Summer Classes: Adam Amaefuna Taking On 3 Engineering Entrepreneurship Courses

Adam smiles looking off to the side.

Ever since he was young, Adam has been fascinated with building things and how they work, which led him into the engineering field. The entrepreneurship side was modeled for him within his family. Adam enjoys communicating and business as a whole, so he felt like it was perfect to pursue this degree. This summer session, […]

Building a Future: Kate Karwowski on Rowan’s Construction Management Program [VIDEO]

Kate stands in her work uniform in front of the sign for Churchill Construction Engineers

Kate Karwowski is a graduate student in the construction management program. She is currently working with Churchill Construction Engineers, where she helps supervise construction projects, works with inspectors to ensure they have all the proper equipment and staff, and helps see each project through from inception to completion. She had previously graduated from Rowan in […]

Mechanical Engineering Major Shares Juggling Academics and Being a Student-Athlete

Rowan mechanical engineering student Abby smiles in front of her engineering equipment in the lab.

Today we feature graduating senior mechanical engineering major and student-athlete Abby Hainsworth from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County). Abby shares her experience while being an engineering major and a member of Rowan’s Field Hockey Team and how she navigates academic workload with her involvement in collegiate athletics.

What is mechanical engineering?

Mechanical engineering is problem-solving different things in the world that have to do with moving parts. Within this field, you learn the science, math, and physics behind the way things work, and then you work to design new things or upkeep things that have already been designed to help keep the world going.

Why did you get an interest in mechanical engineering?

I chose mechanical engineering because it is such a broad field. You could really go into so many different professions with a background in mechanical engineering. Moreover, I have always been passionate about aerospace or sustainable energy, which are two areas that I knew mechanical engineering would help me get into as I progress into my professional career. I also knew it would be a secure field to go into.

I originally was a civil engineering major. As time progressed, I realized my sophomore year that I was more interested in mechanical engineering because it focused on moving things versus static things. 

Was there something specific whenever you were growing up that sparked your interest?

I was always interested in math and science. Outer space was the number one thing that sparked my interest. I was always interested in documentaries on TV, looking up at the stars, or just the possibility of working for NASA one day. That combination of things really inspired me.

Can you discuss the educational process? What is the major like when you first come in as a first-year up until your senior year?

In the first year, you usually go hands-on. We have a first-year and sophomore engineering clinic in which you combine with other engineering majors at Rowan and go through hands-on projects. Within these, students are creating different things, learning how to 3D print and 3D model, and learning how to use machines to manufacture things. In your first year as a mechanical engineering major, you take Intro to Mechanical Design, so you learn all the machines; you even build a mechanical clock in which you learn how to pick up a block and move it to a set position.

During sophomore year, you move more into more specific mechanical engineering courses. For example, you start taking your thermodynamics courses and Statics and Dynamics, which are more physics-based courses.

Junior and senior year, you switch to the junior and senior clinic, which are project-based courses where you pick something you’re interested in, whether in your field or another field of engineering.

You get to do a student-led project and something you are passionate about, which is a great experience. You learn a lot of hands-on things; about areas that you might not be more familiar with, and those skills transfer once you graduate.

I’m taking Internal Combustion Engines now as an elective, which I’ve always been interested in and wanted to learn more about. There is a lot of room to learn what you want to learn.

Abby Hainesworth headshot.

What does Internal Combustion Engines focus on?

Internal combustion engine is what really drives your car or anything that is moving nowadays. In the class we learn about the design of the engine, the fuel that goes in the engine, all the different components of your car that help make your car run and work.

Then, we get to research an engine at the end of it and give them back a report about what the engine is and applications of what we’ve learned in a car or something that we are interested in ourselves.

Throughout your career, what courses really stuck out to you in which you gained the most knowledge from?

I gained a lot of knowledge from my mechanical design course. This course really taught us about different ways to design linkages and moving mechanisms, but it also went into a Manufacturing and Measurement Techniques class where I was able to design a scale from scratch.

I had to learn Arduino to code a little controller and then build a kitchen scale that actually was able to measure something; I was even able to change the units on it. This course gave me a lot of experience that went into my junior and senior courses.

Additionally, I would say a lot of the physics courses. I’ve always been passionate about physics and what I do on a daily basis is primarily all physics. So I would say that statics, dynamics, thermodynamics are my most enjoyable classes.

Can you talk more about the faculty and how they help you get better in your field?

The faculty here are very supportive; they really want to see students succeed. I have reached out to my professors about classwork, I’ve gone to office hours where they work through my homework with me or talk with me about exams, but I’ve also reached out to them for personal things.

When it comes to career advice, looking for my job or an internship, or advice on how to even navigate the field after graduation, I’ve reached out to a lot of professors here and they are so willing to help students. They’re truly passionate about our successes. 

One of my biggest pieces of advice to other students is not to be afraid to talk to professors because that’s what they’re here for.

As you wrap up your final semester, what is it that you want to do?

I want to go into sustainable energy or clean energy. I am currently looking into going into nuclear power. However, even if I am not in nuclear power in the future, I want to do something clean for the earth.

I have a job lined up after graduation at the PSEG Nuclear Power Plant in Salem, NJ. I am looking into working there, probably in mechanical systems engineering. In my role, I will be helping upkeep the mechanical systems in the group. Many of the pumps, valves, and different parts help the plant work; our job is to ensure that they are running correctly to power New Jersey.

Abby Hainesworth utilizing equipment in mechanical engineering lab.
Abby Hainesworth utilizing equipment in mechanical engineering lab.

How did you find out about the job? Were there other jobs that you were looking out to?

I am still seeing what else is out there, but I basically had two internships there over the summer. One internship went from my sophomore year to my junior year. Then, I returned from my junior to senior year; I found the internship independently.

Many resources at Rowan help students find internships. With internship opportunities, there are multiple career fairs here at Rowan. I know PSEG has come to the career fairs before, so although I found it on my own, I have also attended these professional development things that Rowan to help me better my resume and assist me in networking.

Do you have a dream job? Is so, what is it?

My dream job is to work for NASA and aerospace. It has always been something that I have been interested in and passionate about ever since I was a little kid. So that is hopefully what I can do one day.

What was the what was the most difficult thing about being in this major?

The most challenging thing about being a mechanical engineering major and a student-athlete was balancing their individual requirements. A lot is asked of you as a student regarding your classes, homework, and exams. Additionally, the athletics requirements are like a part-time job with the amount of practice I have, games, and extra team commitments. Sometimes it can be challenging to do your classwork and still perform on the field.

How was being a mechanical engineering major during Covid-19?

Mechanical engineering during COVID was definitely difficult, but it was not impossible. Everything switched online, so I was learning Zoom from my bedroom, but it was okay. Many of our hands-on projects shifted to creating something on the computer, but I could still learn successfully.

Some professors did projects where you could pick them up and work on them at home. We also did things where if we were to do it at home, we would be given the supplies for it. Usually, we found ways to do it in our house with our own supplies.

Rowan mechanical engineering student Abby sits in an engineering lab surrounded by equipment.

As we transition to talk about your involvement with athletics, can you share the position you play as a member of the Rowan Field Hockey Team?

I am a goalie on the Rowan Field Hockey Team.

When did you become a goalie?

I was a little late to the game. I joined field hockey during my junior year of high school. I initially was playing a different sport, and when I joined the team, they also needed a new goalie. Something in my gut told me I should try it and could be good at it.

When I put on the pads and started making saves, I realized I wanted to be a goalie and did not want to be a field player.

What sport did you play before?

I originally played volleyball when I was in high school. I also played soccer when I was younger. Those sports were the perfect combination for me to be a goalie because I knew how to dive from volleyball, and I knew how to kick from soccer.

Can you talk about what the Elite 90 Award is? 

The Elite 90 Award is awarded to the student-athlete at the national championship with the highest GPA. It is called Elite 90 because there are 90 national championships across Division III athletics. One Elite 90 Award is given to one student at each school for each sport.

Abby Hainesworth standing behind the Elite 90 Award, presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade-point average participating at the finals site for each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.
Abby Hainesworth standing behind the Elite 90 Award, presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade-point average participating at the finals site for each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.

You won the Elite 90 Award back-to-back seasons. Can you share what this recognition means to you?

Winning the Elite 90 award back to back is an amazing feeling. I was not expecting to win it in my junior year when we went to the national championship in Connecticut. We had just gotten to the field to do our practice, and the NCAA commissioners came on the field and gave me the award in front of my whole team.

I remember being estatic and shocked; I did not see it coming. Senior year, I put a lot of pressure on myself because I wanted to win it again if we got back there. This past year we had a banquet with all Final Four teams, and they gave me the award in front of all the teams.

It was just a fantastic feeling to be there and receive recognition for what I have been doing on the field and in the classroom. To be there with my teammates to celebrate it was very special.

So one of the more difficult majors that you can pack on top of their starter every day for field hockey. How do you balance out life?

Balancing athletics and academics is challenging. It comes down to a lot of time management and looking at your schedule and knowing when you have class when you have practices or games, and when you can get your homework done between them. So a lot of it comes down to being very self-motivated.

Another critical key is finding a way to self-motivate and stick to a schedule. For example, I look at my week before my week starts and see when I am busy and my workload, then plan what I will do at the beginning of the week.

When you say you are going to do your homework and give yourself a rest when you say you are going to give yourself a rest, it is really easy to get burnt out and overwork yourself. However, you have to find a way to balance schoolwork, your other life, and other responsibilities and preserve your mental health.
There are resources, coaches, teammates, and classmates to support you through it; building a support system is very important as well.

What are the most memorable moments from your athletic career?

The most memorable moment of my career was winning the NJAC championship in my junior year against Kean in overtime. In my first year, we did not win; in my sophomore year, we did not have a season due to COVID. So, that was the first championship I had won with the team. It was such a surreal feeling; I remember when Rice scored, and everyone just ran on the field. The celebration was just an amazing feeling. Thankfully we were able to do it again during my senior year. However, the first time was just a surreal feeling.

Another great memory was making it to the Final Four back-to-back seasons. A lot of other teams do not get to experience that, and to reach that level and be one of the top four teams in the country, was really special. We truly put in the work for it and deserved it; I am so lucky to have had that experience with my teammates.

What did you learn by being part of a team?

Being on a team made me a better person throughout my four years here. I came into college, and I was really shy; I was afraid to speak to others and afraid to be judged. Being placed on a team with such supportive other athletes helped me develop into who I am today because they taught me that I should be myself and then I will be accepted.

No matter what is happening in my life, I can contact them for help. They motivate me on and off the field to be the best person I can be. I am eternally thankful for this experience and the relationships that I have made. I would not be who I am today without athletics or my teammates, my coaches, athletic trainers, and the whole support system I have been given here; I am so thankful for it.

Close-up of equipment Abby uses in mechanical engineering.
Close-up of equipment Abby uses in mechanical engineering.

Why did you decide to come to Rowan University?

I decided to come to Rowan because of our excellent engineering program here. In addition, I like the fact that the class sizes are small. Most class sizes only have about 20 students, and I knew I could not learn at a university where I was in a lecture-style classroom. If I was in a hall with about 100 other students, I knew that that learning experience would not be for me.

Furthermore, to be at Rowan and have relationships with my professors and to be able to speak to them, go to office hours, and utilize their resources is special. It helps me learn rather than just being another number because of that. At Rowan, you are not another number. Every student is valued and has the opportunity to cultivate relations with their professors.

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Story by: Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major

Graduate Student Sarah Salazar Shares Advice For Future Engineering Majors

Sarah working in an engineering lab.

Today we feature graduate student Sarah Salazar from Galloway, NJ (Atlantic County), who earned her Rowan bachelor’s in chemical engineering and is continuing her time with a master’s in chemical engineering. She shares her advice for incoming engineering students. Learn more about Sarah’s research.

A portrait of Sarah in an engineering lab.How did you discover that engineering was right for you?

So in high school I really didn’t know what I wanted to do. I knew that I loved all my science classes, loved my math classes, and both were things that I was actually really good at. So I kind of just took that and did some quick research and saw chemical engineering and I said to myself, “Okay, I’m gonna roll with this and see what comes out of this. If I don’t like it, it’s not the end of the world, I could always switch out of my major.’” That’s how I fell into this program. 

Choosing engineering was a rollercoaster of emotion – but not in a negative way. At first, it was very overwhelming. I couldn’t help but think, ‘why did I choose this major? Why do I want to study this much?’ 

During orientation one of my major fears about being an engineer was that I wouldn’t have any social life. I confidently said to myself that I’m choosing this major, but I’m freaking out too because I’m scared that I’m not going to have any friends or not going to have any time to go out and experience college life. 

This many years in, I can say I was completely wrong. I honestly knew that from even the first day that I got here. What really made the experience amazing is the people in our engineering community. 

When I finished my bachelor’s here, I didn’t have to choose Rowan for my graduate program. I had actually applied to a couple different places, but I really wanted to stay in a lab that I was familiar with and continue learning from the graduate students and from my advisors. Dr. Joe Stanzione advised me with a few options, but I ended up choosing here because that’s where I felt most comfortable and I ultimately was excited to continue my education here.

A wide shot of Holly Pointe Commons.Where did you live on campus?

I started off in the Engineering Learning Community (ELC) as a first-year student in Holly Pointe Commons. I lived in this pod section that was only engineers. This is where I had met a few of my best friends who I still hang out with today. It’s nice because your program also starts off with first-year and sophomore engineering clinic. In those classes there would be so many familiar faces because we’d all see each other frequently in Holly Pointe.

By junior year I was in only engineering classes and I became really close with my graduating class. This tight knit group of about 50 or so people would always just be hanging out and studying together – because we were in this together. I would say that’s what really got me through the entire education. We’re putting in so many hours a week studying for exams and doing homework together. The camaraderie, being genuinely good friends, making each other laugh during tough times, made this program so worthwhile. 

Sarah working in the engineering lab.Are you involved in any clubs?

I was involved in Engineers Without Borders, which was my favorite club that serves local and international communities. I would go to all the meetings and ended up getting positions on the executive board. The cool thing about Engineers Without Borders is that it’s a nonprofit club and because of that, any student from any discipline can join – not just engineers. There are a lot of mechanical engineers, civil engineers, chemical engineers, biomedical engineers, so it’s helpful to have variety so each person can put their knowledge together to come up with simple solutions.

When I was involved, we had this one project for a Camden community garden that ran sustainably. There was a modified bike that pumped water throughout the garden if you rode it. So small things like that are rewarding because you are helping out these local communities, and it’s something to put on your resume.

There are a lot of good opportunities. I even attended my first conference. The group went across the country to San Francisco to network with other students who, too, are in Engineering Without Borders. So I would definitely recommend the club for personal and professional development.

Any last advice?

The biggest piece of advice I have is to get involved and maintain a work-life balance. Before, I was really scared to go into engineering because I was nervous about not getting the college experience. But honestly, everybody’s scared going into college. It’s such a big change being on your own! Not having your parents there to cook and give you the support they have given you all your life is initially really intimidating. Find your space. For me, being in the engineering community really helped with that. Creating my own family and support system at Rowan got me through the hard times and ultimately gave me the best experience I could ask for. 

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Second-Generation Rowan Engineering Student Lives Her Legacy

Abigail Cassino sits in a daffodil patch.

September 1996: long before Abigail Cassino was even a thought in her parents’ minds, the foundation was laid for her future legacy. Her parents, Theresa (Gouker) and Chris, met as first-year students at Rowan, part of the first engineering class. Theresa lived in Evergreen Hall; Chris in Mimosa Hall. They met, fell in love, studied alongside one another and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering (Theresa) and civil engineering (Chris). 

September 2023: Abigail stepped on campus as a first-year student majoring in mechanical engineering, embarking on her legacy as only the second Rowan University second-generation engineering student.

Neither she, nor her parents, knew of Abigail’s unique distinction at that time. Abigail Cassino leans against a wall with a reflection of herself bouncing off the wall.

Almost one year ago, Abigail and her parents first toured Rowan, visiting from their home in Maryland. Her parents were wowed by the changes, namely the presence of Rowan Boulevard and the second engineering building, Rowan Hall. Neither existed when they graduated in 2000.

Rowan University was the clear choice for Abigail. “When we toured the engineering building my parents saw several professors they still knew, and the professors still remembered them. They said ‘see that’s what you get here, professors who actually know you for you and who care about your success.'”

Theresa and Abigail Cassino smile in front of a #RowanPROUD sign at Homecoming.
Abigail (right) and her mom, Theresa, being #RowanPROUD at Homecoming.

Though Abigail did not originally set out to major in engineering, having a mom who is your best friend – and also a Ph.D. chemical engineer – has a way of influencing you. “My mom is the one who started it all,” Abigail says. “She is my greatest role model. She is the one who said to give it a shot and apply. And I really do like it.”

Over Abigail’s childhood, she witnessed her parents’ careers grow and blossom from their Rowan roots. The family moved as Theresa and Chris pursued new opportunities. “It was hugely influential,” says Abigail. “I saw them go through tough times, and good times, and how to roll with those changes.”Abigail Cassino sniffs a daffodil in a field.

Being a woman studying in a field heavily dominated by men, Abigail understands it can be challenging for women starting out in STEM. “Women bring something to the table. We have a lot to say,” says Abigail. “Honestly, having more women in this environment makes it a little less intimidating. We really have to work to make our voices heard, which takes effort considering you’re outnumbered.” 

Abigail found that Rowan’s commitment to diversity and inclusion was also evident outside of the classroom. “There are a lot of groups centered around underrepresented groups in STEM,” she says. “I am in the Society of Women Engineers. It’s a good opportunity to talk with other people in the field and learn from them.” 

Abigail has found resources on campus that have helped her succeed. “My advisor in engineering has been amazing,” she says. “As well as being in the engineering learning community [in Holly Pointe Commons.] The engineering department in general is really good with providing resources if you’re having trouble with mental health or school. There is a really big support network here.”Abigail Cassino casually leans on stair railing while smiling.

As she wraps up her first year, Abigail is eager about what’s to come. This semester she joined her mother’s sorority, Theta Phi Alpha, continuing her Rowan legacy in a non-academic fashion. “There’s so much I am excited for,” she says. “I would like to study abroad and I’m really looking forward to my new position as co-sponsorship coordinator with Rowan After Hours (RAH).”

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Story by: Sean Humphrey, senior public relations major
Adeline McDonald

Photos by: Valentina Giannattasio

Lila Dasi Reflects on Her First Year (So Far) as a Biomedical Engineering Major

Lila Dasi posing outside of Bunce Hall at Rowan University

What is your favorite part about attending Rowan University? I think the campus is really pretty and offers a lot of great spaces to sit and relax. I also like that Rowan has a lot of different organizations and clubs on campus for students to be involved in, and to find their community. What inspired […]

Chem E Major Shares: Challenging the World for a Sustainable Future Through Material Science

Sarah S in a lab coat doing chemical engineering research.

Rowan Global graduate student Sarah Salazar is completing a master’s degree in chemical engineering, working with others to challenge the future of plastic.  “Chemical engineering really is everything. Everything that we touch in our lives has been impacted in some way by a chemical engineer,” Sarah says. “What I love about it is that here […]

Rowan Engineering Major Benjamin Busler Achieves Dream of Interning for NASA [VIDEO]

Electrical and Computer Engineering major Benjamin Busler is representing Rowan University this semester as a Pathways Intern with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Benjamin, a junior from Somerset County, is among a select group of students nationwide in NASA’s Pathways program, which offers internships and a direct avenue to future employment with the […]

#PROFspective: Civil Engineering Student and Clubs Enthusiast Kayla King

In this edition of #PROFspective, we learn more of Kayla King of Burlington County. Kayla is currently a senior and majoring in Civil and Environmental Engineering and in this excerpt we learn more of how Rowan provided opportunities to further her career as well as enriched her experience as a college student. 

What is civil engineering?

Civil engineering, to me, is the ability to design, build and construct all types of bridges, buildings, any type of infrastructure. Civil engineering also deals with maintaining all of that aforementioned infrastructure When you’re on a job site you’ll see that it’s not just all the construction workers that you see building things. It’s also all the design teams, consulting teams, the land surveying teams, there’s a bunch that goes into all of the different infrastructure that we see today.

Rowan University Civil Engineering major Kayla works on a project inside the concrete lab in Engineering Hall.

What made you choose engineering and more specifically civil engineering?

I’ve always known that I wanted to be an engineer; my father was actually in the construction industry growing up. My father was an ironworker, to put it into perspective, those are people that you see climbing all the high rises, putting up all that steel. Later in his career he switched into becoming an operating engineer with Local 825. I’ve always had a background in construction, which has influenced my decision, but I’ve also always loved math and science.

I was always a problem solver, I love to answer questions and come up with solutions with intricate questions or challenges. I’ve also really enjoyed engineering diving, that is something that I’ve learned all the way back in eighth grade. I would say that  because of my upbringing and just familiarity in the construction industry I’ve gotten some inner niche details within the industry. So I’ve just kind of always known that I wanted to do civil engineering.

What goes into civil engineer diving? 

They’re basically commercial divers, they do not have typical scuba equipment but you do have something similar to the whole helmet. There are a lot of intricate differences such as how you don’t have the air tank on your back it’s fed into a line to you. Throughout the dive, you have a tagline throughout. With civil engineer divers, these people are the ones that kind of will go in anything that has water. They’re certified to be able to go underground, and they end up taking special care into noticing how things are down below and then report that information to the people up above. That’s how they’re able to do underwater inspections on timber piles on bridges or foundations. So it’s really nice. It’s an interesting thing that a lot of people don’t know about.

Civil engineering major Kayla (left) and another student work on a project in the concrete lab in Engineering Hall.

What made you choose Rowan initially?

Rowan is close to home, but not too close. I’ve also been very fortunate to get a lot of scholarships to go here. Rowan has an incredible engineering program. In my opinion, it’s got to the point where you cannot even argue that it isn’t. I believe we’re 15th in the nation for the last year for our civil engineering program. So I’m very proud to consider myself to soon be a Rowan graduate.

Describe your experience here.

So I’ve been involved in everything since the start of my freshman year. I have been a Chamberlain Student Center building manager and before I did that I had a position working at the Information Service Desk.

Outside of work-related aspects, I’ve been involved in the Wrestling Club, which is something a lot of people wouldn’t think of. I had met a friend freshman year and we became really close. I kind of pinned him in his freshman dorm room and I’ve been going to the club ever since.

I’ve also been involved in various other clubs throughout my time on campus. I am ASCE president and have been for the past two years. Before getting that position, I was the senator of the club. I’m also involved with women’s engineering. I used to hold the workshop chair position as well as the senate chair position for that club as well.

What does ASCE stand for, and what does it represent? 

ASCE is the American Society of Civil Engineers and it is a worldwide organization. The ASCE national has different student chapter branches where we are able to compete in various different competitions with other regions of schools. So for example, we are hosting the ASCE Region One metropolitan symposium from April 21 to the 23rd this upcoming year. There is a lot of excitement around it because of how so many different students can get involved in it. The competition has a bunch of different challenges and tasks such as making things like concrete canoes with surveying competitions. It’s a whole bunch of things to help facilitate fun and learning at the same time.

Could you provide some insight on what went into Women in Engineering? 

WE (Women in Engineering) was definitely a club that I enjoyed being a part of. I wasn’t as involved as I have been in comparison with ASCE just because ASCE is more directly geared towards my major, so I decided to give more time towards that. But WE was definitely a great thing because it was under the I triple E which is the electrical engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering major club. And I just like WE slightly better than SWE (Society of Women Engineers) throughout my time here because I feel like the individuals that WE had were more personable while SWE was definitely more professional. So it kind of depends upon what you were looking for at the time. In my case,I decided to go the latter route because I wanted to make more friends. They also had really good baked ziti at the time. 

Profile picture of Rowan University Civil engineering major Kayla.

What is it like being a woman in the engineering field? How would you say your experience has been so far?

I love being a woman in STEM. I like the fact that I’m constantly expected to do less, because then I always do more and there’s always an element of surprise. I’ve grown accustomed to hearing things such as “What the heck? Where’d this come from?” I like to be able to prove myself and my worth.

So, talk to me about your most influential professor here.

So the most influential professor for me would definitely be Dr. Douglas Cleary. He’s a great teacher. You get an introduction to him in your freshman or sophomore year. Dr. Cleary has courses where you deal with statistics, which is a really fundamental civil civil engineering course. Right from the start, you definitely understand that he’s a professor who’s looking out for your best interest. As time went on, I got more involved with ASCE and I spent more time with Dr. Cleary and I definitely can say he is one of the best professors here.

The camera is panned in and zoomed in on what Kayla is working on.

What are some of the clubs that you’ve been involved with like? 

I’ve been a part of a  slew of different clubs. One of the ones that I’ve been involved in throughout my time here is ASCE, WE and SWE, but there are a million other different ones like Tau Beta Pi, which is an honor-based introductory society. For Tau Beta Pi, it’s invitation only, which is really cool. I’ve also been a part of the Rowan Environmental Action League, which is something where if kids are interested in the environmentally friendly side of civil engineering, it’s definitely a way to give back to the community and participate in a lot of campus cleanups.

We also have EWB, which is Engineers Without Borders, which is a club where a lot of the students can have opportunities to go out of the country and be able to work on small different tasks to help the communities there. Another club is 3D PC. So this one’s not technically engineering-based, but it is something to keep an eye on, because a lot of civil engineers might have some like niche interests. So say if they want to build something themselves, 3D PC allows you to print your own personal designs. You also have NSBE, which is the National Society of Black Engineers, or SAME which is the Society of American Engineers.

When you’re here at Rowan in my opinion I think you should try and give every club that you might be interested in the chance. In my experience, a lot of my peers were doing the same thing and it gives you the chance to separate yourself from others, they’re gonna be the things that get your name out there.

Being a part of different clubs and associations is gonna be the way that professors know you. And professors obviously have had their own life, their own network. So it’s really important to make sure that you are involved in the clubs, because it’ll set you apart from everyone else.

Kayla (pictured in center) and a group of her classmates are listening to the directions of a professor.

What are your goals for the future?

I would love to end up becoming an engineer diver. If that falls through I’d also be open to the idea of becoming a construction project manager, I don’t necessarily have a direct path right now. I’m in a place where I have a great amount of internship experience. I’ve done an excellent amount of work during my time at Rowan. So it’s kind of just kind of where life takes me so far.

What impact do you wish to have on the world?

I would love to be the “know it all” answer for everyone. That’s what I kind of did at Rowan, just being involved in everything. That’s what I really like to do is just being a leader and  being able to help anyone, no matter what it is. Even if I don’t know the answer, I would love to find out and help you with that. So that’s why I’ve always enjoyed being a part of all the clubs because of all the different mentoring opportunities that they include, there is definitely a great way to foster more relationships, and therefore more networking opportunities for a better job in the future.

What’s one piece of advice you would give an incoming freshman?

I would say don’t give up and keep your head high. You know yourself best. So if it is something that you want to do in regards to a club, Greek life, or if it’s something that you’re not sure about and you say you want a friend to go with, that’s ok. You don’t need a friend. Do it by yourself. You have the confidence. 

See our video with Kayla here:

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Story produced by:
Lucas Taylor, English Education graduate student

This Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Student is Advancing Drug Delivery through Research

Today we feature Camila Vardar, a Rowan Global Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. student originally from Puerto Rico. Camila is conducting her Ph.D. research project on contact lens implants for secondary cataract prevention. She completed her undergraduate at Yale University. Camila discusses the process of her research project, why she chose Rowan for her Ph.D., and her plans […]

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

ECE major Jack Campanella sits with robots from the Rowan club from which he is president.

Today we feature Jack Campanella, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Computer Science and a concentration in Honors. Jack is a lab assistant and peer tutor, and he also serves as president of Rowan’s Robotics and Automation Society (RAS). He hails from Monmouth County, NJ. Here, Jack shares more details […]

A Champion and Voice for Graduate Students: Amit Dhundi, President of the Graduate Student Government Association

Amit Dhundi, a Rowan Global Ph.D. in Engineering student with a concentration in Chemical Engineering from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County), shares his continuous work and contributions to Rowan as a graduate student and President of the Graduate Student Government Association.

Emerging from a family of academics, Amit is well-versed in the realm of scholastic success.

Amit came to Rowan as an international student from India in 2018, in which he graduated with a master’s in Chemical Engineering in 2020. Shortly thereafter, he joined Rowan’s Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Institute (AMMI) as a project manager before returning as a PhD student.

Amit posing for a portrait in engineering hall.

“That was a tough time to graduate because of the lockdown and companies were not hiring,” he explains. “I worked for a year as the project manager at [AMMI] and I later joined at the same lab as a Ph.D. student in the summer of 2021. So I became a student, an employee, and then went back as a student. Apart from that, I was also a student worker at the Chemical Engineering department when I was pursuing my master’s.”

As of now, Amit engages in research that is funded by the U.S. Army.

“My research involves the development of a new polymer formulation and fabricating 3D printed parts, which are really great properties for the Army. Specifically, my work involves synthesizing these different formulations in the lab, so this requires knowledge of chemistry.”

Aside from his ongoing investigations, Amit is also the President of the Graduate Student Government Association (GSGA). Ultimately, the mission of the organization is to serve as the official voice and representation for Rowan University Glassboro graduate students at a university level. The GSGA is also a tool for graduate students as they navigate their educational careers. 

“GSGA brings all of these graduate students from different colleges, institutions, and centers to a common place. It is a place for everything like graduate student concerns, needs, professional development, and also advocacy when it comes to some issues that they are facing,” Amit says. “Any graduate student from the Glassboro and South Jersey campuses are welcomed to be a part of this organization, regardless of their major.”

Amit on campus via his scooter.

As an advocate for community, the GSGA championed Amit’s vision of collective ambition. 

“I have been at Rowan for four years and I was always seeking a place for graduate students to gather and get to know each other — especially from different disciplines, backgrounds and colleges. I think it’s really great that we have so many different colleges. Rowan has such a vast campus where the students can come together and learn from each other through different experiences, backgrounds, mindsets and views on a situation. This was what I was seeking, which is what brought me to this organization.”

Due to the demanding schedules of graduate students, the GSGA holds virtual meetings every Monday at 4:30 p.m. to accommodate their members. 

“Each meeting lasts at most half an hour. This is the best way to ensure that most of the graduate students can come together. I am always open to changing it based on people’s needs,” Amit shares. “It starts with something as simple as greeting each other and getting to know any developments about the student life here or their experiences they have had as a student or in the college. Also, if there are any issues or anything that they would want to be a part of the graduate community at Rowan, we see how the GSGA could help them.”

Amit studies at a desk in an academic building on campus.

As President of the association, the catalyst that led to Amit’s role was roused through multiple agents. 

“I have been in both roles at Rowan as a graduate student and as an employee, so I feel as if I have seen both sides. It’s important to me that I use this experience in order to chart out a better path that works for both groups. I think it’s important to be proactive and understand the concerns of others in order to come up with a solution. That’s one thing that I thought I could impact on the graduate community across the university.”

Amit working in an lab on campus.

“Another thing is, I come from a family of academicians. My dad was a mechanical engineering professor in India and he was the Dean of the Federal Level Engineering Institute,” Amit shares. “My mom has a master’s degree in art and a degree in education. She was a teacher. I wanted to put to use the experiences that I had growing up and the experiences here for the betterment of the graduate student community.”

“This association is also relatively new, so while I’m here I will do my best. Also, I will be around for three years so I thought that I could give much more. I don’t have that deadline nearing me for graduation,” he says. 

Since the organization is relatively new, Amit’s responsibilities as President include raising awareness of the GSGA to the graduate student community. His other duties include communicating with the university and administration about any issues, concerns, or developments that the community might be facing or want to see. 

Amit’s commitment to the GSGA has yielded a multifaceted appreciation for the organization. Since graduate students spend more time collaborating with university staff because of the nature of their academic work, the GSGA aids in raising funds as well as increased recognition for the university. Additionally, the recent addition of the organization has incited a need for more involvement through a platform that allows for effective and professional communication. Amit views this demonstration for growth as the driving force for success. 

Amit posing on a spiral staircase in engineering hall.“I think being a part of this process and development is like being a catalyst. I’ve learned many things about myself and it’s a great opportunity to communicate with so many people across the administration hierarchy and the graduate community. This helps me and will help other graduate students in their professional lives. It gives me an opportunity to come out of the Rowan College of Engineering and get to know people.”

When asked about his goals and aspirations for the future of the GSGA, Amit responds: “One of my goals is having more events in order to see a part of a larger community. The second thing is for the graduate community to come out of the shell of their respective colleges and departments to present an academically diverse group which can work together for the benefit of graduate students. Once the GSGA is active across the university, I think that would be the right time to reach out to the university administration for funding because we don’t have as much funding right now. This funding would be used for social events in order to come together and raise awareness about the association. This would just be the beginning of a long journey.”

To spur recognition for the organization, Amit strives to increase acknowledgement of Rowan’s graduate programs in ranks such as the U.S. News. This platform is recognized as a leader in college and grad school rankings. 

  Amit standing in front of the College of Engineering banner.

“U.S. News is used by everyone who goes to university. For example, international students use this as a tool to see if a university is legitimate. Even students in the U.S. start the decision-making process about universities based on U.S. News,” Amit explains. “I know engineering graduate programs have been recognized, but as an association we would like all graduate degree programs at Rowan to be mentioned or listed in U.S. News. I believe this will not only help the incoming graduate students, but Rowan University will also benefit because its programs would get more recognition.” 

A development in the awareness of graduate programs such as the GSGA would also suggest graduate student admittance into campus events. Throughout the year, Rowan University holds signature events and traditions such as the Hollybash. Started in the spring of 2016, this event is a full afternoon outdoor festival that features rides, lawn games, performances, food trucks, novelties and more. Hollybash also sponsors a large concert, which has seen guests such as Andy Grammar (2018) and Mike Poser (2017). Customarily, undergraduate students are the predominant attendees of this event. 

Amit posing with his electric scooter.“What struck me earlier this year is there is this thing called a Hollybash that we have on the campus each year and there were some graduate students, including myself, who wanted to attend it, but we were told that it was only for undergrads,” Amit shares. “I understood because undergrads pay fees for these activities and the graduate students don’t pay that much towards such events. I think the undergrads get two tickets, but I wondered what if graduate students were made available to a facility where we could buy those tickets at a discounted price because it’s a university event.” 

Amit adds, “It would be so much fun for us to attend it as well and be a part of that university celebration. And then I realized that there may be other similar events. I think that if graduate students were expected to pay a certain amount to get in, I’m sure there are so many students who would want to be a part by buying these tickets in order to be active in the student life at Rowan University. Making this facility available is something I would like to bring up to the administration.”

In a dialogue about Rowan’s current focus, Amit advocates for an integration in which graduate programs are examined alongside the university’s undergraduate programs. 

“I somehow want to be involved in making that infusion in which graduate programs are also considered. This is important because the university higher administration has said that we have really good plans and ambitions as a university,” Amit shares. “We started as an R3 university, which is a category for primarily teaching. We have now come to the R2 category, which is impressive, and which means that we are doing research and teaching. We are actually aiming for the R1 category, which is majorly a research university with some teaching. When you talk about research, you of course need graduate students because they are an important part.”

Amit working on research in a lab.
Amit working on research in a mechanical engineering lab.

He adds, “I feel like it is high time for the university to make that infusion on its approach to communication. I think that graduate students make a big impact and we need to start making that change now.”

When asked what Amit would like others to take away from GSGA, he responds: “I would really like the graduate community to reach out. In the past the GSGA had one meet-up event, and I understand that it was a small event, but still it was a good occasion for graduate students from different disciplines to come together to get to know each other. We would like to have similar events in the future. I want to stress that we really value students from different disciplines and backgrounds. Especially because this is a new organization, we are looking for graduate students to join and come onboard with this association.”

If you are interested in joining the Graduate Student Government Association or would like more information, you can contact the organization at gsga@rowan.edu.

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Jessica Nguyen, elementary education and literacy studies graduate

Inside the M.S. in Biomedical Engineering Program with Rowan Global Student Brennen Covely

Brennen leans against a wall inside Engineering Hall.

Gloucester County native Brennen Covely graduated from Rowan University with a degree in Biomedical Engineering and two patents to his name. He returned to pursue his master’s degree through Rowan Global and leads a novel research project studying fetal alcohol syndrome. Brennen takes us through his research and gives us a more detailed look into […]

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

Today we feature Ashleigh Jankowski, a senior Biomedical Engineering major and Chemistry minor and a Manufacturing Engineer Intern for the startup biotech company Vectech. Ashleigh serves as Service Chair for Society of Women Engineers and President of the Biomedical Engineering Society and is a member of the Food Insecurity Committee and Rowan Unified Sports. Since […]

Engineering Entrepreneurship: Senior Daniel Nachtigall Shares All About Major

Dan works on a project inside Business Hall.

Today we speak with Dan Nachtigall, a recent graduate who majored in Engineering Entrepreneurship from Atlantic County, NJ. Dan explains the importance of his major in the engineering field, learning how to collaborate, and his final project while offering insight for others thinking about pursuing the path.

What is Engineering Entrepreneurship? 

Engineering Entrepreneurship is equitable to other engineering majors such as Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering. The only difference is that the Engineering Entrepreneurship major incorporates more business-based classes where the other majors focus more on the deeper-based sciences. My major has about 90% of the same classes as the other engineering majors except for the higher level courses, which are substituted with business and entrepreneurship classes that will help me when I step out into my career path. 

What are some of the business classes that you take in your major? 

We go through classes like Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Product Development, Business Management, Finance, and other things of that nature. These classes help us learn to balance both the creative and management side of engineering. 

Can you tell us more about your final project?

My final project is for the New Product Development course. In that course, there’s more of a focus on requests for proposal contracts. In the engineering field, everything will involve some sort of contract or a request for a proposal to bid to get a contract. It’s really important for engineers to have the ability to prepare, write and communicate about documents that they need to make with their company or their own businesses in order to reach the consumer. 

Daniel explaining his powerpoint
Daniel practices presenting his final project!

What’s the importance of having that education?

It is really important for an engineer to not just be skilled in simply working in design. It’s important that they understand the industry as a whole. They need to know how to communicate with not only their fellow engineers but with the staff they will be working with as well. As much It’s important to be the designer and the one who’s leading the innovation, it’s also important to be able to support the people aiding you in bringing your ideas to life. 

How does this program tailor to a different type of engineer, an engineer who isn’t straight mechanical or biomedical or anything else along those lines?

The reason this program stood out to me was that it appeals to all different types of engineers like technical engineers, operations engineers, or sales engineers. It’s not just someone doing data analysts. I don’t want to be the highest level engineer doing the calculations. I want to be one of the supporting engineers who’s on the shop floor of the business, doing more work with my hands. 

How do collaborations work between you and your classmates? 

In our major, we have a clinic class each semester. The clinic classes are designed to encourage teamwork and collaboration. Most of the work assigned is group projects and team exercise. During my first clinic freshman year, one of the things they had us for first was the spaghetti and marshmallow tower challenge. We had to use raw spaghetti to balance a marshmallow as high as we could. It was fun but it really emphasized the importance of teamwork, communication, and planning, all things are major values and prides itself on. It’s not just all about sitting behind a desk. 

Daniel writing something down while in the Collaboration Room
“Collaboration is a big component of the field,” Daniel shares.

What’s your advice for students looking to get into engineering and may be interested in pursuing engineering entrepreneurship?

I know there’s a lot of students looking to get into engineering but believe it to be really daunting. It was daunting for me, but this program takes away some of the more daunting elements of engineering. Think about the type of engineer you want to be, the job you want to end up in, the type of engineering you enjoy as a hobby, and determine which branch of engineering you could see yourself going down. Take your time, find what’s good for you, and who knows? You might learn that entrepreneurship engineering is the route for you.

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Bianca Gray, English graduate

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming College of Engineering Students From Near and Far

College of Engineering building.

Today we feature incoming first year students Pedro Geraldes (he/him), Ella Pennington (she/her), and Alex Ballou. Pedro is from Newark, NJ (Essex County) and will be living on campus as a Chemical Engineering major. Ella is from Elkton, MD and will be living on campus as a Biomedical Engineering major. Alex is from Mililani, HI […]

Passing the Torch: Outgoing SGA President Matthew Beck’s Parting Advice and Rowan Legacy

Matthew Beck stands in front of Bunce Hall.

“Put yourself out there, take those opportunities, because if you ask for them and are looking for them, then the opportunities will come.” From leading the student body to interning for the company he will now join after graduation, Mechanical Engineering major Matthew Beck of Monmouth County stayed open to new possibilities throughout his Rowan […]

Senior Reflects: Engineering Major Danielly DeMiranda Ribeiro on the Campus Opportunities that Shaped her Rowan Experience

Danielly celebrates commencement with her family.

Peer Tutor. Women in Engineering Club Treasurer. AIChE student chapter class representative. Chemical Engineering major Danielly DeMiranda Ribeiro stayed active on campus and online as Covid-19 surged through her college career. Now, with her degree in hand and a position with the pharmaceutical company Merck, Daneilly shares her best Rowan memories and her words of […]

Rowan University Engineering Alum Shares Advice for Graduating Seniors

Jennifer in front of a sign.

Jennifer Roddy has had a flourishing career since graduating from Rowan University with a degree in Chemical Engineering in 2008. Profiled here for Rowan Blog, she currently serves as Director of GPS Business Development for Bristol Myers Squibb. As we celebrate this year’s graduates, Jennifer offers words of wisdom for future and fellow chemical engineers […]

#PROFspective: Leading the Student Body, Matthew Beck

Matthew Beck smiles and stands outside near the College of Engineering academic buildings on campus.

Matthew Beck, a senior Mechanical Engineering major within the Honors College, shares his #PROFspective as a Rowan student and President of Student Government Association (SGA). Matthew is from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County) and involved with many extracurriculars and clubs. He is an Admissions Ambassador, the Logistics Manager for Food Recovery Network, SGA President, and a member of Society of Automotive Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers and Rowan Environmental Action League

Why did you choose to study Mechanical Engineering? Have you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

I would not say I have always wanted to be a mechanical engineer. The main reason why I wanted to be an engineer was because I have always loved building stuff. As long as I was able to play with toys, I always had Bob the Builder toys and things like that, and this is what initially struck my attention.  

What really made me decide to become a mechanical engineer was because of a class I took freshman year of high school called Electronics I. In this class we learned the basics of engineering design and electric circuit analysis, which is how I fell in love with innovating, crafting and designing things. I think it’s awesome how you can go from having nothing to developing something that works and can be utilized. 

The one project that I think stood out to me most was when we built a speaker that you can plug into your phone. We built it completely from scratch, and I just really loved that project; it inspired me to take Electronics II the following year. I also took a 3D modeling course in high school that also made me realize I was very interested in engineering as a major. 

Matthew Beck smiling outside near the Engineering academic buildings.
Matthew Beck

Why did you choose Rowan to study Mechanical Engineering?

I have a few reasons on why I chose Rowan. Location wise, Rowan is close enough to home to where I can go home whenever I want, but also far enough from home to where I feel independent and on my own. I also like Rowan’s proximity to all the major cities of where I would potentially like to work in the future like Philadelphia, New York or even Washington DC.

The price of Rowan was another huge reason why I chose this university. The price of Rowan is one that I couldn’t really beat when comparing it to other colleges and universities.   

In general, the mechanical engineering program within the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering really stood out to me. I visited a ton of schools and I even applied to 11 different schools, and Rowan’s facilities and opportunities really stood out to me. When I was looking, Rowan had one newly renovated building and one brand new building for engineering, and it was cool to know it was rapidly expanding. 

I also was able to make connections with the administrators very quickly here. The Dean of the college at the time was a really good resource to me. He had an open door policy and was always guiding me and answering all my questions thoroughly. 

Matthew Beck in Rowan Hall.

How would you describe SGA (Student Government Association) to someone who is unfamiliar with it?

Student Government Association (SGA) is kind of like a governing and advocating body for students. The way we operate is kind of like a small business that oversees and kind of manages all the clubs and organizations on campus. We take our budget and we allocate it to all the clubs and organizations, so we help them make their events, make reservations, approve reservations, help them order food, and help provide them with all the resources that they need. 

We also advocate on the behalf of all the clubs and organizations. Any student at Rowan University always has the support of SGA. At any time anyone can come into our offices and we would be happy to help them and assist them with their needs.

Matthew Beck in a lab for engineering.

What is your role within the Student Government Association?

My biggest responsibility is making sure all operations associated with SGA are running smoothly. We have 14 different executive board members ranging from Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and more. My daily task is to make sure that everyone is held accountable and doing their specific tasks. 

Besides this task, I am able to pursue my own personal initiatives. I take time out of every day to answer my emails, to go and look at my initiatives, meet with administrators, and other tasks that voice student opinion.    

What are your goals and aspirations for the future of this association?

In general, I just want the students to be heard. One of the things that we are really focusing on as an organization is promoting the SGA so that people know who we are, what we do and how our actions can help the students. We have spent a lot of time brainstorming how we should promote and advertise ourselves. Overall, I just hope that we make the most positive change to the lives of the students at Rowan that we can.

Matthew Beck smiling in a lab room.

How did you get involved with SGA?

This is actually a funny story. In high school, I was not involved or really interested in student government. I was always a person who preferred to keep their head in the books and to keep themselves out of the spotlight. 

One day I decided I wanted to learn more about a certain club on campus. All I wanted was to receive more information on the club, and I was unaware of any information about the meeting that day. 

It turned out that there were SGA elections that day so the meeting was canceled. I was all upset sitting there because I wanted to hear more about this club and I thought it was rude to get up and leave during the elections, so I decided to just stay and listen and to vote for the elections. I got to the end of the elections and no one ran for SGA Senator so they asked if anyone in the audience was interested in taking on that role. At the time, I was interested in the club and I kind of just said yes. I think it’s funny that because I even joined the club, I was on the executive board. 

As the Senator, I went to the senate meetings every other Monday. I really enjoyed the experience and from there it just went on for me. I stayed very involved over the years and eventually I ran to be SGA President. This challenged me to step out of my comfort zone and a way to make sure I was giving my best to impact the lives of the students.

A close-up of tools Matthew Beck uses in mechanical engineering.

What have you gotten out of being part of SGA personally and professionally? 

I think a lot of the soft skills of working with administrators, working in and opening myself up to the business world, really contributed to how this experience helped me professionally. When I first started SGA, I was timid and was not used to the working world. This experience provided professional experience and equipped me with knowledge that I will be able to utilize in my future professional environments. Working with the Board of Trustees was an awesome experience. The board is composed of some of the most influential people at Rowan University, and it was really cool to network with them. 

Personally, I think this experience has definitely helped my public speaking skills, communication skills. It has expanded my comfort level and expanded my knowledge on simply dealing with people. This experience overall has truly expanded so many skills for me. 

How do you think your leadership role within SGA has prepared you for your future endeavors?

I think SGA has prepared me tremendously for my future endeavors and plans. First off, I think this experience is really going to help me when I aspire to move up in an organization. I have a good understanding of how a large organization like Rowan University runs.

I also think it will help me in my career because I already have a lot of experience of managing 15 plus people within SGA and then trying to help and guide an entire student body with the help of my colleagues. 

By major, I am an engineer as previously mentioned. This summer I will be entering into a very technical role at Lockheed Martin. I think my role within SGA has made me realize some things I would like to do in the future and the settings I would like to work in.

Matthew Beck sitting in a lab room.

What does a typical day for you look like? 

I like to make a habit of wellness everyday. With that being said, I like to have at least 30-60 minutes a day of mindfulness, or physical activity or even time to just take a walk outside in fresh air. I blocked off my mornings everyday from 7:30-10 a.m. to just have that time and the space for that. I have learned that the more things and responsibilities I have picked up, the more I value that time for myself and my wellness in my mornings.

On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays I am usually pretty busy with SGA, so I will head to my office hours from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. During this time I usually have 3-4 meetings for the day. On Monday nights I have executive board meetings from 5-7 p.m. and sometimes I also have night events that start at 7 p.m. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays are similar. I start with my wellness routine, then have class basically from 11 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Overall, my days are pretty jam packed and busy from the morning all the way till around 9 p.m.

Matthew Beck outside the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

Samantha Midili and Bianca Jeremiah: Two Women Leaders in a Male-dominated Industry

Samantha and Bianca ride their bikes outside the Rowan Tech Park area.

Samantha Midili, a senior Mechanical Engineering major from Ocean City, NJ (Cape May County), and Bianca Jeremiah, a junior Mechanical Engineering major with minors in Physics and Music from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County), share their experiences as women in the Society of Automotive Engineers Club at Rowan University. 

Samantha and Bianca are not just women in STEM: they are leaders and trailblazers in the engineering field.

Both are on the e-board of the Society of Automotive Engineers club on campus. Bianca describes the club as “an opportunity to not only do research and create designs but actually manufacture cars and bring those designs to life.”

She adds, “We get the opportunity to compete in an annual global competition. There are different areas of competition that your car can get judged on: the acceleration test, suspension test, maneuverability, endurance, and a business component that delves into the cost of building the car. This year, the competition is in Rochester NY, so we will have the opportunity to compete against other colleges in the area.”

Society of Automotive Engineers club photo
The Society of Automotive Engineers Club at a recent event.

Samantha, the leader of the Baja competition team, talks about her first experience when joining the club. “When I walked in, there was only me and one other girl in the room. It was intimidating and I felt out of place at first, but I stuck with it and I started driving cars. I am so glad I did because now I actually feel like I belong and that there’s a space for me here at Rowan. I can do something I love and feel empowered that I am one of few women that do it.” 

Bianca had a similar experience. “I joined the club as a freshman because I knew other people in the program recommended it. I remember my first project was to build a trebuchet for a pumpkin-chucking competition. After that, I was hooked. I started working on cars and began learning about machining, problem-solving and the importance of working with a team. The club has taught me how to work in intense situations and how to learn/think on the spot.” 

Bianca Jeremiah posing in front of car
Bianca Jeremiah

The Society of Automotive Engineers Club has given Samantha and Bianca the opportunity to learn in the classroom and then apply it. Samantha says, “Rowan is so unique because the program is so hands-on. In many other schools, you don’t get past conceptualizing a design or reading about it in a textbook. Here, you almost always get to create the design and make it come to life by manufacturing it.” 

Samantha Midili driving car
Samantha Midili

Bianca shares the same sentiment.

“Being a mechanical engineer means designing to manufacture. At Rowan, you get to go through the entire process of research, design, and implementation; just like in the industry. It is so interesting to get to execute every angle from start to finish and actually create something,” she says.

Although it may be difficult at times, both Samantha and Bianca are happy and proud to be leaders in a male-dominated industry. Samantha says, “My teammates respect me, look out for me, and have my back. We have a great sense of camaraderie, and we are always together. I really feel like we all come together as a team, regardless of our differences, because we just want to build a winning car.”

“I feel fortunate to be a part of a community where I feel accepted regardless of my identity,” Bianca says. “Sometimes I might be the only girl in my classes and that is overwhelming, but I always try and tell myself that if I made it here, I belong here. I want to be that inspiration for other women in the program, too. I want to know they are accepted and belong. Creating that space and opportunity for everyone is important to me.”

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

#PROFspective: Civil/Environmental Engineering Major, Rowan CHAARG Ambassador Trinity Good

Trinity sits on a rock in front of trees.

Today, transfer student Trinity Good shares her #PROFspective of being a junior Civil/Environmental Engineering major from Upper Township, NJ (Cape May County). Trinity is the Rowan Ambassador for CHAARG, a college health and fitness community. She works as a cook at Kirk’s Pizza in Upper Township, as well as serving at Brown’s in Ocean City. […]

Student Leader Lauren Repmann on Biomedical Engineering Major, 3D Printing Club Success

Lauren sits on a bench next to a white, sphere sculpture.

Today we speak to Lauren Repmann, a senior Biomedical Engineering major with a minor in Chemistry. Lauren is an on-campus resident from Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County). She is the 3D Printing Club founder and co-president, president of the Women in Engineering Club, and a student mentor for the Engineering Learning Community. Lauren works off campus at Tranquility Path Investment Advisors as an Administrative Assistant, and on campus at the Office of Admissions as an Admissions Ambassador.

Lauren poses in the woods.

What inspired you to choose your major?

My mom works as an engineer at AT&T, and I always knew that I wanted to follow in her footsteps. When it came time for me to choose my college major, I wanted to pursue a field that combined engineering with medicine, and Biomedical Engineering was the perfect choice.

As I look back on this decision, I see that there are so many other benefits of choosing Biomedical Engineering that I wasn’t aware of. I’ve developed a genuine understanding of how to approach problems and sticky situations from a logical perspective, and this skill will be useful for all aspects of my life. I’ve also gained confidence in my technical abilities, so much so that I founded a 3D Printing Club at Rowan University.

Most importantly, I’ve recognized the importance of using engineering to set an example for younger female generations. Engineering is known to be a male-dominated field, and reaching out to elementary, middle and high school girls about a potential career in engineering can help to reduce this stigma.

Lauren poses in front of a fountain.

Tell us something interesting thing that you’ve learned in a class this semester.

It’s my last semester as a Rowan student, and I wanted to take a fun class to celebrate! I’ve always enjoyed taking pictures, so I chose to enroll in Honors Digital Photography with Jenny Drumgoole. The coolest thing I’ve learned so far is how to take long-exposure photos. This type of photography is great for taking night-time photos because the camera shutter stays open for a long period of time to record the light. Even if the area where the photo is being taken seems dark, the long exposure photography style will allow light to creep in from peripheral areas. I’ve made lots of awesome photos with this technique, and I’ll definitely continue to use this skill after this course.

Lauren poses in a clearing.

Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.

My typical day at Rowan starts at Engineering Hall. I serve as the co-president of Rowan’s 3D Printing Club, so I’m always in the 3D printing lab to make sure everything is running smoothly. While I’m in the lab, I usually make finishing touches on my homework assignments and get ready for my classes. After about two hours in the lab, I leave for my 11 a.m. classes. My biomedical engineering course load this semester is very heavy, but I’m thankful to have my friends who always want to collaborate on homework and assignments! I usually spend some time with them after my classes are over at 2 pm.

After that, I run back to Engineering Hall to make progress on my engineering clinic project. I work in Dr. Staehle’s Systems Biology and Neuroregeneration laboratory, and my project focuses on assessing the toxicity of exogenous chemicals, including DEHP and BP-3, on planarian flatworms. After catching up on my experiments, I run down the hall to one of the engineering clinic classrooms to teach my Engineering Learning Community seminar. I currently have 18 freshmen engineering students as my mentees, and we have done lots of fun and productive activities together. My favorite has been the icebreaker bingo tournament. It really helped me to get to know my mentees! Once my seminar ends at 5 p.m/, I run down to the first floor of Engineering Hall to close the 3D Printing Lab, then my day is over! Finally getting back to my apartment after each long day is rewarding! I change into my comfy clothes, eat dinner and ice cream, call my parents, do some homework, then start all over again the next day!

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that makes you feel like Rowan is home.

Whenever I step foot in Rowan’s 3D Printing Lab at Engineering Hall, I feel like Rowan is home. When I was a sophomore, I became very interested in 3D printing. The ability to take an idea and turn it into an object that I could hold intrigued me. I taught myself how to use OnShape, a popular CAD software, and I produced lots of cool models that I wanted to 3D print! When I approach one of Rowan’s 3D printing labs to ask about printing my models, I was told that the printers are primarily used for academic purposes. I knew I was not the only student who wanted to print personal models, and I also knew that Rowan University’s 3D printing lab had the resources to offer a personal printing service.

With that knowledge, I worked with a friend to draft a 3D printing plan to present to the technicians at the Engineering Hall 3D printing lab. The technicians were completely on board with our idea, and we then began the club petitioning process through the Student Government Association. On October 12, 2020, we officially became a Rowan club, and in January 2021, we received funding to purchase filament and supplies.

Since then, Rowan’s 3D Printing Club has grown at an exponential rate. We have 75 members who consistently attend our meetings and events, and we even won Rowan’s Outstanding Student Organization Award for the Spring 2021 semester. I’ve always felt that home is a feeling that you have the power to create. Through this club, I’ve not only created the feeling of home for myself, but also for all the other Rowan students who want to become more engaged in 3D printing. There is a genuine sense of community and passion that one can sense immediately upon walking into the room during one of our general meetings or workshops, and that is my Rowan “home” feeling that I will cherish for my entire life.

See Lauren and learn more about the 3D Printing Club in this video. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

Related posts:

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

Inside the M.S. in Biomedical Engineering Program with Rowan Global Student Brennen Covely

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

Reaching New Heights: AJ Pingol Shares His Experience as a Biomedical Engineer

AJ Pingol, a recent College of Engineering graduate from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), shares what it’s like to be a Biomedical Engineering major at Rowan University

What made you choose biomedical engineering (BME)?

Like a lot of people, I’m someone who loves to play video games. When I play video games, I never play on easy mode; I always have to challenge myself.

I knew after I earned my undergraduate degree that I had to pick something that was going to challenge me intellectually and push me to be out of my comfort zone. This is why I chose biomedical engineering.

The reason why I chose Rowan specifically is because I realized how invested they were in their students — invested into what I wanted to do as a career and provided me with the best resources possible to get there. So I think that the combination of the challenge and the kind of community that’s here ultimately led me here to becoming a BME.

AJ sitting while working on a laptop.

Did you know that you wanted to do med school to begin with? 

Yes, I knew I wanted to go to med school to begin with. So I think something so great about biomedical engineering is that I’ve gotten the chance to work directly with physicians. The current project that I’m working on allows us to work directly with local physicians working with patient data to ultimately better these outcomes for the patients.

And I’ve realized … I love having my hands on both sides of the process of helping the patient. And I think that the biomedical engineering majors, they definitely don’t get enough praise because they deal with the more behind the scenes work of what patients don’t see. I’ve realized how important biomedical engineering is to the whole process and I’ve gained this wider perspective of health care for patients.

As far as the research lab experience, do you get that early into your career?

So you definitely can even start as soon as you’re a freshman. I think something so special about biomedical engineering, and specifically the biomedical engineering program at Rowan, is that everybody is so open about teaching and inviting everybody to the lab. In STEM, it can be a little intimidating to go up to someone who is an innovator and has all of these different accolades in the field, but the atmosphere here is so open.

At Rowan, the overall goal is to see everyone succeed. 

What impact do you hope to have on this field?

I think everybody has that one professor that makes you think “Wow, that  professor really made an impact on my life.” Something that I realized going through my BME classes was that I felt that way about every single one of my professors. Each one empowered me in a different way to either push myself to new heights or try something new. I think that kind of empowerment really impacted me and showed me who I really wanted to be.

I want to continue to empower other people, whether it’s through education or through research. I hope to make an impact to create a better patient experience and better healthcare in general. 

AJ sitting while working on a laptop.

Can you share  an “aha” moment you had where you knew you made the right decision?

BME is a major that makes you put your hands in a bunch of different pots. For example, the research program I was involved in was 100% coding based. To be honest, I’m not that great at coding (well, wasn’t that great at coding).  So you can imagine someone who doesn’t have any experience with coding could be intimidating. The research is so impactful that you feel like you don’t want to mess up. But the faculty here, the research groups, and the friends that I’ve made are all so uplifting. In this program I’ve gotten the opportunity to find myself in discomfort to see new heights and how far I can push myself.

So eventually, I was able to use coding to help patients directly and I could see that direct impact. That culmination of all this time and hardwork from being a novice in the field makes being in this program so unique.

What ultimately made you decide to come to Rowan?

What drew me to Rowan was the environment of unity and togetherness that exists here. Rowan emphasizes being different and innovative, especially in the BME program. They do a great job of supporting your individual goals. I found so much support for what I want to do and that’s why I chose Rowan. 

Final thoughts?

When I think of Rowan BME, I think of finding who you are and seeing what you can do. BME definitely is not an easy major, and it’s like that way for a reason — to help you see that you can push yourself to new heights to succeed. I think it’s great because it brings out the best in people. 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Related posts:

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7 Biomedical Engineering Majors Share One Cool Thing About Their Major

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

A Series of Chances Led Biomedical Engineering Major Brandon Hickson to His Perfect Fit

Brandon works in a biomedical engineering lab.

Meet senior Brandon Hickson of Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), a Biomedical Engineering major and member of the Honors College. A last-minute change of plans brought Brandon to Rowan University’s College of Engineering. Later, a cancelled research experience sparked a new passion and career path for Brandon in the medical field. Read on to learn more about Brandon’s story and future plans. 

What made you choose biomedical engineering?

Growing up, I was fascinated with LEGOs and building things and constructing something out of nothing. And as I got older and got into middle school in high school, I realized that I had a passion for people as well. And I knew that I couldn’t live and do something for the rest of my life without incorporating both of those things into my life.

And I found out that biomedical engineering was really the thing that was perfect for me, because it combined the human component of biology and interacting with patients and people. But then also the mathematical and technical side of engineering meant a lot to me. And I feel like I found my perfect fit here at Rowan.

Brandon stands next to a Henry Rowan quote.
What impact do you hope to have in your field?

No matter how big or small it is, on every single level, I hope to impact the patient directly. Patient interaction is huge with me. I have had a family history of medical issues where over the years, we’ve had several different doctors and engineers who have had profound impacts on our lives. And I think that is something that goes very much unsaid that the people who work behind the scenes have a profound impact on the way that people live their lives and the success that they encounter. And I would love to be a part of that success in different people’s lives.

Share an “aha” moment that you’ve had within your discipline that made you feel passionate about your major.

My “aha” moment, believe it or not, happened when COVID was at its peak. I had a cancelled Biomedical Engineering research program at the University of Delaware. And through that cancellation, I ended up working at a doctor’s office in the area. Through that experience, I realized that medicine is actually my true calling.

The work that I have done in biomedical engineering has allowed me to have an appreciation for the overall holistic view of health in the human body, and to one day integrate that into a practice that I will hopefully have on my own. So as of now I’ve wanted to shift over to pre-med studies in addition to biomedical engineering, and I can’t wait to see what that’s going to bring.

Close up of Brandon in the lab.

Can you give one piece of advice for any student who is looking into this major and aren’t sure if it’s right for them?

I would say learn from me, and don’t come in with a very closed-minded approach. I graduated high school and thought that I knew what I wanted to do for the rest of my life and had the next 10 to 15 years planned and ready to be executed. And I had a giant curveball thrown my way. And I feel more at peace now with my professional career than I ever have. So definitely have an open mind when it comes to deciding what you want to do with your future and how you live your life because you’re only going to have one college experience. And you’ll hear this a million times, but live it how you would want to live it. Don’t let other people dictate what it is that you’re going to do with your life.

Portrait of Brandon leaning against a chair.

Why did you choose to come to Rowan?

I chose to come to Rowan because of the size of it. Believe it or not, I originally planned on going to the University of Maryland, and at the last minute decided to come here because of the streamlined approach that the engineering program takes with its students.

The class sizes are extremely small, so much so that the faculty can have a one on one relationship with multiple if not all of their students. And that is not really the case at any other university, especially any other university that has a program as prestigious as this one. Any other university, you would be simply a number on a page, or a name in a book. But here you’re a person who has wants and needs and desires for their future, and the faculty here make sure that that happens. 

Brandon works in the biomedical engineering lab.

The engineering program starts day one [your first] year and is meant to cultivate you to what you would eventually want to do for the rest of your life as you graduate. And you have faculty that are always pushing you along the way for excellence to make sure that you attain all that you seek out to achieve in life.

See our video with Brandon here.  

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Related posts:

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

Reaching New Heights: AJ Pingol Shares His Experience as a Biomedical Engineer

Student Leader Lauren Repmann on Biomedical Engineering Major, 3D Printing Club Success

#PROFspective: Junior Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Omar Bedewy

Omar stands in front of the banner at Rowan Hall.

Today we speak to Omar Bedewy, a junior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Business. Omar is an off-campus renter from Paterson, NJ (Passaic County). He transferred to Rowan from Union County College.

Omar poses in a wooded area.

What inspired you to choose your major?

Life is changing around us. Before I was an Electrical and Computer Engineering major, I was hoping to be a petroleum engineer. I switched to studying electrical and computer engineering because I believe this field will have a big impact on the future.

Tell us something interesting you’ve learned in a class this semester.

I am taking a class on electromagnetics. I found out that electromagnets are in everything, and I am really interested in the science behind it.

Omar poses in front of Rowan Hall.

Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.

Wednesdays are usually my busiest days. I come to Rowan at eight in the morning. I have some coffee and check my email. After that, I head out to my first class at 9 a.m. I have a lab right after, but I have 15 minutes in between. During that time, I talk and chill with my friend. After the lab, I go for some tutoring and study for a bit. Then, I have another class. After this class, I go to the cafeteria for my lunch. I have one more class at 5, and then I go home.

Omar poses in a wooded area.

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that makes you feel like Rowan is home.

I really enjoy going to tutoring at Rowan. The people there make me feel like Rowan is home.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

Valentina Giannattasio, freshman dance and marketing double major

Roshni Gandhi: Combining Innovation and Research in Biomedical Engineering

Roshni looks through microscope.

Roshni Gandhi, a Biomedical Engineering major and future doctor, is a student in the accelerated engineer/physician program who shares her profound research and experiences.

I always knew I wanted to be an engineer first and then a doctor. I think biomedical engineering is super special, because it allows me to combine my passion for medicine and engineering. It also allowed me to diversify my skill set so I’ll have experience to help innovate new medical therapies and medical technologies in the future.

What is your ideal vision? What do you ultimately want to be doing in three more years?

I hope to be treating patients as a doctor first, but I’d also like to use my engineering background to be able to innovate and meet some of the unmet needs and challenges patients have as well. There are some gaps in therapies that are available to patients and I want to fill them. I hope to be able to combine my medical and engineering background to treat patients and be an innovator. 

Roshni working in lab.

Can you share an “aha” moment that you had throughout your time in the program that made you feel like you made the right decision to choose Rowan?

Through my clinic course, I’m working on research with one of the professors here. I remember when I first got involved with his research, he was telling me about a project I could work on that involved developing an injection that’s able to regenerate bone within the body. At that moment, I just remember thinking, “Wow, this is so cool.”

One day, someone who’s suffering from osteoporosis can use this medical therapy so that they have extra bone where they may not have had before. I also remember thinking “I’m working on research that one day will be able to  really help patients.” 

What advice would you give to someone who is considering this route?

I think biomedical engineering is really cool because it places an equal emphasis on innovation and research. So if you’re interested in designing new things, and hands-on technical work with machines and things like that, it’s a great choice for you. If you’re interested in research, that’s also a path you can take within biomedical engineering.

I think the faculty and staff here at Rowan are super supportive. I think everyone goes into engineering thinking, “this is going to be so hard, I don’t know how I’m gonna make it.” But they’re really there to help you. They work with you step by step as you progress from freshman year to senior year to help develop the skills you need to think like an engineer. By the end of it, you have this new skill set, this new way of thinking to be able to solve any problem.

Roshni looking at camera in lab.

Explain a research experience that you really enjoyed. 

I really enjoy working on this injectable hydrogels project. I get to go into the lab work on developing a biomaterial called the hydragel. It’s a very new type of biomaterial that you can add into the body, which is something the BME department is really big on.

I’ve also had the opportunity through some of the skills and projects I’ve been working on through my BME classes to cofound a startup company. The project helps meet some of the unmet needs of Parkinson’s patients and the amputee population. I’ve been able to come up with some devices to be able to help those individuals, and our first device is actually on the market. I think it’s the coolest thing to be able to do both research and innovation here.

Why did you choose Rowan?

I think Rowan’s program really stood out to me because we have small classroom sizes. From day one, I got to meet the professors. They knew my name. They’re working on different things with me, really getting to know my story and offering resources to help me.

The student community is also great. We’re always helping each other, which is so fundamental as an engineering student to be able to work on things together. This helps us develop a community that helps us reach our goals.

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, art graduate

#PROFspective: From Colorado to Glassboro, Biomedical Engineering Major Katie Driscoll

Katie works in a biomedical engineering lab.

Today, we speak with senior Biomedical Engineering major Katie Driscoll of Durango, Colorado. She holds minors in History, Chemistry and Arabic Studies and is part of the Honors College. Here, Katie shares insights on her major, including the research work she’s been part of since her first year here at Rowan, and talks about the importance of getting involved on campus.

What made you come all the way here to New Jersey?

I just felt really at home when I visited the Biomedical Engineering program. It felt like everyone was super excited about Rowan’s potential for growth. And everyone was really happy to be here, students and faculty alike. So it really kind of felt like a welcoming place. 

Why Biomedical Engineering? 

I decided to major in Biomedical Engineering because it is a super well-rounded major. I wanted to know about a lot of things, and I wanted to have a lot of skills coming out upon graduation. So that was kind of my focus coming into undergrad.

Portrait of Katie Driscoll.

What do you want to do with this degree? 

I’m not really sure exactly what I want to do yet. But that’s a really good thing about this degree is you can do pretty much anything coming out of an undergrad in Biomedical Engineering. There are a lot of different paths open, whether it’s industry, med school or grad school, I feel really comfortable and confident going into anything.

Can you tell me a little about your experience in the lab? Have you done any research? 

I started research at Rowan in my freshman year with Dr. Vega, which was really cool, because it’s rare that you get to actually do hands-on research as a freshman in any research university.

I currently work in his biomaterials lab, looking at how the mechanical environments of stem cells affect their behavior. And that is for future use and tissue engineering applications.

Can you share an “aha” moment either with a faculty member or in a class where you knew you made the right decision?

So my freshman year when I started research in Dr. Vega’s lab, he was going over protocols with all of us and teaching us how to do everything. And we were imaging some cells on a fluorescent microscope and one of the labs, and he put the image up on the computer, and I just remember thinking that all the cells against the black background really looked like space. They looked like their own little, little galaxies. And I thought that was the coolest thing ever. Because you always see the pictures or the cells in a textbook, but to see it in real life, and all lit up, that was really different. 

What advice would you have to an incoming student who just chose this major?  

I would say definitely get connected with faculty in the department as early as possible because they are some of the most supportive people that I’ve met at Rowan. And if you know the faculty, you’re going to feel a lot more at home in the program. And also just get involved super early, whether it’s in research or in clubs, whatever you want to do, just kind of day one freshman year go in with a plan of how you’re going to get involved on campus.

Katie performs an experiment in a lab.

Can you share with me some things that you’re involved in or things that have had an impact on your college career?

I’m pretty involved with research here through Dr. Vega’s lab. This is my third year in his lab. And then I am also involved with Rowan Food Recovery Network. It’s a club that focuses on taking food from the dining halls that would otherwise get thrown away and redistributing it to community partners to reduce food waste and help with community hunger. So that is one big thing that I do. 

I’m an assistant resident director through the Office of Residential Learning (University Housing). I also am the Vice President for Rowan Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), which is like a pre-professional club that we have through our department. And that’s been really impactful to get to meet different people from industry and grad school and have them talk about their experiences.

Can you tell me a little bit more about that?

BMES is like our major specific club, and we meet every other week. And we usually have people from industry or have our own professors talk about their research. And it’s just a really great way to get connected within the major. Because a lot of the faculty will come to the meetings, people like freshmen through seniors come, and you can kind of network with each other, and talk to each other.

We also do some community service events. And we also usually, in non-COVID times, we have the BMES games, which is where everyone — it’s like a field day for our department. But all the professors also come out and they compete with us. So it’s a really fun environment.

You said that you’ve been working in a lab for three years. So are you able to start working in a lab early into your college career, you don’t have to be a junior, senior? 

You can start day one. I walked in, and I just emailed the head of the department … it’s that accessible. And he set up a meeting with me as a freshman, which I don’t think that’s really found at any other university. And he was able to get me connected with Dr. Vega. And I started in his lab, like my first month, freshman year. We also have other freshmen in our labs, we have sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

As an out-of-state student, do you have any advice for the transition process to come here? 

Rowan is a place where it’s really easy to make friends. Even though a lot of people here are from New Jersey, and there’s not as many people from out of state, it’s super easy to get integrated with the community. I’ve never once felt out of place.

Katie views a microscope in the lab.

Is there anything else that you want to share?

I’d like to reiterate how excited everyone in this department is to be here. And I think that’s really rare in other schools; faculty just kind of like their jobs. But like, every single one of our faculty members are super passionate, not just about their research … instructors are super passionate mentors. I think that’s a really rare combination to find at another university. 

See Katie with the Rowan Food Recovery Network in this video

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Alumni Success: Chemical Engineer Jennifer Roddy

Jen poses outside of Rowan Hall.

Today we speak to Jennifer Roddy, a 2008 graduate of Rowan’s Chemical Engineering program. Jennifer is originally from Franklinville, NJ and now resides in Metuchen, NJ. She lived both on and off campus during her time at Rowan. Jennifer is currently the Director of External Partner Management at Bristol Myers Squibb and has an MBA from Rutgers University.

Jen poses in front of Engineering Hall.

What is Bristol Myers Squibb?

Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) is a global biopharmaceutical company that drives scientific advancement across multiple therapeutic areas, including oncology, hematology, immunology and cardiovascular disease. Our mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases. Our patients are at the heart of everything we do!

What was your journey like from Rowan to your current position?

I was offered an internship the summer after my freshman year at a pharmaceutical company called Johnson Matthey (JM). I worked there part time while at Rowan, allowing me to develop real world skills while simultaneously obtaining my formal education. After graduation and two years as a full-time process engineer at JM, I was ready for a new challenge. A Rowan alumnus in my network was working for BMS at the time and referred me for an open position in his group. I joined BMS in 2010 as an Outsourcing Coordinator focused on external manufacturing of clinical supplies. I continued to support our external operations throughout my career, with my roles transitioning over time from a technical focus to a business focus. This transition encouraged me to pursue my MBA with a concentration in Pharmaceutical Management at Rutgers University. 

Jen poses in front of a wooded area by the Engineering buildings on campus.

What is your role at Bristol Myers Squibb? 

At BMS we outsource certain operations to external partners for many reasons, including but not limited to balancing our capacity, limiting risk, and evaluating unique technologies. I currently lead a team called External Partner Management. We are responsible for developing and maintaining strong relationships with our partners that develop and manufacture materials that will be used in clinical trials. We also work to identify future partnerships, develop sourcing strategies, and focus on ways to drive value for BMS through these partnerships.

Why did you choose Rowan?

My decision to attend Rowan was driven by the unique program structure and economics.  Rowan’s engineering program offered multidisciplinary labs and engineering projects that allowed you to develop real-world skills in the classroom. Small class sizes also suited my learning style and allowed me to develop strong connections with my classmates. In addition to the program offerings, I was also focused on the affordability of higher education. I could not afford tuition without taking out student loans and needed to ensure my education would have a high return on investment. Rowan offered an amazing program at a fraction of the cost of many other universities.

Jen poses in front of the bridge connecting Engineering and Rowan Halls.

Why did you decide to go into Chemical Engineering?

I initially enrolled as a Chemistry major, but I ended up at an Engineering Open House my first week of school. During the session, one of the professors explained how challenging the program was but that the opportunities after graduation were endless. I switched majors that day and never looked back. 

How do you feel that Rowan’s Chemical Engineering program helped prepare you for your career?

Rowan’s Chemical Engineering program not only prepared me for a career in engineering, but it provided a way of thinking that I could apply throughout all stages of my career. The multidisciplinary labs provided technical skills across many disciplines, while allowing individuals to develop the ability to work across peer groups of different educational backgrounds. At the core, Rowan’s Engineering program teaches you to solve problems. The ability to solve problems will make you successful no matter where your career takes you.

Jen works on her computer.

Do you have any advice for students who are currently in the Chemical Engineering program?

Persevere!—As a former fifth-year student, I understand firsthand how challenging the engineering program can be. As you struggle through content and coursework, know that hard work and perseverance will be your key to success. Celebrate your success as they come, but also appreciate your failures. If you are able to develop the ability to learn through failure, your growth will be limitless.

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Story written by:
Jennifer Roddy ’08, Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering

Organized by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major 

Photography by: 
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

Alumni Success: Julia Reilly, Chemical Engineer at Dupont

Rowan hall and Engineering Pond at night.

Today we feature Julia Reilly, a Rowan Chemical Engineering alumna who graduated in 2019. Julia is currently a chemical engineer at Dupont, a specialty company that makes products in the safety, healthcare, electronics, mobility, and construction spaces. Julia is from Bucks County, Pennsylvania, but she currently lives in Washington, D.C. 

A headshot of Julia.
Julia Reilly

Why Rowan?

My guidance counselor suggested I look into Rowan. Being from Bucks County, I had never heard of it. I went to Rowan’s Honors Accepted Students Day, and Rowan was better than I thought. I met many people at the event, and I loved it. 

Did you have any internships while you were at Rowan?

I had an internship at FMC Corporation, an agricultural sciences company, as well as an internship at Dupont. After my internship at Dupont, they interviewed me for a full-time role in the company during the fall semester of my senior year. I got the job, and it was nice to not have to worry about finding a job during my second semester of senior year. The job was in the Field Engineering and Supply Chain Development Program at Dupont, where I still currently work. 

Julia poses in front of some trees in a blue shirt.

Do you have any advice for Chemical Engineering students at Rowan?

I’d advise students to reach out to professors early on and offer to work in their labs. I started working in Dr. Joseph Stanzione’s lab my freshman year, and it was a great opportunity. I built a good relationship with him and gained valuable experience as I was trying to build my resume. This definitely helped me to secure an internship early on.  

How did Rowan help to prepare you for the job you have today?

Rowan has great chemical engineering classes that teach good fundamentals. My favorite part of the Chemical Engineering department are the special topics classes, such as mixing and process safety courses. These classes are not commonly offered at other schools and help Rowan’s Chemical Engineering program and Rowan alumni to stand out.

Julia poses in front of some trees and shrubbery in a blue shirt.

What do you hope to see in the future of Rowan?

I personally hope to see Rowan expand the Chemical Engineering program. Also, I hope they’ll continue to make diversity, equity and inclusion a priority in the engineering department specifically. It is important to me that they improve the diversity of both students and faculty and make the department an inclusive space for all to thrive.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Out-of-State Students’ Returning to Rowan Bucket List

Einstein Bagels storefront in Engineering Hall.

Many out-of-state students are coming to campus for the first time since COVID, while some were able to come to campus last year. Here are some things that out-of-state students are looking forward to when campus opens up a bit more this semester. 

Magdelyn Kelly is a senior Musical Theatre and Theatre Education major from Inwood, West Virginia. Magdelyn transferred to Rowan from Blue Ridge Community College. Magdelyn is a first-generation college student and an off-campus renter. She says she’s most looking forward to seeing all her peers and learning face to face again. When asked if there was someone she hasn’t seen in person since before Covid who she is very much looking forward to seeing on campus this fall, Magdelyn replied, “My voice teacher!” Magdelyn is involved with Campus Players and Rowan Lab Theatre, and she adds that Rowan Lab Theatre will be putting on some great shows this year. Magdelyn can’t wait to take part in Rowan After Hours (RAH) and Student University Programmers (SUP) events again, such as Bingo. She can’t wait to take senior pictures with her friends and hang out on campus on Bunce Green.

People hanging out on Bunce Green, as Magdelyn looks forward to.
Students hanging out on Bunce Green, as Magdelyn looks forward to.

Nick Kreuz, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major from Quakertown, Pennsylvania, is looking forward to working back in the labs with other students. Nick says, “I am looking forward most to going back to a campus that feels alive,” and he notes being on campus last year felt less warm and welcoming than it has been in the past. Some campus must-dos for him include activities put on by the Rec Center (where he will work as a Building Manager) and shows returning to the Planetarium. Nick is also looking forward to visiting Einstein’s Bagels in the mornings for coffee.

Nick poses in front of some trees.
Nick Kreuz

Petro Skrypnyk has never been to campus before, and he is excited to see the place he has been studying at for a year. Petro is a senior Computer Science major and commutes from his home in Philadelphia. Before attending Rowan, Petro transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County. Petro wants to get involved with Rowan’s Association for Computing Machinery and the Volleyball team. Petro is excited to earn his bachelor’s degree and meet up with people in between classes.

Philadelphia, where Petro is from.
Petro, of Philadelphia, is looking forward to the on-campus experience this semester.

Samuel Jolade, senior Computing and Informatics major from Deer Park, New York, is excited to come back to the Rowan campus after nearly two years. He can’t wait to get back into Gaming Club and visit the Game Room in the Student Center. Samuel hasn’t seen his friend Max and a few other friends since before COVID, and he is excited to see them. 

Samuel looks forward to hanging out in the game room like these guys are.
Samuel (not pictured) looks forward to hanging out in the Student Center’s Game Room.

Ashleigh Jankowski is a junior Biomedical Engineering major with a Chemistry minor from Catonsville, Maryland. Ashleigh is living off campus this semester. Ashleigh says while “virtual learning was a great way to proceed in learning while continuing to be socially distanced, nothing can replace the friendly, bustling campus atmosphere.” She is looking forward to taking classes that are major specific this year, and because most of them are engineering labs, hopefully having them in person! She is looking forward to Outdoors Club getting started again, as she is hoping to go on a few trips with them this semester. She’s also looking forward to RAH events like Bingo and SUP activities like Outdoor Movie Night. Ashleigh also can’t wait to hang out at Einstein’s Bagels again. 

Ashleigh poses in front of Rowan Hall.
Ashleigh Jankowski

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Philadelphia photo courtesy of:
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#PROFspective: Biomedical Engineering Major Danny Tepper Reflects on College

Engineering Hall with flowers out of focus.

Today we speak with Danny Tepper of Atlantic County, who recently earned his degree in Biomedical Engineering. Danny transferred to Rowan his sophomore year from Atlantic County Community College and will be going onto his master’s in engineering at Rowan next year. He is an off-campus resident. Danny was homeschooled until he attended ACCC at 17 years old.

What has been your favorite class at Rowan? 

That’s hard to pick! I’ve taken a few interesting ones, mostly technical ones. One of my favorite ones that were different from the rest was a class on regulatory practices of the FDA. For example, learning the details about how to get through the FDA approval process of new drugs. This is a topic in some engineering and medical courses that is not covered very well. It’s not a required class but it should be. Dr. Erik Brewer, a BME professor, taught this class. I took this course last fall. 

Danny and his teammates pose at a conference.
Danny (at right)

What excites you about your major? 

The idea of being at the front of research really excites me and sort of creating the future to some extent and really helping people. I’ve always had some interest in medicine, but I’ve also never wanted to be a nurse or doctor working with people like that. I like the concept of being on the back end and making the things that doctors use. Also, both my parents have master’s degrees in engineering. It’s only appropriate that I go into something within engineering. My brother also has a bachelor’s in engineering! 

If there was anything you wish you knew beforehand about your major, what would you share? 

It is a lot of work, but it is even more than I expected. There were some weeks where you had absolutely no social life if you wanted to get any of your homework done. It’s unfortunate, but it happens. You learn a lot though.

Danny stands in front of the Rowan sign.

Do you have any internships or clubs you are involved in? 

I have not had any internships, but I’m involved in some club sports here. I’m on the frisbee team. I’m also on the e-board of the Rowan University College Republican Club

What did your activities add to your college experience? 

The sports club definitely added a lot to my friendships. I met my first friend group as a first-year in intramural frisbee. One of those friends became my best friend and we still hang out together a lot. I still talk to all of them periodically. 

What’s the last song you listened to? 

“All the Way Up” by David Guetta

What are you looking forward to this summer? 

Graduating, for one thing, and being back in Wildwood. Hopefully, with fewer restrictions than last year. I’ve been in Wildwood the past five summers working at a waterpark. Last summer, I turned 21 but everything was closed. Hopefully, we don’t have that again.

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Story by:
Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

My Favorite Class: Systems and Control

Alexandra sits and talks with friends on campus.

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Today we feature Alex Jackson, a recent graduate who majored in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a minor in Mathematics. Alex, from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County), is now pursuing her master’s and doctoral degrees at Rowan. 

Alex smiles and wears a RAH shirt while standing inside the Student Center.

What was the name of your favorite class at Rowan?

Systems and Control

What department was the class in?

ECE (Electrical and Computer Engineering)

Who taught the class when you took it?

Dr. Jie Li

Tell us a little about what the class is

It involves mathematical techniques to determine various properties of electrical systems for analysis which is necessary to the success of said systems.

Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting or special to you.

I absolutely loved the content of this class. I’m a big fan of tedious math and mathematical theory, and I loved seeing how this all connected to the ECE field. The labs were also fun and weren’t extremely difficult, though they taught me a lot about MatLab and its importance in the field.

What makes this professor great?

Dr. Li was fantastic and one of the best professors in the ECE department by far. She took time to answer questions, she was great at explaining difficult concepts, she was engaged with the students, and was clearly passionate about what she was teaching. Everything was clear and concise, and she would take time to review throughout the lectures.

How did this class help to support your academic or personal growth, or your professional goals?

I struggled with my choice of major a lot during my sophomore year, but after this class I felt like I belonged there with everyone else. It helped me gain a further appreciation for teaching and how important it is to be a teacher that can truly communicate with their students. It lead me to where I am today in pursuing academia.

Alex smiles and stands outside with James Hall in the background.

What are your professional goals?

I am currently enrolled at Rowan in the Ph.D. program for engineering with a specialization in engineering education and a master’s in BME. I want to broaden my understanding of engineering as much as possible and perform research that ultimately improves the way we teach future engineers. I hope to work in academia performing research and teaching various topics in engineering such as math, statistics and design.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

Passing the Torch: Second-Generation Rowan Grad, Top-Tier Engineering Student Alexa Aulicino’s Favorite College Memory

Alexa stands in front of the Rowan arch.

When we first met Alexa Aulicino, the year was 2017, and the first-year Mechanical Engineering major from Burlington County walked us through her day for this feature profile

Four years later, the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honors Society president and Medallion award winner is poised to begin her career across the country. 

Alexa wears her graduation gown with spring flowers in the foreground.

The move makes sense for Alexa, whose favorite Rowan memory saw her travelling more than 7,000 miles away. 

As a sophomore in 2019, Alexa enrolled in a pilot course called Engineering in a Global Context, where she says students learned what it means to be “globally competent engineers.” The class culminated in a two-week study abroad tour of China, visiting Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. 

The students visited Inductotherm Group China, a branch of the company founded by Rowan University’s namesake, the late Henry Rowan. They toured its factory, where Alexa recalls they were warmly greeted by employees and presented with tiny, hand-painted Inductotherm cups. 

Alexa stands in front of the Rowan arch.

“Then the rest of the trip, we got to visit different universities and engineering programs and see the robotics, their technology, their buildings, and it was really cool,” Alexa explains.

“It definitely puts in perspective how big the world is. And it makes me grateful for things, to live here. And then it also makes me curious, like, what else is out there?”

Alexa smiles in her graduation gown.

Alexa will soon find out. She’s headed out west to work for Roccor, a Colorado-based aerospace company. 

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Senior Reflects: Biomedical Engineering Major Hannah Doyle

Hannah smiles while standing next to a white flowering plant on campus.

Today we speak with Hannah, a graduating senior Biomedical Engineering major from Seaford, Delaware. She tells us more about her time at Rowan and provides some advice for incoming students.

Hannah stands inside a campus gazebo.

Could you share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

Working with my classmates to all get through a semester together that was really tough. We shared notes, studied together, and even though it was one of my hardest semesters, it is something I am fond of and will cherish.

Hannah smiles behind bright pink spring flowers.

Could you share your favorite social memory?

Hanging out with my friends in the Holly Pointe dorms and having bonfires with my friends when they moved off-campus.

What are your career aspirations?

I want to do research and development in industry with nanomedicine.

How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

The BME program at Rowan helped me find out that I was interested in drug delivery. The faculty also helped me write my personal statement, and helped me fill out my applications to graduate school.

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors?

Thanks Mom and Dad and Dr. Brewer!

Who is your favorite professor? What class did you take them for? And why is this person your favorite?

Dr. Brewer was my favorite professor. I took him for three classes, and he was always down to help with coursework at any time of the day, even weekends. He was also a good teacher and willing to help and advise in any way he could. His personality was great and class was never boring. He really cares about the students here.

Hannah stands with Bunce Hall in the background.

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

Stay out of your dorm room as much as you can, spend as much time with your friends as possible.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

Photos by:
Brian Seay, junior sports communication and media major

Senior Reflects: Civil Engineering Major Liam Cutri-French

Liam stands outdoors on campus.

Today, we speak to senior Civil Engineering major Liam Cutri-French from Glen Gardner, NJ (Hunterdon County). He tells us more about his time at Rowan and provides some advice for incoming students.

Could you please share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

My favorite moment from a class was freshman engineering clinic, where I had to trade up from a paperclip to a backpack.

Could you please share your favorite social memory?

My favorite memory from Rowan was probably my time spent in the Holly Pointe. I was able to meet so many great friends while working together to pass freshman year courses.

What are your career aspirations?

I plan on attaining my M.S. in Engineering and Public Policy, and after that I hope to work on designing major infrastructure projects with a focus on how infrastructure impacts the public.

Liam stands in front of the Rowan arch..

How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

My work with interdisciplinary courses as well as extracurriculars helped me to grow as an engineer. I was able to gain valuable project management skills through Engineers Without Borders. I was also able to learn about the intersection of engineering and policy while working as the AVP of Facilities and Operations for SGA.

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors?

I would like to give a shoutout to my roommates Augie Scorzo, Sam Mardini, Chris Contos and Matt Cangemi for always helping me be the best student I could be.

Who is your favorite professor? What class did you take them for? And why is this person your favorite?

My favorite professor is Dr. Jagadish Torlapati, who was my advisor for the Engineers Without Borders Clinic. Dr. Torlapati was extremely helpful for us to complete our projects and has been an excellent mentor.

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

I would recommend that freshmen and transfers should get involved as quickly as possible. Don’t turn down any opportunity, as you never know where it could lead you.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos not submitted by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Senior Reflects: Lucinda Lau, Accomplished Engineering and Future Med Student

Photo of the Rowan Hall bridge with pink flowers close to the lens.

Today we speak with Lucinda Lau from Parlin, NJ (Middlesex County). Lucinda will be graduating this May with a Biomedical Engineering (BME) degree. She is part of the 3+4 BS/MD program.

Could you please share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? 

In one of my core BME courses, I had the opportunity to work with an industry professional to discuss the validity and feasibility of a design project that I was working on with a group of students. This gave me better insight into what I could expect outside of my undergraduate career.

Could you please share your favorite social memory?

I made most of my close friends in the Holly Pointe study rooms [my first] year. We would study together, watch movies, and just spend most of our free time in those public spaces. It was a great way to meet new people as well. I was also the Assistant VP for Habitat for Humanity. This gave me an opportunity to help the organization build houses with the families that were going to live there in the future.

Lucinda smiles wearing a blue dress and holding a sunflower.

What are your career aspirations?

I am planning on attending medical school after graduation. Some fields I am interested in include pediatrics, orthopedics and surgery.

How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

My advisor, Dr. Staehle, was a great resource all throughout my time at Rowan for both biomedical engineering and the steps needed for me to prepare for medical school.

Do you want to give a shout-out to your family, friends, advisors, or mentors?

I want to thank all the amazing people that I have met through my time in the Society of Women Engineers, Admissions Ambassadors, and just the Biomedical Engineering Department in general.

Lucinda poses confidently in front of a cactus plant.

Who is your favorite professor? What class did you take them for? And why is this person your favorite?

Dr. Ik Jae Lee! I took him for Math for Engineering Analysis, and he was probably the best professor I have ever had. He would stay up the night before an exam with us in the library to hold study sessions. He was also just a great professor who made us interested in learning difficult engineering math. 

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

Make sure to join clubs that you are truly interested in and don’t be afraid to go up to people and just introduce yourself. It seems daunting at first but most freshmen have that same social anxiety because everyone is in a new environment. 

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Story by:
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

Professional Goals of Engineering Entrepreneurship Majors

Kenyon looked to the side outside of Rowan Hall.

Today, we feature the long-term and short-term goals of two students in the Engineering Entrepreneurship program. 

Kenyon sits inside the Engineering Bridge.

Kenyon Burgess, a sophomore from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County), is taking advantage of the programs Rowan has to offer to reach his goals.

Currently, Kenyon is on an engineering research project and is also attending events held by the College of Business for networking and personal development. These are all steps he’s taking to be prepared for his next steps after graduation.

His long-term goal is to own his own business where he can utilize his engineering experience. 

Michael sits by Engineering Pond and Rowan Hall.

Senior Micheal Lampasona, from South Plainfield, NJ (Middlesex County), is taking charge of his future by actively expanding his network, self-educating through reading books and watching videos, and reaching out to business professionals to ask them questions regarding his interests in different industries.

In his last semester, Micheal wants to continue to search the technical and business fields to see what industries he gravitates towards for his career. His long-term goal is to own and develop real estate by investing in and developing multi-unit (30+) properties.

He says: “Engineering entrepreneurship will support my dreams and goals because it gives me the best of both the technical and business world. I know that the world of technical sales, product development, project management, technology commercialization, and operations in manufacturing is what I was born to do.”

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

Select photos by:
Quintin Stinney, sophomore radio/TV/film major

Leading Innovation: Rowan Engineering, MBA Grad Brandon Graham Launches Startup Venture, Mentors Future Entrepreneurs

Brandon poses inside Business Hall.

Today we feature Brandon Graham, a recent graduate of Rowan Global’s Master of Business Administration program. Brandon co-founded the company Arke Aeronautics while still an undergraduate Mechanical Engineering student at Rowan. Learn more about Brandon, his business and his contributions to the Rowan community. Brandon Graham defined his own education at Rowan. Now, as a […]

#PROFspective: Victoria Collinsworth And Esports At Rowan

Victoria standing outside near some branches.

Today we feature Victoria Collinsworth, a first-generation sophomore who studies Chemical Engineering. Vic is from Mantua, NJ (Gloucester County). How did your love of video games start?  When I was younger, my brother used to play on his Gameboy a lot, and I would watch. As we grew up, I started loving games more and […]

Junior Giavana DiDonato Shares Insight on Electrical & Computer Engineering

Giavana sitting on a stone near the engineering building with trees behind her.

Today we feature first-generation college student Giavana DiDonato, a junior Electrical and Computer Engineering major from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County). Gi transfered here from Rowan College of Gloucester County after getting her associate degree. She tells us about being a woman in her field and her experience in the engineering classes at Rowan. Tell […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: From North Jersey To Utah, Chemical Engineering Major Jacob Molinaro

Stock image Mountain View.

Meet Jacob Molinaro, a Chemical Engineering major with minors in both Math and Chemistry who transferred from the County College of Morris and is originally from Essex County, NJ. He is taking remote classes at Rowan from his current residence in Utah. He shares more about his decision in choosing Rowan and what he loves about South Jersey.

Jacob taking a selfie of himself while climbing a mountain.

What are your professional goals? And how is Rowan helping to support you in those goals?

My goal is to get my Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and lead research in the field of renewable energy and energy storage. My time at Rowan has provided me with the educational background and experience to be competitive as I apply to my graduate programs and indirectly inspired me to follow this career path.

As a sophomore, my department head sent me an email encouraging me to apply to an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) program in Ohio. Following his advice, I applied and was admitted to the program and discovered my passions for both research and the field of electrochemistry.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

The field of chemical engineering is extremely diverse, incorporating manufacturing, research and development and process design. Without chemical engineering, we would find many of the everyday products we use would be unavailable. I specifically would like to work in the growing field of renewable energy and energy storage, which is becoming increasingly important as we strive for more sustainable and ecologically friendly alternatives to fossil fuels.

What inspired you to choose your major?

Excellent chemistry teachers in high school (for both Honors Chemistry in 10th grade and AP Chemistry in 11th) fostered my interest for the subject, but I have always been more interested in applying chemistry to real-world problems rather than understanding the technicalities of it. Hence, I went into chemical engineering (applied chemistry).

As a student from North Jersey, how did you become aware of Rowan University?

At the time I applied, there were five strong chemical engineering programs in the state of New Jersey that my community college made me aware of. I applied to all of them, and upon being accepted to Rowan, I came to visit and loved it!

How long is your trip/drive “home” to North Jersey?

This is an amusing question. As the question is intended to be answered, it is two hours up the NJ Turnpike/Garden State Parkway to where I lived in Essex County from my apartment in Marlton. To go visit my parents in Pennsylvania is about three hours.

However, at the moment my wife and I are living in Orem, Utah while I do all of my classes remotely. My wife, Kaitlin, is a travel nurse and is supporting a hospital here in Utah. Back to New Jersey from HERE is about 35 hours of driving.

Jacob posing with his wife for a wedding photo.
Jacob and his wife, Kaitlin, at their wedding.

What are some of the benefits for you, living this distance from home?

When I’m back in NJ it is nice to be close enough to my parents to go visit over the weekend and help out around the house, but far enough away that we’re not getting unexpected dinner guests every other evening while I need to be studying for an exam or my wife is getting home from a long shift at the hospital.

Here in Utah, the largest benefits are by far the accessibility of my favorite hobbies. I’m a runner, climber, mountaineer and skier; the whole Salt Lake City area is absolutely amazing for these activities. In the past two weeks I’ve been to the climbing gym, two different ski resorts, been up two mountains, and been able to run and hike in between classes.

Between my own personal travels and moving around with Kaitlin’s travel nursing, I’ve been to 49 of the 50 states, and Utah is probably tied for second with Montana among my favorite states (only second to Wyoming!). Utah residents are also doing a great job with social distancing and mask-wearing, so COVID-19 cases are low here and places like the ski resorts and climbing gyms are able to stay open and operate at reduced capacity.

What are a few interesting or new things (to you) about Rowan’s South Jersey area that you would share with future out-of-state students?

After living in the “sixth borough on NYC” in Essex County, I’ve really appreciated that South Jersey is much more rural. If it hasn’t come across yet, I’m not at all a city person and really appreciate some good nature. The accessibility to different parks and preserves throughout the Pine Barrens has been really special. There’s also a great running community, some really awesome little towns (I work as a barista in Haddonfield and love it there, for example), and a bit more of a laid back feel than you’d be used to in North Jersey.

What off-campus, local fun places do you recommend students check out?

Parallel to 322 and off of Delsea Drive there’s a really awesome bike path that runs about seven and a half miles to Sewell. That’s a fun ride/run, and I would definitely recommend students check it out. Duffield’s Farm Market in Sewell is a great place to visit in the fall for pumpkin picking and year-round for affordable fresh produce. It’s a bit of a drive, but I love the Black Run Preserve a bit north in Evesham Township.

Closer to campus, Pitman is always worth a visit for great restaurants and a fun main street. Overall, I’d encourage any new students to just drive around and get to know both Glassboro and the surrounding towns. There’s a lot of neat stuff to be seen, regardless of whether you’re interested in getting outdoors or visiting a town.

Why did you choose to transfer to Rowan University?

Of the three schools I was accepted for transfer to, Rowan was the most affordable (by a long shot!) and the most rural. I had spent two years at that point living in the extremely urban sections of northern New Jersey and was ready for a little farmland nearby!

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

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We are #RowanPROUD to be included on Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s 2021 Transfer Honor Roll, which recognizes select nationwide colleges and universities that foster dynamic pathways for transfer students.

Leadership #PROFspective: Roshni Gandhi, Advancing Outreach and Mentorship for Women Engineers

Roshni stands by a glass window inside an academic building on campus.

Today we feature Roshni Gandhi, a leader at Rowan University. Roshni served as the President of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) during the 2019-2020 school year. She is from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County) and is a senior Biomedical Engineering major. Roshni is part of the 3+4 BME/MD program with Cooper Medical School, where she completes her Biomedical Engineering degree in three years and then begins medical school for four years. Roshni is also the president of Alpha Epsilon Delta Pre-Health Society and was an SGA Representative of the Biomedical Engineering Society last year. 

This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month. 

What is your role in your organization?

I was the President of SWE during the 2019-2020 school year (we switched eboards at the beginning of this year). SWE is the Society of Women Engineers and is a professional development organization that helps foster a community between female engineering students and hosts career development events like networking opportunities with big industry partners and mentorship programs. This is very important because studies have shown that fostering connections like these are extremely important in retaining females (and minorities) in the STEM fields, and specifically engineering.

Roshni stands inside Science Hall.

What have you learned in your role as a leader?

I am forever grateful that I’ve had the opportunity to serve as a leader for our Rowan community, as I genuinely believe it has helped me build my character and allowed me and my peers to work towards something we believe in and enjoy! I’ve learned how to adapt to new situations — especially with COVID and having to move to a virtual platform mid-semester, the importance of fostering connections and maintaining good relationships with those individuals, and most importantly I’ve learned that so many people are willing to help you bring your ideas to life or to further the mission of your organization, and for that I cannot thank them enough — whether it be faculty and staff at Rowan or people from industry and academia beyond our own university.

What’s your favorite memory as a leader?

My favorite memory as a leader at Rowan has to be being able to help start new outreach programs through SWE and the College of Engineering. It’s really exciting to be a part of something new that will hopefully continue on over the next several years. Our new outreach program – The SWEET program, or Society of Women – Engineers Engineers in Training, is aimed at introducing middle school students to STEM and engineering and getting females interested in it from early on. Our first summer program is going to run virtually this summer, during the month of August. Our SWE team is really hopeful that we can make a positive impact on these young students and give them the confidence to pursue a career in STEM if that is what they’re interested in.

Who inspires you and why?

As a student conducting research in Dr. Vega’s research lab, someone I look up to and am thankful to have as a mentor is my graduate student on the project, Kirstene Gultian, who is getting her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering. She accomplishes so much in the lab, while working as a teaching assistant, and helping with extra-curricular programs as well. She’s a strong leader within our lab, able to balance a number of different tasks at once, and always willing to help everyone.

Roshni stands next to a glass window inside an academic building on campus.

What’s the most significant barrier to women today?

One of the most significant barriers to women today is still representation of females in industry, in the workspace, and in leadership roles. Without the representation, so many women are not given the opportunity to hold leadership positions when compared to their male counterparts due to implicit biases. As such, I think our newest SWE program that we co-founded with PSEG during my time as president is really great in helping female engineering students make industry connections with successful female engineers already working in industry at PSEG.

The program offers mentorship (pairing of SWE students with PSEG mentors) and career advancement events for our SWE members. Through SWE’s international platform, we get to connect with women engineers from all across the world, who offer mentorship and other resources as well, and it is so inspiring to see how much they have and continue to accomplish.

What advice would you give to the next generation of leaders?

Something I’ve learned during my leadership positions over the past few years is: Don’t be afraid to just ask! Sometimes you’ll have an idea that seems crazy or hard to organize and you won’t be sure how to make it come to life or if anyone will support you in making it happen, but lots of times if you just ask, you can make it happen!

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Story by:
Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations major and 
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

Photos by:
Jabreeah Holmes, senior radio/TV/film major

My Favorite Class: Fahed Shakil’s Junior/Senior Engineering Clinic

Exterior shot of bridge connecting Engineering and Rowan Halls.

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Today we feature Fahed Shakil, a senior Computing and Informatics, Psychology and Liberal Studies triple major. Fahed has concentrations in Cyber SecuritySociology and Applied Computing, and he earned CUGS in Management Information Systems and Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Fahed is a first-generation college student and commutes to Rowan from Gloucester City, NJ (Camden County). 

What was the name of your favorite class at Rowan?

My favorite class at Rowan is my Junior/Senior Engineering Clinic.

What department was the class in?

The class is in the Engineering Department

Fahed poses in a suit with his cords.

Who taught the class when you took it?

Professors Karl Dyer and Mario Leone were my professors for my Junior/Senior Engineering Clinic.

Tell us a little about what the class is.

The class provided students the opportunity to gain and apply knowledge regarding human-centric product development utilizing industry-standard practices. Students were taught how to communicate with clients, understand their vision, needs, and wants, manage expectations, develop/maintain comprehensive documentation, and create a product with the main focus being to ensure client satisfaction.

As a Computing and Informatics, Psychology and Liberal Studies triple major, how did you get into a Junior/Senior Engineering Clinic?

I am not an engineering major, nor do I have any prior formal education in any field of engineering, nor would I satisfy the requirements needed to gain admission into Rowan’s engineering program, let alone be a part of a junior/senior level course. However, over the past four years, I have worked alongside a wide variety of engineering students and observed their world as a member of the Apprentice Engineering Team at Rowan, aka the A-Team, who Mr. Leone and Mr. Dyer manage together to efficiently support various initiatives and operations within the College of Engineering.

I was trying to figure out what to do during my 2019 summer vacation and then I remembered that Mr. Leone and Mr. Dyer were going to be teaching a summer course about project management, human-centric design, and providing students the opportunity to work on projects pitched by clients with the similar expectations as students would experience in a job setting. This sparked my interest out of sheer curiosity of wanting to learn things outside my comfort zone and academic discipline.

About 30 minutes before the start of the first day of the course, I went to Mr. Leone’s office, and luckily Mr. Dyer was present as well. At that moment I asked Mr. Leone and Mr. Dyer if I could sit in on the course throughout the summer and just observe the discussions that were going to take place and try to learn some of the content they were teaching. They allowed me to sit in on the course, and throughout the summer I had a wonderful experience.

Materials in an ECE lab.

Part of what made the experience that made it so memorable was that the ever-looming stress of getting a good grade for the class was non-existent as I was not being graded. The learning was purposeful, applicable to various aspects of life, and downright fun. I was exposed to various software I had never used before, engaged in eye-opening group discussions, and was able to observe the process engineers go through in making an idea into a reality while focusing on a human-centric design.

Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting.

This is a course that you cannot describe the experience you have in words that would fairly justify it. It is something unique, and the real value of the learning that takes place is really evident if you are a part of the A-Team. Based on the description of the class, it seems pretty simple, but there is more to the class than what meets the eye. This class was interesting because the professors stripped away the “status quo” style of teaching. Instead, they opted for a more free-flow style of self-directed learning, similar to the environment that students would be in when they enter the workforce, while still having support from the professors as needed.

It was always a new and exciting day full of learning when you were in this class. One day we could be having an energetic and deep group discussion on a thought-provoking Ted Talk for a while. Another day we could be analyzing human behavior and conducting a group design review of different teams working on various projects.

Is there anything else that made this class impactful?

I’ve never been happy when I was forced to learn in a traditional academic setting as I didn’t like the structure of it. It was akin to squeezing a square cube into a round hole. If you push hard enough you may make it fit, but you’re gonna damage the cube in the process. Eventually, I just began to mildly accept the dismal reality that learning can’t be fun and this is how things just are.

Fast forward to my experiences on The A-Team and the Jr/Sr clinic, that all changed.

After reflecting on a story that exemplifies the idea of never settling for the status quo and the learning that took place within the Clinic, I decided to try something new in one of my classes after observing how students were able to learn through a hands-on experience in the classroom rather than just listening to lectures and doing assignments afterward.

During the Fall 2019 semester, I had to take a class for my Computing & Informatics major, called Introduction to Web Development. I didn’t want to go back to the traditional style of learning in a college class after observing how the learning was done in the Clinic course, so I went to my professor’s, Mr. Darren Provine, office after class and asked him what content he had to teach us by the end of the semester. Professor Provine responded that he had to teach us, HTML, CSS, and Javascript or PHP. After explaining to him that I wanted to try to learn differently by doing a semester-long project in place of what he had already planned on doing, he supported my idea. 

Materials in an ECE clinic lab.

So from that day I engaged myself in a self-directed learning style and worked on my personal project. While everyone else in the class was following the standard routine for the course, I was curiously learning at my own pace. I still attended the professor’s class, but the entire time I’d be working on my project while the professor was teaching. At times when I would hit a roadblock in my project that I couldn’t find a solution to, I’d ask my peers on the A-Team and Professor Provine for advice. Additionally, from time to time, I’d check in with Professor Provine to keep him up to date regarding my progress. At the conclusion of the semester, I presented my project and Professor Provine gave me an “A” as my project had included all the requirements he asked for, as well as, extra concepts that had not been covered in the course. Little did I know, the extra concepts that I had learned and applied in the project were supposed to be taught and applied in my Senior Capstone course in the following semester. 

Thanks to the A-Team and the clinic course, for one of the first times in my life, I was finally happy and excited to learn, as I had finally been exposed to an alternative style of learning which engaged my curiosity and made learning the central focus rather than getting good and meaningless test scores. Additionally, I was able to free up my time that would have otherwise been occupied by the course, learn at my own pace with no stress, and collaborate with my A-Team peers on additional projects that we were working on which enabled us to further our learning that semester.

What makes the professors great?

Professors Dyer & Leone are able to clearly break down and articulate concepts in various ways so nobody is left confused if one explanation didn’t work for everyone. They created a fun and engaging learning environment that made me excited to go back the following day, even though I wasn’t enrolled in the class or an engineer. The professors sparked curiosity in the students who were enrolled in the class and would provide resources and food for thought to help students find answers to their questions rather than just giving them an answer. They were always present and genuinely cared about the work and learning that was being accomplished, as well as, the wellbeing of their students.

What are your professional goals?

At the moment I don’t have any as I am still working on figuring them out. Although, a lifetime goal I have is to keep trying to put a smile on people’s faces.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies, and public relations double major

Student photo provided by:
Fahed Shakil, senior computing and informatics, psychology, and liberal studies triple major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Chemical Engineering Major Jean Han

Jean stands outside in front of a wooded area on campus.

Today, we speak to transfer student Jean Han. Jean is a Chemical Engineering major from Fort Lee, NJ (Bergen County) who transferred from Bergen Community College. She shares with us why she chose Rowan and tells us what she likes about South Jersey.

A portrait photo of Jean.

What are your professional goals? And how is Rowan helping to support you in those goals?

I would like to work in the medical device field or within biotechnology. My major allows me to be qualified for these positions as an engineer. I’ve received a lot of professional advice from my professors and academic advice from my peers.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

I think chemical engineering is a broad field that allows various career paths, all of which are pretty innovating. I would like to contribute to society by improving upon medical technology.

What inspired you to choose your major?

I really enjoyed my high school calculus/chemistry classes and wanted to choose a major that would have me take more courses in both subjects.

Jean wearing a lab coat and a blue mask while working in the lab.
Jean working in the lab.

As a student from North Jersey, how did you become aware of Rowan University?

I Googled top engineering schools, and Rowan popped up as one of them for undergrad.

How long is your trip/drive “home” to North Jersey?

About two hours, an hour and 45 minutes on a good day.

What are some of the benefits for you, living this distance from home?

I’m not distracted by my usual friends or family members. There are less places here to go to.

What are a few interesting or new things (to you) about Rowan’s South Jersey area that you would share with future North Jersey students?

South Jersey seems quieter and less busy than North Jersey. It would be a nice area to chill in without too much distraction for someone who is looking for that kind of environment.

Jean sitting outside the engineering building while wearing a tan sweatshirt.

What off-campus, local fun places do you recommend students check out?

I like going into Pitman. It’s a quaint area with some cafes and restaurants to eat at. I would also recommend going into Philly, of course.

Why did you choose to transfer to Rowan University?

Rowan was the most affordable option for me. I also had a bad impression of other in-state schools.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

We are #RowanPROUD to be included on Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s 2021 Transfer Honor Roll, which recognizes select nationwide colleges and universities that foster dynamic pathways for transfer students.

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Chemical Engineering Major David Aguirre

David outside of the Engineering building.

Tell us a little bit about your favorite class at Rowan so far. My favorite class so far is Chemical Process Component Design (CPCD). It’s a senior-level class where we apply many of the concepts and techniques from previous courses to perform sizing and specification of commonly-used process equipment. It’s really cool to see how […]

#PROFspective: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski

Ashleigh sits on a ledge outside of Engineering Hall.

Today we speak to Ashleigh Jankowski, a sophomore Biomedical Engineering major with a minor in Chemistry from Catonsville, Maryland. 

Ashleigh poses outside of Engineering Hall with her face reflected on a reflective surface.

What is a typical Rowan day for you?

In the morning, I go to do research in Engineering Hall. I do research for Dr. Byrne’s biomedical engineering lab. Usually, after that, throughout the day I have various classes, and I usually grab a quick lunch from the Student Center. Typically, a nap fits in there somewhere. I work in the evenings as a Classroom Support Technician for Rowan’s IRT Department. After I get off work, I either do homework or hang out with my housemates. We watch movies together, play games, bake, and more.

Could you share with us one moment during your time at Rowan that made you feel inspired or confident that you’re in the right major for you?

In doing research with the Byrne Lab, I have realized that majoring in Biomedical Engineering was definitely the right choice for me. We have weekly meetings where fellow teammates present their work. It was in the first of these meetings that I attended where I realized that being a BME is something I genuinely enjoy and can get excited about.

Ashleigh poses outdoors in a wooded area.

Could you tell us a little bit about your transition into Rowan as an incoming student?

I was very nervous but super excited. At first, my transition was rough, but it was self-inflicted. I kept my head down and didn’t go out. But, with the coaxing of my wonderful roommate, I began attending RAH and SUP events, which is where I came out of my shell and met some of my best friends.

What are your professional goals?

I intend to pursue a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering once I complete undergrad, and after that, I intend to pursue a research career in biomedical engineering.

Ashleigh poses by the pond at Engineering Hall.

How has Rowan helped to support you with your professional goals?

Rowan offers so many opportunities to help support me in achieving my educational and professional goals. I am a part of multiple student organizations, including the Society of Women Engineers, Women in Engineering (WIE), and Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), that provide networking opportunities as well as workshops for academic growth. Professors are more than supportive, offering help when needed in class and advice on career-based matters. Getting the opportunity to do research starting my freshman year has also been a big help in supporting my goals. I am learning through experience how to do hands-on research, how to work in a lab team, how to formally present data, and how to write a paper for publication. All of these things are going to benefit me in the long run as I pursue a Ph.D. and a successful biomedical engineering career.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

#PROFspective: Senior Chemical Engineering Major and Transfer Student Bob Patterson

Bob poses on the stairs by the Engineering building.

Today we speak to Bob Patterson, a senior Chemical Engineering major and transfer student from Drexel University. Bob commutes to campus from Philadelphia, PA. 

Bob poses outdoors by the Engineering Pond.

What is a typical Rowan day for you?

On a typical day for me at Rowan pre-COVID, I would spend a lot of time finding parking. Then, I would attend all my classes. In the Chemical Engineering department at Rowan, many classes are structured to emphasize group work, so many times after class you’ll find me with a group in a study room and working on homework, projects, and exam preparation at night.

Could you share with us one moment during your time at Rowan that made you feel inspired or confident that you’re in the right major for you?

It happens all the time! Every time that I’m in class and I learn new chemical engineering concepts, I am reminded that I’m doing something really cool that I love. Rowan affords me those moments daily, from professors and staff who have built something great here.

Transferring from Drexel University (top 40 nationally in Engineering), I can say that the program at Rowan is just as good. Here at Rowan, there are cutting-edge and ample undergraduate research opportunities with a real focus on undergrads. There are many industry partnerships, and the program here at Rowan College of Engineering has been established for a long time.

Every junior and senior chemical engineering class here at Rowan is just as good as what is offered at Drexel, and at less than half the price! Even out of state, my tuition is less than half I was paying at Drexel. If you’re looking for a great engineering education that compares to the expensive private schools, Rowan gives a comparable option at a fraction of the price. The facilities are new, they upgraded the existing building and built another brand-new engineering building a few years ago. Newness matters.

I feel like it won’t be long for Rowan to become a prestigious option as well, they are on the fast track with their curriculum and investments. Take it from someone who was 18, didn’t know any better, and accumulated student loans well over $100k. I’m 31 years old now, and how much debt you accumulate over your 4-year bachelor’s degree matters. Rowan affords you the opportunity to have your cake and eat it, too (great degree and less debt).

Bob sits outside Engineering Hall.

Could you tell us a little bit about your transition into Rowan as an incoming student?

A little nervous, but that’s ok! I’m very simple though, no-frills necessary for my transition. I just got a plan together, signed up for the courses I needed, and I’ll be graduating this summer!

What are your professional goals?

My professional goal is to really make a difference somewhere. A chemical engineering degree opens so many doors that I didn’t have while I took gap years and couldn’t work where I wanted. Eventually, I want to get my Ph.D. and have my own research lab. Like I mentioned earlier, I have a lot of student debt, so I’ll go into the industry, get a high-paying job, cut down on that debt and who knows next from there! With the degree, my future is looking bright!

Bob sits outside Engineering Hall.

How has Rowan helped to support you with your professional goals?

Rowan Engineering has prepared me to go into whatever profession I want. I have learned so much about so many aspects of science, applied physics, cutting edge research, chemical processing, the list goes on. I’m so happy with the opportunity that was given to me here, and I am grateful for how the amazing education has prepared me for what’s ahead.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

#PROFspective: Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rowan After Hours and More

Alex standing outside James Hall in the background.

Today we feature Alexandra Jackson, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major who minors in Mathematics, from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). She lives on campus and is a Resident Assistant, the treasurer of the College Diabetes Network, is involved in Out in STEM (oSTEM) and Catholic Campus Ministry. Tell us about one club, organization or […]

#PROFSpective: Civil and Environmental Engineering Major Muhammad Akhtar

Muhammad standing in front of a pond.

Today we feature first-generation college student Muhammad Akhtar, a senior Civil and Environmental Engineering major. Muhammad is involved in the Rowan American Society of Civil Engineers (Mentorship Chair), Rowan Muslim Student Association (Secretary), Rowan Racquetball (Active Member) and outside of school works as a Structural Engineering intern at HNTB and is a Big Brother with […]

Reppin’ North Jersey: Transfer Student Jean Han

Jean Han standing outside.

Today we speak to senior Chemical Engineering major Jean Han from Fort Lee, NJ (Bergen County). Jean, who also minors in Math, transferred from Bergen Community College and is a part of AIChE. What do you like to do off campus for fun? I like to go into Philadelphia. I also enjoy riding my bike […]

3 Mechanical Engineering Majors Share How Their Major Supports Their Professional Goals

Photo of someone writing on paper.

Today, we hear from three Mechanical Engineering majors on how their major is getting them ready for their professional goals.

Caroline drinking from a mug that says "engineer" and then provides the definition.

“I’d love for my career to improve the relationship between humanity and the planet, and have an impact on the way and efficiency with which we carry out our daily lives.” – Caroline Thistle, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major with an honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Nicholas posing for a portrait photo of himself while wearing a suit.

“My major helps tremendously with what I want to go into after I graduate. I want to be an aerospace engineer. It has been a goal of mine for a few years now. Getting a degree in mechanical engineering will bring me closer to my goal since mechanical and aerospace engineering can go hand-in-hand.” – Nicholas Mastropolo, Senior, First-generation college student, Mechanical Engineering major with a minor in Mathematics, Transfer from RCSJ, Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County)

A portrait photo of Lia.

“My professional goal is to work at Stryker Corp. I have learned that one of my goals in life is for my work to have a positive impact on others. One way for a mechanical engineer to have a positive impact is through designing medical devices. And Stryker’s philosophies and goals completely align with my own.” – Lia Mahoney, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior, music industry major

Beyond The Classroom: Senior Liam Cutri-French On Engineering Opportunities

Liam sitting outside on the Engineering steps.

Today we feature Liam Cutri-French, a senior Civil and Environmental major with an Honors concentration. Liam is from Glen Gardner, NJ (Hunterdon County). He is the local project lead for Engineers Without Borders, a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the Engineering Honors Society. He also stays active on […]

5 Women in Engineering Share Insights on Being Females in a Male-dominated Field

Engineering senior Alex Jackson poses outside on campus.

Today, we speak to five seniors from the College of Engineering about their experiences as women in a predominantly male field.  

A portrait photo of Lia.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field can feel intimidating at times. I want to be seen and treated as an equal but I am aware that people will never treat me like a male, therefore I’ll never be treated like the majority. Even though I have not experienced any out right discrimination I still have my guard up. And it can be very intimidating to be the only female in a class. But I also feel more motivated to do my best and aim high. Being a strong female engineering can be just as or more intimidating as a room full of men.” – Lia Mahoney, senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

Alex posing against a wall and smiling.

“It’s fantastic. Honestly, it’s great. The professors and students all know me, it is easy to make friends because I stand out, I know a lot of people, and I have better relationships with my professors. I have also had the opportunity to connect with the other women which is fantastic. I feel like the department is really rooting for me.” – Alex Jackson, senior, Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a Math minor, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) 

Caroline sitting and smiling on her bed in her bedroom.

“Being the only person who looks like you in a classroom is tough, especially when you also have to provide the feminine insight for a product or service you’re designing. Impostor syndrome kicks in, and you constantly feel like you’re not good enough or you’re the only person who feels anxious or intimidated. It feels like everyone else knows way more than you and is constantly studying and you feel like you need to overcompensate to feel adequate. It’s very frustrating, but being able to bring a fresh perspective and excelling for yourself is incredibly rewarding.” – Caroline Thistle, senior, Mechanical Engineering major with a Honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Julia posing for a photo.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field is rewarding and allows us to show we are capable of doing any career we want. It is important to stand your ground and remain confident in yourself.” – Julia Bally, senior, Biomedical Engineering major with Honors concentration, Sparta, NJ (Sussex County) 

Alexa smiling and holding an apple in an apple orchard.

“My one piece of advice for women entering a male-dominated field like chemical engineering is to be confident in your abilities. If you find yourself the only female in the group, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty — set off the bottle rocket, build the turbine, test the reaction! Henry M. Rowan once said, ‘What this country needs is not more engineers, but more great engineers.’ Rowan has taught me that great engineers, both male and female, share their knowledge and skills to ultimately achieve their goal as one.”  – Alexa Lynch, senior, Chemical Engineering major, Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) 

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

7 Biomedical Engineering Majors Share One Cool Thing About Their Major

Biomedical engineering student in the lab.

Application, research and … a games competition? Upperclassmen from Rowan’s Biomedical Engineering program share what they’ve discovered in their major.

Lauren sitting outside on campus.

“The coolest thing about Rowan’s biomedical engineering department is the annual BMES [Biomedical Engineering Society] Games Competition! This outdoor sports competition is hosted annually during the fall semester, and it gives students and professors the ability to bond outside of the classroom.” – Lauren Repmann, junior, Biomedical Engineering with a Chemistry minor, Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County)

AJ studying on his laptop in a study room.

“One cool thing about my major is that there are different tracks you can follow as a BME to help guide what upper-level BME classes to take. But at the same time, the Rowan BME department understands that everyone is different and has different goals. If none of those tracks lines up with what you what you’re looking to do as a career, the advising staff at Rowan is always flexible in helping you figure out what the right path is for you.” – AJ Pingol, senior, Biomedical Engineering major (Pre-Med), Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County)

Hannah posing for a selfie.

“All of the microbiology and how it interacts with medicines and implants. You tend to only think of things on the big scale, so I thought it was interesting to learn how things work on the cellular level. It has definitely made me more curious, and I have started reading how medications work on the cellular level every time I learn about a new one.” – Hannah Doyle, Biomedical Engineering major, senior, Seaford, Delaware

Gatha smiling for a picture while wearing a Rowan Proud shirt.

“Biomedical Engineering has so much to offer including applications in tissue engineering, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, pharmaceutical engineering and therapeutic delivery, orthopedic engineering, and bio mechanics.” – Gatha Adhikari, senior, Biomedical Engineering major, first-generation college student, Begnastal, Nepal

Brandon posing for a picture while wearing his Rowan University PROS shirt.

“One cool thing is that we normally have a very small graduating class. Since there are so few of us, the faculty and staff develop a great personal relationship with each and every student.” – Brandon Hickson, junior, Biomedical Engineering major, Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)

Katie sitting on a bench with foliage in the background.

“One cool thing I’ve learned is how ears transduce sound. I was actually reading the wrong chapter in the textbook for a homework assignment and I was confused because we had been working on the muscular system and I wasn’t sure what hearing had to do with that but it was so interesting I finished the whole section. I definitely recommend doing some research about it because it is super complicated but really interesting.” – Katie Driscoll, junior, Biomedical Engineering major with minors in Chemistry, History, and Arabic and concentrations in Honors College and Global Health, Durango, Colorado

Danny posing with a friend in the rec center.

“That research can come from anyone, including undergrads.” – Danny Tepper (seen at left), senior, Biomedical Engineering major, transfer from Atlantic Cape Community College, Glassboro, NJ (Gloucester County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

8 Chemical Engineering Majors Share the WOW Moment in Their Majors

Chemical engineering student works in lab.

Today, eight Chemical Engineering majors share their “WOW! I’m in the right major for me!” moments.

Dylan sitting on the steps of the engineering building.

“Well, it turned out my physics teacher was right. Most of everything that I’ve learned is intuitive to me, whether it is in engineering or chemistry. Quite honestly, I catch myself accidentally memorizing equations and information before I go to study.” – Dylan Snyder, sophomore Chemical Engineering major from Wilmington, Delaware

Tori posing with a sign that says "AlChe".

“Once I visited Rowan and heard about the program I knew it was right for me.” – Tori Vanduren, senior Chemical Engineering major from Kutztown, PA

Margot smiling and wearing lab gear.

“Learning about how the healthcare industry and engineering can intersect in a chemical engineer’s career fascinated me.” – Margot Clarke, senior, Chemical Engineering major with a concentration in Biomedical Engineering and Honors Studies, minor in Chemistry, and CUGS in Spanish, from Delran, NJ (Burlington County)

Alyssa posing in a scenic area on a bridge.

“I love science and math.” – Alyssa Grassie, senior, first-generation, Chemical Engineering major and Mathematics minor, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

A black and white photo of Jenna smiling.

“I knew this was the right major for me by making friends in my major that love and get excited about the same weird things as me. Just when you walk outside and the humidity makes you think about the topics discussed in class, your mind goes on a tangent, and then you stop yourself (and think ‘Wow I am weird’). But the next day a friend tells you how they did a similar thing. When that happens, it just makes you feel understood and at home.” – Jenna Wyshinski, Senior, Chemical Engineering major with a minor in Business Administration, from Pennsville, NJ (Salem County)

Courtney posing with a Rowan shirt inside the Wilson Hall building.

“Sophomore year, I had the opportunity to work as a research assistant in Dr. Stanzione’s lab. Getting to experience so many applications of chemical engineering and material synthesis was such a cool experience and made me realize that I am right where I am supposed to be.” – Courtney Lemasney, junior, Chemical Engineering major, Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Rebecca sitting and smiling on the floor.

“When I started taking classes my freshman year and genuinely enjoyed what I was learning.” – Rebecca Hansson, senior Chemical Engineering major from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

A chemical engineering lab.

“Actually making alum in chem lab.” – Evan Harper (not pictured), sophomore Chemical Engineering major working toward minors in Chemistry and Mathematics, Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

#PROFspective: Learning by Doing with Engineering Major Nicholas Kreuz

Nick stands outside in front of green tree foliage.

Nicholas Kreuz working on electronics in an engineering lab.

Today we speak to junior Nicholas Kreuz, an Electrical and Computer Engineering major from Pennsylvania. Here, Nick shares his Rowan experience through his work in Engineering Clinics, including creating a quadcopter drone and a rocket, which he will enter into a competition in New Mexico. 

Nicholas Kreuz of Quakertown, Pennsylvania is the epitome of “involved” at Rowan. He has an on-campus job as a building manager for Campus Recreation while also being a part of Alpha Phi Delta Fraternity.

Nick is on track to get his bachelor’s degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering. His goal with this degree is to work in the field of aerospace engineering. Nick said he “would love to work for a company like Boeing or Lockheed Martin” when he is finished at Rowan. 

Nick grew an interest in engineering at an early age due to his desire to be very “hands-on and technically oriented.” He said throughout middle school and high school he knew he would want to pursue something involving engineering, but it wasn’t until he arrived at Rowan that he became interested in the electrical and computer engineering aspect to it.

“When I came to this college in particular I really liked how they combined the two majors into one and really had a hands-on focus to their curriculum, especially the clinical classes through the engineering building,” Nick says.

Engineering student Nicholas Kreuz poses sitting down with his hands on top of one another.

Engineering Clinics are the signature aspect of Rowan’s engineering programs. For all four years, engineering students participate in these clinic classes, which involve various hands-on projects. With the guidance of a credentialed engineer, students in groups have the opportunity to learn by doing. 

One of the things that Nick has accomplished in a clinic class involved “constructing and testing a fully submersible Underwater Remote Operated Vehicle (UROV).” Kreuz explains the concept of the project and what was asked of him and his group:

“We had to simulate a task that a UROV in the field would have to do. For example, work on an oil rig and go to the seafloor to examine something. So we had this obstacle course set up and had a basic system of motors and a receiver that we could use that would be the actual operation of the vehicle but as far as constructing the vehicle and designing it to complete all its tasks was completely up to us.”

One semester later, Nick was tasked with creating a “Quadcopter Drone,” which unfortunately he was not able to finish once all students were sent home for Covid-19. He says this project’s objective was a similar concept to the UROV because there was a certain task that the drone had to perform. Like his last project, this too was going to be tested on an obstacle course that was meant to simulate a real-life situation. 

Perhaps the most impressive part of Kreuz’s college career so far is his most recent endeavor. Nick is a part of a team with nine other students and one professor to build a rocket and compete in the Intercollegiate Rocket Engineering Competition in New Mexico. 

Nick Kreuz poses and smiles outdoors.

This is a yearly competition that hosts around 40-50 schools in a desert in New Mexico. Anyone who is a part of a college or university is allowed to enter the competition. Teams at the competitions will test their rockets in front of a group of judges. 

“The way it works is they judge us on our documentation, our predictions, and our calculations, and the second half of the competition comes from how well our rocket actually performs,” Nick says.

Projects in the engineering clinics can be so involved and advanced that they can last as long as five years. Nick will work on this one through this entire school year, and the competition in New Mexico will take place after next semester. 

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Story by:
Luke Garcia, junior music industry major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Grad Student Jamal M. Samah on Earning His Master’s in Engineering Management Fully Online

Jamal sitting outside the business building.

Today, we speak to Jamal Samah, a Rowan Global student in the Engineering Management master’s program from Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County). He earned his Mechanical Engineering undergraduate degree at the University of Pittsburgh but decided that Rowan’s graduate program was the right fit for him. He tells us more about his online program and why he chose Rowan.

Jamal sitting outside Business Hall on Rowan's campus.

“I chose to pursue a master’s in engineering management because I work in a business office and want to grow and move into a management position,” Jamal says.

What inspired Jamal to pursue the master’s program in Engineering Management was the combination of engineering and business he’s noticed as he progresses in his career. He currently works in Philadelphia and looks forward to furthering his career into management.

He was part of the online master’s program even before COVID-19 and finds it suits his lifestyle — the online program works around his schedule. 

Jamal sitting outside Business Hall on Rowan's campus.

When asked why he chose Rowan, Jamal shares: “I like having a college that’s local … and some of the other programs I just found were a little too expensive. So, it was a combination of cost and location.

I have three courses left. They’re 100% online, which benefits me because I get the flexibility. You have all your lectures online. If I have to stay up to midnight, I can do that. The faculty supports me even more than when I went for my undergrad. I can send an email and they’ll get back to me at any time. I don’t have to worry about office hours. I like the online format.”

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

#PROFspective: Meet Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Bhavik Malkani

Bhavik sits on the steps of Engineering Hall wearing a mask.

Meet Bhavik Malkani, a junior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Systems Engineering and an Honors Concentration at Rowan University. Bhavik is a first-generation college student from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County). Bhavik is a part of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Phi Kappa Psi and Honors College. Here, he shares his experience as a Prof thus far. 

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that make you feel like Rowan is home.

One of the biggest organizations that made me feel like Rowan is my home is Residential Life and University Housing or RLUH. Ever since becoming a Resident Assistant (RA), I have felt like I truly have a home here. Everyone within RLUH has made me feel like family, and it was definitely one of the best decisions I have made so far in my college career.

Bhavik smiling on Engineering Hall steps.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you?

I think Rowan being a welcoming environment started with orientation, along with the PROS and other orientation staff who made that experience possible. I met people who immediately made me feel welcome and am still friends with today.

What’s your favorite thing about one typical day at Rowan for you?

My favorite thing about one typical day at Rowan is being able to see my friends.

What is one thing about Rowan that was a happy surprise for you?

One thing about Rowan that was a happy surprise for me was how active campus was along with how many events are put on throughout the semesters.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a professor or staff member in which you felt like they truly cared about your well-being.

I was a sophomore and concerned about my academic success as well as my choice of major. I talked to a couple professors together after class for a few weeks, and they gave me many study suggestions as well as encouraged me to stick with my current major. They showed me that I could earn my degree and be successful.

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major 

Beyond the Classroom: Up in the Air with Mechanical Engineering Major and Pilot Jay Petersen

Jay posing next to a small private plane.

Today, we speak to Jay Petersen, a sophomore Mechanical Engineering major from Edison, NJ (Middlesex County). Jay is an on-campus resident and a fourth-generation college student! Jay tells us more about himself, his major and when he’s not in the classroom, his passion for flying.

How did you find Rowan?

My parents had me work with college counselors my Junior year of high school and they really encouraged me to focus on a school that matches my personality and interests. I had the chance to attend Purdue but being born and raised in NJ, I’m very rooted here. Rowan also felt more like home. The campus wasn’t overwhelming, the staff was incredibly nice and welcoming.  It was an experience that made me feel very comfortable. I didn’t experience that same attention and sincereness from the other big schools.  At Rowan I’m not just a number but I’m a member of a community — especially with the honors program I’m in!

Why did you choose your major?

Ever since I was young I knew I wanted to be an engineer like my dad. It’s all I’ve been around my whole life and his work motivated me to explore this option further. I contemplated a focus in medicine but in the end, engineering just aligned more to my interests.

How did you come to find your interest in flying? Did anyone push you in the right direction?

It all really started with a test flight that my parents gifted me for my 17th birthday but aeronautics has always fascinated me. Whether it’s figuring out how they put a plane together or actually getting it in the air, the whole process is intriguing. Who knows, I may end up using my degree to get into that field long term, but flying just seemed like a natural skill to obtain. Something about knowing you’re in control of this machine and figuring out how to get yourself off the ground is amazing. 

Mechanical engineering major Jay flying a plane over New York City.

Do you fly over campus often?

Yes, I try to fly by about once a month. I also try to do as many cross-country flights as possible. That’s when you fly from one airport to another that is at least 75 miles away. This gives me practice in my communications with air traffic control for neighboring commercial airports.  The further you can fly in one trip, the more confident you feel.

A picture of Rowan's campus taken from Jay's plane.
Jay captured this aerial view of Rowan’s Glassboro campus.

What’s the best part about becoming a pilot?

It’s a sense of accomplishment and the freedom to go wherever I want without the Jersey traffic! Knowing I can achieve this and pass a six-hour FAA exam makes me feel like I can do much more in life. Sky’s the limit! (pun intended).

Any advice to students or those looking into getting a private pilot license or learning to fly?

Find the right school. Having an instructor that is committed to you and your goal is very important. Also make sure you are going to be able to invest the time and money. I was very fortunate to have my parents support me financially and mentally so that really did help me get through it. It’s not easy to balance this goal with school so try to do it in your summer months.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos provided by:
Jay Petersen, sophomore mechanical engineering major

Passing the Torch: Second-generation Rowan Grad Offers Advice

Front of Bunce Hall in the backrground and Don's cap in the foreground

“Take advantage of everything that’s available to you here,” says Don Stahlberger, a recent Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate from Pittgrove, NJ (Salem County). His mom, Lisa, graduated from the College of Education when Rowan was then Glassboro State College. 

Don in the center with his parents on either side in front of Bunce Hall

“We have access to a lot of equipment and resources that a lot of people don’t have,” Don says. “Learn as much as you can about it because it will help you when you go to look for a job.”

Don should know: he’s already secured a position with the IT firm Innovative Defense Technologies and will soon relocate to Arlington, Virginia. 

He notes his favorite class within the College of Engineering was Computer Architecture. 

“We basically built a computer processor from the ground up, and it taught me a lot about my major and it was just really insightful,” Don explains. 

Don holding graduation balloons in front of Bunce Hall

As he leaves campus for the last time as an undergrad, Don says, “Rowan has been awesome. If I had to go back and do it all again … I’d pick Rowan again.”

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Future In Roller Coaster Design for Mechanical Engineering Grad Matthew Mazalewski

four grads toss their hat.

Meet Matthew Mazalewski a graduating senior who majored in Matthew Mazalewski pops champagne.mechanical engineering. Matthew lives with his three engineering roommates (above) for all four years at Rowan

Favorite Classroom Experience: Finishing thermal/fluids systems was a huge accomplishment that I’m sure many mechanical engineers (MechE’s) can relate to.

How Did You Meet Your Roommates? I simply reached out to a random person and asked them if they like their room frigid year around, and if they liked cranberry juice. Weird questions, right? But, both of those answers were a yes and we’ve been close friends ever since. 

As for my friend group, we all shared the  similar drive, passion, and interest that was needed to succeed in such a challenging, yet rewording major and career. 

four grads jump in commencement attire.
Matthew Mazalewski, far right, with his fellow mechanical engineering classmates.

Career Aspirations: I want to create/design, build, and program awesome roller coasters and jaw dropping themed attractions. Stay tuned!

Shout outs! Of course, I wouldn’t be where I am today without my friends, family, advisors and my mentors. Words can’t describe how thankful I am for everything that everyone has done. Thank you all!

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Senior Reflects: Jonathan DeLair Celebrates Commencement with Fellow Engineers — from a Safe Distance

4 rowan grads jump in graduation attire.

Meet Jonathan DeLair, a graduating senior from Piscataway, NJ Jon poses for a commencement portrait.(Middlesex County) who majored in mechanical engineering. He and his closest engineering friends met at Bunce Hall for a social distancing graduation farewell.

Favorite Class Memory: My favorite moment would have to be when my partner and I got the air engine we built from scratch to run great after a real bad failure in Dr. Bhatia’s TFS II class.

How did you meet your closest friends: I met Matt my freshman year on GroupMe. We were both searching for a roommate and we decided to be roommates because we both loved cranberry juice and cold rooms. We’ve been roommates/apartment mates for 4 years.

four graduates throw their caps in front of bunce hall.
Kristin, Jonathan, Matt and Dominick toss their graduation caps.

Career Aspirations: I aspire to be a successful engineer in my professional life and maybe even secure higher management roles in the future.

Shout outs: I first want to thank my parents, without them I wouldn’t be where I am or who I am today. I also would like to thank the rest of my family and friends I’ve met for believing in me and being there along the way. Lastly, I’d like to thank all the staff at Rowan for bringing love and hard work to class and for giving us the tools we need to handle the professional world.

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Senior Mechanical Engineering Major Launches Career, Looks Back on Rowan Experience

Senior mechanical engineering major Jason Fisch

Meet Jason Fisch, a graduating senior majoring in Mechanical Engineering from Camden County, NJ who lives on campus on Rowan Boulevard. Jason shares a few highlights from his Rowan career and has several people to thank along the way. 

Tell us about a favorite experience in one of your classes.

My favorite memory in one of my classes would be the Air Engine Project in my junior year TFS [Thermal-Fluid Sciences] class. Over two semesters, mechanical engineering students work in groups to fabricate their own engine, which runs on compressed air. It was a very challenging but rewarding project.

Mechanical engineering major Jason Fisch in front of a Rowan Student Government Association sign

What was your favorite or most meaningful personal moment at Rowan? 

My most meaningful moment at Rowan was being elected as the SGA [Student Government Association] Executive Vice President by the student body. It was such an honor to serve the undergraduate population, clubs, and organizations this past year, and I learned a lot along the way.

What are your career aspirations and how did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with those aspirations?

Upon graduation, I will be working as a strategy analyst at Accenture. Rowan’s interdisciplinary and project-based learning allowed me to grow into the leader I am today and build critical thinking and problem solving skills, which I will use throughout my career.

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors? 

Mechanical engineering major Jason Fisch and his family on vacationI’d like to thank my parents and my brother Jared for supporting me and pushing me to achieve my goals and aspirations at Rowan. I have had many amazing professors and got to know some fantastic administrators.

While I cannot thank them all individually here, I’d like to give a shout out to Dr. Lowman, Dr. Tinnin, Professor Amadoro, Dr. Jha, Dr. Ik Jae Lee and Dr. Krchnavek. Every faculty member at Rowan that I have had the chance to interact with over my four amazing years has had a positive impact on my life.

Mechanical engineering major Jason Fisch in Zion National Park
Jason, seen here at the summit of Angels Landing in Utah’s Zion National Park, will embark on new adventures after graduation.

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Meet #Rowan2024: Location & Major Key for Chinmayee Narayan

drone view of campus highlighting Holly Pointe Commons.

Today we feature incoming freshman Chinmayee Narayan, from Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County) who will be a biomedical engineering major and live on campus. 

Why Rowan?
I chose Rowan because of the amazing biomedical engineering program as well as the campus environment. Rowan is its own little niche in Glassboro, a home away from home! The staff has also shown how much they care and want to help from the start and I’m beyond excited to get to be a part of the College of Engineering.

Chinmayee stands in front of a high school graduation sign, wearing a Rowan shirt.

What are a few things you are looking forward to next year at Rowan?
I look forward to meeting new friends and joining clubs! I’m excited to be living on campus and I can’t wait to have late night study sessions with friends.

How or why did you choose your major?
I chose biomedical engineering as my major because it’s such an innovative and prominent field in medicine. As a society we can’t progress medically without the research and technology created by biomedical engineers. It’s such a diverse field and there’s so many options in terms of areas of focus!Chimayee proudly wears a Rowan shirt.

Why did you choose a university that is close to home?
I chose a university close to home so that I can still be close to my family and still be involved in my community back home. Rowan is perfect because it’s like its own little area away from home, but close enough that I can feel at home too!

What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan? (Or a new one you’d like to try?)
Something I’d like to continue from high school is playing my instrument! I’d also like to hopefully pick up swimming again, something I used to do competitively a few years ago.

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Meet #Rowan2024: Biomedical Engineering Major Ariana Torres

Ariana posing against a white wall.

Today we feature incoming freshman Ariana Torres, a first generation college student and Biomedical Engineering major from Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County) who plans to commute to campus. 

Ariana poses in her Rowan gear against a white wall.

What are a few things you are looking forward to next year at Rowan? Something I look forward to doing at Rowan is joining plenty of clubs and really being involved in school activities. 

How or why did you choose your major? I chose biomedical engineering to be my major because I took a campus tour of the engineering department when I was in eighth grade. Once the Admissions Ambassadors showed us the biomedical engineering aspects, I fell in love with the program and knew that’s  what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.

Ariana poses in her Rowan gear against a white wall.Why did you choose a university that is close to home? I chose a university that was close to home because I didn’t want to move too far away from home but I wanted some kind of commute to make me more independent.

What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan? I hope that I can continue to play softball at Rowan. I also hope to join some more clubs and activities.

Why Rowan? I chose Rowan because from the first time I toured, I knew that it was going to be my home for the next four years after high school. The school was perfect in my eyes and I never had a doubt about choosing Rowan.

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Organized by:
Rachel Rumsby, freshman communication studies and public relations double major

Meet #Rowan2024: Student Athlete Shane Vostenak

A stock image of a close up of running feet.

Today we feature Shane Vostenak, an incoming freshman from Delran, NJ (Burlington County) who will live on campus and major in mechanical engineering.

Shane stands holding a homemade sign that says Rowan2024.

What are a few things you’re looking forward to next year at Rowan?
Next year I’m looking forward to meeting my new teammates on the cross country and track team and getting to know all my professors and classmates. I’m really excited to be on my own and have a sense of self-sufficiency. I think it will be a challenge but one that really brings excitement. I’m also looking forward to learning new and interesting things about my major and about how the world around me functions. 

Why did you choose your major?
I chose mechanical engineering because I have always been the kid that wanted to tinker and find out how and why things worked in a mechanical/physical sense. I would always take apart random things in my house to see what made them tick. Most times I couldn’t get them to go back together the right way but it was the interest that made me choose this major.

Why did you choose a university close to home?
The fact that Rowan is close to my house is comforting but it was too major of a factor for me. I plan on staying on campus most of the time and really enjoying the new freedom and trying to really soak up the college experience. However it’s nice to know that if need be I could be home in less than an hour.Shane wears his cross country uniform.

What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan?
As I said above I will be running for Rowan’s cross country and track team and I’m really hopeful to grow a lot as a person and as a runner in my four years. Another club however I might like to join is an investment club if one is available. At my high school we didn’t have one of these but in the past year I have become more and more interested in the stock market and how money circulates the country and the world.

Why Rowan?
Rowan for me was the right school because of its value. I see it as the right bang for my buck sort of. It’s is one of the top engineering schools that I know of and it is half the price of most other colleges I looked at. I also fell in the love with the new updates that the school has made to the engineering building and all the advancements that have been made to increase the technology and modernity of the supplies.

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Meet #Rowan2024: Mullica Hill’s Grace Harris

Grace Harris: Freshman Voices

Today we feature incoming freshman Grace Harris, an electrical and computer engineering major from Mullica Hill, New Jersey (Gloucester County) who will commute to campus.

What are a few things you’re looking forward to at Rowan next year?
I’m looking forward to making friends and making all the memories that come with being a college student! I’m also excited to work with faculty who are respected leaders in their fields, and network with other people my age who share the same interests and passions. 

How or why did you choose your major?
There are so many different reasons I could give! However, my primary motivation for choosing my major is because electrical and computer engineers have left their mark all over modern society with innovations that have transformed our world, from computers to cell phones to electric power and everything in between. Engineers will undoubtedly continue to leave their fingerprints all over technology and play a vital role in shaping the future. Being able to take part in this digital renaissance is an exciting prospect for me, and I can’t imagine anything else I’d rather be working towards, at least in my academic major and career.

Grace smiles toward the camera, wearing a flannel.

Why did you choose a university close to home?
The convenience of remaining close to family and friends I have in the area, while at the same time immersing myself in the college experience, appealed to me very much!

Why Rowan?
There are several reasons I chose Rowan. Rowan was more affordable than the vast majority of other college options I’d considered before, and it didn’t hurt that I lived close enough to Rowan to easily commute. However, the major deciding factor for me was the quality of the Electrical and Computer Engineering program, which is ranked #15 in the nation in the US News Best Colleges report. The prospect of attending a nationally recognized engineering program that is affordable and close to home was an opportunity I simply couldn’t pass up! 

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How Construction Management Major Jeremiah Cason Earned a Degree From Across the Country

Photo of a banner located in the College of Engineering.

Jeremiah takes a selfie at a construction site.Name: Jeremiah Ryan Cason

Class of: 2019

Degree: B.A. in Construction Management

Hometown and county: I live in Beaumont, CA with my wife and 3 kids.

First-generation college student? Yes, I am the first student in my family to earn a bachelor’s degree.

What inspired you to choose Construction Management?

Honestly, it was the need to provide for my family that caused me to enter the field. Money as a union tradesman was good, and I knew I was good at building things and putting things together with my hands. It felt natural and I have excelled at the field of construction. I now work for the 4th largest general construction management firm in the U.S. I love seeing the final result of a project and knowing I was a part of the greater picture. I feel like a conductor of a concert hall music symphony, and I love knowing I made this group of people come together to make a beautiful sounds (or building).

Jeremiah poses with a coworker.What would you share with a future student interested in Construction Management?

This program is a great way to get your feet and mind into this line of work. The teachers are great, and they have amazing experience in the line of work that they can offer great advice and even suggestions on paths toward future employment. However, don’t go into construction management unless you understand it is challenging, stressful, and you work a lot of hours. There are a lot of times where you are going to struggle to and even fail, but that is how you learn and become better and grow.

Did you ever have a moment of uncertainty within your major? How did you get through the challenge?

I never had any uncertainty, I was and am fully invested in this line of work. I have poured myself into this career. I did not go to college like most at a young age, I went back to school in my 30s to finish my degree after I had already started my path in construction. I knew I wanted to advance and I knew I was going to need a degree to do it, so I had to go back to school.

Did you feel supported throughout your college career by the Rowan community? 

I took a study abroad class and got to meet some Rowan students face-to-face for the first time. I live in Beaumont, CA and I never got to meet anyone or even any teachers at Rowan until this study abroad class. Not only did the students and teachers from the study abroad class embrace me and help me, they have all been there for me after the class and given me help and advice after in other classes as well. If fact, Dr. Hague from the WWII Study abroad class and I have stayed in touch since my graduation and we still text back and forth. My fellow students (Dan Cirino) even came to graduation and gave me a personal tour of the campus during my trip out to Rowan [for] graduation.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

I think my line of work (and what I do) is the cornerstone of building America’s infrastructure. I am proud of what I do, and I look forward to being a part of my line of work in the years to come because I think methods for construction are going to get very high tech and demanding for new, “greener,” methods to improve building life cycles and reducing waste in the industry.

What is your biggest career accomplishment so far?Jeremiah takes a selfie with his family in Hong Kong, Korea.

Aside from providing for my family (because that was my whole motivation and drive when I started my line of work), I think it was, and is, earning my degree. I think that it’s going to open doors to finally get to the next step and place in my career. Not only that, but I also felt so blessed and proud that my family (especially my children) got to see me earn my degree. My kids now know that you can never be too old to go back to school and better yourself and your chances at advancing your career.

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Story by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

Photos courtesy of Jeremiah Cason

Alumni Success: Chemical Engineering Major Brad Johnson

a drone photo of engineering hall at sunset.

Brad Johnson is a Chemical Engineering alumnus from the Class of 2016, from Langhorne, PA (Bucks County). Brad was part of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society, University Orchestra, String Ensemble and Republican Club. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate for the Department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.

What inspired you to choose Chemical Engineering?Brad Johnson lecturing in a chemical engineering room.

“In high school I was interested in chemistry and, in particular, physics. I was drawn to engineering in general because of its hands-on nature and emphasis on applying scientific principles to improve the world.”

What would you share with a future student interested in Chemical Engineering?

“Chemical engineering unit operations and processes are pretty cool. There are so many inventive ways to transport, transform, separate and combine different materials.”

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

“Chemical engineers have a hand in developing and producing almost anything you can imagine: energy, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, food and advanced materials to name a few. We excel at process modeling, utilizing math, chemistry and physics to create products in a safe and economical fashion.

“My sub-field is process systems engineering. We develop and apply rigorous mathematical optimization and modeling methods to improve the design, operation and control of chemical engineering processes.”

Can you share a current research project you’re working on?

“I’m currently developing computationally efficient dynamic models for powder flow in pharmaceutical drug product continuous manufacturing. For example, one model leverages our knowledge of powder properties to predict how fast a powder can be fed through different screw feeders and under different process conditions. Predictive models can speed up a new drug’s time to market by reducing the need for experimental data to begin process development.”

What is your biggest academic/career accomplishment so far?

“Successfully proposing my thesis, ‘Theory and Application in Best Subset Selection and Constrained Regression,’ last September.”

Tell us about your transition into graduate school and how you pushed through any challenges.

Exterior shot of Engineering pond“The biggest difference between undergraduate coursework and graduate research is the switch from solving curated, self-contained problems with well-tested methods to having to pose your own problems and solutions with no guarantee they will work. This difference, in part, made it challenging to transition my strong undergraduate work ethic into my graduate work. To combat this, I’ve scheduled a period of time each day to focus on meeting small research goals. This helps me keep momentum even when unexpected challenges arise.”

Do you have any plans after graduation? 

“I don’t have firm plans for after graduation. In the future, I hope to continue developing technical software and algorithms. I’d also like to help teach the next generation of engineers.”

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Story by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

Alumni Success: Staff Engineer for Hershey Company’s Reese Plant Christopher Dromgoole

Christopher Dromgoole, a chemical engineering alumnus, graduated with his B.S. in 2000 and M.S. in 2003. He is from Gloucester Township, NJ (Camden County). During his time at Rowan, he was an Undergraduate Lab Assistant and Graduate Assistant. He is a Staff Engineer at The Hershey Company’s Reese Plant. 

Chris Dromgoole smiles for a selfie on the beach.What would you share with a future student interested in Chemical Engineering?

“There are many career opportunities and pathways to choose from for those with a Chemical Engineering degree such as: food and beverage, pharmaceutical, energy, medical, legal and sales.  Don’t just focus on the word ‘chemical’!”

Did you ever have a moment of uncertainty within your major? How did you get through the challenge?

“Sure, Chemical Engineering was difficult and required a lot of hard work, which made me question whether I really wanted to be an engineer. The key for me to overcome this challenge was to maintain focus and persevere through the rough times knowing that graduation was right on the horizon.”

Did you feel supported throughout your college career by the Rowan community? If so, explain.

“Yes, I most definitely felt supported by the Rowan community, especially my professors and classmates. I was part of the first graduating engineering class, so at that time, the program was small and each semester only had one section per course due to the minimal amount of faculty. This forced our class to be together for every required course, and we became like a second family. If anyone had trouble understanding classwork, homework or projects, there was always someone willing to sit down and explain things differently in hopes of making you understand.”

Chris Dromgoole poses with his children.Tell us about your transition into the work field and how you pushed through any challenges.

“I had a relatively smooth transition into the work field having been well prepared by learning how to work in teams during my various Rowan Engineering Clinic projects. As an engineer, one of the most important skills that you will need to learn is how to effectively troubleshoot an issue or a problem. This skill will greatly improve over time as you become immersed within your field of concentration or industry, but as a new engineer, you can’t be afraid or too proud to ask others for help or advice…”

What is your biggest career accomplishment so far?

“My biggest career accomplishment so far was the commercialization of the Hershey’s Air Delight Bars and Kisses. I worked together with the marketing and product development teams to create and scale up the production of aerated milk chocolate products in multiple plants that were located within different countries.”

How did you begin working for Hershey?

“I believe that working on one of my Senior Engineering Clinic projects, which was the reassembly of a donated, Specialty Chemical Pilot Plant, helped me to stand out from other Chemical Engineering candidates that applied for the entry level position of Associate Process Design Engineer. The clinic project had required me to learn how to read Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs) and Process & Instrumentation Diagrams (P&IDs), which was needed for the role at Hershey.”

Can you explain your duties for the External Advisory Board?

“I help to advise the Rowan University Chemical Engineering department on ways that they could improve their curriculum based on the skills that are needed and preferred for the Food & Beverage Industry.”

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VISIT CAMPUS

Story by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

Photos courtesy of Christopher Dromgoole.

Faculty PROFile: Experiential Engineering Education Department’s Dr. Kaitlin Mallouk

Professor sits at her desk, hands clasped

Meet Dr. Kaitlin Mallouk, Assistant Professor within the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering

What is your area of expertise? Currently, my main area of expertise is engineering education pedagogy – basically, what are the best ways of teaching engineering students. I am also working on developing expertise in faculty development and leadership practices and diversity, equity, and inclusion in engineering education. These new areas have synergies with each other and with my existing expertise, so I’m very excited to learn Dr. Mallouk sits at her desk in Rowan Hall.more.

Share an “aha!” moment that you’ve had within your discipline that made you feel passionate about your field. A few years ago, I championed the inclusion of weekly reflections in our first-semester first-year engineering clinic course that all engineering students take. As I began reading my students’ first reflections, I was struck by how many of them so clearly needed an outlet beyond what we typically provide in engineering (i.e., problem sets and lab reports). Their reflections were personal and honest and gave me a window into their lives that I don’t normally get. It reminded me that our students are whole people, and I had newfound motivation to provide them the best classroom experience I could.

Describe for us an experience you’ve had with a student that made you feel excited about educating the next generation in your field. I developed a project for our first-year engineering clinic class during which students learn about Net Zero Energy buildings and sustainability – we talk about solar power, heat transfer, and low energy appliances in the context of the engineering basics students are learning (like engineering economics). I think the project is super interesting and relevant, but I was so gratified when a student emailed me after the semester was over to let me know that his internship was going to require him to analyze solar panels and energy reduction measures and that he felt totally confident going into the internship having worked on the Net Zero project in my class! Our current students are the people who will be solving the most challenging engineering problems our society has ever faced and I’m proud that I can contribute to their development as engineers and people.

What is one thing you wish people knew about your academic discipline or your research focus? Just because a particular way of teaching/learning things worked for you doesn’t mean it works for everyone (or even the majority of people). Our education system has been designed to select for particular strengths, which means we’re missing out on a huge amount of talent that doesn’t happen to thrive in our current system.

What is a current project you and your students are working on? I have several students working on analyzing the reflections our first-year students are writing in their engineering clinic course. We are taking a few different approaches to this work—one is to try to understand how students think about the entrepreneurial mindset (curiosity, connections, creating value) and another is investigating how students conceptualize themselves as learners based on their responses to the prompt “Tell me about yourself as a learner”. We have found some interesting results—the publications are forthcoming!

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Story and photography by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

First Year Voices: Chemical Engineering Major Dylan Snyder

Chemical Engineering major Dylan Snyder outside Rowan Hall

Today, we talk to Dylan Snyder, a freshman Chemical Engineering major from Wilmington, Delaware.

How has your freshman year at Rowan been so far?

“Freshman year has been great! It is so much more interesting than high school. I’ve gotten so many new phone numbers and made so many new friends. If you get yourself out there, you can create the best experience at college.

Have you joined any clubs yet?  

“Yes! I am currently a part of five clubs: The Rowan Alternative Music Club, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, MMA Club, Karate and Self-Defense Club and Student University Programmers (SUP). In that club, we plan a lot of the campus and charity events.”

How have you been adjusting to college life?

“I’ve adjusted pretty quickly. It’s a different rhythm, living on your own, for sure. If you’ve ever held a job, it’s similar to that. You just need to be responsible and manage your time well. As an engineering student, I’m constantly complaining about your lack of time; but as long as you know how much time to put aside for yourself and what you need to get done, it’s really smooth sailing. All that matters is that you’re interested in what you’re doing.”

Chemical Engineering major Dylan Snyder outside of Rowan Hall

What are some of your favorite spots on campus?

“Favorite spots on campus? Honestly, the beautiful pond out back behind Rowan Hall. The Market Place in the Student Center is really nice too. The Student Center is where all of college life happens at. Most of the clubs will meet around there. Mariachi Grill and Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard are also some of my favorite spots.” 

What is one piece of advice you can give to incoming freshman?

“Don’t be afraid of anything. Go do everything and whatever you’re interested in. I signed up for emails for at least 50 clubs my first day! It’s funny, as soon as you get yourself out there you start making so many new friends. Don’t be afraid to be friendly, get out there, meet new people. Just go for it!”

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, junior music industry major

Photos by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Where is He Now? Computer and Electrical Engineering Grad Becomes COO

Twilight exterior shot of Rowan Hall

College of Engineering alumnus Ken Whelan at his job at ESS

Meet Kenneth Whelan, a 2002- and third-class graduate from the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering. Kenneth is the chief operating officer (COO) of Engineered Security Systems, one of the top 100 security integrators in the country. Today, he will share with us his journey, from picking Rowan University to becoming COO.

What inspired you to go into engineering?

My cousin, who is also my godmother, graduated from NJIT (New Jersey Institute of Technology) in engineering when I was 8 years old. I thought it was really cool to know what an engineer actually does. As I got older, I got into computers, so I kind of put them together and got into electrical and computer engineering.

How did you know Rowan University was for you?

Nighttime exterior shot of Rowan HallWhen I was looking at colleges, I really thought I was going to go to NJIT like my godmother. I went to two NJIT open houses and two open houses for Rowan. NJIT was a nice sunny day, nice weather, and it still didn’t feel like home. When I went down to Rowan, it was cold, windy and rainy, and yet it still felt like home. I went with Rowan because even on a day like that, it seemed like a nice place to be.

How did Rowan University impact your life?

I was very shy and not outgoing. Between the classes and student community, I really got out of my shell. Every class in the engineering department had a presentation we had to do and work in groups. It really taught me to work with other people and be able to stand up and present what I’ve done and really advocate for myself. I was also active in the electrical engineering society.

I learned to round myself, and it really helped me out in my career. I went from just being an engineer when I first got out to now being COO for a nationwide security company. I really attribute everything Rowan taught me to get here. 

Can you tell us more about Engineered Security Systems and your role in the company?

It’s a family-run company, and it was founded in 1971. I’m the first person to be leading it who is not part of the family. We do electronic security like access control, fire alarm systems, burglar alarm systems for businesses, colleges and hospitals. We do very high-end systems that are customized for each client.

Interior shot of a College of Engineering banner inside Rowan HallIn the morning I first come in and talk with the engineering department, I ask what they’re working on and what products are coming down the pike. As the day goes on, I spend time with the operations department. Same thing, I ask what they’re working on, what service call popped up. And I also check in with our sensor monitoring center to see how everything is going and how our clients are doing. As the afternoon goes along, I have meetings and conference calls with our clients and vendors. And I kind of spend my time rotating around all functions of the business.

Any advice for students interested or who are currently pursuing a degree in engineering?

Try to get involved in as much as you can. Don’t try to do just one type of project with engineering projects. Get involved in student organizations on campus and definitely get out of your comfort zone. Join something you don’t think you’ll enjoy — whether it is a fraternity, sorority or some other activity group — just to broaden your horizons and meet people who are not in your major.

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Story by:
Iridian Gonzalez, senior journalism major

Photo courtesy of:
Kenneth Whelan

#PROFspective: International Engineering Student Thai Nghiem

Thai Nghiem stands on the steps inside the Engineering Hall lobby

Name: Thai Nghiem

Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Minor: Computer Science

Year: Senior

Are you a first-generation college student? No

Hometown and county: Hanoi, Vietnam

Commuter: Yes. I’m commuting from Franklinville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Academic clubs you are a part of: Bantivoglio Honors Concentration, Tau Beta Pi – Engineering Honor Society

Social clubs you are a part of: Rowan Cru – Secretary

Thai sits in a round orange chair in the bridge connecting the two engineering buildings at Rowan University.Do you work on campus? I worked in the library as a Technology Desk Specialist for a year.

Share an “aha!” moment you’ve had within your major that made you feel passionate about your intended field. I was always good at math and physics in high school, and since Rowan offered an outstanding engineering program, I did not hesitate to choose engineering as my major. 

Describe an on-campus experience (academic or non-academic) in which you felt that your future goals are supported. I found the Career Fair on-campus very helpful, as I landed many interviews and two internships. The two engineering internships were with Ellenby Technologies and American Water. Both of them offered me competitive pay and treated me as a regular employee; they trusted and assigned me with great responsibilities. I had a great time interning with them and gained a great deal of practical knowledge and industrial experience. I would recommend everybody of all majors attend the Rowan Career Fair. 

Thai is pictured behind a handrail as he walks up the steps holding a red and black toolbox .
On a typical day, Thai brings his toolbox with him to work on projects in Engineering Hall.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? My freshman year (2015), Rowan Cru held a Halloween party at the International House, where I used to live. As an international student, I did not have a lot of friends back then, especially those who are American. The event was a great deal to me, as I got to meet and talk to new people who were very friendly and helpful. Since it’s hard for an international student to get a car and a driving licence, many of them offered me rides to ShopRite whenever I needed. Furthermore, they invited me to be a part of their club — Rowan Cru, where I continued to make new wonderful relationships and great memories.

Why did you choose Rowan? Actually, Rowan found and chose me. I uploaded my resume on a merit-aid website, and Rowan officials contacted me. Due to the generous international scholarship, I was able to attend Henry Rowan College of Engineering. 

Thai works on a project in the Engineering Hall lobby between classes.

On your busiest day, what academic, non-academic and social responsibilities are you juggling? On my busiest day, I am juggling between exams, my part-time job at the library, and leading a Bible study session at Rowan Cru. There are tough times, but those are what make us a better person. My friends in Cru, as well as my classmates, help each other through stressful times. I really appreciate these people and always enjoy spending time with them. 

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Story by:
Thai Nghiem, senior electrical and computer engineering major

Photography by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Future Chemical Engineer Shares Her Research Experience with ExxonMobil

“In high school, I was extremely interested in chemistry and Rowan Chemical Engineering major Casey Wagner sits outside Engineering Hall.pharmaceuticals. I thought about first going to pharmacy school, but I was more interested in how drugs were actually made rather than the dispensing of drugs to patients,” shares Casey Wagner, senior Chemical Engineering major from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County).

Four years later, she’s conducting research for ExxonMobil.

While working as a research assistant at Rowan over the summer, Casey bumped into her past professor, Dr. C. Stewart Slater. He encouraged her to join his fall clinic team to help ExxonMobil with a project involving the flushing operations of its lubrication plant. Casey explains, “It seemed like an awesome opportunity as a student who wants to go into industry.”

She continues, “The project is still in the beginning stages of development. So far our team is researching how we can relate other industries to the oil industry. Being able to visit the lubrication plant in Paulsboro, NJ and see Rowan Chemical Engineering major Casey Wagner works in an engineering lab.how the operations are completed was an awesome experience. Being able to contact engineers and operators who are working at this plant to ask them questions and learn from their experiences has been a great experience for my future.

“Overall, I’ve been very happy with the professional experience I’m gaining from being a part of this project. I’m extremely happy with the way the communication is between the students and ExxonMobil workers. I feel like we are slowly narrowing our focus as a unit and getting closer to finding plausible options for the plant.

“I have gained some very valuable research experience from being a part of this project. Obviously, as engineers, we have to create unique ideas for our own experiments all the time. Reading about previously done work in contrasting industries and finding correlations between those different industries within the oil industry is very important for this project. This procedure is important no matter where I work in the future.

“Also, working with different groups of people whether it be within the same company or at a different company has given me valuable professional experience. Learning different terms and expressions used by other engineers and chemists has been helpful.”Rowan Chemical Engineering major Casey Wagner works in an engineering lab.

Casey feels Rowan best prepared her for this opportunity through the engineering clinics. Every semester, all engineering majors are enrolled in clinics, which provide students with an opportunity to join projects they are interested in. She continues, “It definitely prepared me for work after college and for deciding whether I want to continue my education or move on to working in the industry.”

She knows if she ever has any questions, Dr. Slater or Dr. [Mariano] Savelski will always answer them. She shares, “Dr. Slater this past year has been a guiding hand for me and is someone who I know I can always go to for help with future careers.”

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Story and photography by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

A Leader in Rowan’s First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program

Amanda Yannarella, a Biomedical Engineering major, was a student leader this summer in the First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program.

Amanda Yannarella, a Biomedical Engineering major, was a student leader this summer in the First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program.

Meet Amanda Yannarella, a sophomore majoring in Biomedical Engineering from Burlington Township, NJ (Burlington County). This summer, Amanda became a student leader for this year’s Rowan’s First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program. Today she will share with us her experience in the program and what she’s learned from being a student leader.

Why did you decide to join Rowan’s First-Year Connection program?

“Last year as a freshman, I wanted to get acclimated to campus and wanted to start of my year well by volunteering.Amanda Yannarella, a Biomedical Engineering major, was a student leader this summer in the First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program. I volunteered a lot in high school, too. I was in Key Club, so I did a lot of volunteering then and I wanted to continue here. I was a leader this year because I loved it so much my freshman year. I wanted to do it again and have a positive impact on the incoming first-year students, because that was really important to me.”

What kind of activities did you do?

“We went to the Food Bank of South Jersey and we helped sort all the donations they had into proteins, soups and grains. Two people went into the bakery to bake muffins, so that was really cool. We also helped with the Saint Bernard’s [disaster relief] Project, which is similar to Habitat for Humanity, in which I am also involved in. We went to someone’s house that was damaged by Hurricane Sandy and we helped fix up their house. We did flooring, drywall, spackling and hurricane clips, which is supposed to help the roof stay on with strong winds.

“Then we helped with the Little Owls Preschool at Rowan. We were cleaning their classrooms to prepare for the school year. It took us about two hours, which would have taken all the Little Owl teachers all day. Then we did SAIL Bowling Night; they do activities for adults on the autism spectrum. We had a great time bowling with them and making conversations — just hanging out and having fun, but it was important because I feel like we were making everyone’s day better. I’m not good at bowling, but still had a good time.”

Amanda Yannarella, a Biomedical Engineering major, was a student leader this summer in the First-Year Connection: Volunteerism Program. What was your favorite activity?

“The Saint Bernard’s Project was my favorite because you learn skills that I feel you can transfer to your own house. Now I know how to put in hardwood flooring, and that’s pretty cool.”

What knowledge or skills have you developed through this program?

“When we went to the food bank [someone] told us the amount of food we sorted, which was a lot, was between 2,000 to 5,000 pounds. The guy was like, ‘Congratulations guys, you really helped us out, but there are still families going to bed hungry tonight. And even though we worked so hard there is still a lot of work to be done.’ Then you’re like, ‘Wait what? I just did this whole work and you’re telling me that there’s more?’ It’s kind of eye opening. That is why I like doing stuff like that because you get impacted and it’s good to get reminded with that kind of stuff. And as a leader I learned leadership skills, like learning to communicate. I use to hate talking. I was so quiet when I was younger, but this actually helped me get more comfortable talking to bigger groups of people.”

What did being a leader for Rowan’s First-Year Connection program mean to you?

“I liked being able to have an impact on incoming students and setting them off into a positive way. We were focusing on the volunteering stuff all week and the importance of that, but we were also getting them ready for campus. And it just meant a lot to get that kind of leadership experience under my belt.”

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Story by:
Iridian Gonzalez, senior journalism major

First Year Voices: Joining Her Cousins at Rowan

Krishna stands at Rowan University posed with the owl mascot's wings behind her

After hearing good things about Rowan’s engineering program and with two cousins already here, Rowan was a natural choice for incoming freshman Krishna Barot. 

Krishna sits on a bright pink chair with PCI friends

Meeting people and forming the beginnings of lifelong friendships has been the highlight of Krishna’s summer at Rowan University. The first generation college student, from Galloway, NJ (Atlantic County), spent six weeks on campus as a part of the Pre-College Institute (PCI), an academic/residential program to better prepare freshmen for college. 

When Krishna returns to campus in September, she’ll have already earned three college credits through PCI, will have a core group of friends she’ll be reunited with and will already have a familiarity with campus. A civil engineering major, Krishna will live in Evergreen Hall

In September, Krishna says, “I’m most looking forward to learning about the different clubs and activities to join.”

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First Year Voices: A 4-Year Dream Begins to Launch

Alexis Benitez smiles, sits on a green bench with his bookbag by his side

Incoming freshman Alexis Pacheco Benitez of Bridgeton, NJ (Cumberland County) has waited patiently four years to finally begin his education toward his dream career. “When I was a freshman in high school we had this seminar to find out what you want to do, and ever since then I’ve known that I want to go […]

Engineering Alumnus and Entrepreneur Finds His Dream Job

Peter DAmico at his Rowan graduation in 2013

Meet Peter D’Amico, a 2013 Rowan alumnus from Mays Landing, NJ (Atlantic County). Today he shares his experience in the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering and how far his time at Rowan has taken him. 

“Rowan taught me how to talk to people, be social and gave me the ability to get the job I want.” 

Rowan engineering alumnus Peter D'Amico working for the FAA

After struggling to choose a college, Peter decided to attend Rowan University for its smaller class sizes and more intimate learning experience. Before going away to college, he wasn’t fully set on a career path. The one thing he knew for sure is that he loved to “break things down and figure out how they worked.” 

Eventually, he decided to pursue Electrical and Computer Engineering. Peter noted that he is forever grateful for the College of Engineering, especially Professor John Schmalzel. He recalls spending time in Professor Schmalzel’s office, where they talked about everything under the sun. 

After leaving Rowan, Peter began his career with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), where he worked as an electrical/computer/mechanical engineer. His job was to travel around the country to collect pavement data for the National Airport Pavement Testing Facility. After two years of working as a contractor, he was promoted to a computer engineer position. Now within the test and evaluation branch, he became the first member of the storyboarding team, where his job is to “communicate the complexities of the National Airspace System (NAS).”

Rowan College of Engineering alumnus Peter D'Amico (pictured at right)

“I work directly with the engineers, programmers and human factors experts to tell the story of the NAS. I love the fact that I am on the front lines communicating these elaborate programs to people all over the country,” he said.

Along with being a successful engineer upon graduating, Peter is also a businessman and entrepreneur. A year after graduation, he purchased his first rental property in Glassboro. He has since bought two other properties and provides affordable housing to a number of current Rowan students.

Rowan alumnus Peter D'Amico wearing a T-shirt with his business namePeter also started a YouTube Channel, The Sundae Drive, where he and a fellow Rowan alumnus perform DIY car maintenance tips. This channel currently has more than 5,000 subscribers. On top of all of this, he launched a supplement company, PWR Supplements, with another Rowan alumnus. 

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Story by:
Chad Wittmann, senior journalism major

Photos courtesy of:
Peter D’Amico 

Where Is He Now? Rowan Chemical Engineering Alumnus Theodore Cohen

Engineering Hall at Rowan University

Rowan alumnus Theodore Cohen at his office at IPS

Today we feature chemical engineering alumnus Theodore Maxwell Cohen, originally from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County). Now residing in Gladwyne, PA, he works as a project engineer on the design of pharmaceutical facilities at Integrated Project Services, LLC (IPS). Cohen shares with us how Rowan University helped him figure out what he was truly passionate about.

Before getting his bachelor’s in 2009 and his master’s in 2016 from Rowan, Cohen had to choose what university he wanted to attend. 

“I applied to nine schools and got into all nine of them. I eliminated five of them that were pretty far away. Both of my sisters had gone to college far away, and I saw that it wasn’t all that fun. I filtered it down to Rowan, Rutgers and Udel (University of Delaware),” said Cohen.

After eliminating Rutgers from his list due to the immense campus Rutgers has, it was down to the University of Delaware and Rowan. Cohen visited the University of Delaware and asked, “How are you going to help me succeed?” Cohen said the University of Delaware responded, “We take about 100 chemical engineering majors (ChE’s) every year. We graduate 50 of them as chemical engineers, and the rest we find something for them to do.” He thought, “Huh, those aren’t terribly great odds.”

Cohen then visited Rowan and met with Dr. C. Stewart Slater, professor and founding chair of the chemical engineering department. He asked the same question, and Dr. Slater said: “Well, we take about 30 ChE’s and we graduate around 23 of them as chemical engineers. But if you are willing to work hard, we will help you be successful.”

“At the end of the day, that and my scholarship is why I chose Rowan,” said Profile picture of Rowan alumnus Theodore CohenCohen.

The program has since doubled both its enrollment and full-time faculty, yet still maintains a small faculty-to-student ratio.  

During his time at Rowan, Cohen mentioned that he met some incredible faculty mentors, who really made a positive influence on him.

“I had a couple of great mentors that impacted my life. One of them was Chuck Clerecuzio. He was an adjunct professor who taught a senior level course in biopharmaceutical facility design,” said Cohen. “It was the course that I took that made me realize what I wanted to do in my life. Chuck was my mentor for many years. Unfortunately, Chuck passed away recently.”

Another great mentor who helped Cohen was Dr. Brian Lefebvre. Dr. Lefebvre was a chemical engineering professor at Rowan University from 2004-2008. While completing research for Dr. Lefebvre, Cohen was able to get a paper published as the primary author.

“His specialty was bio process, which is what I really loved. I did three and a half years’ worth of lab work and research for him learning the basics of upstream and downstream bioprocessing. He helped me get a paper published while I was an undergraduate on anion-exchange chromatography,” said Cohen. “We became friends while I was a student, and continued that friendship with him long after I graduated. Brian helped me get my first job out of school at DuPont working on a similar project to his.”

Cohen is currently working at IPS as a project engineer for the design of pharmaceutical facilities. His role is to ensure that the design of the facility is cohesive and meets all of the numerous requirements from both the client perspective as well as regulatory.

His advice for Rowan students is: “Work hard. Try to learn as much as you can. Don’t be so wrapped up in your grades, they’re important but not that important. Learn the information and try to figure out what you love because you will spend the next 40 years working. Do something you enjoy.”

Cohen is thankful for figuring out what he loves. “Brian and Chuck helped me figure out what I was passionate about,” said Cohen.

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Story and photography by: 
Iridian Gonzalez,
 senior journalism major 

Where is He Now? A First-Generation PCI Alumnus

Meet Pre-College Institute (PCI) alumnus Ishraqul Wara, a first-generation student and 2018 graduate from the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering. Wara lives in Clementon, NJ (Camden County) and works as a manufacturing engineer for Omega Engineering. Ishraqul will share with us how PCI helped shape his Rowan experience and where he is today.

What inspired you to choose your major? “My grandfather inspired me to be an engineer, so I got it started. [But] my first year here, I was not an engineering major. I got introduced to the engineering [program] and I became friends with many from the department. I started going into the rotation and I just applied. They accepted me, and that was the transition from PCI to an engineering major.”

How did the PCI program help you prepare for Rowan? “Many ways, I don’t think I can count all the things I learned from PCI and all the things it did for me — especially all the relationships it helped me build. It definitely helped me in my studies. [There are] so many ways they supported me throughout my four years here.”

What was it like being a first-generation student in PCI? “I think half ofIshmaqel a mechanical engineer in a navy blue suit us in PCI were first-generation students. So, I didn’t feel alone because we were on the same page. We understood the situation we were in. It was a mixture [in our] group, and that is why PCI is so great, it builds relationships and gives support out for people who need it.”

What are you doing currently? “I’m working at Omega Engineering as a manufacturing engineer.”

What advice would you give to our future freshmen? “Make connections.”

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Story by:
Iridian Gonzalez, senior journalism major

Faculty PROFile: Engineering’s Dr. Cheryl Bodnar

Meet Dr. Cheryl Bodnar, Assistant Professor Experiential Engineering Education (ExEEd) within the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering and Assistant Director of Faculty Programs Rowan Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (RCIE)

What is your area of expertise?

My research areas focus on game-based learning and engineering entrepreneurship. With both of these research areas, my focus is on how to improve the classroom experience so that engineering students can leave my classes well-rounded and ready to tackle the variety of Dr. Bodnar working with students in her freshmen clinic course.challenges that are integral to the engineering field. More specifically, my work within engineering entrepreneurship focuses on the development of an entrepreneurial mindset.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that students will start their own businesses, but that they will develop an innate curiosity about the world around them, be able to connect ideas and concepts from different classes, and, together, create products and/or services that will provide great value to the community around them.

Share an “a ha!” moment that you’ve had within your discipline that made you feel passionate about your field.

One of my greatest “a ha!” moments was when I could see differences in my students a few years after they had been exposed to the game-based learning techniques that I apply in my classes for developing an entrepreneurial mindset. I knew deep down that these methods of teaching would make a difference in the students and help them develop into individuals who would be prepared to take on the challenges of today’s world. However, when a student came back to me a few years after I taught them to share that they used one of the games they played in class as an example in a job interview, it really brought home that the use of these techniques is leaving a memorable impression on my students. This experience reinforced to me how leveraging teaching methods that actively engage our students and challenge them to work outside their comfort zone can really help in their overall professional development and lead to lasting memories they can draw upon.

Describe for us an experience you’ve had with a student that made you feel excited about educating the next generation in your field.

I have had several great experiences with students in my time at Rowan.  With regards to Engineering Entrepreneurship, I believe one of my most memorable experiences is engaging with students as both a teacher and advisor.  I have one student that I had the fortunate opportunity to teach and then advise as they are moving through the Engineering Entrepreneurship program.  This student brings such a passion to Dr. Cheryl Bodnar flipping through a book in her office at the engineering building.everything that they do and is eager and open to learning whatever is necessary to be successful.  The student often challenges the status quo and looks for opportunities to improve their and other students’ experiences on campus, thus applying an entrepreneurial mindset in and out of the classroom.

Engineering Entrepreneurship focuses on providing students with a technical foundation within engineering while providing students with the necessary business skills to become innovators within existing organizations or start their own businesses.  I think that we too often overlook how essential business skills are to the engineering profession; this degree brings to the forefront that blending these skillsets can lead to new possible career directions that our engineering students may not have considered. 

What is one thing you wish people knew about your academic discipline or your research focus?

I really wish that individuals would realize that Engineering Entrepreneurship is not exclusively for individuals that would like to start a business.  Although this is one potential career pathway, most of the program is really focused around providing students with the technical and business skills necessary to take on critical and essential roles in the engineering industry.  The jobs our students will excel at include business developers and technical sales positions, and other positions that interface directly with customers.  The skillsets taught within this program focus on the cultivation of an entrepreneurial mindset which means students can recognize opportunities, are comfortable with ambiguity, can persist A portrait of Dr. Bodnar at her desk located in the engineering building.through failure, and can manage risk.  These are skill sets that are so important to today’s society when the economy is constantly changing and individuals are having to pivot their careers.

What’s your favorite thing about being on campus on a typical Tuesday?

My favorite thing about Tuesdays is my chance to interact with junior and senior engineering students through our junior and senior engineering clinic program.  As part of this program, students are grouped into teams that are assigned to work on different faculty projects.  I always enjoy having discussions with my student teams and seeing how their curiosity has led them to new areas of investigation.  Several of these projects are grant funded, which means the students are working towards publications that allow them to showcase their work to regional and national audiences.  The amount of growth I observe in the students over the course of a semester is incredible and although not explicit, I believe that many of these students develop aspects of an entrepreneurial mindset as they start to recognize opportunities for further development, persist through failure, and deal with the ambiguity associated with research.

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Story and photography by: Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

#PROFspective: International Student Gatha Adhikari

Today, we speak with Gatha Adhikari, a sophomore biomedical engineering major from Begnas Tal, Pokhara (Nepal), who lives at Holly Pointe Commons as a Resident Assistant. Gatha will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be an international Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof.

How is Rowan welcoming to you? During the Flying First Symposium by Rowan’s Flying First Task Force for first generation college students, I was invited to speak on the panel to Gatha Adhikari posing in front of her Resident Assistant sign in Holly Pointe Commons.share my journey. To see the first generation alums and get their support made me feel welcomed and a sense of belonging.

Could you tell us a little bit about being a first generation college student? My family is back home in a small village in Nepal and were supportive to let me come here for my studies. Being first-gen is a point of pride in itself, but is also a big struggle. As a first-gen student, I am able to accomplish the dreams of my parents and inspire my community. I affirm for the young ones that they can live their dreams and achieve immense opportunities. Gatha Adhikari mixing a solution in the Science Hall.

Tell us a little bit about the sacrifice that you and your family has made in order to make college a reality for you.  My family and community have made a big emotional sacrifice to let me come to this foreign land and study while my other friends got married without finishing their education. While my family could have kept me home to assist them with their agriculture, they decided to let me fly away and be independent, which means a lot to me. I have left behind my friends and family who are very close to my heart, my traditions and festivities behind and work days and nights to make college a reality.

How do you feel your family will feel when they watch you walkGatha Adhikari posing in the first floor in Engineering Hall. across that graduation stage? I can imagine the tears of joy in the eyes of both my parents and brother when I finish my degree and graduate. They have dedicated their love and sacrificed so much to make it happen. My parents’ goal in life will be fulfilled when they see my accomplishments. My graduation ceremony will mean a lot.

What organization is most meaningful to you on campus? I work as a Resident Assistant (RA) for the Residential Learning and University Housing which means a lot to me. As a team, we strive to build communities within Rowan’s campus to provide the best possible residential life experience to Rowan students so they can find a home away from home here. The residents I lead are a part of an engineering learning community in Holly Pointe Commons

Gatha Adhikari handing a beaker to her professor in Science Hall.

Tell us about your transition into college and how you pushed through any challenges. Leaving everyone I knew and my home country behind when coming to Rowan has been a challenging journey. I have faced numerous obstacles along the way including financial difficulty, as I don’t get any financial aid for being an international student and it is hard to find scholarships I am eligible to apply for. I still have this problem, but I work hard, work on-campus and apply to every scholarship I can.

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VISIT CAMPUS

Story and photography by: Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

#PROFspective: Mechanical Engineering Major Morgan Dean

Today, we speak with Morgan Dean, a senior mechanical engineering major who rents a house off campus with friends. Morgan will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof.

Name: Morgan DeanMorgan Dean sitting in Rowan's Engineering building.
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Minors or concentrations: Writing Arts, Mathematics; Bantivoglio Honors College
Year: Senior
Hometown and County: Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)
Off-Campus resident: Yes, I live in a house on University Boulevard with my five roommates!
Do you work on campus? If so, where/what do you do? I work as a tutor in the Rowan University Writing Center (in Campbell Library)

Morgan Dean sitting in front of the Engineering auditorium. What wakes you up in the morning? The thrill of getting to do and/or learn something new. Also, I love to have my morning coffee while reading!

What is one thing you wish people knew about your academic discipline or research focus? I find that being a girl in engineering, especially one of the five or six in the MechE undergraduate program, is more advantageous than most realize. Additionally, although mechanical engineering tends to be associated with cars/engines/etc., the possibilities of post-undergraduate work are endless. You’re in no way tied down to any one field of work.

What is one thing this field has allowed you to do, that you either Morgan Dean showing Rowan student something on her laptop.dreamed of doing or thought you’d never get to do? Through its interdisciplinary program, mechanical engineering sparked my interest in biomedical engineering. Although I once said I would never take another biology class again, I am now set to be a PhD Biomedical Engineering student come Fall 2019.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? The Rowan Writing Center has provided me with a sense of belonging ever since I began working there. The staff took me in immediately as family and I always feel a sense of peace while in the space.

Morgam Dean posing in front of the pond in back of the Engineering building.Why Rowan?  I have made some incredible student-professor relationships here which have shaped my future by unlocking my potential. Professors Dr. Staehle, and Dr. Merrill and Writing Center Director Celeste DelRusso have exposed me to new areas of research through the engineering clinic curriculum, summer programs, and professional development conferences. Additionally, I would never have been accepted to graduate school if it weren’t for these valuable connections I made.

Like what you see, come visit us!

VISIT CAMPUS​​

Story and photography by: Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Katherine Villacis

Katherine Villacis sitting in the bridge connecting Rowan's Engineering building.

Meet transfer student Katherine Villacis, a junior civil engineering major  from Beverly, NJ (Burlington County) who is a resident assistant here on campus. Katherine recently served as a student panelist on Rowan’s first-generation college student symposium, hosted by Flying First

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you?

“One of my first experiences since I transferred was just taking the leap and getting involved. Being an RA helps me know what’s going on around campus and connect me to resources. I’ve met returning and professional staff who want to see me succeed. Flying First, Rowan’s support program for first-generation college students, is also welcoming environment. We recently had a symposium that was open to other schools, with student panelists discussing their first generation experience.”

Why did you choose Rowan?

“I chose Rowan because of convenience. I went to Rowan College at Burlington County and the programs here made it easier for me to transfer. I didn’t know at first where I wanted to go, but heard great things about the engineering program and knew this was something that could work out.”

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Story and photography by:
Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

#PROFspective: Civil Engineering Major Joseph Cerasi

Today, we speak with Joseph Cerasi, a junior civil engineering major who rents a house off campus. Joseph will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Joseph Cerasi Major: Civil Engineering Year: Junior […]

#PROFspective: Electrical & Computer Engineering Major DJ Stahlberger

DJ sitting inside electrical lab

Today, we speak with DJ Stahlberger, a junior electrical and computer engineer major from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County) who commutes. DJ will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: DJ StahlbergerMajor: Electrical and […]

Engineer Furthers Her College Experience

Kelly outside Rowan College of Engineering sign outside

Like a proton, Kelly Yorke has a positive charge, driving her to go above and beyond in her field. The New York state resident, a chemical engineering major, became president of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at Rowan as a sophomore, a remarkable feat, and continued on through her junior year. Heavily involved with […]

Students Unify Rowan through Unified Sports

Kaitlee and Joseph sit on a bench together

 Co-presidents of Unified Sports, seniors Kaitlee Francisco, an elementary education and mathematics major from Washington Township (Gloucester County) and Joseph Egan, a mechanical engineering major from Fairfield (Essex County) contribute to the Rowan and South Jersey communities in ways that go far beyond the classroom.  On Nov. 3, Kaitlee and Joseph were elated to see […]

Sophomore Biomedical Engineering Major Jeremy Decker

Jeremy inside science lab at college of engineering

“We’re creating microfluidic devices to take analytical measurement of biologically significant molecules. Now, I know that sounds confusing…” When I first met with Jeremy, he spoke a language I probably could only follow about 80 percent of the time … but after listening to him explain and talk about his work, I walked away with […]

Compare/Contrast Freshman Housing

Scott Timko is a resident assistant in Mullica Hall, wearing a yellow sweatshirt that says Glassboro State

Chatting with Rowan University on campus residents on a frigid, hectic morning just before finals (seriously, is it really spring yet?!), one thing was clear: the sense of community within their residence halls is what they love most. However, what “community” means in each residence hall is different. I learned that Evergreen is known for […]

#PROFspective: Civil Engineering Major Sidney McLeod-Whitener

Sidney in track pose outside the track field at Rowan

Today, we speak with Sidney McLeod-Whitener, a freshman civil engineering major from Philadelphia (Philadelphia County), PA, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe. Sidney will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: […]