the full college experience,” says Jayshalie Jennings, Secondary Education (Mathematics) major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County).

A selfie of Gabrielle.

“I am looking forward to dancing, of course. I could dance, thankfully, at home in my basement all school year, but I hope to dance in a studio. The last time I did that was March 10, 2020,” says Gabrielle Langevine, a Dance major from Middlesex County, NJ.

Sumayyah posing with a piece of artwork.

“Being able to work in the studios again and have more free time by doing so!” says Sumayyah Hayes, first-generation college student and Art major from Burlington County.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Aspiring College Professor Holly Zurenda

Holly stands against a brick wall.

Today we speak to Holly Zurenda, a senior Computer Science and Mathematics double major. A Rapid City, South Dakota native, Holly attended Black Hills State University and South Dakota School of Mines & Technology before transferring to Rowan University ten years later. Holly commutes from Egg Harbor Township, NJ (Atlantic County). Holly is set to graduate in December 2021. 

Holly poses next to the sign for Science Hall.

How was your transition into Rowan?

The process was amazingly simple. I had originally applied to be in the Combined Advanced Degree Program (CADP) in Subject Matter Education for Math and Science majors. Then, somebody had mentioned Computer Science and told me to try that degree program instead to see if I would like that more. I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I thought I would teach, but I liked math more, so I ended up in the Computer Science program.

Could you share a moment when you felt that Rowan was the right place for you?

I think most of all, it’s the professors. I feel like every professor is always willing to help. They help within office hours. They’ll schedule meetings with you outside of office hours if you need help. I think definitely it was the professors who have made this experience the best that it can be for me.

What are you most excited about when Rowan returns to face-to-face learning?

I think I’ll be most excited to work as a team with people in person, rather than on group calls. It is a little more difficult to work in a group online, especially when it’s computer science. Everybody has something up on their screen and we can’t all share our screens at once. I’m definitely most excited to do a group project in a true group fashion.

What are your plans for after you graduate from Rowan?

I think I will get a master’s degree in Computer Science. Then, I will get a Ph.D. in Computer Science. I want to teach Computer Science at a college level. 

What are you passionate about in your majors?

I wouldn’t say that my passion is truly for computers, science or math. My passion is actually teaching people. I seem to have a knack for it, and computer science is a high-need area. Most people don’t understand math and therefore they don’t understand computer science or vice versa, so I just figured it would be an excellent subject that I could actually help people learn about.

Holly poses in front of Science Hall.

How was transferring to Rowan the right choice for you?

I think that overall, it comes down to flexibility. A lot of colleges put a cap on how far you can commute, and I could commute from an hour away to Rowan. Also price-wise, it was better for me than other colleges. Overall, I just think Rowan is a pretty standup school. 

Do you have any advice for someone else who is returning to college after a long hiatus?

It’s definitely going to be difficult at first, but don’t give up. You will get back into the swing of things so quickly if you just keep trying.

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Meet #Rowan2025: Lizzie Schmidheiser, Future Teacher from Washington Twp. NJ

Stock image of math equations being written on a blackboard with chalk in hand.

Today we welcome first year student Lizzie Schmidheiser who will begin studying Secondary Math Education in the fall. Lizzie will commute from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County) and attends Washington Township High School. Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college? I am looking forward to meeting […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: From North Jersey To Utah, Chemical Engineering Major Jacob Molinaro

Stock image Mountain View.

Meet Jacob Molinaro, a Chemical Engineering major with minors in both Math and Chemistry who transferred from the County College of Morris and is originally from Essex County, NJ. He is taking remote classes at Rowan from his current residence in Utah. He shares more about his decision in choosing Rowan and what he loves about South Jersey.

Jacob taking a selfie of himself while climbing a mountain.

What are your professional goals? And how is Rowan helping to support you in those goals?

My goal is to get my Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and lead research in the field of renewable energy and energy storage. My time at Rowan has provided me with the educational background and experience to be competitive as I apply to my graduate programs and indirectly inspired me to follow this career path.

As a sophomore, my department head sent me an email encouraging me to apply to an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) program in Ohio. Following his advice, I applied and was admitted to the program and discovered my passions for both research and the field of electrochemistry.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

The field of chemical engineering is extremely diverse, incorporating manufacturing, research and development and process design. Without chemical engineering, we would find many of the everyday products we use would be unavailable. I specifically would like to work in the growing field of renewable energy and energy storage, which is becoming increasingly important as we strive for more sustainable and ecologically friendly alternatives to fossil fuels.

What inspired you to choose your major?

Excellent chemistry teachers in high school (for both Honors Chemistry in 10th grade and AP Chemistry in 11th) fostered my interest for the subject, but I have always been more interested in applying chemistry to real-world problems rather than understanding the technicalities of it. Hence, I went into chemical engineering (applied chemistry).

As a student from North Jersey, how did you become aware of Rowan University?

At the time I applied, there were five strong chemical engineering programs in the state of New Jersey that my community college made me aware of. I applied to all of them, and upon being accepted to Rowan, I came to visit and loved it!

How long is your trip/drive “home” to North Jersey?

This is an amusing question. As the question is intended to be answered, it is two hours up the NJ Turnpike/Garden State Parkway to where I lived in Essex County from my apartment in Marlton. To go visit my parents in Pennsylvania is about three hours.

However, at the moment my wife and I are living in Orem, Utah while I do all of my classes remotely. My wife, Kaitlin, is a travel nurse and is supporting a hospital here in Utah. Back to New Jersey from HERE is about 35 hours of driving.

Jacob posing with his wife for a wedding photo.
Jacob and his wife, Kaitlin, at their wedding.

What are some of the benefits for you, living this distance from home?

When I’m back in NJ it is nice to be close enough to my parents to go visit over the weekend and help out around the house, but far enough away that we’re not getting unexpected dinner guests every other evening while I need to be studying for an exam or my wife is getting home from a long shift at the hospital.

Here in Utah, the largest benefits are by far the accessibility of my favorite hobbies. I’m a runner, climber, mountaineer and skier; the whole Salt Lake City area is absolutely amazing for these activities. In the past two weeks I’ve been to the climbing gym, two different ski resorts, been up two mountains, and been able to run and hike in between classes.

Between my own personal travels and moving around with Kaitlin’s travel nursing, I’ve been to 49 of the 50 states, and Utah is probably tied for second with Montana among my favorite states (only second to Wyoming!). Utah residents are also doing a great job with social distancing and mask-wearing, so COVID-19 cases are low here and places like the ski resorts and climbing gyms are able to stay open and operate at reduced capacity.

What are a few interesting or new things (to you) about Rowan’s South Jersey area that you would share with future out-of-state students?

After living in the “sixth borough on NYC” in Essex County, I’ve really appreciated that South Jersey is much more rural. If it hasn’t come across yet, I’m not at all a city person and really appreciate some good nature. The accessibility to different parks and preserves throughout the Pine Barrens has been really special. There’s also a great running community, some really awesome little towns (I work as a barista in Haddonfield and love it there, for example), and a bit more of a laid back feel than you’d be used to in North Jersey.

What off-campus, local fun places do you recommend students check out?

Parallel to 322 and off of Delsea Drive there’s a really awesome bike path that runs about seven and a half miles to Sewell. That’s a fun ride/run, and I would definitely recommend students check it out. Duffield’s Farm Market in Sewell is a great place to visit in the fall for pumpkin picking and year-round for affordable fresh produce. It’s a bit of a drive, but I love the Black Run Preserve a bit north in Evesham Township.

Closer to campus, Pitman is always worth a visit for great restaurants and a fun main street. Overall, I’d encourage any new students to just drive around and get to know both Glassboro and the surrounding towns. There’s a lot of neat stuff to be seen, regardless of whether you’re interested in getting outdoors or visiting a town.

Why did you choose to transfer to Rowan University?

Of the three schools I was accepted for transfer to, Rowan was the most affordable (by a long shot!) and the most rural. I had spent two years at that point living in the extremely urban sections of northern New Jersey and was ready for a little farmland nearby!

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Header photo courtesy of:
Unsplash

We are #RowanPROUD to be included on Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s 2021 Transfer Honor Roll, which recognizes select nationwide colleges and universities that foster dynamic pathways for transfer students.

Black History Facts All Students Should Know

"Black History Month" written in colorful letters.

Today we speak to Rowan students from three different colleges who share insight on key moments in Black history and suggest books and movies to learn more. 

“Black History Month originally began as Negro History Week, created by Carter G. Woodson in 1926. It only became Black History Month in 1976 when President Gerald Ford called for the public to ‘seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.’ The month of February also coincided with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.” 

Gregory Williams, a freshman Dance major from South River, NJ (Middlesex County) is a resident on campus at Magnolia Hall. Gregory says he learned about Black history mostly through social media and his own research online. He recommends students read “Stamped from the Beginning” by Ibram X. Kendi or view the movies “Selma,” “13th” and “Harriet” to educate themselves about Black history. 

Gregory poses outside the student center in a Rowan sweatshirt.
Gregory Williams

“Jack Johnson became the first African American to be a world heavyweight champion.”

Latiesha Small, a freshman Biological Sciences and Mathematics double major from Matawan, NJ (Monmouth County), is a resident on campus at Evergreen Hall. Latiesha says she learned about Black history from her family. 

Latiesha poses at a table.
Latiesha Small

“Before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, there was a young girl named Claudette Colvin who refused first.”

Jamar Green, a junior Law & Justice Studies major with an Africana Studies minor, is from Linden, NJ (Union County). Jamar transferred to Rowan from Union County College and is a resident on campus at 230 Victoria. He is a first-generation college student. Jamar says he learned about Black history by researching. “I was always told by my grandfather if you want to know your history you have to learn it for yourself, so I read articles, books and watched videos, documentaries and movies.” A book that he recommends for students to educate themselves about Black history is “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” by Frederick Douglass.

Jamar Green sits and smiles, wearing a red vest.
Jamar Green

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Story and photo of Gregory by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photo of Latiesha provided by:
Latiesha Small, freshman biological Sciences and mathematics double major

Photo of Jamar provided by:
Jamar Green, junior law and justice studies major

Header photo courtesy of:
Pixabay

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Jordan Jiosi

Jordan sitting at a table in Wilson with a window behind him.

Today we feature first-generation college student Jordan Jiosi from Medford Lakes, NJ (Burlington County). Jordan is a double major in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) and Mathematics (Statistics) and is in a Combined Advanced Degree Program for an MS in Computer Science. Jordan is a transfer from Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC) and tells us […]

Black STEM Majors Share Advice for Black High School Students Interested in STEM

Ylanda sits outside campus near Campbell Library.

Today, we’re highlighting Black STEM majors as they share some advice on where to start when looking into STEM.

Ylanda wearing a Rowan shirt and posing outside the Campbell Library.

“Attend as many events as you can to meet new people that has the same interests as you and to also carry out with your interests,” says Ylanda Souffrant, a sophomore, first-generation college student and Math Education major from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

Josephine wearing a lab coat and posing in the Science building.

“It’s alright if you know you’re interested in STEM, but you don’t know what you want to do with it in life. Carefully choose the school/program you join because that is how you will position yourself and expose yourself to experiences and individuals that will guide you along your journey,” says Josephine Babatunde, a senior Biochemistry major and transfer student from Union County College (Union County, NJ).

Dévon sitting and posing for a photo while wearing a dotted dress shirt and blue dress pants.

“One major key of advice I would give for high school STEM students is to not give up. I know this sounds a bit cliché, but you’re going to run into many obstacles and people who try to hold you down or stop your progress, but you can’t let nothing stand in your way. The road is going to be rough and tough but like my family always used to preach to me, ‘If someone already did it, you can too,'” says DéVon Malloy, a junior, first-generation college student and Biomedical Engineering major from Hillside, NJ (Union County)

Briana sitting and posing on the fountain stature outside Campbell Library.

“Hold your head up high! The courses may seem rigorous and tedious, but you are more than capable. You are just as competitive as anyone else around you; don’t give up! Ask for help if you need it, take advantage of programs that cater to your major whether it is directly or indirectly correlated with the unrepresented, be sure to make connections any chance you get, and try to get some some volunteer experience in the field if possible.” — Briana Davy, junior, first-generation college student and Biological Sciences major (planning on receiving a CUGS in Spanish), Honors Concentration, transfer from RCSJ Cumberland, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Akil leaning against the bridge and smiling outside Engineering Hall.

“Start early. Time flies really fast and you never know what the next day will bring you. Get involved in programs, especially offered by the schools you go to, because it not only looks fantastic on your resumé but also the skills and knowledge you acquire from it goes a long way. Get involved early too, don’t be afraid of clubs and participating, and don’t be afraid to reach out to people in college now and ask questions.” — Akil DeBruhl, junior Biological Sciences major with a minor in Psychology, South Orange, NJ (Essex County)

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

Photography by: Stephanie Batista, sophomore Music Industry major and Joe Gentempo, Senior Art major

#PROFspective: Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rowan After Hours and More

Alex standing outside James Hall in the background.

Today we feature Alexandra Jackson, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major who minors in Mathematics, from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). She lives on campus and is a Resident Assistant, the treasurer of the College Diabetes Network, is involved in Out in STEM (oSTEM) and Catholic Campus Ministry. Tell us about one club, organization or […]

#PROFspective: NASA Grant Recipient Emilio Vega

Emilio standing outside of the Science building.

Today we feature Emilio Vega, a senior Physics major with a minor in math and a certificate of undergraduate study in health physics from Monroe, NJ (Middlesex County). Emilio talks about his research and his time here at Rowan. Why did you choose your major? I first fell in love with physics when I was […]

One Great Thing About Living Away (Even During a Pandemic)

Sunset at Rowan with stark red sky against black silouette of buildings and trees.

“The atmosphere. Your mind is in the school mindset. It would be harder to do homework in your room, because at home your mind thinks you’re at home and resting. But being here you see the buildings, the professors, the students and you still think it’s school first and relax later,” says Jaylen Shanklin, a sophomore […]

4 Mathematics Education Majors Share Insight About Their Major

Backlit image of woman writing on a white board.

Today, we speak to four students pursuing masters’ degrees in STEM education about one thing they wish they knew about their major or something that was better than expected. 

Reese posing for a portrait photo.

“Teaching is a profession that requires passion. I warn future education majors to really make sure they are passionate about teaching and will love what they do. There are things we do not consider in the future before making the decision to be a teacher. For one, we do not have full control of what we teach and how we teach it. There are very specific restrictions and each school has different expectations.  You must have the ability to save money. The final year of your education will consist of you being a full time teacher without any compensation. It will be a lot of hard work but you will learn to appreciate it as time goes by,” says senior Reese Hart a Mathematics and Education major, transfer from Rowan College of South Jersey (RCSJ), from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County)

Tiffany posing for a selfie.

“The staff associated with my education degree have by far been the best, most personable, helpful and considerate people in all of my college career!” says first-generation college senior Tiffany Burke with a B.A. in Mathematics with an M.A. in Education and a minor in Psychology, transfer from Rowan College of Gloucester County (now RCSJ) from Buena, NJ (Cumberland County) 

Stephanie posing for a selfie.

“I love how open all the supervisors are with all of us graduates. They go out of their way to help us succeed and treat us all like a large family. If any questions or concerns are had they are answered immediately by the many supervisors in this field,” says senior Stephanie Gomez with a B.A. in Mathematics, working toward M.A. in STEM Education form Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County)

Michael posing with a trail sign while hiking.

“I would tell people starting this out to save up some money. You’ll need it come clinical year,” says senior Michael Garber Mathematics, transfer from Camden County College (now RCSJ) from Camden County, NJ

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Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

#PROFspective: Mathematics Major Alisa Patel

Alisa standing outside of Robinson Hall.

Today we feature Alisa Patel, a junior Mathematics major with a Statistics of Operations Research and Data Analysis minor. Alisa is a first-generation college student from Cedar Grove, NJ (Essex County). Alisa is a tutor through tutoring services, a resident assistant (RA) through Residential Learning & University Housing and a mentor with Dr. Harley E. […]

Reppin’ North Jersey: Transfer Student Jean Han

Jean Han standing outside.

Today we speak to senior Chemical Engineering major Jean Han from Fort Lee, NJ (Bergen County). Jean, who also minors in Math, transferred from Bergen Community College and is a part of AIChE. What do you like to do off campus for fun? I like to go into Philadelphia. I also enjoy riding my bike […]

3 Mechanical Engineering Majors Share How Their Major Supports Their Professional Goals

Photo of someone writing on paper.

Today, we hear from three Mechanical Engineering majors on how their major is getting them ready for their professional goals.

Caroline drinking from a mug that says "engineer" and then provides the definition.

“I’d love for my career to improve the relationship between humanity and the planet, and have an impact on the way and efficiency with which we carry out our daily lives.” – Caroline Thistle, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major with an honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Nicholas posing for a portrait photo of himself while wearing a suit.

“My major helps tremendously with what I want to go into after I graduate. I want to be an aerospace engineer. It has been a goal of mine for a few years now. Getting a degree in mechanical engineering will bring me closer to my goal since mechanical and aerospace engineering can go hand-in-hand.” – Nicholas Mastropolo, Senior, First-generation college student, Mechanical Engineering major with a minor in Mathematics, Transfer from RCSJ, Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County)

A portrait photo of Lia.

“My professional goal is to work at Stryker Corp. I have learned that one of my goals in life is for my work to have a positive impact on others. One way for a mechanical engineer to have a positive impact is through designing medical devices. And Stryker’s philosophies and goals completely align with my own.” – Lia Mahoney, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior, music industry major

6 Economics Majors Share What They Wish They Knew About Their Major

Economics major Sarah stands outside

“Economics is a social science which is focused on governments, individuals, companies, the environment, and every factor which affects each of these. Economics is not similar to a business or finance major and students will receive a broad education about the world rather than a specific education to prepare one to trade stocks or such.” […]

5 Women in Engineering Share Insights on Being Females in a Male-dominated Field

Engineering senior Alex Jackson poses outside on campus.

Today, we speak to five seniors from the College of Engineering about their experiences as women in a predominantly male field.  

A portrait photo of Lia.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field can feel intimidating at times. I want to be seen and treated as an equal but I am aware that people will never treat me like a male, therefore I’ll never be treated like the majority. Even though I have not experienced any out right discrimination I still have my guard up. And it can be very intimidating to be the only female in a class. But I also feel more motivated to do my best and aim high. Being a strong female engineering can be just as or more intimidating as a room full of men.” – Lia Mahoney, senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

Alex posing against a wall and smiling.

“It’s fantastic. Honestly, it’s great. The professors and students all know me, it is easy to make friends because I stand out, I know a lot of people, and I have better relationships with my professors. I have also had the opportunity to connect with the other women which is fantastic. I feel like the department is really rooting for me.” – Alex Jackson, senior, Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a Math minor, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) 

Caroline sitting and smiling on her bed in her bedroom.

“Being the only person who looks like you in a classroom is tough, especially when you also have to provide the feminine insight for a product or service you’re designing. Impostor syndrome kicks in, and you constantly feel like you’re not good enough or you’re the only person who feels anxious or intimidated. It feels like everyone else knows way more than you and is constantly studying and you feel like you need to overcompensate to feel adequate. It’s very frustrating, but being able to bring a fresh perspective and excelling for yourself is incredibly rewarding.” – Caroline Thistle, senior, Mechanical Engineering major with a Honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Julia posing for a photo.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field is rewarding and allows us to show we are capable of doing any career we want. It is important to stand your ground and remain confident in yourself.” – Julia Bally, senior, Biomedical Engineering major with Honors concentration, Sparta, NJ (Sussex County) 

Alexa smiling and holding an apple in an apple orchard.

“My one piece of advice for women entering a male-dominated field like chemical engineering is to be confident in your abilities. If you find yourself the only female in the group, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty — set off the bottle rocket, build the turbine, test the reaction! Henry M. Rowan once said, ‘What this country needs is not more engineers, but more great engineers.’ Rowan has taught me that great engineers, both male and female, share their knowledge and skills to ultimately achieve their goal as one.”  – Alexa Lynch, senior, Chemical Engineering major, Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) 

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Alumni Success: B.A. in Mathematics Grad Bri Arnold

Bri surrounded by leaves.

Today we feature Bri Arnold, an alumna from the Class of 2019 who holds a B.A. in Mathematics. Bri transferred to Rowan from Monmouth University in 2016. She lived on campus during her sophomore year in Holly Pointe Commons and lived off-campus during her junior and senior years. Bri is from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), and currently lives in West Chester, PA. 

Bri poses by a white door.

What made you want to come to Rowan? I met my current fiance, who is also a Rowan graduate, while he was a student at Rowan and I was a freshman at a different university. After visiting the campus so much and seeing all that Rowan has to offer, I fell in love with the University and I transferred. It was the best decision I ever made.

Bri and her fiancé pose in front of a sunset in their Rowan gear.

What field are you in? I graduated with a degree in Mathematics, but I am in the field of data analytics. I work for Chemours, a DuPont spin-off, based in Wilmington, Delaware, in internal audit, but I’m not really an auditor. I just do the fun stuff.

Bri poses by the Rowan Arch in her graduation attire.

How did your degree help you get into the field of internal audit? My math degree helped me, but what really helped the most was my minor in Statistics. When you have mathematics as a degree, you usually go in one of two directions, which are theory math and applied math. I chose to go the route of applied math, and I went into the industry. The statistics helped me out because I learned how to analyze data sets; take large data sets and draw conclusions in the ways that my auditors want to see it. 

Did you have any internships while you were at Rowan? The summer before my Junior year, I participated in a research program with the College of Science and Mathematics. When I was a senior, I was an intern at Chemours. They offered me a full-time job, and I am still working there today.

Bri poses with friends at Rowan.

What did you love about Rowan? The best decision I ever made was transferring to Rowan. The location of Rowan is great, because it’s so close to Philly, it’s pretty close to Atlantic City, and Wilmington, and all these other places where there are job opportunities. It’s in a good area, and I don’t think I would have had the opportunities I had at Rowan at any other college. My professors were open and wanted to help, and they wanted to make sure that you knew the material, and not just that you went to class and then took an exam. They were totally invested in your education. Transferring to Rowan is the best decision I ever made, and I don’t think I would be where I am now if I never went to Rowan. I’m so grateful I transferred. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos provided by:
Bri Arnold

8 Chemical Engineering Majors Share the WOW Moment in Their Majors

Chemical engineering student works in lab.

Today, eight Chemical Engineering majors share their “WOW! I’m in the right major for me!” moments.

Dylan sitting on the steps of the engineering building.

“Well, it turned out my physics teacher was right. Most of everything that I’ve learned is intuitive to me, whether it is in engineering or chemistry. Quite honestly, I catch myself accidentally memorizing equations and information before I go to study.” – Dylan Snyder, sophomore Chemical Engineering major from Wilmington, Delaware

Tori posing with a sign that says "AlChe".

“Once I visited Rowan and heard about the program I knew it was right for me.” – Tori Vanduren, senior Chemical Engineering major from Kutztown, PA

Margot smiling and wearing lab gear.

“Learning about how the healthcare industry and engineering can intersect in a chemical engineer’s career fascinated me.” – Margot Clarke, senior, Chemical Engineering major with a concentration in Biomedical Engineering and Honors Studies, minor in Chemistry, and CUGS in Spanish, from Delran, NJ (Burlington County)

Alyssa posing in a scenic area on a bridge.

“I love science and math.” – Alyssa Grassie, senior, first-generation, Chemical Engineering major and Mathematics minor, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

A black and white photo of Jenna smiling.

“I knew this was the right major for me by making friends in my major that love and get excited about the same weird things as me. Just when you walk outside and the humidity makes you think about the topics discussed in class, your mind goes on a tangent, and then you stop yourself (and think ‘Wow I am weird’). But the next day a friend tells you how they did a similar thing. When that happens, it just makes you feel understood and at home.” – Jenna Wyshinski, Senior, Chemical Engineering major with a minor in Business Administration, from Pennsville, NJ (Salem County)

Courtney posing with a Rowan shirt inside the Wilson Hall building.

“Sophomore year, I had the opportunity to work as a research assistant in Dr. Stanzione’s lab. Getting to experience so many applications of chemical engineering and material synthesis was such a cool experience and made me realize that I am right where I am supposed to be.” – Courtney Lemasney, junior, Chemical Engineering major, Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Rebecca sitting and smiling on the floor.

“When I started taking classes my freshman year and genuinely enjoyed what I was learning.” – Rebecca Hansson, senior Chemical Engineering major from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

A chemical engineering lab.

“Actually making alum in chem lab.” – Evan Harper (not pictured), sophomore Chemical Engineering major working toward minors in Chemistry and Mathematics, Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Prof Style: Computer Science Major Matthew Kresge Shows Off His Colorful Hair

Today, we feature sophomore Matthew Kresge, a Computer Science major with a minor in Mathematics from Douglasville, PA. Matthew tells us more about his fashionable hairstyle.

Matthew smiles while wearing a mask.

Why Rowan?

Honestly, I knew I wanted to go a little bit away from home. I kind of wanted to go to a school that I knew a lot of classmates weren’t going to go to, so I thought this would be the right school for me.

What did you use to get your hair color?

 I use Arctic Fox for my hair. 

How did you decide on the color?

So, when I first dyed it, I bleached my hair because it was a brown. It turned blonde, then when I dyed it again, it turned into a darker blue. This is like two weeks of fading so it turned into this shade of green! At first, my parents were very hesitant to let me dye my hair, but now they don’t really care.

Have you dyed your hair before?

Before this, I dyed my hair red, like a very bright red, and then it faded into orange.

Profile shot of Matthew's hair while wearing a mask.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Meet #Rowan2024: Future Math and STEM Educator Rachel Bonhomme

Meet Rachel Bonhomme, a future Math and STEM Education major from Brick, NJ (Ocean County). She is excited to be an on-campus resident and part of the Rowan community. She tells us more about why she chose Rowan University! 

Rachel Bonhomme is wearing a #RowanPROUD T-shirt and is holding up her acceptance letter.

What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan? 

One activity I’ve always done in the past is choir! It’s always been a part of my life and I’d love to join at least one of Rowan’s choirs.”

How or why did you choose your major?

I’ve always wanted to teach because my mom is a teacher and I’ve been impacted positively by so many teachers, so I thought it was a good choice! I learned about the 4+1 Math and STEM Education pathway, and I thought it was an amazing opportunity to get what I need.”

Why did you choose a university close to home?

Choosing a university close to home has always been one of my top priorities, and Rowan is a perfect distance away from home! It’s close enough that if anything happens, I’m not a long distance from home, but it’s far enough that I get the freedom I need. “

Why Rowan?

The moment I stepped onto Rowan’s campus, I knew that I wanted to go here. The environment was exactly what I was looking for, and every interaction I’ve had with staff has been a great one! There are amazing programs and opportunities, and it’s just a great fit for me.”

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Photos courtesy of:
Rachel Bonhomme
Pixabay

Meet Rowan #2024: Alex Micharski Prepares for a Strong Start at Rowan

Stock image of robotics parts

Today we feature incoming freshman Alex Micharski, a Computer Science major with a Math minor from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County).

A photo of Alex holding his Rowan admissions package and wearing a gray Rowan sweatshirt.What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan? Or something new you’d like to try?

I spent a lot of my time in high school in FIRST Robotics and spent four years on the football team: two years as a player, and due to academic constraints and an internship in my junior and senior years, I became a student manager on the football team, filming games and occasionally calling plays. Although I wasn’t too happy when I had to step down from being a player, I will be graduating high school with 61 college credits with the decision that I madeWhile I was at the STEM Academy, I had a debut on the morning announcements starting from my freshman year lasting until my junior year, where I cracked jokes over the loudspeaker and laughed harder at my jokes than anybody else. 

How/why did you choose your major?

I chose Computer Science to be my major because I have been into programming and information technology since I was 11 years old.

Alex reclines in a desk chair next to a desk with a laptop and scattered papers.What is something you’re looking forward to next year at Rowan?

Next year at Rowan, I am looking forward to doing many new things. This might surprise you, but I am a boater. My family just bought a new boat and we named it “Unsinkable II.” The best thing about Unsinkable II is the glass bottom, which allows us to see Unsinkable I every time we’re out on the water. I am also hoping to try out some intramural sports like football and lacrosse (I also played lacrosse in high school for a year and spent more time in the penalty box and on the bench for slashes than I did playing). Another thing that I am looking forward to doing at Rowan is looking to run a morning podcast where I talk about life, Rowan events, and stuff going on around us. I also heard about open mic nights on campus, and I might give one a shot.

Why did you choose Rowan?

I chose Rowan University for a few reasons. The first reason is the low tuition. The second reason is because their Computer Science program is about to explode in size. The third reason is because of its location. Rowan is far enough where I can live on my own, but also not too far where if something happened, I could go back home without a problem. And the last reason, which is certainly not the least, is because it’s close to Philadelphia, which is where the Eagles play (sorry Giants fans). I am hoping to meet a lot of new people, learn new things, and see where life takes me.

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Photos courtesy of:
Alex Micharski
Pexels

How One Professor Changed My Perspective on Math

Adriana and Professor Smith smile in front of the Mathematics suite.

Meet Adriana Simiriglio, a junior Elementary Education major specializing in Mathematics from Gloucester County. Today she shares how her mathematics professor changed her outlook on teaching and learning that ultimately made her a better problem-solver and soon-to-be teacher.

Adriana sits outside Education Hall.

I’m an education major. This means that I will relearn nearly 12 years of schooling, but this time from another perspective.

I was a little hesitant to take my math class my first year. I was good at math, but I was never the strongest at it, and I was afraid that college math would be at least 50 times harder than what I experienced during my regular school years.

It wasn’t.

I walked into the classroom to meet my bright-eyed professor, William Smith, who welcomed me with open arms and was already practicing everyone’s names. He placed us sitting in different groups, where I was able to meet three other education majors who were scared of math just like me.

He started out by handing us all a pencil because he knew a lot of us would ultimately forget. However, it was what he had inscribed on the pencil that got my mind reeling.

“Math is not a spectator sport.”

A close up photo of a pencil that reads "Math is not a spectator sport."
Adriana still holds onto the pencil that Professor Smith gave to the class.

Professor Smith began to explain what this math class really was. We had to relearn all of math, starting with regular addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, and then next semester, we’ll continue with fractions and probability. I was shocked. I had to relearn addition and subtraction? That was a kindergarten skill that I had already mastered many eons ago.

I thought I knew it all. I was wrong.

To help support us, Professor Smith made his own textbook and made it available in a PDF form. He explained he would never to assign too much homework because assigning book problems that don’t give us an answer and show us how to solve the problem are useless because we will never learn that way.

As soon as he was done explaining, he put addition problems on the board. Simple addition problems, but this started the epiphany of why math isn’t as scary as it looks.

The problems were easy, 2+2, 5+5, 20+10. When he asked us to explain our answer, we just simply said that “we knew it.” There was no explanation.

That’s the problem. We are never forced to explain. We are robots to the common knowledge, but we don’t know why or how we got the answers to the problems.

Now for the big guns, 367+83. Everyone was amused by what we thought was humor. So, we grabbed our papers, carried and borrowed with confidence, and all came up with the same answer. When we were asked why, it was just because “we were taught that way.” We had absolutely no knowledge of why we did math the way we did math.

Adriana and Professor Smith chatting at a table.

This is when he explained the pinnacle of what math truly is:

We are forced in our classes to memorize formulas, patterns, ways of solving problems the quickest. We are never taught to look at the problem, become problem solvers, and think of our own way to solve it. He asked how many of us were told by our teachers “not to use your way,” or “don’t use your parents way, just stick to this” even though we were getting the right answers. We were forced to copy the work of our teachers, and expected to get the right answers. All of us raised our hands. He told us he is going to guide us through this class, but he is not going to teach it, we are.

We are going to explain our thinking of answers to the class, share our own ways of solving the problem so others can try, and most importantly: scrap all formulas and shortcuts because they will never show you what math truly is. No more carrying and borrowing, no more solving from the right to the left. He taught us so many different ways to add, subtract, multiply, and divide so we could find what works best for us. Tests told us on every question to use the method that works best for us.

Throughout the semester, he had us volunteer to lead the class lessons, and as I started to feel comfortable and confident with my own work, I took strides and led the class multiple times, even within the first week of school. He told us that if we are going to be teachers, we have to get up in front of the class and explain something that is our biggest fear to our peers first. 

But why? Why did we feel confident? The answer is simple: We were allowed to let our brains work out and process problems in a way that we could figure out. We weren’t force-fed information that we had to mimic, but instead, we were given full range to expand our minds and understand what we were learning.

Adriana and Professor Smith hug.

So yes, math is not a spectator sport. It requires effort, thinking, and problem-solving skills. But when you open your mind to the different possibilities that math has to offer, it is only the beginning of what you can accomplish. Not only did this class change my perspective on math as a future teacher, but it made me feel confident instead of belittled when I couldn’t solve a problem, it made me feel empowered that I could solve the problems the way that I saw fit, and most importantly: this class taught me that math isn’t something to be afraid of. It is only yourself that can make you afraid, but when you have the right teacher, math can be as easy as 3.14.

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Story by:
Adriana Simiriglio, junior elementary education major

Public Relations Major Lands Full-Time Job After Internship

Ciara Sikking stands in front of Rowan Art Gallery at 301 High St.

Meet Ciara Sikking, senior Public Relations and Mathematics double major, from Buena, NJ (Atlantic County). She shares how her summer internship at Holman turned into a full-time position post-graduation.

Ciara Sikking posing in the Glassboro Town Center.In October of last year I sat down with my public relations advisor, Lori Block, to discuss class registration. I did not expect this very routine meeting to land me a full-time job.

In the PR department, the word “internship” is a huge deal, so it did not surprise me when Lori asked if I was looking for one. She suggested that I apply for the Holman Enterprises summer internship program, one I hadn’t even considered applying to due to its notoriously competitive selection.

Three months later I landed an interview and two months after that received one of the 50 positions out of over 500 applicants.

During my time at Holman, I worked in the client relations department and assisted with projects for the company’s most profitable clients including United Rentals and FedEx. Within the first four weeks I conceptualized, programmed and presented a tracker to organize information for United Rentals. Speaking in front of the upper management team was nerve-wracking, but it gave me the chance to utilize the presentation skills I have learned in many of my PR classes.

Aside from my client relations projects, I worked with a team of interns to research and create start-up recommendations for Holman Auto’s mobile Ciara Sikking sitting outside Barnes and Noble.service initiative. My team and I delivered an exciting presentation to a roomful of company leaders and, as a result, the company decided to move forward with the ideas we presented in our project. It is thrilling to know that the executives loved all of our hard work, especially Mindy Holman, granddaughter of the company’s founder.

Interning at Holman helped me grow in every way possible. It allowed me to mature professionally, gave me the confidence to tackle real-world problems and provided me with impressive projects to add to my portfolio. To add icing on the cake, I recently received a full-time position in the client relations department for after graduation.

I know that I could not have gotten this far without Lori Block and the strong education that I have received over my last three years at Rowan University. I encourage every student thinking about an internship to be bold and never sell yourself short. You can accomplish fantastic things if you just take a chance.

Ciara Sikking posing with her Holman Enterprises T-shirt.

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Story by:
Ciara Sikking, senior public relations and mathematics double major

Photography by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

Alumni Success: William Moylan, Special Education Teacher

Unified Sports members posing for a photo

William Moylan graduated with his bachelor’s degree in Subject Matter Education/Math (2013) and master’s in Special Education (2015). From Park Ridge, NJ (Bergen County), William chose Rowan because he liked the small school feel and the respected education program. The distance was also perfect for him — Rowan was close enough for it to be “close to home” but also far enough away so he could “get away.”

William Moylan (top row, second from left) credits his on-campus experience with Unified Sports with his own work as a special education teacher.
William Moylan (top row, second from left) credits his on-campus experience in Unified Sports with inspiring his career as a special education teacher.

Bill worked in the Recreation Center when he attended Rowan. He says that many of the essential skills that helped him then and later in life were provided by the Rec Center, such as resume building, social skills and figuring out where he wanted to take his career. 

Bill also worked with Unified Sports, a program where Special Olympics athletes and Rowan students come together to play competitive games; it also offered students volunteer coaching opportunities. This experience led Bill down the career path he’s in now in special education. It helped him realize how important working in a positive atmosphere is, and he wanted to instill that feeling to more students.

Bill recalled his idea to have he and the other coaches start wearing suits to their games. Along with suits, they’d wear different outfits for certain events, like pink for breast cancer awareness and Hawaiian shirts for the Hawaiian Invitational event. This tradition, along with others started by Bill and his friends, carries on to this day. 

Bill said the most exciting thing he’s currently doing is working with the Special Olympics and Unified Sports, “being able to make an impact on individuals with intellectual disabilities and how that environment around Unified and the atmosphere can trickle into every day life and society,” he explained. 

The most fulfilling part of his career now is working with the intellectually disabled, being able use his youth right now to show that he’s been in their shoes and that their struggles are OK. He shows them a perspective from an inclusive atmosphere to help them be able to grow.

Rowan alumnus William Moylan speaks at a Unified Sports event
Moylan speaks at a Unified Sports event.

Bill teaches math at Whippany Park High School, where he says he always talks to his students about the positive environment you can find in college and in general how valuable the experience of college can be.

This is Bill’s fifth year teaching, and the first year that he’s seeing students he’s been with throughout their high school experience graduate and move on to college. He says 12-15 of his students are coming to Rowan for the class of 2023.

When asked if he had any advice for students interested in his career path, Bill believes the biggest thing that made his application stand out from others was his involvement with the Rec Center, Unified Sports and the Special Olympics. Bill urges any student to start joining clubs and getting these valuable experiences as soon as they can. He mentioned that he started working with Unified Sports during his junior year and wishes he had started even sooner.

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Story by:
Dean Powers, sophomore radio/TV/film major

Photos courtesy of:
William Moylan

#PROFspective: Mechanical Engineering Major Morgan Dean

Today, we speak with Morgan Dean, a senior mechanical engineering major who rents a house off campus with friends. Morgan will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof.

Name: Morgan DeanMorgan Dean sitting in Rowan's Engineering building.
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Minors or concentrations: Writing Arts, Mathematics; Bantivoglio Honors College
Year: Senior
Hometown and County: Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)
Off-Campus resident: Yes, I live in a house on University Boulevard with my five roommates!
Do you work on campus? If so, where/what do you do? I work as a tutor in the Rowan University Writing Center (in Campbell Library)

Morgan Dean sitting in front of the Engineering auditorium. What wakes you up in the morning? The thrill of getting to do and/or learn something new. Also, I love to have my morning coffee while reading!

What is one thing you wish people knew about your academic discipline or research focus? I find that being a girl in engineering, especially one of the five or six in the MechE undergraduate program, is more advantageous than most realize. Additionally, although mechanical engineering tends to be associated with cars/engines/etc., the possibilities of post-undergraduate work are endless. You’re in no way tied down to any one field of work.

What is one thing this field has allowed you to do, that you either Morgan Dean showing Rowan student something on her laptop.dreamed of doing or thought you’d never get to do? Through its interdisciplinary program, mechanical engineering sparked my interest in biomedical engineering. Although I once said I would never take another biology class again, I am now set to be a PhD Biomedical Engineering student come Fall 2019.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? The Rowan Writing Center has provided me with a sense of belonging ever since I began working there. The staff took me in immediately as family and I always feel a sense of peace while in the space.

Morgam Dean posing in front of the pond in back of the Engineering building.Why Rowan?  I have made some incredible student-professor relationships here which have shaped my future by unlocking my potential. Professors Dr. Staehle, and Dr. Merrill and Writing Center Director Celeste DelRusso have exposed me to new areas of research through the engineering clinic curriculum, summer programs, and professional development conferences. Additionally, I would never have been accepted to graduate school if it weren’t for these valuable connections I made.

Like what you see, come visit us!

VISIT CAMPUS​​

Story and photography by: Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

#PROFspective: Mathematics and Education Major Lawrance Stephenson

Student outside Wilson Hall on bridge

Today, we speak with Lawrance Stephenson-Mosley, a freshmen Mathematics and Education major from Bridgeton, NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Lawrance will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he got the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. […]

#PROFspective: Physics Major Marcella Mazzuca

Marcella stands by a metal sculpture outside the Engineering Hall at Rowan University.

Today, we speak with Marcella Mazzuca, a sophomore physics major from Mullica Hill (Gloucester County) who lives on campus at Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Marcella will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: […]

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Kaitlee and Joseph sit on a bench together

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While the Exploratory Studies program at Rowan is being chosen more by freshmen undecided about their educational paths, many within the major do have a general idea of what fields they are drawn to, but they want a closer look before committing to a major. The workshops held by Exploratory Studies provide students with an […]

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students in line at RAH event in the student center

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student in education building

Today we speak with Kaitlee Francisco, a sophomore elementary education and mathematics  major from Washington Township, Gloucester County, who lines on campus in the Townhouses. She will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: […]

Rowan Prof Sweethearts Share Tales of Love, Lifelong Friendships

cloud in shape of a heart in a blue sky

Rowan alumni Bernard (‘94) and Julie Creache (nee Santoloci, ‘97) are the type of couple that will remind you of the various definitions of love this Valentine’s Day. Besides the usual love that is shared between swooning couples each Valentine’s season, Bernard and Julie beam with the love of friendship as well, both for their lifelong […]