Dance Majors Share Their Professional Goals

Two dancers in mid-pose outdoors.

What is your long-term professional dream goal? “Long term I see myself working with a big theater corporation like Lincoln Center, administratively. I want to continue working in DEI work to some capacity. And hopefully working in the dance world as a teacher later down the line.” – Gabrielle Langevine, senior dance major and women […]

Biological Sciences Major Shares a Snapshot in Time of Her Days at Rowan

Yesenia sits at a lab table for a portrait.

Originally from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County) first-generation senior biological sciences major Yesenia Flores heads into her final semesters at Rowan, and there’s so much more to come for her. About her major Yesenia shared, “I have always been very curious about the dynamics and mechanisms by which science is able to revolutionize the world and […]

Q&A With a Senior Public Health and Wellness Major & Rowan Choice Student

Theresa Bennett stands outside her internship at Inspira Health Network with their logo behind her.

Public Health & Wellness Major Discusses Her Passion for Public Health & Wellness, her internship and professional goals Senior Theresa Bennett, from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County) joined Rowan through the Rowan Choice program, a partnership with community college RCSJ that allows students to live on Rowan University’s campus while taking 24-30 community college credits, which […]

#PROFspective: A Closer Look At PULLA Tracker and its Founder Siena Rampulla

Rowan University Psychology major Siena stands underneath the art installation Time Sweeps by Discovery Hall.

Siena Rampulla is a senior student here at Rowan University, originally from Holmdel, NJ (Monmouth County). Siena is a Psychology major, with an honors concentration and a minor in Journalism.  When asked to share more about her major, Siena explained she originally planned to go on the pre-med track, which was a long-term dream of […]

#PROFspective: A Closer Look at Music Education and Jazz with Jovan Rivera

Rowan University student Jovan Rivera posing inside of Wilson Hall with a saxophone sitting in front of a piano.

Today, we are hearing from Jovan Rivera, a junior Music Education and Jazz Performance major and transfer student from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). Could you share a few on-campus activities, clubs, sports, or events that you’ve attended so far? What was your favorite, and why? I am a part of the Photography Club, Esports Club, […]

#PROFspective: How Senior Jasmine Hull is Working Toward a Better Future in Healthcare

Rowan University Public Health and Wellness major Jasmine stands outside Rowan's Business Hall.

Today we feature senior Public Health and Wellness major Jasmine Hull (she/her) from Mercer County, NJ. Jasmine is living on-campus after transferring to Rowan from Stockton and is a first-generation college student. Here, she gives us some insights into her major and favorite experiences at Rowan. Why did you choose Rowan? Larger sum of transfer […]

Rowan Engineering Major Benjamin Busler Achieves Dream of Interning for NASA [VIDEO]

Electrical and Computer Engineering major Benjamin Busler is representing Rowan University this semester as a Pathways Intern with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Benjamin, a junior from Somerset County, is among a select group of students nationwide in NASA’s Pathways program, which offers internships and a direct avenue to future employment with the […]

First Year Voices: Finding My Place at Rowan University as a Music Education Major [VIDEO]

Aaliyah sits in Robinson green.

Today, we introduce you to Aaliyah Jenkins of Mercer County, NJ. Aaliyah, a first-year student, studies Music Education and lives on campus. Could you share a few on-campus activities, clubs, sports or events that you’ve attended so far? What was your favorite, and why? There are many on-campus activities to do. This is because of […]

Beyond The Classroom: Senior Supply Chain and Logistics Major Alivia DiNorscio’s Internship with Cape Resorts

An image of Congress Hall where Alivia interned.

Today we feature senior Alivia DiNorscio (she/her) from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County). Alivia is an on-campus resident and first-generation college student majoring in Supply Chain and Logistics, having transferred to Rowan University from Raritan Valley Community College. She discusses the major with us here along with the internship she recently completed with Cape Resorts in […]

Beyond the Classroom: Marketing Major Josh Echandia Talks Sales Internship with CobbleStone Software

Today we speak with Josh Echandia, a senior Marketing major from West Creek, NJ (Ocean County). Josh switched from an Education major to Marketing at the end of his sophomore year. Within the last semester, Josh worked as a Marketing Intern for CobbleStone Software, a contract management software company. He also works full-time as a sales representative for Best Buy. He discusses his decision to switch majors, his internship experience and how working in the field cultivated a love of marketing and sales. 

Why did you choose Rowan to study Marketing?  

I originally came to Rowan to be an Education major focusing on the Math Education route. That just ended up not working out for me because I did not really enjoy it. After about a year, I switched to Physical Education and then after another semester, I switched to Marketing. I had already been working at Best Buy for a couple years prior to going to Rowan, so I was already in the sales field a little bit; I thought marketing would be a good fit. I loved Rowan as a whole, so I didn’t really care what my major was. As long as I was still a student here, I knew I was going to be happy. 

What are your future plans and what is your dream job for working as a marketing major?

After gaining some experience in the business field, I discovered that I really liked the sales aspect of things. Whether that is business-to-business or business-to-consumer sales, I would love to try at all. I’m really not set on one specific job title or position. 

Marketing is a big part of sales. Within the field, you must be able to advertise what you’re selling and target what market you’re striving for. That all plays a massive role in the sales world. I know that I want to incorporate what I’ve learned in marketing and couple it with sales.

Josh Echandia.
Josh Echandia

How did you seek out the internship opportunity for Cobblestone Software? 

I went to networking events at Rowan. They were so cool. I loved talking to all the different companies there and learning about the various opportunities you could have. The first internship that I actually applied for was CobbleStone Software. They stood out to me because they were in the technology field. So I decided to apply, and it worked out well.

What did you learn from interning at CobbleStone Software? Can you talk about the pros and cons for working hybrid?

I’ve been working full-time on top of being a student since I got into college, but going from regular retail work to an internship was a change of pace. Working for CobbleStone Software made me slow down and think about applying what I’ve learned in class to what I’m doing in a real-life professional setting.

Being in a hybrid setting helped because when I started the internship, I was in the office three days a week, and on two of those days, I had class right after work. So I felt like I was always running from work to class. Once I adjusted to the hybrid setting, it made my life much easier because I could work from home comfortably. I already had a desktop setup, so it just worked out perfectly.

After transitioning to a hybrid schedule, I was able to get to class on time, and I was able to eat in between. I was truly able to structure my day around my work and school obligations.

What was your role at this internship, and what did you do on a daily basis? 

As a sales and marketing intern, we were responsible for making pre-calls for our sales advisors. Essentially, we were calling to see if they were interested or open to the market for the software we provided, just contract management, sorting contracts and auto-billing contracts. We were trying to sell our service and our software to other companies.

It was very interesting. And there were a lot of companies that I never would’ve thought they were working with, like [a local grocery story chain], for example. So it was interesting to see how real-life applications work in these settings.

What were some of your biggest challenges that you faced as a Cobblestone Software?

CobbleStone Software was very helpful in the whole process of becoming an intern and going through my day-to-day. My biggest struggle was adjusting to an office setting rather than making in-person sales connections.

Because I’m very personable, I think one of my most significant assets includes communicating with people in person. So being over the phone was a little challenging to get used to. Beyond that, everything was easy to adapt to, and CobbleStone made it very easy to adjust. So I would say the biggest struggle for me was just the change of pace and change of setting.

What was your biggest takeaway from Cobblestone Software? What was the best thing you think you’ve learned that you will be able to utilize in your future endeavors?

This response is more general, but internships teach you what real-life business is about and whether you want to be in specific fields or not. Without being so broad, I realized that CobbleStone taught me about employee engagement and employee appreciation.

Our software is not an easy thing to learn. And it was tough for a lot of us when we first onboarded to pick it up. However, the leadership team and all the people above us made the transition much more manageable. And through that, they gave us a lot of employee appreciation and were extremely curious about taking feedback from us. They made it apparent that we were at the forefront of many of their decisions. It made me feel appreciated and heard.

Do you have any advice for sticking out during the application and interview process of applying for internships?

One thing that I never really paid attention to until I started my junior year was the resources that Rowan offers their students. Especially within the College of Business, there are so many resources for you to be successful, and the only way to get those resources to the full extent is to apply yourself to them. Make sure you attend networking events, even if it’s not a class requirement, because you may find your next potential boss. Networking is key.

You may find some of the best friends through these networking events, too. It is essential to take advantage of what the school is providing you. Not only is it making the most of your tuition cost, but it’s also making the most out of your experience. Being engaged with your professors and being involved with the clubs associated with your major are ways to make the most out of your college experience and prepare you for your future.

Josh smiles whiles walking down a stairwell inside Business Hall.

How has your experience working at Best Buy and being active at Rowan in various social and athletic clubs helped prepare you and develop your skills for your professional endeavors?

My experiences within Best Buy and the social and athletic clubs at Rowan all help me develop skills and qualities that will only benefit me in my professional life. For example, being the President of the Wrestling Club opened my eyes to being a leader in general. With Best Buy, I was in management; this gave me a little bit of retail management experience.

Being the president of a club kind of opens you up to many different things, like the structure of leadership, balancing tasks, and even time management. For example, I have to delegate to my e-board certain things that must be done within the club. Everything I have learned from my job at Best Buy and my experiences made available by Rowan can efficiently be utilized in my future.

Did you experience any unexpected parts associated with your major? 

So I started to piece together many connections between education and marketing. It was kind of weird because when I went into marketing, I went in with a sales-person mindset. And for me, education was just another form of selling; instead of selling products and services, it is like you are selling information.

I didn’t know how much depth and development there was in marketing — targeting different markets and being able to adapt to various market changes like that. So I never really thought about it. And that was not only interesting for me to see, it [showed] how I wanted to learn through marketing and what I could do with it afterward.

Josh sits holding two business textbooks and smiling inside Business Hall.

What was your favorite part of your major so far? 

Honestly, my favorite part was being able to learn and now utilize Canva. Canva is an application like an Instagram editor or a video editor, and it is pretty cool to make custom logos through. It’s pretty much a design portfolio that you can use online. And we were taught to use it for different projects and assignments and marketing principles, and it is a tool I have been using ever since I started learning about it. I utilize it for the Wrestling Club, my accounts and professionally. 

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major

Photos by: 
Ashley Craven, junior radio/TV/film major

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

ECE major Jack Campanella sits with robots from the Rowan club from which he is president.

Today we feature Jack Campanella, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Computer Science and a concentration in Honors. Jack is a lab assistant and peer tutor, and he also serves as president of Rowan’s Robotics and Automation Society (RAS). He hails from Monmouth County, NJ. Here, Jack shares more details […]

Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective: Law & Justice Major Kathleen has “Dreamed Big”

Close up of the top of Bunce Hall with a blue sky in the background.

Today, as part of our Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective series, we feature senior Kathleen (she/her) from Perth Amboy, NJ (Middlesex County). Kathleen is majoring in Law & Justice Studies, having transferred to Rowan University from Rowan College of South Jersey. She discusses her experience at Rowan, professional aspirations, and gives advice to future students. What […]

Meet Transfer Profs: College of Education Student Emilie Pretto

A photo of Rowan University's education building, James Hall.

Today we feature incoming transfer student Emilie Pretto (she/her) from Ocean County. Emilie tells us about her major, why she’s excited to start classes at Rowan, and gives advice to future transfer students. Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to at Rowan University? I’m looking forward to […]

Meet Transfer Profs: Welcoming Students from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Bunce Hall on Rowan's Glassboro Campus behind some foliage.

Today we feature incoming transfer students April Casey (she/her), an English major from Gloucester County and Emma Rodriguez (she/her), an Anthropology major from Ocean County. The two tell us about their majors, why they’re excited to start classes at Rowan, and give advice to future transfer students. Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us […]

Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective: Sports Communication Major Spencer Reyes on Inclusion at Rowan and “Never Losing” His Heritage

Rowan University's Bozorth Hall.

Today, as part of our Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective series, we feature senior Spencer Reyes. Spencer is majoring in Sports Communication and Media with a concentration in Radio/TV/Film and minoring in Communication Studies. He is from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County) a first generation college student, and a transfer student from Middlesex College. 

What is your student experience here at Rowan? Do you feel included? Supported? How so? Could you highlight an example or two?

At Rowan I most definitely feel included and supported by my peers. At first it was difficult to mesh in with others because I was a transfer student; however, it became a lot easier when I started to join clubs and organizations and some friends took me under their wings.

How did you find your friend group here at Rowan?

I found my friends through clubs and organizations.

Are you involved on campus? How so?

I’m one of the two sports producers at Rowan Television Network, produce games for Rowan Radio, I am an Admissions Ambassador, an active member of Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society, I play Club Hockey, and I work for Rowan’s Athletic Communications Department.

Spencer Reyes pointing up at the scoreboard, standing next to an ice hockey rink.
Spencer Reyes pointing up at the scoreboard after working as a studio host personality and graphics operator for the Danbury Hat Tricks, a member of the Federal Prospects Hockey League.

Could you highlight a Rowan classroom or campus experience that was inclusive and made an impact on you?

An experience that was very inclusive to me was when I helped RTN cover WrestleMania last year in the Pit. Prior to the event, I had limited experience on camera and production, but had watched wrestling growing up. Our Special Events Producer at the time taught me how to succeed at each position and the event was super fun, and I was awarded member of the week for my work.

Do you have a role model or mentor here at Rowan? Who are they and how have they supported your growth?

A mentor of mine at Rowan would have to be the Director of the Center for Sports Communication and Social Impact, Neil Hartman. He commended my work in the sports industry prior to transferring to Rowan, and allows for me to contact and meet with him frequently [to talk] about how I can progress my sports career.

What advice would you give to a Hispanic/Latinx high school student considering your major here at Rowan?

I would tell them that you don’t need to feel lonely or excluded as a Hispanic/Latinx student at Rowan, especially in the Sports Communication & Media major. Everybody gets along very well and invites new students with open arms.

Spencer Reyes sits with headphones on, speaking into a microphone.
Spencer Reyes as a studio host and producer of RTN Overtime, the official sports podcast of Rowan Television Network.

What are your professional goals?

My professional goal is to become a professional sports broadcaster for baseball and hockey.

If you are open to it, could you share a little about your Hispanic or Latinx heritage?

I like to think of myself as a Caribbean blend, I’m half-Dominican (from my mom’s side), a quarter Puerto Rican and a quarter Cuban (both from my dad). Although I grew up in an Italian based neighborhood in Central Jersey with pizzerias on every corner, I never lost my heritage. I still eat rice and beans on a daily basis, cook my favorite Spanish foods and desserts, visit Elizabeth and Newark, and even my family in Westchester County in Miami, FL, which I highly recommend visiting if you want some authentic Cuban dishes without leaving the country.

Spencer Reyes listening to earpiece as the on field host for the Trenton Thunder, a member of the MLB Draft League on Halloween Night.
Spencer Reyes as the on field host for the Trenton Thunder, a member of the MLB Draft League on Halloween Night.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major

Photos courtesy of: 
Spencer Reyes

Beyond the Classroom: Graduate Student Jon Witkowski Puts Data Science Studies to Work in Cooper University Healthcare Internship

Jon stands in front of a chalkboard inside a a classroom on campus.

Today we speak to Jon Witkowski of Ocean County, N.J. on his internship with Cooper University Healthcare. Jon is a Rowan Global student pursuing a master’s degree in Data Science through Rowan’s accelerated CADP 4+1 program. He recently graduated with degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics. While an undergraduate student, Jon was a member of Rowan’s chapter of the Upsilon Pi Epsilon honor society and worked as a peer tutor

Can you tell us more about data science?

Data science is an interdisciplinary field between computer science and statistics, leveraging technology and utilizing computer science and high-level math to transform data and draw a useful output for informed, analytical decision making.

Jon smiles and stands on a walking path on campus.

What is your day-to-day like at your internship with Cooper University Healthcare?

The first project I was assigned was to make a dashboard for different health systems’ market shares in the general South Jersey region over the past four years. Other departments source the data and hand it to me, and basically, I built a dashboard to whatever their specifications are.

I’ll either be doing something like preparing the data and wrangling it to get it in a state that I want for the databases, or I’ll be trying to figure out how to format my dashboards and what kind of layout to do. Maybe I’ll be thinking about what types of different visualizations I can use. One of the things that we use are interactive, graphical filters. So instead of just having a drop down for selecting things, maybe you format your filter as a bar chart with the labels on it, so you can just click it, and it filters by that.

Getting the data and the results is the easy part. It’s putting it in a way that you can show as much as you can, without it being crowded — that’s really the hard part.

The best part was being able to experiment with new visualizations. I got hands-on experience in the software I had only gone over in class last semester.

Jon sits at a desktop computer station against a blue wall.

One of the more interesting things I’ve done was writing complex table queries that made the data look good, show the visualizations I wanted, and are efficient. An example of that: One of my proudest achievements is we have a map, and it’s colored by zip code. The intensity of the color represents Cooper’s market share in that region. So how many of the inpatient discharges in that region were Cooper’s and a lower volume or market share will be a yellow color, and it’ll get darker red for the higher color. Figuring that out was really fun to try to do.

How did you discover your internship?

It’s very hard to get an internship in the tech field as a college student. You would think it’s easy because it’s such a necessary field. I read online that the unemployment rate in the tech field like computer science and programming is less than 2%, so you’d imagine that many people are getting jobs. I applied for anything I could find, and I happened to get this one.

It actually worked out in the end. The work I do at Cooper is similar to work I did in a class I took last semester, which just happened to turn out to be important to me if I am working in that field, but it really is my favorite class that I ever took at Rowan called Visual Analytics. [The course] involves data visualization and analytics. You’re basically performing analysis on your data and coming out with any results you’re looking for. It’s all about the visualization of set results in an effective way. I really loved it. 

Jon stands inside a stairwell in an academic building.

Will your internship help you inside and outside of your master’s program?

I think so. The internship also focused on the back end of data visualization for you actually get the data. Before you have the data the way you want it for the visualizations, you have to prepare it and model it. My next project is for social determinants of health. I’m on the data modeling part of that. That is definitely not something I have a ton of experience in, so it’s going to be massively valuable during my career.

What advice would you offer to your peers?

To discover an internship, think about what keywords you should put in a job search. Look at LinkedIn, Indeed, Monster Jobs, Zip Recruiter, or anything. Just apply for as many internships as you can, because the more you apply, the more options you have. It might seem really annoying and stressful to be applying for hundreds of internships, but that just gives you more options to choose what you actually want. It will give you a better chance of finding something you like in the long run.

If you don’t know what you want to do in any degree program, I would look at the different course descriptions for the different courses in that major and the topics of the different concentrations. Also, I didn’t get to use LinkedIn Learning until my fifth semester here, but I would absolutely use LinkedIn Learning. If I could just go back to my freshman year, I would have used LinkedIn learning. I would have looked up all the computer science concentrations and started doing independent learning through that. It’s a resource that Rowan provides with countless hours of coursework. It’s incredibly useful. I think everyone should use it, and it’s definitely something that Rowan doesn’t emphasize enough.

How did you choose your majors in Computer Science and Mathematics?

I guess I got lucky with computer science because it’s what I always knew I wanted to do. I can remember as far back as like seven or eight in elementary school. When I was a kid, I wanted to do stuff with computers. Then, I learned what programming was. I just knew that’s what was in store for me.

Jon sits in the Wilson amphitheater.

Math was always my best subject in school. I initially had it as a minor coming in because the computer science degree is most of the math minor. It’s two extra classes to get the minor. Then, I found out there was another minor in the math department called Applied Math. That was three more classes, so I figured, “Why not tack that on?” Then, I found out that the math department had the Bachelor of Arts, which was maybe three or four more classes to tack on. So I figured, “Why not?”

Can you tell us about any faculty who have particularly impacted your college career?

Three professors who stand out most for me are Dr. H. [Dr. Gabriela Hristescu] and Professor [Jack] Myers from the computer science department and Dr. [Charalampos] Papachristou from the math department. I had three different classes with Dr. H, and I was also a learning assistant in one of her classes last semester. She was also one professor in charge of the Computer Science Honor Society, Upsilon Pi Epsilon, which I was a member of for three semesters, and was also on the e-board for. Dr. H has been a very huge part of my entire college career. She wrote me a recommendation for the master’s program.

I had Professor Myers for two classes, and I’m taking another class of his this upcoming fall. He is one of the best people I know. I took his database class back in the spring of 2020. Without that class, I wouldn’t be in data science. I just absolutely loved it. I’ve had a couple of classes in college that I would consider to be my favorites. Database was my first favorite class. I told him I loved the class, and he recommended data science to me. So I looked into it, and I saw that it aligned with what I wanted to do. He also wrote me a recommendation for the data science master’s program. Without either of these professors, I wouldn’t be in the field. 

Dr. Papachristou (or Babis for short) is a statistics professor whom I’ve taken three classes with. It was the first stat class with him that made me decide to concentrate my math degree in statistics, which was instrumental in me choosing to go into data science.

Jon works on his laptop inside a classroom.

What are your career goals or outcomes after having obtained the 4+1 degree?

My department at Cooper was pleased with my work this summer and has asked me to continue working with them part-time during the semester. I was also planning on being an adjunct professor in the computer science department. I think it’d be a great way to give back to the people who helped me get where I am.

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Edited by:
Rachel Rumsby, senior communication studies and public relations major

Photos by:
Ashley Craven, junior sports communication and media major

Beyond the Classroom: Business Double Major Bryan Emery Interns for L’Oréal

Today we speak to Bryan Emery, a senior Marketing and Management double major from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County). He recently spoke with Rowan Blog on his internship with the the Rohrer Center for Professional Development. This summer, Bryan is interning at L’Oréal’s Jersey City and New York City offices. Bryan shares his experiences marketing in the beauty industry.

Can you give me an overview of your role?

I’m interning at L’Oréal. I am a Marketing Operations Intern, and I have a focus on digital. I’m currently working on the It Cosmetics brand. I’m in the eye and brow division of the team, so I work on eyeshadow, and mascara is my big thing.

Bryan smiles at his internship location.

The internship is split into a big project and daily tasks. My big project is mainly optimizing the targeting strategy for one of the 2023 launches, which is very exciting, and then my day-to-day consists of mostly competitive analysis. I also did some holiday-related work with their product display pages and then just a lot of just helping here and there, with other small projects.

My work is a lot of looking at data of what customers are saying, quantifying that, and then reporting that to top management. I never thought that I’d use Excel this much in my life. I’m happy that I took some classes that helped me with Excel.

Bryan sits in the Business Hall lobby stairwell.

The internship is on a hybrid platform. I’m required to be in the office for three days, and then I work from home for two days. IT Cosmetics has a satellite office in Jersey City, but our headquarters is in New York City. For all the intern-specific events, I have to go to the New York office, but I am mainly in Jersey city.

How were you able to get this opportunity?

I applied for the internship on their corporate website. From there was the first round in September, and the second round was in late September, and then I got my offer end of November. It was really quick, which was surprising, but I was also happy to have an offer so early. 

How did Rowan help to prepare you for the internship application process?

All the business events helped me learn to network within my cohort of student interns, but also with professionals. Specifically, at the Rohrer Center for Professional Development, the mock interviews and resume reviews have definitely helped me. Also, I don’t think I would have applied or been in the position to apply to this without the support of the faculty.

Bryan works in Business Hall.

Have any of your experiences at Rowan helped you so far in your internship?

Yes. I work for Rowan’s Rohrer Center for Professional Development, which is at the Rohrer College of Business, and that has been dramatically beneficial. I think it’s helped with presenting myself, but I also did some analytic work for the events that we did. Having prior experience working with excel and just being in the business environment definitely helps with my transition. Specifically, using Microsoft Office in the position was helpful. As students, we use Google or Canvas, so having Microsoft Office definitely helps because I would not have even known how to open an email.

As a marketing major, have any of your classroom experiences helped you in your role?

I’m learning a lot hands-on, but I think some classes built the base knowledge that was needed for me to understand what is happening at my internship. I took a digital marketing class at Rowan. A lot of the assignments that we had in class, such as creating a fake product display page and writing the copy, are tasks I am working on for actual products at a real company. That definitely helped me tremendously, because when people would use certain references, I’d be like, “Oh, like, I know what that means.” I think my Foundations of Analytics course and other marketing courses have allowed me to know what key performance indicators (KPIs) to look for and how to test with them, whether it’s statistically, or just using Excel. I think they definitely helped form a baseline from which I can get more in-depth experience and knowledge with an internship.

Bryan wears a branded L'Oreal t-shirt.

What is one thing you’ve taken away from your internship so far?

I have so many things I’ve taken away, but I think the biggest thing is adapting to new tasks and environments. You have to have some sort of agility when it comes to working in the business field, specifically in marketing. Everything changes so quickly. We students don’t really think of the environment and how, if one consumer stops doing X, Y and Z, how much influence that could have on the total market. I’m finding that it’s important to understand how small impacts can make a big change and how you have to react to them strategically.

How is this internship helping to push you toward your future career goals?

L’Oréal has an MT program, which is a management training program. Essentially, it’s an accelerated one-year duration, where I would transition from MT to assistant manager, depending on how that goes. My end goal is hopefully to get a full-time offer. Down the line, maybe a C-suite level position, Chief Marketing Officer, or maybe I’ll be CEO of my own marketing consulting firm, but I think I am going to stay in the beauty industry for a little longer. Time will tell.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, senior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, senior business management major 
Bryan Emery

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Students Look Forward to Clubs, Sports Teams, New Friends

Rowan University drone footage from above.

Today we feature incoming Exploratory Studies first year students Kelly Hector and Olivia Szumloz (she/her). Kelly is from Watchung, NJ (Somerset County) and will be living on campus. Olivia is from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County) and will also be living on campus.  Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Profs from the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences, Education

Image of prof statue near Robinson and James Halls.

Today we welcome incoming first year students from the College of Education and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Rowan University. Haley Hill (she/they) is from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County) and will be living on campus as an Education and History major. Gianna Burgio (she/her) is also from Williamstown, NJ and will be […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Rohrer College of Business Students

Picture of Business Hall.

Today we feature incoming first year students Hunter Sharp (she/her) and Jake Larocca. Hunter is from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) and will be commuting to campus as an Accounting major in the Rohrer College of Business. Jake is from Brick, NJ (Ocean County) and will be living on campus as an aspiring business major. […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Edelman College of Communication and Creative Arts Students

College of Communication & Creative Arts.

Today we feature incoming first year students Samantha Szumloz, Kyle Sheridan, Morgan Van Holtz and Donato Bazemore (he/him). Samantha is from Hamilton Township, NJ (Mercer County) and will be living on campus as a Writing Arts major. Kyle is from Galloway, NJ (Atlantic County) and will be living on campus as a Sports Communication and […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming College of Science and Mathematics Students

Exterior shot of Science Hall.

Today we feature incoming first year students Ariana Benitez, Soorya B., Abby Titus (she/they), Leila Underwood (she/her), and Dallas Hainsworth (she/her). Ariana is from Bergen County, NJ and will be living on campus as a Psychology and Exercise Science major. Soorya is from Princeton, NJ (Mercer County) and will be living on campus as a […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Introducing Students from the College of Performing Arts

Today we feature incoming CPA first year students Katherine Lanzerotti (she/her), Grace Hoeltje (she/her), Bella Campo (she/her), and Jeszenee Turner. Katherine is from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County) and will be living on campus as a Music Education in Vocal Performance major. Grace is from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County) and will be living on campus […]

Senior Reflects: Ella Emmer on Being PRISM President

Exterior shot of Bunce Hall lit in Pride colors.

Ella Emmer, a senior Psychology major with a minor in German from Somerset County, NJ, reflects on her experience as the PRISM club president and the legacy she hopes to leave on the organization.  

Ella has made her mark on Rowan University’s community. Her impact can be attributed to her efforts as PRISM president, an LGBTQ+ organization on campus.

“PRISM provides a safe space for members of the LQBTQ+ community to socialize, form friendships and be their true selves,” she says.

Ella stumbled across PRISM… literally.

“I got lost going to a study abroad meeting and I wandered into JoAnna Murphy’s office in the SJICR office. After we got to talking, she introduced me to PRISM. The meeting times fit with my schedule, so I started going to meetings regularly. I became really close with members of the e-board and passionate about activism, so I decided to run as secretary my sophomore year. After serving as secretary, I ran for president and have served in that role ever since,” Ella explains.

As president of PRISM, Ella manages a lot of events for the organization. “So much goes into planning and executing events for the club. I have to pick a venue, contract any guest speakers or entertainers that come out, and spearhead any fundraising necessary for the event.” 

Ella Emmer headshot in front of a PRIDE flag.

Ella was especially proud of PRISM’s role in the university’s Lavender Graduation ceremony, which recognizes and celebrates LGBTQ+ students and allies ahead of their respective college commencement ceremonies. 

“Lavender Graduation is very special to me. Since legal names have to be put on your diploma for graduation, it can oftentimes not reflect a person’s true identity. PRISM helps host a graduation that uses the person’s preferred name — their real name, to be recognized and honored for graduating as their true selves. I am speaking at the event and I could not be more proud to be a part of it.” 

Ella at the Lavender Graduation ceremony.
Ella (third from left) at the Lavender Graduation ceremony (credit: Desire Forman)

Along with hosting events, Ella leads e-board meetings as PRISM President. “During meetings, aside from preparing for events or upcoming fundraisers, we have an educational portion about LGBTQ+ history. Since LGBTQ+ history is not taught in schools, it is so important to learn about our history and all of the activists who got us here today,” she says.

As she reflects on her experience in the club, Ella looks back fondly on the memories she has made.

“I am really happy I got to be involved in an organization that makes a difference. Since I have been in PRISM, we have raised over $2,500 for LGBTQ+ organizations. This money has gone to not only big organizations, like The Trevor Project, but smaller organizations that aren’t as popular or advertised as well,” she says. “Aside from fundraising, I also worked with JoAnna Murphy with the SJICR to create a map for gender-neutral bathrooms on campus. This was a really important project to help others feel more comfortable on campus.”

Ella hopes the club continues to advance and do great things after she graduates.

“I hope the future of PRISM is bright and continues to make a positive impact for people in the community. Now that Covid is slowing down, I hope the new e-board can hold more events and partner with other organizations in the surrounding area for our members.” 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, public relations and advertising graduate

Photos courtesy of:
Ella Emmer
Desire Forman

ICYMI: Rowan University Dance Team Ranked Fifth in Nation

Group photo of Rowan Dance Team at Nationals.

This year, the Rowan University Dance Team competed at the Universal Dance Association (UDA) Nationals in Florida, where the team placed fifth in the Open Division Hip Hop category. Here, members of the Dance Team reflect on their time at the competition and talk about their dynamic as a team. 

What makes the Rowan Dance team different? 

Jordyn Dauter, a first-year Dance & Exercise Science from Quakertown, Pennsylvania says: “Everyone on the team has something unique to offer, whether that is something specifically to dance, or other elements like attitude or leadership skills. We all have something special to offer, which makes our team diverse.”

Teammate Amber Schott, a junior Psychology major from Bayville, NJ (Ocean County), adds, “Definitely the dynamic of the team. I made my best friends here at Rowan through this team and I always feel super supported and encouraged in reaching my dance goals.”

Rowan Dance Team outside at the Florida competition.

Senior Kaya Snow, a double major in Dance and Theatre Arts with concentrations in Acting and Musical Theatre from Oak Ridge, NJ (Passaic County), says, “We’ve really gone through some huge changes in the last few years and we’ve come out stronger through it all. I’m so glad that we decided to pursue UDA Camp and Nationals my sophomore year because it really has changed the entire dynamic of the team for the better.”

Kristin Mostrangeli, a sophomore Psychology major from Hamilton, NJ, (Mercer County) puts it simply: “Since we get to spend so much time together, we really become so close with each other as a team.”

Dance team outside

What is your most memorable memory with the team?

Junior Inclusive Elementary Education Bianca Moffa from Maple Shade, NJ (Burlington County), shares, “Hearing our university get called as a finalist qualifier will definitely be a core memory for sure. I am so proud to be a member of this team and to see all our hard work pay off by becoming 5th in the Nation in Hip Hop.”

Do you have a Rowan University or Dance Team experience you’d like to share?

Nicholette Voci, a junior Law & Justice and Psychology double major from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), says that “being able to dance at football games, volunteer events, and be in Florida with my best friends is the best experience anyone could ever have in college.”

Sophomore Sociology major Taryn Larsen from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), reflects on her time with the Rowan Dance Team by saying “it is the perfect mix of practice each week, meeting new friends and performing.”

A member of the Rowan Dance Team smiles at Nationals.

How was your experience at Nationals 2022?

Reflecting on her experience, Mia Tabasco, a first-year Sociology student from Haddon Township, NJ (Camden County), says, “It was so incredible. I’ve been dreaming of going to UDA for the longest time and I’m so proud of our team for making finals. We’re a new team and we made our names known.”

Sophomore Exercise Science major Adrianna Laezza from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County), shares that the journey to the UDA National competition was a big deal to her. “It was the best feeling in the world to perform on stage again. I got to compete at UDA which was a dream I have had since I was 12 years old.”

Valentina Giannattasio, a first-year double major in Dance and Marketing from Buenos Aires, Argentina, says, “It was definitely one of the best experiences of my life. I still cannot believe we performed there with all those astonishing dancers. I am proud of how far we have gone. Now we are Top 5 in the nation for Hip Hop!”

Dance team performing

What is the best part of being a member of Rowan University Dance Team?

Alyssa McAvoy, a sophomore Music Industry Technology and Business major from Shrewsbury, NJ (Monmouth County), says, “I love that I am still able to dance in college and the friends I have made through being on the team!” 

Junior Engineering Entrepreneurship major Isabel Rivera from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County), puts it simply. She says, “The best part about being a member of the Rowan University Dance Team is “being surrounded by people who will motivate you no matter what.”

First-year Spanish Education major Lily Cummings from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County), reflects on her first year on the Rowan Dance Team by saying, “It allows me to grow in my ability as a dancer and dance throughout college without it having to take up my whole life. It also provides so many exciting and memorable experiences along with amazing new friendships.” 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

Header photo courtesy of:
Rowan University Dance Team ProfLink



Beyond the Classroom: Bryan Emery, Intern for Rowan’s Rohrer Center for Professional Development

Bryan poses in front of Business Hall.

Today we speak to Bryan Emery, a junior Marketing and Management double major from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County). Bryan is an Event Management and Marketing Intern with Rowan’s Rohrer Center for Professional Development. Read on as he tells us about his majors and what he’s learning from his internship experience. Why did you decide to […]

#PROFspective: Leading the Student Body, Matthew Beck

Matthew Beck smiles and stands outside near the College of Engineering academic buildings on campus.

Matthew Beck, a senior Mechanical Engineering major within the Honors College, shares his #PROFspective as a Rowan student and President of Student Government Association (SGA). Matthew is from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County) and involved with many extracurriculars and clubs. He is an Admissions Ambassador, the Logistics Manager for Food Recovery Network, SGA President, and a member of Society of Automotive Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers and Rowan Environmental Action League

Why did you choose to study Mechanical Engineering? Have you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

I would not say I have always wanted to be a mechanical engineer. The main reason why I wanted to be an engineer was because I have always loved building stuff. As long as I was able to play with toys, I always had Bob the Builder toys and things like that, and this is what initially struck my attention.  

What really made me decide to become a mechanical engineer was because of a class I took freshman year of high school called Electronics I. In this class we learned the basics of engineering design and electric circuit analysis, which is how I fell in love with innovating, crafting and designing things. I think it’s awesome how you can go from having nothing to developing something that works and can be utilized. 

The one project that I think stood out to me most was when we built a speaker that you can plug into your phone. We built it completely from scratch, and I just really loved that project; it inspired me to take Electronics II the following year. I also took a 3D modeling course in high school that also made me realize I was very interested in engineering as a major. 

Matthew Beck smiling outside near the Engineering academic buildings.
Matthew Beck

Why did you choose Rowan to study Mechanical Engineering?

I have a few reasons on why I chose Rowan. Location wise, Rowan is close enough to home to where I can go home whenever I want, but also far enough from home to where I feel independent and on my own. I also like Rowan’s proximity to all the major cities of where I would potentially like to work in the future like Philadelphia, New York or even Washington DC.

The price of Rowan was another huge reason why I chose this university. The price of Rowan is one that I couldn’t really beat when comparing it to other colleges and universities.   

In general, the mechanical engineering program within the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering really stood out to me. I visited a ton of schools and I even applied to 11 different schools, and Rowan’s facilities and opportunities really stood out to me. When I was looking, Rowan had one newly renovated building and one brand new building for engineering, and it was cool to know it was rapidly expanding. 

I also was able to make connections with the administrators very quickly here. The Dean of the college at the time was a really good resource to me. He had an open door policy and was always guiding me and answering all my questions thoroughly. 

Matthew Beck in Rowan Hall.

How would you describe SGA (Student Government Association) to someone who is unfamiliar with it?

Student Government Association (SGA) is kind of like a governing and advocating body for students. The way we operate is kind of like a small business that oversees and kind of manages all the clubs and organizations on campus. We take our budget and we allocate it to all the clubs and organizations, so we help them make their events, make reservations, approve reservations, help them order food, and help provide them with all the resources that they need. 

We also advocate on the behalf of all the clubs and organizations. Any student at Rowan University always has the support of SGA. At any time anyone can come into our offices and we would be happy to help them and assist them with their needs.

Matthew Beck in a lab for engineering.

What is your role within the Student Government Association?

My biggest responsibility is making sure all operations associated with SGA are running smoothly. We have 14 different executive board members ranging from Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and more. My daily task is to make sure that everyone is held accountable and doing their specific tasks. 

Besides this task, I am able to pursue my own personal initiatives. I take time out of every day to answer my emails, to go and look at my initiatives, meet with administrators, and other tasks that voice student opinion.    

What are your goals and aspirations for the future of this association?

In general, I just want the students to be heard. One of the things that we are really focusing on as an organization is promoting the SGA so that people know who we are, what we do and how our actions can help the students. We have spent a lot of time brainstorming how we should promote and advertise ourselves. Overall, I just hope that we make the most positive change to the lives of the students at Rowan that we can.

Matthew Beck smiling in a lab room.

How did you get involved with SGA?

This is actually a funny story. In high school, I was not involved or really interested in student government. I was always a person who preferred to keep their head in the books and to keep themselves out of the spotlight. 

One day I decided I wanted to learn more about a certain club on campus. All I wanted was to receive more information on the club, and I was unaware of any information about the meeting that day. 

It turned out that there were SGA elections that day so the meeting was canceled. I was all upset sitting there because I wanted to hear more about this club and I thought it was rude to get up and leave during the elections, so I decided to just stay and listen and to vote for the elections. I got to the end of the elections and no one ran for SGA Senator so they asked if anyone in the audience was interested in taking on that role. At the time, I was interested in the club and I kind of just said yes. I think it’s funny that because I even joined the club, I was on the executive board. 

As the Senator, I went to the senate meetings every other Monday. I really enjoyed the experience and from there it just went on for me. I stayed very involved over the years and eventually I ran to be SGA President. This challenged me to step out of my comfort zone and a way to make sure I was giving my best to impact the lives of the students.

A close-up of tools Matthew Beck uses in mechanical engineering.

What have you gotten out of being part of SGA personally and professionally? 

I think a lot of the soft skills of working with administrators, working in and opening myself up to the business world, really contributed to how this experience helped me professionally. When I first started SGA, I was timid and was not used to the working world. This experience provided professional experience and equipped me with knowledge that I will be able to utilize in my future professional environments. Working with the Board of Trustees was an awesome experience. The board is composed of some of the most influential people at Rowan University, and it was really cool to network with them. 

Personally, I think this experience has definitely helped my public speaking skills, communication skills. It has expanded my comfort level and expanded my knowledge on simply dealing with people. This experience overall has truly expanded so many skills for me. 

How do you think your leadership role within SGA has prepared you for your future endeavors?

I think SGA has prepared me tremendously for my future endeavors and plans. First off, I think this experience is really going to help me when I aspire to move up in an organization. I have a good understanding of how a large organization like Rowan University runs.

I also think it will help me in my career because I already have a lot of experience of managing 15 plus people within SGA and then trying to help and guide an entire student body with the help of my colleagues. 

By major, I am an engineer as previously mentioned. This summer I will be entering into a very technical role at Lockheed Martin. I think my role within SGA has made me realize some things I would like to do in the future and the settings I would like to work in.

Matthew Beck sitting in a lab room.

What does a typical day for you look like? 

I like to make a habit of wellness everyday. With that being said, I like to have at least 30-60 minutes a day of mindfulness, or physical activity or even time to just take a walk outside in fresh air. I blocked off my mornings everyday from 7:30-10 a.m. to just have that time and the space for that. I have learned that the more things and responsibilities I have picked up, the more I value that time for myself and my wellness in my mornings.

On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays I am usually pretty busy with SGA, so I will head to my office hours from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. During this time I usually have 3-4 meetings for the day. On Monday nights I have executive board meetings from 5-7 p.m. and sometimes I also have night events that start at 7 p.m. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays are similar. I start with my wellness routine, then have class basically from 11 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Overall, my days are pretty jam packed and busy from the morning all the way till around 9 p.m.

Matthew Beck outside the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

Samantha Midili and Bianca Jeremiah: Two Women Leaders in a Male-dominated Industry

Samantha and Bianca ride their bikes outside the Rowan Tech Park area.

Samantha Midili, a senior Mechanical Engineering major from Ocean City, NJ (Cape May County), and Bianca Jeremiah, a junior Mechanical Engineering major with minors in Physics and Music from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County), share their experiences as women in the Society of Automotive Engineers Club at Rowan University. 

Samantha and Bianca are not just women in STEM: they are leaders and trailblazers in the engineering field.

Both are on the e-board of the Society of Automotive Engineers club on campus. Bianca describes the club as “an opportunity to not only do research and create designs but actually manufacture cars and bring those designs to life.”

She adds, “We get the opportunity to compete in an annual global competition. There are different areas of competition that your car can get judged on: the acceleration test, suspension test, maneuverability, endurance, and a business component that delves into the cost of building the car. This year, the competition is in Rochester NY, so we will have the opportunity to compete against other colleges in the area.”

Society of Automotive Engineers club photo
The Society of Automotive Engineers Club at a recent event.

Samantha, the leader of the Baja competition team, talks about her first experience when joining the club. “When I walked in, there was only me and one other girl in the room. It was intimidating and I felt out of place at first, but I stuck with it and I started driving cars. I am so glad I did because now I actually feel like I belong and that there’s a space for me here at Rowan. I can do something I love and feel empowered that I am one of few women that do it.” 

Bianca had a similar experience. “I joined the club as a freshman because I knew other people in the program recommended it. I remember my first project was to build a trebuchet for a pumpkin-chucking competition. After that, I was hooked. I started working on cars and began learning about machining, problem-solving and the importance of working with a team. The club has taught me how to work in intense situations and how to learn/think on the spot.” 

Bianca Jeremiah posing in front of car
Bianca Jeremiah

The Society of Automotive Engineers Club has given Samantha and Bianca the opportunity to learn in the classroom and then apply it. Samantha says, “Rowan is so unique because the program is so hands-on. In many other schools, you don’t get past conceptualizing a design or reading about it in a textbook. Here, you almost always get to create the design and make it come to life by manufacturing it.” 

Samantha Midili driving car
Samantha Midili

Bianca shares the same sentiment.

“Being a mechanical engineer means designing to manufacture. At Rowan, you get to go through the entire process of research, design, and implementation; just like in the industry. It is so interesting to get to execute every angle from start to finish and actually create something,” she says.

Although it may be difficult at times, both Samantha and Bianca are happy and proud to be leaders in a male-dominated industry. Samantha says, “My teammates respect me, look out for me, and have my back. We have a great sense of camaraderie, and we are always together. I really feel like we all come together as a team, regardless of our differences, because we just want to build a winning car.”

“I feel fortunate to be a part of a community where I feel accepted regardless of my identity,” Bianca says. “Sometimes I might be the only girl in my classes and that is overwhelming, but I always try and tell myself that if I made it here, I belong here. I want to be that inspiration for other women in the program, too. I want to know they are accepted and belong. Creating that space and opportunity for everyone is important to me.”

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

The (Abridged) Beginner’s Guide to Communication Studies

Brandon is smiling and gazing at the camera behind a forest.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook

When I first entered college, I was unsure about what I wanted. My friends all seemed so solid in their paths to becoming mechanical engineers, accountants or even psychologists. For a long time, this made me insecure about my own choices and, more often than not, my inability to make them. However, even with all of the trouble that I had faced with indecision, I realize now that I found my place in one of the broadest majors Rowan University has to offer: Communication Studies.

Brandon Simon is sitting on swing in the forest.

The most elusive thing about my major is its definition. What is communication studies? According to the University of Otago in New Zealand, communication studies can be described as “a study of how we communicate differently to various audiences/users and communities. It understands that communication is social, political, and media-based, and occurs in different contexts” (University of Otago).

This idea can be applied in countless different ways across two major tracks: Rhetoric/Cultural Criticism and Interpersonal/Organizational. This major gives students so many options when it comes to specializing in the specific fields of communication that they would like to study. While this freedom may sound like a good thing, students often can feel restricted when it comes to narrowing down their concentration and looking for a job.

Brandon is squatting down and smiling at the camera.

A graduate of communication studies can do anything with their degree. Some students in the Interpersonal track may find a job in human resources at a large company, while students in the Rhetoric track may go on to graduate school and conduct their own research. A minor or certificate of undergraduate study can also help guide students through this process. The number of opportunities out there can feel overwhelming, but the key is keeping an open mind and knowing how to market yourself and your acquired skills.

References 

What is Communication Studies. University of Otago, University of Otago, New Zealand. (n.d.). Retrieved February 3, 2022, from https://www.otago.ac.nz/mfco/about/otago040200.html

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Story by:
Brandon Simon, senior communication studies major, Wellness Center intern

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

Produced by:
Lucas Taylor, senior English education major

My Most Interesting Class: United States History to 1865

Ahmad looks to the side while leaning against a railing in Business Hall.

While senior Ahmad Conteh has pursued his degree in Finance through the Rohrer College of Business, one course he took from outside his major quickly became one of his favorites. Read on as Ahmad, a transfer student from Mercer County College, shares details on a class that took him centuries back in our nation’s past. […]

Beyond The Classroom: Entrepreneurship Major, Owner of Showtime Sneaker Boutiques, Christian Giannola

Today we feature Entrepreneurship major Christian Giannola. Christian, a senior, transferred freshman year from Monmouth University to increase his knowledge in business and entrepreneurship to assist him in running his full-time sneaker boutique business. Christian shares information on Showtime Sneaker Boutique and its two locations, how he started this business, and how Rowan helped him […]

Rowan Dance Major Gabrielle Langevine, Front and Center

Gabrielle dances with two spotlights shining on her from either side.

Dancing since she was 10 years old, sophomore Gabrielle Langevine of Middlesex County continues to study her craft at Rowan University’s College of Performing Arts. She is part of the Dance Extensions group and the university’s NAACP chapter. As a Black artist, she hopes to encourage future dancers of color not to “shrink themselves” but […]

Student Leader Lauren Repmann on Biomedical Engineering Major, 3D Printing Club Success

Lauren sits on a bench next to a white, sphere sculpture.

Today we speak to Lauren Repmann, a senior Biomedical Engineering major with a minor in Chemistry. Lauren is an on-campus resident from Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County). She is the 3D Printing Club founder and co-president, president of the Women in Engineering Club, and a student mentor for the Engineering Learning Community. Lauren works off campus at Tranquility Path Investment Advisors as an Administrative Assistant, and on campus at the Office of Admissions as an Admissions Ambassador.

Lauren poses in the woods.

What inspired you to choose your major?

My mom works as an engineer at AT&T, and I always knew that I wanted to follow in her footsteps. When it came time for me to choose my college major, I wanted to pursue a field that combined engineering with medicine, and Biomedical Engineering was the perfect choice.

As I look back on this decision, I see that there are so many other benefits of choosing Biomedical Engineering that I wasn’t aware of. I’ve developed a genuine understanding of how to approach problems and sticky situations from a logical perspective, and this skill will be useful for all aspects of my life. I’ve also gained confidence in my technical abilities, so much so that I founded a 3D Printing Club at Rowan University.

Most importantly, I’ve recognized the importance of using engineering to set an example for younger female generations. Engineering is known to be a male-dominated field, and reaching out to elementary, middle and high school girls about a potential career in engineering can help to reduce this stigma.

Lauren poses in front of a fountain.

Tell us something interesting thing that you’ve learned in a class this semester.

It’s my last semester as a Rowan student, and I wanted to take a fun class to celebrate! I’ve always enjoyed taking pictures, so I chose to enroll in Honors Digital Photography with Jenny Drumgoole. The coolest thing I’ve learned so far is how to take long-exposure photos. This type of photography is great for taking night-time photos because the camera shutter stays open for a long period of time to record the light. Even if the area where the photo is being taken seems dark, the long exposure photography style will allow light to creep in from peripheral areas. I’ve made lots of awesome photos with this technique, and I’ll definitely continue to use this skill after this course.

Lauren poses in a clearing.

Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.

My typical day at Rowan starts at Engineering Hall. I serve as the co-president of Rowan’s 3D Printing Club, so I’m always in the 3D printing lab to make sure everything is running smoothly. While I’m in the lab, I usually make finishing touches on my homework assignments and get ready for my classes. After about two hours in the lab, I leave for my 11 a.m. classes. My biomedical engineering course load this semester is very heavy, but I’m thankful to have my friends who always want to collaborate on homework and assignments! I usually spend some time with them after my classes are over at 2 pm.

After that, I run back to Engineering Hall to make progress on my engineering clinic project. I work in Dr. Staehle’s Systems Biology and Neuroregeneration laboratory, and my project focuses on assessing the toxicity of exogenous chemicals, including DEHP and BP-3, on planarian flatworms. After catching up on my experiments, I run down the hall to one of the engineering clinic classrooms to teach my Engineering Learning Community seminar. I currently have 18 freshmen engineering students as my mentees, and we have done lots of fun and productive activities together. My favorite has been the icebreaker bingo tournament. It really helped me to get to know my mentees! Once my seminar ends at 5 p.m/, I run down to the first floor of Engineering Hall to close the 3D Printing Lab, then my day is over! Finally getting back to my apartment after each long day is rewarding! I change into my comfy clothes, eat dinner and ice cream, call my parents, do some homework, then start all over again the next day!

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that makes you feel like Rowan is home.

Whenever I step foot in Rowan’s 3D Printing Lab at Engineering Hall, I feel like Rowan is home. When I was a sophomore, I became very interested in 3D printing. The ability to take an idea and turn it into an object that I could hold intrigued me. I taught myself how to use OnShape, a popular CAD software, and I produced lots of cool models that I wanted to 3D print! When I approach one of Rowan’s 3D printing labs to ask about printing my models, I was told that the printers are primarily used for academic purposes. I knew I was not the only student who wanted to print personal models, and I also knew that Rowan University’s 3D printing lab had the resources to offer a personal printing service.

With that knowledge, I worked with a friend to draft a 3D printing plan to present to the technicians at the Engineering Hall 3D printing lab. The technicians were completely on board with our idea, and we then began the club petitioning process through the Student Government Association. On October 12, 2020, we officially became a Rowan club, and in January 2021, we received funding to purchase filament and supplies.

Since then, Rowan’s 3D Printing Club has grown at an exponential rate. We have 75 members who consistently attend our meetings and events, and we even won Rowan’s Outstanding Student Organization Award for the Spring 2021 semester. I’ve always felt that home is a feeling that you have the power to create. Through this club, I’ve not only created the feeling of home for myself, but also for all the other Rowan students who want to become more engaged in 3D printing. There is a genuine sense of community and passion that one can sense immediately upon walking into the room during one of our general meetings or workshops, and that is my Rowan “home” feeling that I will cherish for my entire life.

See Lauren and learn more about the 3D Printing Club in this video. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

Related posts:

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Inside the M.S. in Biomedical Engineering Program with Rowan Global Student Brennen Covely

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

A Day in the Life of Communication Studies Major, Admissions Ambassador Coordinator Tiana Howard

Tiana poses in front of a wooded area.

Today we speak to Tiana Howard, a senior Communication Studies major with concentrations in Rhetorical Criticism and Honors. A first-generation college student from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County), Tiana is president of her sorority, Mu Sigma Upsilon, and a member of Rowan’s EOF program. Tiana works as an Ambassador Coordinator for Rowan Admissions, and she also […]

#PROFspective: Senior Communications Studies Major Jack Maisonneuve

Jack works on his laptop computer.

Today we feature Jack Maisonneuve, a senior Communications Studies major from Asbury Park, NJ (Monmouth County). Jack is a photographer for Rowan Blog and speaks with us today about his love for photography and his experience within his major.

Why did you choose your major?

I chose my major because I figured it would be broad enough where I could continue pursuing my photography career, while also exploring other aspects that I found interesting that Rowan had to offer.

Tell us about one moment that made you feel like Rowan was the right fit for you.

When I joined my club that I’ve been a part of for four years now (Rowan Alternative), it made me find crowds that I enjoyed being with, as well as help me find some of my lifelong friends.

Did you ever have a moment of uncertainty within your major? How did you get through the challenge?

I was uncertain that communications would be for me, and well actually I’m still pretty uncertain of it. But communications helped me find that I’m interested in aspects of research and communications in itself, and that’s what made me stick with it.

What are you most looking forward to after graduation?

Moving out! No, but getting to experience the professional world and finding my career.

Are you involved in any clubs/organizations on or off campus?

I’m involved in Rowan Alternative as well as being a founding consultant for Rowan Photo Club.

Jack playing the drums in his room.

How did you get into photography?

One of the classes I took here during my sophomore year! I had [Prof.] Jenny Drumgoole … for photos, and she inspired me to want to become a photographer.

If you could have a photoshoot with someone famous, who would it be and why?

Henry Rollins from Black Flag. He’s my number one hero; I aspire to be like him when I grow up. I think he’s a very worldly person, and he has a lot of interesting things to say.

Who or what inspires you to create? 

What inspires me to create and shoot are the people I get to work with, and my surroundings.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I see myself working for a music magazine company of some sort, and getting to do what I love most, which is concert photography.

Jack smiling in front of a gray background.

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Story and photos by:
Missy Pavorsky, junior advertising major

M.A. in Criminal Justice Student Says it’s “Never Too Late” to Earn a Master’s Degree

Angela sits under a tree with Bunce Hall in the background.

Meet Rowan Blog guest contributor Angela Damiano, a student in the M.A. in Criminal Justice Online program through Rowan Global. After earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology with a concentration in forensic psychology, Angela set off into the workforce. Here, she shares her hesitation at going back to school, the differences she feels between being […]

Music Industry Major Pharaoh Freer’s Big Break

Pharaoh sits on a bench near James Hall.

Today we feature Pharaoh Freer, a sophomore Music Industry major from Jamesburg, NJ (Middlesex County). Over the summer, Pharaoh had the opportunity to work on a movie set as an extra! Pharaoh shares his experience on set with us and how it has impacted his life. 

Can you tell us a little about yourself?

My name is Pharaoh Freer, and I’m a sophomore Music Industry major. I went to a school in Philly before I came to Rowan. Before going there I didn’t really know what I was doing when it came to school. That school was my chance to show myself and others that I can do school. Prior to that, I didn’t really think I would end up at Rowan. I’m still living in the “Wow, I’m really here!” Other than that, I’m an artist and a rapper. My goal for right now is to make my mark on Rowan.

Pharoah smiles in front of Wilson Hall.

You were recently in a movie! What was the experience like for you?

My aunt works for Turner Broadcasting in Atlanta. Somebody she knew was a movie director and he let her know that they needed a few extras. My parents flew me out the next week. It was so fast. The movie was filmed at my aunt’s house. You had to see it! Her house is so big and modern, which is why they asked to film there.

I get there and all the movie stuff is set up: microphones, cameras, all of it. I’m just thinking, “Wow, this is really a movie.” All the stuff behind the scenes was almost like a movie itself.

The scene they needed me for was a church scene. I had to wear certain attire and I needed a haircut. But I was doing more than just my scene. I was helping the director, I was taking COVID temperatures, and doing other stuff like that. It was super crazy!

Pharaoh walks on a path near James Hall.

Would you ever do something like that again?

I definitely would! I’m already a musician. Music, acting, fashion, all of that comes hand in hand. After my experience in Atlanta, all I thought about when I got back to New Jersey was, “I want to make a movie! I need to direct my own movie!” I’m the type of person where if I see something and I feel like I can accomplish it then I want to do it! 

Did you go to the premiere? 

Yes! There were two premieres. One in Atlanta that I went to see and a premiere in Michigan. There weren’t a ton of people but enough people to show that the director really had a lot of support. It’s not a crazy big movie, but seeing the community really come out in support made me want to move to Atlanta. 

Pharaoh looks ahead near James and Wilson Halls.

Tell us a little bit about “Broken Covenant: The Movie.” 

I’ll sum it up in a nutshell. It’s basically all about family, love and trust. I’m telling you, the movie is crazy! 

Has the experience made you want to get more involved in the film industry?

I want to do it all! One thing about me is I try to do everything I set my mind to. I want to do movies, music, fashion, everything! After my first experience in Atlanta I told myself, “The next time I come out here to do a movie, I’m going to have a bigger role.” I’ve always loved acting and I’ve started to take becoming an actor more seriously along with my music. 

Read Pharoah’s first-person take on the lessons he’s learned on his journey to becoming a Rowan Prof here

Pharaoh sits and smiles with Wilson Hall in the background.

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Story By:
Bianca Gray, senior English major

Photos By:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

First Year Voices: Musical Theatre Majors Olivia Frankenbach and Liz Baginski

Olivia and Liz sit outside Holly Pointe Commons.

Meet College of Performing Arts students Olivia Frankenbach of Lambertville, NJ (Hunterdon County) and Liz Baginski of Metuchen, NJ (Middlesex County), who share the theatre experiences they’re looking forward to this year.  “I love Rowan. I knew when I chose this school I would be happy here and my opinion hasn’t changed. I’m looking forward […]

Andrew Slowinski, 2021 Rick Rosenberg Jr. Memorial Scholarship Recipient

Exterior shot of Robinson Hall.

Today we feature Andrew Slowinski, a junior Political Science major. Andrew also minors in Economics and is from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County). Andrew shares his internship experience this past summer as a recipient of the 2021 Rick Rosenberg Jr. Memorial Scholarship.  

According to the Rowan Institute of Public Policy and Citizenship (RIPPAC), the scholarship awards $2,500 for a student to take an unpaid summer internship “and aspire to pursue a future political career like the late Rick Rosenberg, Jr., the Republican political operative.”

    What got you interested in political science?

    Back in my junior year of high school I took a class called Political and Legal Education because the class I originally wanted to take was not available. I decided to take this class after having a few options to choose from. I quickly realized that I really liked learning about the political science field and I thoroughly enjoyed taking the class.

    During the class there was a legal chapter where we had to do a mock trial, which I thought was very fun. After that class I decided to make a career out of it.

    Andrew Slowinski.
    Andrew Slowinski

    How did you find out about the Rosenberg scholarship?

    Professor Dworkin introduced me to this scholarship and internship opportunity. I met Professor Dworkin through a club I am part of called the Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship (RIPPAC). He told me to check out the RIPPAC internship scholarships available, and that is how I found the Rick Rosenberg, Jr. Memorial Scholarship.

    What are your responsibilities in your internship?

    I interned at the New Jersey Office of the Public Defender, and I had several responsibilities for the summer. First off, my supervisor would send me documents, court reports and testimonies to look over and prepare for upcoming court that we had. I would outline key sections that would be of value to us, write questions for cross-examination and write memos. An example of a memo I have written was a memo for reconsideration and I would apply it to a case we currently have because the judge ruled it not the way we hoped … therefore we ask for reconsideration.

    The internship took place over the whole summer, and we had court at least five times a week.

    Andrew (left)with friends Brandon, Tyler, and Joey at Joey's sisters wedding.
    Andrew (left) with friends Brandon, Tyler, and Joey at Joey’s sister’s wedding.

    What are your professional goals?

    After undergrad I will be attending law school; I am not sure on where I want to get my law degree from yet. From there I am still deciding on whether I want to become a lawyer or a judge for my future profession. 

    What advice do you have for other students seeking political science internships?

    Networking is imperative when it comes to seeking out any internship or scholarship opportunities. I reached out to Professor Dworkin, and he helped me build a well-written resume. In high school I interned for a U.S. congressman because my mom’s friend is a supervisor and she assisted in helping me get that internship at such an early age.

    Networking and reaching out to friends or family that may work in your area of interest is huge when starting out. 

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    Story by:
    Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

    Photos courtesy of:
    Andrew Slowinski

    Header photo courtesy of:
    University Publications

    Finally Face to Face!

    Three friends pose in front of Bunce Hall.

    Today, we speak to Rowan students who are excited about being physically present in class when we return to campus in the fall. 

    Rachel sitting outside the Rec Center.

    “I’m really looking forward to going to more in-person classes and looking to join clubs. It’s been hard to get involved and talk to people in my classes because everyone is behind a screen. In the few classes that I have in person, I’ve already made connections, and it makes a huge difference. I can’t wait to make more friends next fall!” says Rachel Bonhomme, a Math and Education major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

    Bri poses at the gazebo by Bunce Hall.

    “I would really love to join a sorority next year. Just being part of a sisterhood sounds amazing!! I am really excited to open that chapter of my life at Rowan,” says Bri Solomon, a Biochemistry major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

    Tammy posing for a picture in front of a city landscape.

    “I’m currently in the Vietnamese Student Association at Rowan. I encourage people who’s interested in learning the culture/language or anyone down to have a good time to join. I really enjoyed being in this club so far,” says Tammy Nguyen, a first-generation college student and Early Childhood Education major from Lawnside, NJ (Camden County).

    Jayshalie leaning and sitting by the Engineering fountain.

    “I am most looking forward to being able to have classes and more activities in person. As a current [first year], I am really looking forward to in-person activities to be able to get the full college experience,” says Jayshalie Jennings, Secondary Education (Mathematics) major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County).

    A selfie of Gabrielle.

    “I am looking forward to dancing, of course. I could dance, thankfully, at home in my basement all school year, but I hope to dance in a studio. The last time I did that was March 10, 2020,” says Gabrielle Langevine, a Dance major from Middlesex County, NJ.

    Sumayyah posing with a piece of artwork.

    “Being able to work in the studios again and have more free time by doing so!” says Sumayyah Hayes, first-generation college student and Art major from Burlington County.

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

    Sneak Peak into the Theatre – Design/Technical Program and its Stagecraft Class

    Someone measures a line on a piece of wood.

    Today we share moments from our conversation with College of Performing Arts students Michael Landolfi and Jenna Hope during a session of their Stagecraft Fundamentals class. We asked them about their favorite parts of their majors and the course itself.

    Michael Landolfi is a sophomore Theatre major with a concentration in Theatre – Design/Technical

    Why did you come to Rowan?

    “I recently just transferred from the Music Industry program so it was actually the major that made me want to come to Rowan. I also like that it is fairly close to home but not too close. It was important to me to be close enough to home where I could see family but still be able to explore a new area.”

    In the Stagecraft Fundamentals course, have you found anything you are particularly passionate about that you did not think you would like? 

    “I definitely have taken an interest in woodwork and carpentry more than I thought I would have.”

    Michael in class.
    Michael Landolfi

    Can you tell me about the relationships you have between the staff here? 

    “Especially the staff in the theatre department and the staff in the music program … [t]hey all have been pretty open with communication. Several professors have helped me figure out what trajectory I am taking in terms of what I am learning here and what I want to do in the future.” 

    What made you change your major?

    “I personally did not like taking business classes … [t]here were quite a few of those classes I had to take. Also I have also always loved live sound, and that is mainly what I am trying to get a career in because those jobs are more secure than trying to land a job as a music producer or a performer in general.” 

    A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals.
    A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals

    What is your favorite class so far?

    “Stagecraft Fundamentals is pretty great. Starting to get involved in the theatre department and stuff has been a really good experience. I also enjoy a Social Problems class I have taken that is completely not related to my major. I just needed to take it for credits, but I heavily enjoyed it.”


    Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.
    Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.

    Jenna Hope is a transfer junior Musical Theatre major; however, she will be switching to the Theatre – Design/Techical major. 

    What made you want to change your major?

    “What made me change my major was the fact that I felt like I was not able to use my hands as much, and getting to take classes like Stagecraft Fundamentals in my first year was something that really made me realize that design and tech is something that makes me really excited. Things like carpentry and costuming are so interesting and also simply fun for me.”

    A picture of a power saw used in Stage Craft Fundamentals.

    Out of all the elements in design and tech, what would you say your favorite is?

    “Out of all of them I would say carpentry, but I really have a soft spot for costuming even though I have not gotten to do it yet.”

    Can you tell me about some things that you have made in your Stagecraft Fundamentals class?

    “We made a couple of different things … sadly most of the things we make in class are for productions we are holding in the semester, but with Covid we were unable to put on the amount of productions that we would have liked to so we did not have that many sets or props to make. With that being said, we have been making birdhouses this semester as a little project for everybody.”

    What advice would you give to a person who is interested in the major but unsure of design and tech?

    “I think they should just take Stagecraft because it gives total insight to the major. Asking for help is also so important. Just because you need assistance or help does not mean you cannot partake in something you enjoy.”

    Stage Craft Fundamentals students using a power saw.
    Associate Professor Tom Fusco (left) works with Jenna (center) and another student using a power saw.

    See more from the Stagecraft Fundamentals class in this video. 

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    Story By:
    Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

    My Favorite Class: American Material Culture

    Anthony stands with Bunce Hall far in the distance.

    This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

    Today we speak with recent graduate Anthony Raisley. He earned a degree in History with a concentration in U.S. History and multiple minors in Entrepreneurship, New Media, International Studies as well as a CUGS (Certificate of Undergraduate Studies) in Italian! Anthony comes from Middletown, NJ in Monmouth County and lived on campus all four years of college. 

    Tell me about your favorite class at Rowan.

    There are a few! I have a favorite class for [each of my concentrations]. As far as History courses, one of my favorite classes was the U.S. Since 1945. We studied recent history. That’s my favorite period of American history, post-World War II and on to the present. Even now, I’m taking a class with Dr. Jennifer Janofsky called American Material Culture, it’s an aspect of history that a lot of people don’t realize — for example, the music, decor, and clothes.

    A lot of people think of History majors and history in general as date-oriented or event-oriented, but there’s so much more to it. The development of different things is also part of history. I find that class very interesting because it’s basically from the Civil War and on.

    Can you share why history is relevant to people who are not History majors? 

    For example, we can look at technology and how much of a role it has played in our lives, and its development. Fifty to 60 years ago, the refrigerator, oven or microwave were just starting to develop. Now we obviously see with our computers or phones just how that has certainly changed over time. The computers were massive, and now we basically have a computer in our pocket.

    I think it’s important for non-history majors to realize that we live in history, and we’re living through it now (obviously with Covid). It’s certainly all around us. Even in car culture, there’s so much technology now within cars, the role of cars, and how that has changed in the development of our neighborhoods. [There is] so much around us that a lot of people don’t realize is history.

    Anthony stands under a tree wearing a pastel yellow shirt.

    Do you ponder on the sociological impact of technology in history? 

    The first [TVs were in] black and white, now we have color TVs. Now the TVs are even smaller, thinner and bigger. Just the channels and the content you can watch [now] have expanded over time. There used to be only six or seven channels 40 years ago; now we have over 500. There are so [many] things out there for people to see and learn.

    What makes the professor of this class so wonderful?

    She’s been teaching this class for a while so she’s very knowledgeable. This is her area of expertise. She really connects it to the present as well. It all ties back to the present. We actually just did a class discussion on the Coney Island Amusement Park. Over a hundred years ago when Coney Island first opened up, it was a totally new concept. Now we [have] places like Six Flags. A hundred years ago that would have been a totally foreign thing.

    Anthony gazes into the sun in front of Bunce Hall wearing all light colors.

    How did this class help to support your academic or professional growth? 

    I really like public history because of this class. I had never taken too many courses focusing on public history, especially on material culture. I think that definitely prepares me for my master’s degree next year. It’s a great foundation and will help prepare me going forward.

    Where do you see yourself in the future? 

    I hope to work in communications for either a private company or for public officials in the government. I see myself working in media, [although] I’m not entirely sure [on the specifics] yet, but I [have] a general idea. Most likely for a public official doing communication or research for them. I think that’s something that I see myself doing since I’m going to be down in DC.

    Anthony skate boards underneath the Rowan arch.

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    Story by: 
    Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

    5 Interesting On-Campus Jobs

    Rowan Blog student worker Bianca on the job at a photo shoot.

    Finding the right on-campus job can change your whole college experience, leading you to important connections, helping you discover your career goals or letting you find the right school/work/life balance. Five students share their experiences in some of the most interesting, beneficial and well-paid jobs on campus!

    Summer Conference Assistant – Chase Campbell

    Chase Campbell smiles for his portrait in front of Bunce Hall.

    Advertising major Chase Campbell of Burlington County worked as a Summer Conference Assistant for the Office of Conference & Event Services in 2019. As part of a staff of eight students, Chase worked and lived with his teammates! This job offers a stipend and free summer housing. He found this job through the Rowan Announcer and attended an informational session.  

    Some of the responsibilities in this job included helping people check into the conferences, preparing residential and event spaces and taking turns being the 24/7 customer service representative for the events. Chase learned the importance of being himself rather than just being the “perfect customer service representative.” He enjoyed speaking with clients and helping them feel welcome to the university with kindness. Look out for this job if you enjoy working on a team and assisting people! 

    Academic Success Coach – Alee Rebillon

    Alee works on her laptop and chats with a friend.

    Alee Rebillon, a senior Psychology major from Mercer County, worked as an Academic Success Coach her junior year for one semester. She found this opportunity through an email listing Federal Work-Study (FWS) options. She also spoke to their department staff at the on-campus Fall Job Fair. As a psych major, Alee felt this would give her great experience in working with people one-to-one. Although, Academic Success Coaches come from all different majors and walks of life! 

    Alee worked with fellow students who needed guidance in lots of different areas! Such as, who to speak to if they want to change majors, where to find a student organization, or even how to make a schedule for themselves. She learned so much about herself, other students, and the university from this job. She has helped people receive supports through the Wellness Center and Tutoring Services; she also walked students through how to use The Shop or Prof Jobs. If you want to help other students by being a relatable source of guidance, this job is for you! 

    Picking Peppers with President Houshmand – Dyone Payne

    Dyone holds a bucket of peppers fresh from the farm.

    Public Relations major Dyone Payne, a senior from Gloucester County, worked for Dr. Houshmand, Rowan University’s president, on his local farm picking peppers and several other vegetables. They use the peppers to create the famous Houshmand’s Hazardous Hot Sauce, which is processed in a factory (by professionals) in Bridgeton. All proceeds from the Hot Sauce go towards the Student Scholarship Fund. The amazing part of this job is that they work to support students on all levels of operation in the making of this hot sauce. A team of students, Houshmand, and his staff go out to the West Campus farm throughout the spring and summer to begin the process. 

    Dyone remembers enjoying the hands-on experience and learning so much about the different kinds of peppers and sauces. The ghost peppers went into the hottest flavor, the mushroom peppers were the mildest peppers, and jalapeno peppers also went into the mildest sauce. She also shared how kind the staff was, always making sure the students were hydrated and offering transportation to and from the farm. Another responsibility of this role was selling the Hot Sauce (and Hot Sauce merch) at university football games, basketball games, and university holiday parties. She enjoyed being able to connect with the university staff and see that they truly understand the students’ struggles. 

    Dyone found this job through Rowan emails and contacted the president’s staff. She learned important life skills such as the importance of patience and taking your time. She also appreciates the president’s mission, even more, knowing that he is genuinely kind and interested in caring for Rowan students. Dyone also recalls the students having to leave their phones (because the pepper residue may get to your eyes and face through your phone). This helped the students to connect with each other and forge strong friendships. She absolutely adores plants and keeps a lovely mini garden oasis in her room now!

    Engineering Intern – Jed Vergara 

    Students working in the RU Sustainable Facilities Center with faculty.

    Students working in the RU Sustainable Facilities Center with faculty (Jed Vergara not pictured).

    RU Sustainable Facilities Center – Rowan University + NJARNG (NJ Army National Guard) Building Information Modeling (BIM) Intern

    Jed Vergara worked as a Building Information Modeling (BIM) Intern for more than two years as a Rowan undergraduate. This internship was under Rowan’s Sustainable Facilities Center in contract with the NJ Army National Guard (NJARNG). It’s offered as both a part-time job as well as an engineering clinic on campus. He first discovered this role at the beginning of his sophomore year after a professor shared the opportunity because of Jed’s stellar grades. 

    The internship also offers different roles in the operation. Some interns would inspect recruitment centers across NJ for the Army National Guard, and others like Jed worked on building information modeling (BIM). BIM is basically cataloging several parts of a building such as spatial measurements, construction materials, HVAC, electrical or plumbing. In the 50 years the buildings have been around, there have been so many refurbishments added that no single catalog of the buildings records all of the changes. Rowan was contracted to change this and catalog every NJARNG recruitment center in the South Jersey area. 

    Jed was able to work with a 3D laser scanner and connect individual room scans into a large model of the building on a program called Revvit. The basic three-step process of his internship was to scan the building, consolidate all of the scans, and finally add the details. He greatly appreciates this internship experience because he works with images of building scans as a Structural Engineer. He also found that his experiences with different computer programs proved to be very valuable in his career. Many times, Jed had to quickly learn how to use a program and help others learn how to use it as well. Another valuable lesson he learned was how to plan effectively and efficiently. This internship is open to civil engineering majors, electrical & computer engineering majors (ECE) and mechanical engineering majors. This department is located within Rowan Hall (the original Engineering building).

    Rowan Blog Digital Content Contributor – Bianca Torres

    Bianca stands confidently in front of a brick building on Rowan Boulevard.

    Lastly, we speak with Bianca Torres, a Music Industry major and senior from Morris County, who works as a fellow Digital Content Contributor for Rowan Blog. Bianca helps the blog run smoothly in so many different ways! She not only creates content for the Admissions page, but she also contributes to the Humans of Rowan Instagram and other Rowan social media platforms. Bianca finds ways to market the school to incoming first year and transfer students. She loves sharing the vibrancy of campus life through stories. She started off creating music for the background of Rowan’s YouTube videos. She has since branched out into photography, writing articles, interviewing leads and strategy (planning stories and Google Ads). Bianca appreciates how much knowledge she has learned about journalism and marketing in this role. 

    She really enjoys working with fellow college students and diving into the campus culture (which helps her with networking). The schedule is super flexible and was perfect for working during the pandemic because it can be remote and you can work whenever you choose. She enjoys how much freedom she has gotten in this job, being able to pitch stories and share so many unique perspectives at Rowan. This real-world experience has taught her how to market effectively to different target audiences. Knowing that the skills she uses every day, such as blogging and creating graphics for social media, she feels confident in her career goals. Without this job, Bianca would not have known that she wants to do digital marketing for the music industry.  

    Bianca found this job through an email from the program director of the music industry program. She advises students looking for student jobs to start looking as soon as possible and ask their professors if they know of any openings! Many professors have side gigs and know other connections on campus. She also says to check if you qualify for Federal Work-Study (FWS). If you enjoy connecting with people and making creative content, working for Rowan Blog is for you.

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    Story by:
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

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    Profs Abroad: Stephanie in Paris (and Other Parts of France)

    Stephanie wears glasses and a red beret smiling at the camera with a green forest in the background.

    Today we speak with Stephanie Ibe, who graduated in the Spring of 2020 and majored in Biological Sciences with a minor in French and an Honors and Pre-med concentration. Stephanie stayed in Le Havre, France for seven months while working as a teaching assistant through the TAPIF Program. Stephanie comes from Franklin Park, NJ in Somerset County. She was involved in MAPS (Minority Association of Premedical Students), Res Life as an RA/ARD, research labs, tutoring, RUPAC (Rowan University Philippine American Coalition), Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED – Premed Honors Society), University Chorus, and mentoring through the Dr. Harley E. Flack program.

    What happened after you arrived in France?

    After I arrived, I had to go through all these different transportation modes to go from Paris to Le Havre and my phone wasn’t working! I had to navigate the entire thing just by talking to people and from reading signs. I don’t know how I ended up making it to Le Havre. It was raining, too. It was a bit of a shock to just be thrown in and use [only] French right away. 

    I had a Prof Référente (Referent Teacher) with whom I could communicate through Facebook. She was so helpful. She helped me find my place to stay because the high school that I worked at didn’t have housing available for me. So she asked another high school nearby if I can stay there and it ended up working out. She picked me up from the train station once I arrived. She gave me bed sheets and a week’s worth of groceries. I was lucky to have good support over there.

    Picture of “La Funiculaire” (little train Stephanie had to take to get up to her apartment). It is about 5 feet wide and maybe 6 feet tall with paintings of flowers on the side.
    “La Funiculaire” (little train) Stephanie had to take to get up to her apartment.

    Was it scary having to talk in French to French people? 

    I was honestly really scared when I first arrived because it wasn’t the same as “classroom French.” I’ve never studied abroad before, so I never knew what it was like to actually speak French in France. I went to France once when I was in high school, but I always had my teachers there to help us. This time, I was by myself. I had to use my French, especially when I had to explain things to my students. Sometimes they didn’t understand what I was saying in English, so I would have to translate in French.

    You get used to it after a while. There’s a lot of slang I need to learn as well as very technical vocabulary. I had to open a bank account in France and I didn’t know any banking vocabulary, so it was a bit difficult. I also observed the biology lab classes in one of the high schools. Even small things, like DNA, were switched. It was ADN.

    Stephanie wears a red beret in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

    Your brain automatically switches to your second language after being immersed in it for a while. It’s also easier to learn different languages when you are able to see the connections between languages. When I was there, I tried to practice my Spanish with the Spanish assistants. It’s a lot easier when you’re talking to someone that’s native to that language. They can tell when I am making a mistake and they don’t feel shy to correct me and give me feedback because they are teachers. It’s what they do. 

    What other countries were your fellow assistants from?

    I met assistants from Spain, Germany, England, Northern Ireland, Los Angeles, Colorado, New York, Kenya, Russia and Jordan.

    Stephanie and the other TAPIF assistant poses by a giant building in Normandy, France.
    Stephanie (bottom, right) at Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy

    What was your favorite memory (outside of being a teaching assistant)?                 

    Spending all of my time with the assistants because that’s all we really had. Everything was closed after one week of me being there. We didn’t have museums or restaurants to go to. All we had was each other. I was lucky to live right next to the beach, so I had a lot of beach days. It was only a 20-minute walk to the beach. Having that space to get out, explore new places, and take my beach days were fun.

    Fancy French food on a white plate prepared by a culinary student in France.
    Meals from the student restaurant

    I worked 12 hours a week, 5 days a week, a few hours each weekday. In France, they start school at 8 a.m. and finish at 5:20 p.m. They get two 15-minute breaks as well as an hour and 20 minutes for a lunch break. They can do whatever they want during their break, like walk around town and eat anywhere. A lot of my students would go home and eat lunch. They also take the public bus to school, not a singular school bus.

    Fancy French dessert on a white plate prepared by a culinary student in France.
    Dessert from the student restaurant

    What was your favorite meal in France?

    I ate a lot of vegan food because most of [the assistants] were either vegan or vegetarian. I really liked it because I never knew you could do so much with such little ingredients because the vegan diet is so restricted. They can’t eat any meat or dairy, or even honey. But, you can do so much with spice. We would always have potluck dinners. Also, the food at my high school was so fancy because [the students] are training to be proper chefs. They would practice making fancy French desserts and sophisticated dishes. French school meals are also very balanced and affordable.

    Photo of French school lunch showing a well-balanced and delicious meal.
    School lunch in Le Havre, France

    What was the most interesting thing you learned about France?

    I guess, how welcoming everyone was! I watched Emily in Paris right before I left and I had this idea in my head. “I’m going to be all by myself and they’re going to shoo me away because I’m American.” But no, everyone was so welcoming! When you’re walking down the street, everyone says “Hello, how are you?” Even though you’re complete strangers. When I first got back, I wanted to have a conversation with my cashier like in France.

    Stephanie plays a ukelele while sitting on a beach in Le Havre, France.
    Stephanie plays the ukulele at a beach in Le Havre

    What was your favorite souvenir?

    My favorite souvenir was a ukulele. I had to get rid of a lot of clothes and a pair of shoes to fit the ukulele! I only came with one suitcase, one carry-on, and one backpack. I ended up leaving a lot of shirts. I traded with other assistants. For example, I gave some of my Rowan shirts. I traded them for a Spanish white sweatshirt from Granada as well as a Spanish jean jacket. I also bought real lavender. It is really cool because it keeps its scent for a really long time. It made my luggage smell amazing!

    Is there anything else you’d like to tell me about your time in France?

    The overall experience made me think about how it felt like to be a foreigner in another country, which is something that a lot of us have not experienced. It made me really think about how it might have felt for my mom who came from the Philippines to the U.S.

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    Story by: 
    Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major and Stephanie Ibe, biological sciences graduate

    Related posts:

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    Studying Abroad in Japan: The Best Decision I Have Ever Made

    Amber’s Study Abroad in Spain

    Beyond the Classroom: Kevin McCarthy and His Time with SGA

    Kevin smiles wearing a gray Rowan t-shirt with Bunce Hall in the distance.

    Today we speak with Kevin P. McCarthy, a recent graduate from Cranford, NJ (Union County) with degrees in Political Science and Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management. He was an RA (Resident Assistant) for three years in Holly Pointe, Chestnut Hall and Triad Apartments. Kevin was also heavily involved in the Student Government Association (SGA) as well as Rowan EMS.

    How did you get involved with SGA? 

    At the federal work-study career fair, SGA had a table looking for student workers. They hired me but I also had an offer from IRT doing something that was a little bit more in [tune with] my major. But, I decided to go with SGA. I ran for the senator-at-large position. It was a mid-semester election. I served one semester as the senator-at-large. Then I ran for vice president of government relations. I’ve been there for three years. 

    What have you gotten out of being part of SGA personally and professionally? 

    I helped pass the Student Wellness Fee my sophomore year. It was introduced as a $50 fee and it wasn’t well-discussed in e-board, so it failed miserably at the Senate. 

    We had our CFO at the time rally against it. It lost by 125 to 10. I spent the rest of the year working with Arielle Gedeon, who [later became] President. At the time, she was the Recording Secretary. I worked with her and a couple of other e-board members in order to get the fee reshuffled and changed. Eventually, we put it up during the series 2 elections for a $30 fee to support Rowan EMS and the Wellness Center in hiring more counselors and physical health providers as well as providing free medications and other free [items] for students. During the series 1 elections, it tied exactly at 250 to 250. So, we put it in front of the Senate. Arielle and I talked for 45 minutes, then we were discussing and debating the bill.

    Kevin and Leah sit on the marble steps of Bunce Hall wearing Rowan t-shirts and glasses.

    It provided so many critical things like vehicle replacement for Rowan EMS. People spoke out against the Wellness Center charging per visit [preventing students from reaching out for help]. They were planning on charging Insurance in charging a copay. I have good insurance; my mom works for a hospital up north. However, it is one of those in-network kinds where if [the treatment] was connected to the hospital it cost $5, but if it’s not connected in any way it cost $100. So a Wellness Center bill for me would cost over $100. I really advocated for the bill and eventually, it passed. 

    I also did a couple other things in SGA. I attended the Conference on Student Government Associations in Texas. We actually went right before the pandemic, like March 10. A week later, we were sent home. I went with the Dean of Students, the next SGA Vice President Sarah McClure, the current AVP of Facilities & Operations Liam Cutri-French, and one senator. We thought Covid was not going to be a real thing and would be over in two weeks. But here we are now! 

    From that, I got the inspiration to start the New Jersey Conference of Student Government Associations NJSGA. We had the first one in 2019 around Thanksgiving. 

    We had it in the Business Hall. Rutgers New Brunswick and TCNJ came as well as William (Bill) Moen, who’s actually a Rowan alumnus and a current assemblyman from Camden County. He came to do the keynote speech. We took a little hiatus, but last weekend we hosted the second conference of NJSGA. Rutgers New Brunswick, Rutgers Newark, TCNJ, Ramapo, and Drew attended as well. We [aim to] raise fruitful discussion about supporting students and how SGAs should operate.

    Kevin stands confidently in front of Bunce Hall.

    Luckily, Rowan does really great with shared governance. For example, Arielle has a meeting with President Houshmand every month. The AVP of Academic Affairs meets monthly with the Provost. The AVP of Student Affairs meets with advisor Kevin Koett. We really have very involved faculty that want to know what the students want.

    It’s super important to get involved with SGA. We always have openings for our Class Senators and Academic Senators. Every class has four senators, there are four at-large Senators, and every single college has its own Senator. 

    With everything that you’ve experienced, what has been your most to use what is 

    Definitely “Rowan Well,”  just having the mental health resources available to students is a really big thing. Obviously, it’s taken a long time to see that change, but there were at least two counselors hired, there are more resources available, and they got rid of a waitlist.

    After the Rowan Well bill passed, they expanded counseling services to include Victoria St. and in different academic buildings. Rowan EMS also got a new truck. I think they get $3 out of the $30 every semester from every undergraduate student. It really helps a lot. 

    Is there anything else you’d like to share about your SGA experience? 

    Applications are open for Senator positions. We have every position open except for the College of Science & Math. If you go on ProfLink and look into forms, you can find them. Applications close in September which allows people going through any incoming student orientation to get involved.

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    Story by: 
    Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

    Meet #Rowan2025: Aspiring Business Major Brooke Woodworth

    Drone shot of Business Hall.

    Meet incoming first-year Brooke Woodworth, a first generation college student and aspiring Business Management major from Freehold, NJ (Monmouth County). Brooke tells us more about what she’s looking forward to at Rowan.

    Brooke posing for a photo on the side of a main street.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college?

    One thing I am looking forward to in college is meeting new people. College is a whole new experience where you could meet new people and make friendships that last a lifetime. I have already met so many new friends, and I can’t wait for school to start.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

    One sport that I was a part of in high school was cheerleading. I did high school cheer for three years and I have done all-star cheerleading for eight years. I would like to continue to do cheerleading in college because I do not want to give up what I love.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college?

    One thing that I would like to discover about myself in college is my independence. College is something that you have to take upon yourself and be independent about. You have to learn to do things on your own. I am excited to see what I can do. 

    What majors are you considering and why?

    I am majoring in business. The reason why I chose a business major is because I want to one day be CEO of my own company. I hope one day I have my own company and it becomes very popular throughout the country and or one day the world.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    I took a live tour of Rowan. I thought the campus was beautiful, and I loved how close everything was.

    Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    One piece of advice that I have for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to school yet is choose a school that best fits you. Don’t go to school because it is the most popular or all of your friends are going. Choose a school that you will love for all four years and make great memories out of it.

    Where are you going to live next year?

    On campus.

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    One thing I loved about Rowan is how close the town was. Everything is walking distance, and the campus just seems like such a happy place.

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

    Alumni Success: Stephanie Ibe and How She Became a Teaching Assistant in France

    Stephanie sits at the Giant Prof statue on campus while wearing a custom stole showing the Filipino and French flags.

    Today we speak with Stephanie Ibe, a 2020 graduate who majored in Biological Sciences with a minor in French and Honors and Pre-med concentrations. Stephanie stayed in Le Havre, France for seven months while working as a teaching assistant through the TAPIF Program. Stephanie comes from Franklin Park, NJ in Somerset County. She was involved in MAPS (Minority Association of Premedical Students), Res Life as an RA/ARD, research, tutoring, RUPAC (Rowan University Philippine American Coalition), Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED – Premed Honors Society), University Chorus, and mentoring through the Dr. Harley E. Flack program.

    What is the name of this program? 

    It’s called TAPIF, which stands for Teaching Assistant Program In France and it’s through the French Ministry of Education. TAPIF was recommended to me by my French teacher, Dr. Maria Hernandez, a former Fulbright Program alumna.

    What part of France were you mainly based in? 

    Normandy! It has a mix of everything. It’s in the northwest of France. You can find suburbs, cities, small towns, beaches, cliffs and the countryside. It’s about two hours away from Paris. You could take a bus to Paris from Normandy for as low as eight euros (about $9). When we traveled to the south of France, we took a train ride from Normandy that took about six hours.

    Stephanie poses in a gorgeous, tiny street in the French city of Marseilles.
    Marseilles

    My base city is really special. It’s called Le Havre. It is an urban city with a beach and a port. It is located right next to Sainte-Adresse, where Claude Monet created many of his paintings. What happened in Le Havre is that during the World War II bombings, the entire city was destroyed. The city was rebuilt not too long ago. It was rebuilt by Auguste Perret between 1945 and 1964, so Le Havre looks completely different from other typical French cities. The buildings are a little bit newer and more modern. They are boxier and made of concrete.

    How many people again were in your program in France? 

    According to the website, about 1,100 people participated in it and in my city there were 13 assistants.

    How close did you live near each other? 

    We were all within about 20 minutes of each other, whether by bus, tram or walking. Public transportation is really important in France so we all had our own public transportation card which was pretty affordable. I only had to pay 25 euros a month. It made transportation really easy. Most of us were within the city center, so it was very easy to walk to each other’s apartments.

    Stephanie wears a dark red winter hat to the cold beach in Le Havre, France.
    Beach of Le Havre

    Could you describe what it was like going from graduation to the pandemic to going to France? 

    It was such a stressful experience. From the time I graduated to the time I was actually on the plane to France, I didn’t know if I would still be doing the program. We didn’t get our acceptance letters until the end of June, because of Covid delays, and our actual placements until the end of July. And even though we got our acceptance letters, we still weren’t sure if we could leave the country because of the pandemic. The visa center did not open until mid-September. They were not accepting applications to apply for a visa until mid-September, and I had to be in France by mid-October. After I was able to schedule my appointment time for the visa center it took a little bit of time for my visa to process. I got my visa about one week before I had my flight to France. 

    Even after I got my visa, I had a lot of other things to do before my flight to France. I had to get a background check, my fingerprints scanned, and I had to get my COVID test done 72 hours before boarding. Until I was on the flight, it was stressful, but I made it! Thankfully, it was a lot easier to come back to the US.

    Stephanie poses under a transportation sign in Bordeux, France with a reflective structure in the background.
    Bordeux

    What did you do as a teaching assistant?

    I taught English and American culture. I taught at two different high schools. One was a hotel and service trade school, where they taught things like culinary, restaurant service. All of the classes I taught for that school were centered around things like food and drinks, holidays and traditions, nutrition, and service dialogues. The other high school I taught at was a technical and professional high school, where they have programs for Biotechnology, Health, and Social Science. I got to talk a lot about things I was passionate about like U.S. healthcare, our education system, civil rights, nutrition, designing experiments, ethics, biotechnology, and general American culture and traditions. 

    I incorporated a lot of things they were interested in learning about. I would do different kinds of presentations and activities about American culture. I helped them prepare for their oral presentations and would give them feedback.

    Did you get to decide that or was there a guideline from TAPIF?                

    When you’re filling out your application, you get to check off a few boxes about your background. I majored in biology and I did bench and clinical research, so that’s what I included in my application.

    I think TAPIF also tries to decide your placement based on your hobbies. For example, I put on my application that I really enjoy cooking so they placed me in a school with a culinary program. For the most part, they put you where they think you’d fit in best and what high school you are able to give the most to.

    Stephanie sits on a wall overlooking the whole city of Marseilles, France.
    Marseille from Basilique Notre Dame de la Garde

    What was your favorite memory as a teaching assistant?                             

    I really liked getting to know all of my students and seeing their growth from when I first began teaching to the end. I remember when I first met them, they were so shy and scared to speak to me. By the end of the program, they were so excited to speak in class and we were able to have a lot of fun conversations together.

    I loved being able to actually talk to them about what they’re interested in and seeing them build their confidence in being able to speak English. I had them pick what topics they’d be interested in learning. I really liked that because they also had a lot to teach me in return, through our discussions. I would always ask them about things like what kind of music, shows, food, stores, and activities they like. It was like an inside scoop to their culture.

    Stephanie poses happily while holding a Rowan umbrella in the air in France.
    Vieille Ville (Bordeaux)

    How did Rowan’s French program help prepare you for this experience?

    I loved how small Rowan’s French program was. I had a lot more opportunities to practice speaking with the students in my class because there were only five or six students. There’s also more one-on-one help from your professors.

    The support I got from the faculty was huge. I wouldn’t have gotten the position if it wasn’t for Dr. Hernandez. She encouraged me to pursue the French minor and apply to the program. In the beginning, I was debating on whether or not I should go to France because I am also applying to medical school. Dr. Hernandez walked me through the pros and cons of going to France in the midst of a pandemic. Eventually, I made my decision to go based on the idea that I’ll never get to experience and learn about France the way I did in those seven months. It truly would’ve been an opportunity of a lifetime.

    Stephanie wears a custom stole with the Filipino and French flags on the sunny and green Rowan campus near Bunce Hall.

    In the end, I was honestly so thankful that I went this year. Even though everything was closed the entire time I was there, I don’t think I would have built such a strong bond with all the other assistants if everything was open. We would have each been doing our own thing. Being able to experience big cities like Paris with fewer people on the streets was also really cool.

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    Story by: 
    Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

    and Stephanie Ibe, biological sciences graduate

    Related posts:

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    My Favorite Class: Integrated Marketing Communication

    Caitlyn stands near a gazebo on campus.

    This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

    Today we feature Caitlyn Dickinson, a recent Public Relations and Advertising graduate from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County). Caitlyn is a first-generation college student and transfer student.

    Caitlyn outside of Bunce Hall.

    What was the name of your favorite class at Rowan?

    Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC)

    What department was the class in?

    Advertising

    Who taught the class when you took it?

    Professor Rodolico

    Tell us a little about what the class is

    IMC goes over all the parts to an integrated marketing communications plan, such as advertising, public relations, direct marketing, digital/internet marketing, sales promotion and personal selling. You really get to work a lot of different muscles within the communications industry.

    Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting or special to you.

    In this class, I was put into a group where we were tasked to create an IMC plan for a sustainable company. We created a situational analysis including a competitive analysis, SWOT analysis and storytelling summary. We wrote objectives and strategies for our plan, and we also wrote up a creative brief regarding our vision for the campaign based on research which would be used when making the creatives for the campaign. We featured billboards, print ads, a radio script, social media posts, app icon design, email blasts, interstitials and a news release.

    Caitlyn smiles and stands on the steps of Bunce Hall.

    Is there anything else that made this class impactful?

    This class was so impactful because it allowed me to use the knowledge I have learned from previous classes and put it all together in one IMC plan. I learned how to write news releases from Basic PR Writing, how to write radio scripts and create print ads from Ad Copywriting, and use basic design elements I learned from Publication Layout and Design.

    What makes this professor great?

    Professor Rodolico is one the best professors within the advertising department. He presents information in a way that’s easy for students to grasp and understand and also in a way that’s interesting. He grabs your attention with humor and creates an environment within the physical classroom and over Zoom that is comfortable. You’re never afraid to ask questions or speak up and comment on something. Since I’d had him for Ad Copywriting, I tried to take as many classes with him as I could.

    Caitlyn stands near Bunce Green on campus.

    How did this class help to support your academic or personal growth, or your professional goals?

    This class exposes you to a lot of different aspects within the communications industry. You leave the class at the end of the semester with a strong grounding of each part of an IMC plan. A lot of what was covered in the class was review and the opportunity to put what you’ve learned to the test. While some material I learned was brand new that I was able to try out and add to my knowledge.

    What are your professional goals?

    Rowan has offered me so much knowledge about my industry that I feel like I have so many options with what I could get into post-graduation. Being an advertising and public relations double major, I’ve learned a lot and have done a lot of work in both respective fields that allows me to choose where I want to take my degree. I’d like to end up in either content creation or event planning. I like to be creative and use my skills in a way I find exciting and fun. 

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

    Photos:
    Joe Gentempo, art graduate

    #PROFspective: History Major Anthony Raisley on Living On Campus

    Anthony sits on the grass in front of Bunce Hall wearing a yellow shirt.

    Today we speak with recent graduate Anthony Raisley, who majored in History with a concentration in U.S. History and multiple minors in Entrepreneurship, New Media, International Studies as well as a CUGS (Certificate of Undergraduate Studies) in Italian! Anthony comes from Middletown, NJ in Monmouth County and has lived on campus all four years of college. Anthony graduated this past May.

    Advice for incoming transfers or freshmen who want to live on campus?

    It’s very exciting to see all the facilities Rowan has to offer and the new things that Rowan is developing. There’s great housing and great options for everybody. I’d definitely say to live on campus if you can because the experiences you get are certainly unique to being an on-campus resident. I very much enjoyed my time living on campus all four years.

    What are some of the advantages of living on campus? 

    It’s much easier to walk to class and to visit friends in other residence halls. Also if I have to meet up with other classmates to work on projects, it’s easy to meet in one of the academic buildings or in one of the resident lounges.

    Anthony stands confidently in front of the Rowan arch.

    What about practical tips for packing? Tips on what to leave at home?

    Each year you get better and better with picking and knowing what you need to bring. To be honest, I never bring enough (lol). There are things where I’m like, “Oh, you really don’t need this.” But you can never have too many sweatshirts if it gets chilly on certain days. Don’t forget the rain boots or rain jacket. Those are things you forget because it’s a beautiful August day when you move onto campus and then you realize once it’s October: “Oh yeah, I need my boots and rain jacket!” Definitely prepare for all of the elements, but it’s great to see the campus change through all of the seasons!

    How did you make friends as a resident? 

    My freshman year, when I moved in, I started off running cross country and track. I was able to move in early. I met the guys on the team. Everyone from Rowan Athletics is fantastic, makes you feel welcome, and helps you with your transition from moving from home into college. My sophomore year I was still running. I [also] started working in admissions as an ambassador. Being able to meet a lot of my fellow ambassadors as a sophomore, junior, and senior, you get a great idea of what Rowan represents as far as all of the different backgrounds and different majors. It’s a great way to meet people that way. It’s a great environment to work in. In my junior year, I started working for the social media team, another great way to meet people and professional staff as well.

    Anthony gazes into the sun in front of Bunce Hall wearing all light colors.

    How did you get connected with Rowan Social Media? 

    I saw an email or announcement online. Immediately, I was interested in it because on the side I take photos. Being able to be part of this environment, taking photos of campus, and getting to meet so many people has been fantastic.

    What do you want to do professionally after graduation? 

    After graduation, I’m actually going to Georgetown for grad school. I’m moving to Washington, D.C. because the program I got into was the Master of Arts in Communication, Culture, and Technology. It’s exactly what I love, all those subject areas even with the minors that I have here and also my major. It all fits together. I’m so glad I’m able to pursue that next year. It’s nice because you can pick what you want to focus on. That’s what’s in store for me this fall.

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    Story by: 
    Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

    Beyond the Classroom: Rowan Global Wellness and Lifestyle Management Major Discovers Passion for Research

    Jenna stands by the entrance sign for the Williamstown Organic Community Garden.

    Meet Jenna Bottiglieri, who graduated from Rowan with a degree in Exercise Science and is now pursuing her master’s degree in Wellness and Lifestyle Management through Rowan GlobalLearn more about Jenna and how her work with two health research and grant programs helped her zero in on her career goals.

    Seeing a new installation of wheelchair-accessible raised beds for the first time while visiting the Williamstown Organic Community Garden, Jenna Bottiglieri witnessed part of her research come to fruition. 

    Jenna, a student in the M.A. in Wellness and Lifestyle Management program, serves as project coordinator for Inclusive Healthy Communities, a grant-funded initiative that works with South Jersey towns on projects that make spaces more welcoming for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 

    Jenna talks with the Borgersen family by the raised garden beds.
    Jenna (second from right) checks out one of the new, accessible raised beds in the Williamstown Organic Community Garden with the Borgersen family, clients whom she worked with from both Rowan’s Get FIT program and the Inclusive Healthy Communities project. Standing, from left: Kim and Brenda. Seated, from left: Charlotte and Nathan.

    She also coordinates the Shop Fresh Foods Rx program, a research study combining nutrition outreach and education for South Jersey residents who are pre-diabetic and food insecure. 

    Jenna’s work on these research projects has altered her academic career trajectory; she now wants to pursue another advanced degree in public health policy either at the master’s or doctoral level.

    “I think that it’s so interesting being involved in research. And that’s definitely something I would like to continue, in my next degree, and after that, and actually, in my career … continuing some kind of research,” Jenna says. 

    A chance discussion set Jenna on a continued path at Rowan in graduate studies and sparked her passion for health research. As an undergraduate Exercise Science major, Jenna headed into her last two semesters unsure of where to go next. One of the highlights of her college career had been volunteering and then working for Get FIT, a Rowan fitness and nutrition program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 

    She describes the program as “fitness oriented but also very socially oriented.” Rowan students and volunteer staff work one-on-one with each client. “They’re able to exercise together, they talk together. And it’s really just a great program for everyone,” she says.

    Jenna at the Williamstown Organic Community Garden.
    “I definitely see myself leading a nonprofit organization or working for a state Department of Health,” Jenna says.

    Jenna worked all the way up to program coordinator for Get FIT, run by Dr. Leslie Spencer, professor of Health Promotion and Wellness Management. She and Jenna were to conduct a study on the social impact of Get FIT on clients and caregivers before the Covid-19 pandemic paused both their research and the in-person client sessions. At the height of the pandemic, Jenna then organized a virtual Get FIT program

    When Jenna shared her uncertainty about her future with Dr. Spencer, the professor suggested Jenna look into the Wellness and Lifestyle Management master’s program through Rowan Global. Here, Jenna says she could expand her health and wellness knowledge beyond the anatomy and kinesiology-based training she received as an undergraduate. She also appreciated the online format that allows her to craft a flexible schedule around her research.

    “That was really helpful, because I wasn’t really ready for that commitment of going back onto campus right after I graduated. So this ended up being perfect from not only just the criteria that I’m learning in the curriculum, but also the structure of the courses definitely just aligned with my schedule,” Jenna says.  

    She now works with Dr. Spencer on the Inclusive Healthy Communities project, a grant from the Division of Disability Services, NJ Department of Human Services. Jenna explains the university’s work has three main components. A Rowan team, working with master gardeners, has partnered with seven area community gardens, reviewing each and making changes such as reducing sensory stimuli, adding Braille and images to signage and designing paths and beds that are more accessible. 

    Jenna poses with the Borgersen family, Backyard Gardens LLC and the Sustainable Monroe Township.
    Jenna (fourth from left) with the Borgersen family, Patrick McDevitt of Sustainable Monroe Township (center) and Alex Seidel and Brian Pearsall (standing, left) of Backyard Gardens, LLC, who designed and built the garden’s accessible raised beds.

    Jenna says the second and third parts of the project include a collaboration with five area group homes; the Rowan team has subcontracted area master gardeners to build garden spaces and organized cooking classes for its residents. 

    “The goal is to hopefully use what they grow in the garden,” Jenna adds.

    Her work with Dr. Nicole Vaughn, assistant professor of Community Health, on the Shop Fresh Foods Rx program analyzes data collected throughout a four-month period with 20 participants, whom Jenna recruited throughout South Jersey. Participants receive groceries and dietician-created recipes, then attend sessions on food, fitness, nutrition and managing stress. For the last four weeks of the program, Jenna says participants will shop for their own healthy groceries using the skills they learned from the program. 

    “The goal is to see if this lifestyle change will prevent their onset of type 2 diabetes,” she explains. 

    Jenna speaks highly of her faculty, recalling: “My friend Brianna … we work together in Dr. Vaughn’s lab, and we met working together on Shop Fresh Foods Rx. We had been discussing a topic like nutrition knowledge and social media, because we go on social media, [and] there’s so many things that are just not true. And we actually ended up presenting this to two professors in our department (Dr. Dara LoBuono and Dr. Dylan Klein). 

    Jenna chats with the Borgersen family.

    “And they were extremely happy to hear us out there even though it sounded very ambitious, they were all very supportive. The professors are so helpful at Rowan, they really want you to succeed and get involved within the research.”

    She adds, “I just wish other students would get involved in research because it really is a really great experience, especially at Rowan. There’s so many opportunities.”

    See Jenna’s work with the Inclusive Gardens project in this video: 

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    My Favorite Class: Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

    Field of flowers near Wilson hall.

    Today we feature recent graduate Amanda Carlin. Amanda earned her degree in English with a minor in Psychology and is from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County) where she transferred from Raritan Valley Community College. Amanda’s favorite class is Gender, Sexuality, and Literature in the English department, which was taught by Dr. Yvonne Hammond. Tell us a […]

    Meet Transfer Profs: Dual Major Stephanie Maszera

    Exterior shot of Stephanie smiling.

    Meet incoming transfer student Stephanie Maszera! Stephanie is an aspiring double major in Athletic Training and Education from Millstone Twp., NJ (Monmouth County) who transferred from Brookdale Community College. She shares why she chose Rowan and what she’s looking forward to!

    Stephanie smiles outside wearing a yellow dress.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

    Being able to fulfill my dream career for real.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

    Stage crew, managing a sports team, and participating in any sort of band.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan?

    I’d like to learn a new language in my program!

    What majors are you considering and why?

    I want to double major in athletic training and education, because both would go together really well in a school environment, leading to two great jobs. I love the field of sports medicine, and I see myself as a teacher.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    I toured Rowan back in 2018, and was in love with the campus ever since.

    Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    The process is extremely tedious and frustrating, and it takes all of your time. You’re going to worry about things not working out, but I promise if you take it slow and get help, everything will be perfect.

    Where are you going to live next year?

    On campus!

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    The environment and the beautiful campus.

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

    Senior Reflects: Lucinda Lau, Accomplished Engineering and Future Med Student

    Photo of the Rowan Hall bridge with pink flowers close to the lens.

    Today we speak with Lucinda Lau from Parlin, NJ (Middlesex County). Lucinda will be graduating this May with a Biomedical Engineering (BME) degree. She is part of the 3+4 BS/MD program.

    Could you please share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? 

    In one of my core BME courses, I had the opportunity to work with an industry professional to discuss the validity and feasibility of a design project that I was working on with a group of students. This gave me better insight into what I could expect outside of my undergraduate career.

    Could you please share your favorite social memory?

    I made most of my close friends in the Holly Pointe study rooms [my first] year. We would study together, watch movies, and just spend most of our free time in those public spaces. It was a great way to meet new people as well. I was also the Assistant VP for Habitat for Humanity. This gave me an opportunity to help the organization build houses with the families that were going to live there in the future.

    Lucinda smiles wearing a blue dress and holding a sunflower.

    What are your career aspirations?

    I am planning on attending medical school after graduation. Some fields I am interested in include pediatrics, orthopedics and surgery.

    How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

    My advisor, Dr. Staehle, was a great resource all throughout my time at Rowan for both biomedical engineering and the steps needed for me to prepare for medical school.

    Do you want to give a shout-out to your family, friends, advisors, or mentors?

    I want to thank all the amazing people that I have met through my time in the Society of Women Engineers, Admissions Ambassadors, and just the Biomedical Engineering Department in general.

    Lucinda poses confidently in front of a cactus plant.

    Who is your favorite professor? What class did you take them for? And why is this person your favorite?

    Dr. Ik Jae Lee! I took him for Math for Engineering Analysis, and he was probably the best professor I have ever had. He would stay up the night before an exam with us in the library to hold study sessions. He was also just a great professor who made us interested in learning difficult engineering math. 

    What advice would you give to incoming freshmen or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

    Make sure to join clubs that you are truly interested in and don’t be afraid to go up to people and just introduce yourself. It seems daunting at first but most freshmen have that same social anxiety because everyone is in a new environment. 

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    Story by:
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

    Professional Goals of Engineering Entrepreneurship Majors

    Kenyon looked to the side outside of Rowan Hall.

    Today, we feature the long-term and short-term goals of two students in the Engineering Entrepreneurship program. 

    Kenyon sits inside the Engineering Bridge.

    Kenyon Burgess, a sophomore from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County), is taking advantage of the programs Rowan has to offer to reach his goals.

    Currently, Kenyon is on an engineering research project and is also attending events held by the College of Business for networking and personal development. These are all steps he’s taking to be prepared for his next steps after graduation.

    His long-term goal is to own his own business where he can utilize his engineering experience. 

    Michael sits by Engineering Pond and Rowan Hall.

    Senior Micheal Lampasona, from South Plainfield, NJ (Middlesex County), is taking charge of his future by actively expanding his network, self-educating through reading books and watching videos, and reaching out to business professionals to ask them questions regarding his interests in different industries.

    In his last semester, Micheal wants to continue to search the technical and business fields to see what industries he gravitates towards for his career. His long-term goal is to own and develop real estate by investing in and developing multi-unit (30+) properties.

    He says: “Engineering entrepreneurship will support my dreams and goals because it gives me the best of both the technical and business world. I know that the world of technical sales, product development, project management, technology commercialization, and operations in manufacturing is what I was born to do.”

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    Story by:
    Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

    Select photos by:
    Quintin Stinney, sophomore radio/TV/film major

    #PROFspective: ESS Major, Athlete and Activist Ayanna Johnson

    Today we speak with Ayanna Johnson, a junior Environmental & Sustainability Studies (ESS) major under the School of Earth and Environment. She comes from Ewing, NJ in Mercer County and is the captain of the Women’s Basketball Team. She also participates in We Are One Team, Social Justice Action, and OWL (Outstanding Women Leaders) Group.

    Ayanna smiles and leans against a tree outside on campus.

    Why did you choose ESS? 

    When I was a senior, I went on a trip to the Bahamas and studied at the Island School. I focused on environmental science and marine biology. We saw the coral reefs that were dying and how the Bahamas is being disproportionately impacted by global warming. It made me feel that this is a really important field more people need to study. 

    What has been your favorite ESS class?  

    My favorite ESS class was called Earth, People, and The Environment taught by Professor Richard Federman. I learned about the interconnectedness of people and their environment. 

    What do you want to do in the future? 

    Every company needs an Environmental Sustainability Specialist to make sure they’re following the rules and regulations from like the EPA. I want to do that in the future. 

    Do you have a mentor on-campus? 

    My mentor is Mandy Jiang, the former assistant coach of the Women’s Basketball Team. She helps me with school, studying, basketball and basically anything! 

    Can you tell me more about the We Are One Team panel that happened in October 2020?  

    The We Are One Team panel was an opportunity for me to speak on my personal experiences and also listen to different people from diverse backgrounds speak on social justice issues. We also discussed how we’ve been working to improve our communities by helping people become more educated and understanding about issues that are going on in modern-day America.

    I was able to connect with other people that cared about these issues and also wanted to learn more. I made good friends with people who are dedicated to making a difference and speaking out. We bounce ideas off of each other about how we can do more to get our message across.

    Ayanna smiles while sitting and leaning on a bench on campus.

    What’s it like being the captain of the basketball team? 

    It’s not much different than being a regular player. Everyone on my team is so awesome, and we all work together. It’s more about the responsibility of leadership. It pushes me to be more confident when speaking up and in my ability to lead. I never really looked at myself as capable of this, but it’s forcing me to face my insecurities and just do it. 

    What advice would you give to newer college students? 

    Appreciate the moment and enjoy it. Don’t keep thinking about the next thing. You’re going to waste your whole life thinking about the next step. You have to be in the present and enjoy the current moment. Appreciate life when you are happy because it’s not going to always last. 

    If you spend your whole time stressing and not experiencing college, you’re going to regret it. You’re not going to be in your 20s forever. 

    Make sure that you’re taking care of yourself because it’s a hard time for everyone. We don’t validate our own emotions or acknowledge things that we’re feeling inside. Everybody should take time to look inside yourself. 

    What social justice issues are you most passionate about? 

    I’m most passionate about educating people. A lot of what perpetuates injustice is people being ignorant to it. People not understanding how the small things are actually big things which allow for injustice to continue. 

    On your busiest day, what academic, non-academic and social responsibilities do you juggle? 

    I have practice, academics and work. I also juggle about 15 credits per semester along with basketball. This gives athletes room to stay above the 12-credit minimum and drop a class if necessary. 

    How do you balance all of it?

    I’m actually not very good at balancing or time management. I try my best to get organized and refocus. I try to make sure that I’m taking care of myself first because I can get caught up with so many different things. I’m not going to be able to do my best like mentally and physically if I don’t take care of myself.

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    Story by:
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

    Photos by:
    Joe Gentempo, senior art major

    Music Majors Share Music to Listen to While Studying

    Photo of a student studying.

    Need some tunes to help you study for finals? Here are some recommendations from upperclassmen music majors.

    The "Spiegel im Spiegel" by Arvo Part album cover.

    Spiegel im Spiegel – Arvo Pärt

    “It’s one of my favorite minimalist pieces. It repeats over and over, so it’s good to listen to when you’re trying to focus. I love how delicate it sounds; it reminds me of a lullaby. A couple years ago, I was reading a book called ‘The Rest Is Noise’ by Alex Ross. Pärt was mentioned in it, so I wanted to dive into his music more,” says senior Kimmy Speers, a Music Education: Instrumental major from Morristown, NJ (Morris County).

    The "3am Talk" by Icemann album cover.

    3Am Talk – Icemann

    “Chill vibe. I created the song myself,” says first-generation junior Justin Nunez, a Music Industry major with a concentration in Technology and a transfer from Kean University from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County).

    Lisa holding a clarinet outside by the Rowan Hall pond.

    Nocturnes (all 21) – Chopin

    “It is very calming and relaxing. Chopin is very popular in the classical music world, and played very often by pianists,” says senior Lisa Harkisheimer, a Music Education Instrumental major from Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County).

    Melissa wearing a Rowan sweatshirt while walking on the beach.

    Etude No.2 – Phillip Glass

    “Phillip Glass is a minimalist artist. His songs are thought provoking and stimulating to the ear. I studied minimalist artists in my theory course a year ago and found the compositions of Phillip Glass. I use his Playlist on Spotify to focus when I’m studying and thought it might help other students,” say junior Melissa Breslin of Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), a Music Education Instrumental major and transfer student from Rowan College at Gloucester County. 

    Liz sitting on a bench.

    Rêverie – Claude Debussy (or really anything by Debussy)

    “It relaxes me without putting me to sleep. I discovered the song by researching romantic composers on my own and also hearing his music in my music classes,” says senior Liz Cicali, a Music Education major with a specialization in instrumental music from Absecon, NJ (Atlantic County).

    Sunshine holding a guitar while smiling outside.

     The Brain Dance – Animals as Leaders

    “This will stimulate your mind and senses in every way. You will be awakened to learn and receptive to new information. I discovered the song at a concert,” says senior Sunshine Jones, a Music Education Vocal Major and Classical Guitar minor from Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County).

    The "Viberations" by Iman Omari album cover.

    L.A. Vibes – Iman Omari 

    “Iman Omari is the king of chill and loops. He’s a producer that makes dream like beats. He can chop any song up and claim it as his own. A lot of his music doesn’t contain words, he has a beat tape that has nothing but loops and it really helps me study. Hearing the beats allow me to read, think and focus on my tasks. I’m able to listen to music and concentrate, that’s all I need in this world. Music and focus,” says first-generation college junior Phinesse Scott, a Music Industry major and transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County

    Phinesse adds: “I discovered Iman Omari through YouTube. You can really go down a never-ending hole on YouTube. I typically like to search for beats on there and I came across one of his old tracks and it was at that moment I became a fan and looked for every song I could find that he made.”

    The "We the Kings" album cover.

    Check Yes Juliet – We The Kings

    “It’s a good song and catchy but by studying to this song it helps you to think back to what you read right before an exam if you listen to it again. It’s a popular pop rock song similar to artists I listen to,” says first-generation college junior Amanda Uretsky, a Music Industry major with a concentration in Technology and Business from Lumberton, NJ (Burlington County).

    Emileigh smiling for a photo.

    Imagine Paris – Daniel Paterok

    “I find this song very relaxing, which I believe is important when doing homework or studying. Plus, I find the melody really pretty and catchy. I found this song on a public Spotify playlist that I sometimes listen to when I study,” says junior Emileigh Zane, a Music Industry major with a Business concentration who transferred from Rowan College of South Jersey and is from Penns Grove, NJ (Salem County).

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, senior music industry major 

    Header photo courtesy of:
    Unsplash

    Meet Transfer Profs: Fabrizio A. Galindo of Whiting, NJ

    Sideways look at the glass side of windows of a building.
    A selfie of Fabrizio on a beach.

    Meet incoming transfer Fabrizio Galindo, who will live on campus in the fall. Fabrizio is a first generation college student and an aspiring Biological Sciences major from Whiting, NJ (Ocean County) transferring from Stockton University. 

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

    I look forward to growing as a person while achieving my academic goals and succeeding at all the dreams I set my mind to.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

    Most of my time I spend studying online. I think I would like to try an Honor society and develop my hobbies with them. I found that to be a lot more ideal.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

    I found out that Rowan’s science department is among the best ones in NJ. I feel that involving myself in Physics and Math clubs would be a set of new skills I will like to grow.

    What majors are you considering and why?

    Biology, Biophysics and physics. I have always wanted to study sciences and these are the best sciences to take if you like particles.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    I have not done so due to Covid. I would like to go to Rowan’s Church and the science building I’m also curious about the Engineering building, I heard they have a pretty good signal.

    Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    Please look at all of your opportunities, you have no idea what you are going to miss on if you don’t check Rowan out.

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    Other than Dr. Ali A. Houshmand having graduated in mathematics, I liked the University’s private scholarships and the Honors concentration.

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    Story by: Bianca Torres, senior, music industry major

    Meet #Rowan2025: Uche Ezeukwu of Hamilton, NJ

    A sign that says Wake up and Workout.

    Today we welcome incoming first year student Uche Ezeukwu. Uche will live on campus in the fall studying Exercise Science. Uche is from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County) and attends Nottingham High School. Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college? I am looking forward to meeting new […]

    Beyond The Classroom: Business Major Joe Sansone Secures Virtual Internship

    Joe Sansone stands outside the entrance to Business Hall.

    Joe Sansone, a senior Business Management and Marketing double major from Monmouth County, shares his experience at his virtual internship with Clearbridge Branding Agency and how he manages his busy schedule. 

    Joe Sansone leans against a railing outside of Business Hall.

    Do you feel that Rowan provided you with the necessary skills and education to help secure your internship?

    I feel like with business majors there is an emphasis on networking and marketing yourself and your resume and just putting yourself out there. We do a lot of group projects so I think that prepares you, too. Communicating with other people who are different from you and working together, I definitely felt prepared with my education. 

    How did you secure your internship?

    I had a pretty tough time finding an internship, so I was applying to a bunch of different ones. Even though I’m not a Communications major, they have a match program for internships [through Profs Jobs], so I talked to someone in the Communications department and they set me up on this interview with [Clearbridge] and I ended up getting it. 

    Joe Sansone reads a book inside Business Hall.


    What do you love the most about your internship? 

    I like how they are very flexible around my schedule. I think they’re very respectful to me in the way they communicate with me. My boss is very attentive, polite and respectful yet still laid back and casual at the same time. 

    How did you become interested in business?

    Going into college I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I thought about doing social science, law and justice, or emergency preparedness but I kind of thought about what I was good at. I think for my life and in high school I loved being involved in the school through different clubs and I noticed I liked the leadership position in these clubs. I think Business Management is similar to that. 

    Is there anyone in your industry that you admire or inspire you?

    A lot of my professors have been sources of inspiration for me. They have been industry professionals and bring a lot of experience and examples into the classroom. I think going into college everyone told me, “Oh, your professors are going to be so hard on you, you can’t do what you did in high school.” I think it’s the complete opposite. I think that there’s a level of respect that they have for us and we have for them. I’m motivated and excited to learn because of how nice they are and how informative they are to us. 

    Joe Sansone stands outside the entrance to Business Hall.

    What do you think is the most important to skill to have in your industry?

    Willingness to learn. You can’t go into it thinking that you’re going to know everything, going into it open to challenge yourself and willing to be wrong and learning from that is really important. 

    How do you handle your time in and out of the classroom?

    I just write things down and cross them off as I go. I have a really good memory too, I just know what I need to do in my head. It’s a lot of discipline between my time here. I think every year prepares you for the next. It’s being able to know that I don’t always need to hangout with my friends if I have something to get done but I also can let an assignment wait a little and go out and get my mind off things too. It’s just being responsible and having an end goal in sight. 

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    Story by:
    Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations major

    Photos by:
    Joe Gentempo, senior art major

    Leadership #PROFspective: Roshni Gandhi, Advancing Outreach and Mentorship for Women Engineers

    Roshni stands by a glass window inside an academic building on campus.

    Today we feature Roshni Gandhi, a leader at Rowan University. Roshni served as the President of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) during the 2019-2020 school year. She is from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County) and is a senior Biomedical Engineering major. Roshni is part of the 3+4 BME/MD program with Cooper Medical School, where she completes her Biomedical Engineering degree in three years and then begins medical school for four years. Roshni is also the president of Alpha Epsilon Delta Pre-Health Society and was an SGA Representative of the Biomedical Engineering Society last year. 

    This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month. 

    What is your role in your organization?

    I was the President of SWE during the 2019-2020 school year (we switched eboards at the beginning of this year). SWE is the Society of Women Engineers and is a professional development organization that helps foster a community between female engineering students and hosts career development events like networking opportunities with big industry partners and mentorship programs. This is very important because studies have shown that fostering connections like these are extremely important in retaining females (and minorities) in the STEM fields, and specifically engineering.

    Roshni stands inside Science Hall.

    What have you learned in your role as a leader?

    I am forever grateful that I’ve had the opportunity to serve as a leader for our Rowan community, as I genuinely believe it has helped me build my character and allowed me and my peers to work towards something we believe in and enjoy! I’ve learned how to adapt to new situations — especially with COVID and having to move to a virtual platform mid-semester, the importance of fostering connections and maintaining good relationships with those individuals, and most importantly I’ve learned that so many people are willing to help you bring your ideas to life or to further the mission of your organization, and for that I cannot thank them enough — whether it be faculty and staff at Rowan or people from industry and academia beyond our own university.

    What’s your favorite memory as a leader?

    My favorite memory as a leader at Rowan has to be being able to help start new outreach programs through SWE and the College of Engineering. It’s really exciting to be a part of something new that will hopefully continue on over the next several years. Our new outreach program – The SWEET program, or Society of Women – Engineers Engineers in Training, is aimed at introducing middle school students to STEM and engineering and getting females interested in it from early on. Our first summer program is going to run virtually this summer, during the month of August. Our SWE team is really hopeful that we can make a positive impact on these young students and give them the confidence to pursue a career in STEM if that is what they’re interested in.

    Who inspires you and why?

    As a student conducting research in Dr. Vega’s research lab, someone I look up to and am thankful to have as a mentor is my graduate student on the project, Kirstene Gultian, who is getting her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering. She accomplishes so much in the lab, while working as a teaching assistant, and helping with extra-curricular programs as well. She’s a strong leader within our lab, able to balance a number of different tasks at once, and always willing to help everyone.

    Roshni stands next to a glass window inside an academic building on campus.

    What’s the most significant barrier to women today?

    One of the most significant barriers to women today is still representation of females in industry, in the workspace, and in leadership roles. Without the representation, so many women are not given the opportunity to hold leadership positions when compared to their male counterparts due to implicit biases. As such, I think our newest SWE program that we co-founded with PSEG during my time as president is really great in helping female engineering students make industry connections with successful female engineers already working in industry at PSEG.

    The program offers mentorship (pairing of SWE students with PSEG mentors) and career advancement events for our SWE members. Through SWE’s international platform, we get to connect with women engineers from all across the world, who offer mentorship and other resources as well, and it is so inspiring to see how much they have and continue to accomplish.

    What advice would you give to the next generation of leaders?

    Something I’ve learned during my leadership positions over the past few years is: Don’t be afraid to just ask! Sometimes you’ll have an idea that seems crazy or hard to organize and you won’t be sure how to make it come to life or if anyone will support you in making it happen, but lots of times if you just ask, you can make it happen!

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    Story by:
    Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations major and 
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

    Photos by:
    Jabreeah Holmes, senior radio/TV/film major

    Leadership #PROFspective: Yashaswi Parikh, Uplifting Leader, Cofounder and Copresident of Rowan SASA

    Yashawhi standing behind Bunce Hall.

    Today we speak with Yashaswi Parikh, cofounder and copresident of the Rowan South Asian Students Association as well as sunshine chair of Alpha Phi Omega (APO). As sunshine chair, she works to bring joy and happiness to the organization! Yashaswi is a senior Biological Sciences major and Spanish minor who is part of the 3+4 […]

    Leadership #PROFspective: Ayanna Johnson on Speaking Up as a Woman in Sports

    Ayanna sits down and leans against a bench on campus.
    Ayanna wearing a yellow dress while posing against a tree.

    Today, we speak with Ayanna Johnson, captain of the Women’s Basketball Team and an active member of We Are One Team, Social Justice Action Committee, and Rowan Athletics’ OWL (Outstanding Women Leaders) Group. Ayanna is an Environmental & Sustainability Studies (ESS) major from Ewing, NJ (Mercer County). 

    This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month. 

    What is your role in your organizations? What do your organizations do? 

    We are One Team gives a voice to those in sports who are not always recognized and uses the power of sports to unify people. What’s special about sports is it unites people who all come from different backgrounds and walks of life and they have the same love for the game. It really represents who we are. We are activists, we care about social justice. We’re more than just athletes. I’m an athlete representative for the club. I speak for panels that they want to have an athlete representative for. I’m very involved in my team and the club!

    (OWL) Group is Outstanding Women Leaders. It’s really about empowering women in sports and shedding light on women’s sports because it’s so underrepresented and under-publicized. It’s about leadership in women’s sports and how to be good to other women as a woman. I really love that club because it sheds light on issues that need to be brought to light. As athletes, we’re already in a man’s world.

    I’m also a member of Social Justice Action. I’m not on the e-board, but you don’t always have to be the one out there and organizing things. As long as you can be there and have your voice heard, there’s a lot of value in that.

      Ayanna wearing a Rowan Basketball shirt.

      What have you learned in your role as a leader? 

      I’ve learned that your impact on people is way bigger than you realize. When you talk to that [first-year student], they will probably remember that conversation for the entirety of their college career. Just doing small things can change people’s lives more than you know.

      I need to realize how small acts of kindness can make a difference in people’s lives and just speaking up. If everybody felt like their voice didn’t matter, that’s what the people who want to keep you silent want you to feel like. Once you have knowledge and education about things, that’s power.

      Knowledge is power. When you’re educated about something, you can recognize when something isn’t right. When you’re used to being ignorant about things, you want even recognize injustice. So, I take every opportunity to educate myself on history. 

      What’s your favorite memory as a leader or at Rowan in general?

      Hands down, winning the NJAC (NJ Athletic Conference) championships! In 2019-2020, we beat Montclair who has won the conference for the past 10 years. We came back from being down and we won. I ended being the defensive player of the year and broke two records that year! 

      Who inspires you and why? 

      A lot of people inspire me. My little sister inspires me a lot because she’s one of those kids that is good at everything, and she looks up to me a lot. I have to do what I can to be a good role model for her. I know my little sister will root for me, just being able to see her blossom. I just love her so much. How she views me as a good big sister, makes me want to be that. I struggle a lot with self-confidence but I love both of my sisters so much. Your siblings see your whole life. You go through all the ups and downs with your siblings!

      Ayanna wearing a yellow dress while sitting on a bench and smiling.

      What’s the most significant barrier to women today? 

      Knowing that there’s a problem. In 2021, a lot of people are complacent with the way things are. There’s still discrimination and things we need to fight for. If we’re not educated about that, and still don’t see there’s still a problem, then we won’t fight it. If you think racism and sexism is a thing of the past, you’re never going to realize what you’re facing is injustice. 

      What advice would you give to the next generation of leaders? 

      Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Don’t be afraid to have your own opinions. Just because the majority feels this way doesn’t mean you do. If you feel like you should speak up about something, speak up about it! There   are probably other people who are hiding and feel the same way. If you’re brave, you’re probably being brave for so many other people who didn’t have the courage to say the thing you said. 

      Is there anything else you would like to share?

      Take care of your mental health. It impacts your whole life. It’s something I struggle with, it impacts sports a lot. It impacts everything. Just because you’re physically healthy doesn’t mean you’re mentally healthy. There’s a lot of stigma around it, and it’s something I’m really passionate about.

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      Story by:
      Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

      Photos by:
      Joe Gentempo, senior art major

      7 History Majors Share How Their Degree Supports Their Professional Goals

      Raymond standing outside.

      “This major supports my professional goal of being a teacher and continuing to give back to my community and my country. I am excited to see where my dual major takes me,” says junior Frank Gurcsik, a History and Education major from Gloucester County. “My major has been helping me to prepare and become an educator […]

      Leadership #PROFspective: Camryn Hadley, Choosing Her Own Legacy

      Camryn kneeling outside near a house and bush.

      Today we feature Camryn Hadley, a leader at Rowan University. Camryn is involved with many activities on campus like SUP (Student University Programmers), Student Government Association, PRaction, Residence Life and more. Camryn is a senior from Somerset, NJ (Somerset County) who double majors in Public Relations and Advertising with minors in Journalism and New Media […]

      Leadership #PROFspective: Tara Lonsdorf, Managing Editor Of The Whit

      Fanned out back issues of The Whit.

      Today we feature Tara Lonsdorf, a leader at Rowan University. Tara is the managing editor for The Whit. She is a senior Geology major with a minor in Geographic Information Systems from East Windsor, NJ (Mercer County). This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month.  What is your role […]

      Seniors Share: Women’s Club Lacrosse [VIDEO]

      View of the intramural field through the fence.

      Seniors Paige Ryan (white jersey), and Jeannie Corcione (grey shirt) share the positive impact that the Women’s Club Lacrosse team had on their college experience. Paige, captain of the team, is a double major in Biology and Psychology from Sparta, NJ (Sussex County). Jeannie is social chair of the team and is a Psychology major […]

      Meet #Rowan2025: Athletic Training Major Bobby Wietecha

      An action shot of Bobby playing basketball.

      Meet #Rowan2025 student Bobby Wietecha! Bobby is an incoming freshman Athletic Training major from Aberdeen, NJ (Monmouth County). He shares what sports he wants to continue in college and why he chose Rowan.

      Bobby wearing a Matawan high school track jersey.

      Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

      Meeting new people and learning new things.

      What is one hobby, activity, sport, or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

      Weightlifting, basketball, and track and field.

      Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport, or club?

      I want to better myself academically and physically by learning and continuing to work out and participate in sports.

      What majors are you considering and why?

      Athletic Training.

      Where are you going to live next year?

      On campus!

      Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

      Yes, I toured and my sister is an Engineering student currently, so I have visited her and I was impressed by the campus.

      Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

      Find something you like that interests you that you can build a career around.

      What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

      The campus and the master’s program in Athletic Training.

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

      Pharaoh Freer: Realizing My Power, Passion and Prof Pride

      Pharaoh stands outside on Rowan's campus.

      Meet Pharaoh Freer, a Music Industry major from Jamesburg, NJ (Middlesex County). Read his first-person perspective on the lessons he’s learned on his journey to becoming a Rowan Prof. From discovering how to hone in on your passions to understanding the power of your brand, Pharaoh shares the wisdom of leading a life with great ambitions, talent and vision.

      Pharaoh stands outside near a wooded spot on campus.

      When building an empire, you will go through many obstacles. Life is constructed of multiple points and times you learn and make a mental note so that it won’t happen again.

      When I was in middle school, I wasn’t the best kid. This age was my lesson stage. I was getting in trouble, disrupting class. It never occurred to me the image I was setting out for my brand, and when I say brand I mainly mean my name. In your adolescent days, you aren’t aware of the meaning of your name and how much power it has. 

      After middle school, I went to a technical school and made better decisions, but there were still a few things I had to “freshen up” on. High school was trial and error. I didn’t take it seriously. I was doing music but not seriously, very unconscious of my actions. All of my friends left me. When I graduated, I hadn’t quite understood what I wanted to do. 

      What did I love? Music was something I was always around but never started to take it seriously. My dad introduced it to me early when he started his gospel group. “Heaven Sent” is the group name I helped them [create]. When they went to the studio, I would play around on the mic. So, maybe I fell in love with the way I sounded on the mic. Once I found out I wanted to pursue music as my career, that’s when I found out what person I wanted to be. 

      Pharaoh stands inside an academic building stairwell.

      After not doing well at community college, I went to an audio engineering school in Philadelphia. [I] shadowed a well-known producer … who has worked with B.o.B, Christina Aguilera, and M.G.K. I passed with flying colors there. It was the first time I maintained a 3.3 GPA.

      After this program, I transferred to Rowan and [chose] my major: Music Industry. My dad went here, so this was always a school in mind. When he went back in the day, he came here for soccer on a full ride. But that wasn’t my main reason. I got accepted to Full Sail University in Florida, but I felt like it was too far from home, and I needed to master my area before venturing off. 

      Rowan gave me a chance to STRIVE. When my back was against the wall, this was the school that gave me that second chance to strengthen my empire, which is my name. When you think of yourself as a business or an entity, you will try your hardest to not tarnish your business, which is your name. 

      I never thought I would ASPIRE to these heights, but it would have been very hard [without] the helping hand of big brother Rowan. 

      Pharaoh stands outside an academic building on campus.

      If you’re a transfer student coming here or someone discouraged to apply, don’t hesitate: “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” 

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      Story by:
      Pharoah Freer, freshman music industry major

      Edited by:
      Marian Suganob: senior public relations and advertisting double major

      Photos by:
      Stephanie Batista: sophomore music industry major

      Meet #Rowan2025: Incoming Biological Science Major and Field Hockey Player Isabel Weiner

      The Rowan intramural field.

      Today we feature Isabel Weiner, an incoming Biological Science major from Metuchen, NJ (Middlesex County). Isabel plans to live on-campus and will be a part of the field hockey team next year. 

      Isabel poses outdoors.

      Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

      I am enthusiastic about becoming a member of a community full of bright, young leaders. I look forward to surrounding myself with individuals who have the same interests and goals as me.

      Isabel poses while playing field hockey.

      What is one hobby, activity, sport, or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

      During high school, I was a member of a four-time conference champion field hockey team and had the honor to be captain for the 2020 season. I will be a member of the Rowan University Field Hockey program, and I hope to win an NCAA championship. Go Profs!

      Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college?

      I am hoping I grow as an athlete and as a student. I intend to become a member of the Applied Behavior Analysis Club so I can further my understanding of a potential future career.

      Isabel poses outdoors wearing a Rowan sweatshirt.

      What majors are you considering and why?

      I am considering a major in biological science, as well as a minor in psychology and neuroscience. I have always had a deep interest in STEM and psychology. I hope to one day publish articles on the brain and its impact on behavior and cognitive functions.

      Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events?

      I toured the campus when I attended Rowan University for a field hockey prospect clinic. I was impressed by the coaches and the camaraderie of the players on the team. I attended the virtual, informative session about psychology and learned about the degree options.

      Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

      Choose a school where you can see yourself thriving and contributing to your college community proudly.

      What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

      I enjoyed the culture of the field hockey team. They have a competitive and hardworking nature, which makes Rowan Field Hockey such a highly-ranked program.

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      Story by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Photos submitted by:
      Isabel Weiner, incoming freshman biological science major

      Meet #Rowan2025: Political Science Major and Future Congressman Vincent Giasullo

      Photo of a building on Rowan's campus.

      Meet #Rowan2025 incoming freshman Vincent Giasullo! Vincent is an incoming freshman and first-generation college student, Political Science major from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County). He shares why he chose Rowan and where he wants his degree to take him after he graduates.

      Vincent looking at and holding a purple flower.

      Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

      I am looking forward to new experiences in my life and participating in on-campus activities that are relevant to my major.

      Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport, or club?

      I plan to expand my knowledge about politics and life in general.

      What majors are you considering and why?

      I am going to major in Political Science because I want to know what policies were made that were a result of all the good and bad things that are going on in the world and what I can do to fix them by running to be a member of Congress.

      Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

      I did tour Rowan, and I thought it was excellent. I felt like I had a special connection with my tour guide because we are both in the same major and I could have conversations with her that I could not have in high school.

      Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

      When you look at a school, look at the following things: The environment of the area, the cost of the school and how much the school has to offer concerning the major that you want to go into.

      Where are you going to live next year?

      On campus!

      What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

      The environment of the school and how some parts of the school are in some parts city-like and in others suburb-like. For example, I had gotten the view of all of the dining areas and stops at Rowan, and the environment was comparable to an urban area in my opinion.

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

      One Semester Down: 6 First Years Share

      Group of Rowan freshmen friends outside.

      Six students share their thoughts on their experiences so far at Rowan and what advice they would share with future freshmen. “I am most looking forward to meeting new people and making friendships for life at Rowan. But also the opportunities that Rowan gives to further my career. In the future I would like to […]

      Black #PROFspective: Junior Sports Communication and Media Major Zai Smith

      Outdoor photo of track at football field.

      Today we speak to Zai Smith, a junior Sports Communication and Media major with a concentration in Sports Journalism from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). Zai is a transfer student from Virginia State University and lives on campus.

      Thank you to Tatianna Addison, senior communications studies major from Browns Mills, NJ (Burlington County), for this series idea to honor Black students during Black History Month. 

      What is your student experience here at Rowan, as a Black student at a Primarily White Institution?

      My experience at Rowan as a Black student isn’t bad at all. I didn’t expect certain things that I’ve experienced. I feel supported by my peers and my professors, alongside my advisor.

      How did you find your friend group here at Rowan?

      My friend group came from the track team.

      Zai Smith smiles, wears sunglasses while in front of a door.

      How would you describe inclusion? 

      In my opinion, it’s kind of seen as “human rights.”

      What advice would you give to a Black high school student considering your major here at Rowan?

      Just go hard, reach for the stars, because nobody will get in your way and in your head more than you will.

      What are your professional goals?

      I want to become a famous writer because I love to write, and I have quite a story to tell. I also want to own my own business.

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      Story by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Header photo by:
      Anthony Paisley, senior history major

      Black History Facts All Students Should Know

      "Black History Month" written in colorful letters.

      Today we speak to Rowan students from three different colleges who share insight on key moments in Black history and suggest books and movies to learn more. 

      “Black History Month originally began as Negro History Week, created by Carter G. Woodson in 1926. It only became Black History Month in 1976 when President Gerald Ford called for the public to ‘seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.’ The month of February also coincided with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.” 

      Gregory Williams, a freshman Dance major from South River, NJ (Middlesex County) is a resident on campus at Magnolia Hall. Gregory says he learned about Black history mostly through social media and his own research online. He recommends students read “Stamped from the Beginning” by Ibram X. Kendi or view the movies “Selma,” “13th” and “Harriet” to educate themselves about Black history. 

      Gregory poses outside the student center in a Rowan sweatshirt.
      Gregory Williams

      “Jack Johnson became the first African American to be a world heavyweight champion.”

      Latiesha Small, a freshman Biological Sciences and Mathematics double major from Matawan, NJ (Monmouth County), is a resident on campus at Evergreen Hall. Latiesha says she learned about Black history from her family. 

      Latiesha poses at a table.
      Latiesha Small

      “Before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, there was a young girl named Claudette Colvin who refused first.”

      Jamar Green, a junior Law & Justice Studies major with an Africana Studies minor, is from Linden, NJ (Union County). Jamar transferred to Rowan from Union County College and is a resident on campus at 230 Victoria. He is a first-generation college student. Jamar says he learned about Black history by researching. “I was always told by my grandfather if you want to know your history you have to learn it for yourself, so I read articles, books and watched videos, documentaries and movies.” A book that he recommends for students to educate themselves about Black history is “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” by Frederick Douglass.

      Jamar Green sits and smiles, wearing a red vest.
      Jamar Green

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      Story and photo of Gregory by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Photo of Latiesha provided by:
      Latiesha Small, freshman biological Sciences and mathematics double major

      Photo of Jamar provided by:
      Jamar Green, junior law and justice studies major

      Header photo courtesy of:
      Pixabay

      Meet #Rowan2025: Inclusive Elementary Education Major Kristina D’Antonio

      Exterior shot of James Hall.

      Today we feature Kristina D’Antonio, an incoming Inclusive Elementary Education major from Manalapan, NJ (Monmouth County). Kristina plans to live on-campus next year. 

      Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

      One thing I am looking forward to in college is making new friends!

      What is one hobby, activity, sport, or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

      I enjoy music and would like to join Rowan Alternative Music in college.

      Kristina poses against a backdrop.

      Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college?

      I would like to try new kinds of clubs, such as a dance club or an education club.

      What majors are you considering and why?

      I am majoring in Inclusive Elementary Education.

      Kristina poses with a guitar.

      Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events?

      I toured Rowan a couple of months ago, and I loved the environment of the school. I’ve been wanting to come here since freshman year.

      Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

      Rowan is a great school for several kinds of majors.

      Kristina poses against a backdrop in her graduation cap and gown.

      What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

      I like the student life at Rowan. There seems to be a diversity of students.

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      Story by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Photos submitted by:
      Kristina D’Antonio, incoming freshman inclusive elementary education major

      6 Geology Majors Share Their Long-Term Career Goals

      Kayla and her friend talking about a fossil.

      Today, we ask six Geology majors about where they would like to see themselves long-term.

      Kayla holding a small, dinosaur fossil head outside on campus.

      “To be a paleontologist and either be a college professor or a museum curator. I want to focus on either paleoneurology or paleopathologies,” says junior Kayla Bagley, a Geology major with a concentration in Paleontology and a transfer from Ocean County College from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County).

      Tara posing in front of the Badwater Basin sign.

      “I want to be a career academic researcher, professor and science writer. Doing so would combine all of my passions of discovery, community engagement and communication. In this capacity, I hope to publish some high-impact research about our planet’s processes, while also making it a better place for people,” says senior Tara Lonsdorf, a Geology major with GIS minor and Certificate of Undergraduate Studies in Technical and Professional Writing from East Windsor, NJ (Mercer County).

      James smiling for a portrait picture taken outside Wilson Hall.

      “I hope that my climate-heavy course load, research and future internship will help me join a career where I can help the environment and help people understand how important our impact on it is while doing something I’m passionate about. I would like to become a climate scientist,” says first-generation college junior James Milward, a Geology major with a Global Climate Change concentration and with a GIS and Geography minor from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County).

      Matthew smiling and standing in front of a lake while wearing hiking gear.

      “My long-term professional goal is to be a successful professional geologist working for a government agency or a private business doing some form of hydrology, or general environmental consulting,” says senior Matthew Vitale, a Geology major from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County).

      Kyle posing for a portrait photo taken outside on campus.

      “I would like to be a paleontologist and do research,” says senior Kyle Macauley, a Geology major from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County).

      Mairen taking a selfie.

      “My dream goal is to become a volcanologist and work at an observatory. However, I’m open to a variety of careers, as long as I’m able to maintain a balance between time spent in the field and in the lab,” says junior Mairen Flanagan, a Geology major with a Chemistry minor from Point Pleasant, NJ (Ocean County).

      Take a look at Discovery Hall, home to our Geology program, here:

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

      Related posts:

      Breaking New Ground with Geology/Paleontology [VIDEO]

      5 Geology Majors Share Their Short-Term Professional Goals

      Rowan Alumna Shares Advice with Future Profs

      First Year Voices [VIDEO]

      Nathalie poses outside of Wilson Hall.

      Today we chat with Nathalie Hernandez, a violin performance major from Feasterville-Trevose, PA, and Marc Rivera, a music industry major from Ewing, NJ. These two freshmen share their experience so far this year and what they’re most looking forward to during their time at Rowan. Like what you see? Video by:Max Morgan, senior Radio/TV/Film major […]

      #PROFspective: Accounting Major David Nicolas

      David stands outside of Savitz.

      Today we feature first-generation college senior David Nicolas, an Accounting major from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). David is a part of the Accounting Society and NABA – National Association of Black Acountants. What are your career aspirations? One of my aspirations is to get my Series 6 license. I am in the process of doing that […]

      Madison Hayes Shares Insight On Being A GIS And ESS Major

      Madison sitting near a lake.

      Today we feature senior Madison Hayes, a Geographical Information Systems and Environmental and Sustainability Studies major with a minor in planning. Madison is a first-generation college student from Hopewell, New Jersey (Mercer County) who transferred from Lebanon Valley College. How did you become interested in this major? After transferring home to be a commuter I […]

      Black STEM Majors Share Advice for Black High School Students Interested in STEM

      Ylanda sits outside campus near Campbell Library.

      Today, we’re highlighting Black STEM majors as they share some advice on where to start when looking into STEM.

      Ylanda wearing a Rowan shirt and posing outside the Campbell Library.

      “Attend as many events as you can to meet new people that has the same interests as you and to also carry out with your interests,” says Ylanda Souffrant, a sophomore, first-generation college student and Math Education major from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

      Josephine wearing a lab coat and posing in the Science building.

      “It’s alright if you know you’re interested in STEM, but you don’t know what you want to do with it in life. Carefully choose the school/program you join because that is how you will position yourself and expose yourself to experiences and individuals that will guide you along your journey,” says Josephine Babatunde, a senior Biochemistry major and transfer student from Union County College (Union County, NJ).

      Dévon sitting and posing for a photo while wearing a dotted dress shirt and blue dress pants.

      “One major key of advice I would give for high school STEM students is to not give up. I know this sounds a bit cliché, but you’re going to run into many obstacles and people who try to hold you down or stop your progress, but you can’t let nothing stand in your way. The road is going to be rough and tough but like my family always used to preach to me, ‘If someone already did it, you can too,'” says DéVon Malloy, a junior, first-generation college student and Biomedical Engineering major from Hillside, NJ (Union County)

      Briana sitting and posing on the fountain stature outside Campbell Library.

      “Hold your head up high! The courses may seem rigorous and tedious, but you are more than capable. You are just as competitive as anyone else around you; don’t give up! Ask for help if you need it, take advantage of programs that cater to your major whether it is directly or indirectly correlated with the unrepresented, be sure to make connections any chance you get, and try to get some some volunteer experience in the field if possible.” — Briana Davy, junior, first-generation college student and Biological Sciences major (planning on receiving a CUGS in Spanish), Honors Concentration, transfer from RCSJ Cumberland, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

      Akil leaning against the bridge and smiling outside Engineering Hall.

      “Start early. Time flies really fast and you never know what the next day will bring you. Get involved in programs, especially offered by the schools you go to, because it not only looks fantastic on your resumé but also the skills and knowledge you acquire from it goes a long way. Get involved early too, don’t be afraid of clubs and participating, and don’t be afraid to reach out to people in college now and ask questions.” — Akil DeBruhl, junior Biological Sciences major with a minor in Psychology, South Orange, NJ (Essex County)

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

      Photography by: Stephanie Batista, sophomore Music Industry major and Joe Gentempo, Senior Art major

      #PROFspective: Junior Computer Science Major Alex Levinson

      Today we speak with Alex Levinson, a junior Computer Science major from East Windsor, New Jersey (Mercer County). He lives on-campus in the Townhouses, and he is involved with Student University Programmers, Neurodiversity Club, and Colleges Against Cancer

      Alex poses with his stocking.

      Why did you choose your major?

      I chose my major because I’ve always loved technology-related activities, and my dad was also a computer science major in college. I thought this would be the perfect major for me. I love working with technology and learning how computers work. I like learning about programming too. I might go into IT after graduating. 

      How do you feel that the clubs and activities you are involved with on-campus fulfill you?

      The clubs I am involved with, Student University Programmers, Neurodiversity Club, and Colleges Against Cancer, fulfill me because they give me a nice break from, you know, doing schoolwork, and also allows me to get to know my peers and other people on campus. 

      What would you share with a future student interested in your major?

      Computer Science is a really great major, and with how common technology is nowadays, there is so much you can do with this major and in this field. It is important to work hard in the major, but in the end, it is worth it.  

      Alex poses with an ice cream cone.

      What impact would you like to have on the world by going into your field?

      Computers and technology, in general, are so common nowadays, it feels good to help technology move forward and stay up to date with technology in the future. Also, the more I learn about computers and how they work, the more I am able to help others who may not be as proficient in technology as I am. If someone were to ask me for help with their computer, I would be able to help them fix any problems or explain how to use certain functions of their computer. 

      Is there a professor that has helped you get where you are today in your major?

      I had Professor John Manz, an adjunct professor, for a programming class. I was not very good at programming, but he explained it very well, and some of the programming concepts clicked in my brain after taking his class. 

      Alex poses outdoors.

      How was your transition to Rowan?

      My transition to Rowan was mostly good. I handled it a lot better than I thought I would, being in a whole new environment and not having my parents with me every day.  I was able to get through this by having weekly Skype sessions with my parents. There are also times where I am able to visit home, or they are able to visit me.

      Why did you choose Rowan?

      I chose Rowan because I really liked the campus. I like to compare the campus to the Goldilocks and the Three Bears. It’s not too big, not too small. It’s just right. We have a main street, which is something I wanted in a college, and Rowan Boulevard. I thought the size of Rowan was a perfect fit for me.  

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      Story by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Photos provided by:
      Alex Levinson, junior computer science major

      7 Dance Majors Share How Their Degree Supports Their Dreams and Goals

      Photo of dancer Grace Koller in an upward split.

      Shoot for the stars. Seven Dance majors share how they’re dreaming big and how their degree is going to get them there. 

      Grace dancing in a dance studio.
      Grace Koller

      “Being in a B.A. dance program gives me the opportunity to expand and customize my dance major. While I am taking dance classes weekly, I also have the opportunity to grow in my passion for business through my entrepreneurship minor. Some days I am in the dance studio all day working on my technique, and other days I am in the business building learning how to run my own business and how to create product prototypes in the lab. This degree supports my short term and long term goals by giving me the confidence to dance professionally and the knowledge to run my own business!” says first-generation college student Grace Koller, senior, Dance major with a Entrepreneurship minor from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County).

      Gregory outside the student center wearing a Rowan sweatshirt.
      Gregory Williams

      “Having a degree in dance would help me expand my ideas so that I can become a more well-rounded dancer. I like to keep in mind the things that I am taught so that everything can intertwine with each other creating depth in my ideas,” says freshman Gregory Williams, a Dance major with an Entrepreneurship minor from South River, NJ (Middlesex County).

      Katie dancing in a show.
      Katie Fasbach

      “As someone who has been dancing my entire life up until this point, there is no way I couldn’t include dance in my future – near or far. Through my dance degree, I will be able to accomplish all that I plan to because I have learned the necessary skills to go beyond in the real world of dance,” says senior Katie Fasbach, a Dance major from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County).

      Brooke posing for a picture on a railing while wearing a yellow skirt with a lake in the background.
      Brooke Foster

      “A dance degree is the first step to reaching my goals of getting my master’s in dance.” says senior Brooke Foster, a Dance and Exercise Science double major from Burlington, NJ (Burlington County).

      Abby holding a trophy from a dance competition.
      Abby Lamb

      “My dance degree supports my dreams and goals because I needed to be fully experienced and educated in dance to be able to continue and educate others. A dance degree shows my eligibility to teach dance in schools and show future members of my studio that I have a very good understanding,” says junior Abby Lamb a Dance and Business Management double major from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County).

      Lesleigh posing for a picture on train tracks.
      Lesleigh Emanuel

      “Pursuing my dance degree has allowed me to study with so many amazing different professors and learn different techniques to broaden my horizons. I also study so many different styles of dance that I have become a more well rounded dancer,” says first-generation college student, freshman Lesleigh Emanuel a Dance major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County).

      Gabrielle smiling on a cobblestone street.

      “A dance degree will help me gain a possible dance company job after I graduate. Also, this degree allows freedom to possibly do other things such as, teaching or choreographing,” says freshman Gabrielle Langevine, a Dance major from Piscataway, NJ (Middlesex County).

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

      #PROFspective: NASA Grant Recipient Emilio Vega

      Emilio standing outside of the Science building.

      Today we feature Emilio Vega, a senior Physics major with a minor in math and a certificate of undergraduate study in health physics from Monroe, NJ (Middlesex County). Emilio talks about his research and his time here at Rowan. Why did you choose your major? I first fell in love with physics when I was […]

      #PROFspective: Brett Mayer, An EMT At Rowan EMS

      Brett poses next to a tree.

      Today we speak with senior Law & Justice Studies and Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management double major Brett Mayer. Brett is an EMT at Rowan EMS. He also lives on campus and works as a resident assistant in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Brett is from Manalapan, NJ (Monmouth County). 

      Brett poses next to some trees.

      Are there any professors you feel are a visionary in your field? 

      Definitely. Dr. Stanley Yeldell in the Law and Justice Studies department, and Dr. Demond Miller in the Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management department. They both send their students job opportunities, and, especially senior year, it is important to look at all the opportunities and try to line up jobs. They have both been big helpers with my internship. They also both gave me a lot of help along the way with helping me decide what courses I should take, and helping me maximize my education. 

      What career field do you see yourself in after graduation?

      As of now, I am still deciding, but I am thinking of going into the Law and Justice field and becoming a police officer, or something in emergency management. 

      Brett poses in front of the student center and sits at a table.

      Why did you choose your majors?

      I chose my majors because of being an EMT. I knew I wanted to be in the emergency response field, whether that’s the police or EMS. I figured, I love it so much, why not study something in that field? I had an interest in it, and I was already working in the field, so I thought I might as well study it.

      How do you feel that your field impacts the world? 

      Especially today, a lot is going on in the world. Especially in the Law and Justice and police area specifically. The Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management side definitely impacts the world, because disasters happen all the time, and the emergency managers are the people who handle those disasters. Someone is needed to run operations when there is a disaster or big storm, and these events are always going to happen. There is not only job security, but the field has a great impact on the world. 

      Brett poses against the wall of the student center.

      What would you share with a future student that was interested in one of your majors? 

      Get involved within the major. Law and Justice has a few clubs, one that I know of is the Criminal Justice Preparation Club. In clubs related to your major, you can meet other people in your major, discuss job opportunities. It is a great way to meet other people in your major, as well as get ready for your future. 

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      Story and photos by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      One Great Thing About Living Away (Even During a Pandemic)

      Sunset at Rowan with stark red sky against black silouette of buildings and trees.

      “The atmosphere. Your mind is in the school mindset. It would be harder to do homework in your room, because at home your mind thinks you’re at home and resting. But being here you see the buildings, the professors, the students and you still think it’s school first and relax later,” says Jaylen Shanklin, a sophomore […]

      4 Mathematics Education Majors Share Insight About Their Major

      Backlit image of woman writing on a white board.

      Today, we speak to four students pursuing masters’ degrees in STEM education about one thing they wish they knew about their major or something that was better than expected. 

      Reese posing for a portrait photo.

      “Teaching is a profession that requires passion. I warn future education majors to really make sure they are passionate about teaching and will love what they do. There are things we do not consider in the future before making the decision to be a teacher. For one, we do not have full control of what we teach and how we teach it. There are very specific restrictions and each school has different expectations.  You must have the ability to save money. The final year of your education will consist of you being a full time teacher without any compensation. It will be a lot of hard work but you will learn to appreciate it as time goes by,” says senior Reese Hart a Mathematics and Education major, transfer from Rowan College of South Jersey (RCSJ), from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County)

      Tiffany posing for a selfie.

      “The staff associated with my education degree have by far been the best, most personable, helpful and considerate people in all of my college career!” says first-generation college senior Tiffany Burke with a B.A. in Mathematics with an M.A. in Education and a minor in Psychology, transfer from Rowan College of Gloucester County (now RCSJ) from Buena, NJ (Cumberland County) 

      Stephanie posing for a selfie.

      “I love how open all the supervisors are with all of us graduates. They go out of their way to help us succeed and treat us all like a large family. If any questions or concerns are had they are answered immediately by the many supervisors in this field,” says senior Stephanie Gomez with a B.A. in Mathematics, working toward M.A. in STEM Education form Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County)

      Michael posing with a trail sign while hiking.

      “I would tell people starting this out to save up some money. You’ll need it come clinical year,” says senior Michael Garber Mathematics, transfer from Camden County College (now RCSJ) from Camden County, NJ

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

      3 Mechanical Engineering Majors Share How Their Major Supports Their Professional Goals

      Photo of someone writing on paper.

      Today, we hear from three Mechanical Engineering majors on how their major is getting them ready for their professional goals.

      Caroline drinking from a mug that says "engineer" and then provides the definition.

      “I’d love for my career to improve the relationship between humanity and the planet, and have an impact on the way and efficiency with which we carry out our daily lives.” – Caroline Thistle, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major with an honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

      Nicholas posing for a portrait photo of himself while wearing a suit.

      “My major helps tremendously with what I want to go into after I graduate. I want to be an aerospace engineer. It has been a goal of mine for a few years now. Getting a degree in mechanical engineering will bring me closer to my goal since mechanical and aerospace engineering can go hand-in-hand.” – Nicholas Mastropolo, Senior, First-generation college student, Mechanical Engineering major with a minor in Mathematics, Transfer from RCSJ, Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County)

      A portrait photo of Lia.

      “My professional goal is to work at Stryker Corp. I have learned that one of my goals in life is for my work to have a positive impact on others. One way for a mechanical engineer to have a positive impact is through designing medical devices. And Stryker’s philosophies and goals completely align with my own.” – Lia Mahoney, Senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

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      Story by: Bianca Torres, senior, music industry major

      Senior Reflects: Subject Matter Education And English Major Christina Bharda

      Christina standing outside.

      Today, we speak to senior Subject Matter Education and English dual major Christina Bharda from Middletown, NJ (Monmouth County). She tells us more about her Greek life involvement and what she looks forward to doing with her degree.

      Christina smiling outside on Rowan Boulevard wearing a white shirt.

      Are you in any campus involvement or clubs?

      I’m in a sorority! I’m the vice president of programming and ritual for Alpha Sigma Alpha.

      What do you want to do with your degree once you graduate?

      I want to teach middle school or high school English. Eventually, I want to teach students with learning disabilities.

      What favorite class experience or professor have you had so far?

      I would say Dr. Glazer is the most amazing Education professor. I’m also student teaching right now, too so that’s pretty cool! I’m teaching at Millville Memorial High School.

      Christina posing with a friend.

      How would you rate your Rowan experience as a whole?

      Ten out of 10. It has been the best. I definitely picked the right place!

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      Story by:
      Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

      Photography by:
      Rachel Rumbsy, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      3 Finance Majors Share Financial Tips for College Students

      Kyle standing at Business building.

      Rowan’s Finance majors love to talk dollars and cents. Today, they give some of their best advice to peers or future Profs. 

      Kyle outside the business building wearing a monogramed Rowan SGA jacket.

      “Eliminate the small everyday purchases, coffee at Starbucks, going out for lunch, etc.” – Kyle Perez, senior Finance major with a Certificate of Undergraduate Studies in Management and Leadership, Manalapan, NJ (Monmouth County)

      Peter taking a selfie.

      “Learn to budget effectively, cook more at home instead of eating out. On average, college students could save around $1,000 a month if they eat out less.” – Peter Moran, senior, Finance major, transfer student from Cumberland County College (Cumberland County)

      Jaden posing for a picture while wearing a suit and tie.

      “Try to save at least $10 a week. It can go a long way toward building your financial future.” – Jaden Sinondon, senior Accounting and Finance Major with a Management Information Systems minor, Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

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      Story by:
      Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

      #PROFspective: Translational Biomedical Sciences Major Neha Alaparthy

      Viles of blue liquid.

      Today, we speak to Neha Alaparthy, a Translational Biomedical Sciences major from Princeton, NJ (Mercer County). Neha is a junior and looks forward to joining the club Active Minds. She talks about why she chose her major and her time here at Rowan. What inspired you to choose your major? Growing up, I have always […]

      TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Future Chemistry Teacher Trevor Jones

      Trevor outside.

      Today we feature Trevor Jones, a senior first generation college student majoring in chemistry education. Trevor transferred his junior year and is from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). He is a resident assistant at the Nexus apartments and is involved with various clubs such as rugby, Men of Color Alliance (MOCA) and Student Organization for Caribbean […]

      11 Art Majors Share Artists Who Inspire Them

      Studio art major's artwork.

      Some are famous; others, just under the radar. Today, 11 Art majors from Rowan’s Ric Edelman College of Communication and Creative Arts reveal artists whom they admire — perhaps they will inspire you!

      Lotta Nieminen, submitted by Marysa Naiduk.
      Lotta Nieminen

      Marysa Naiduk is a senior, first-generation college student with a specialization in Graphic Design who transferred from Ocean County Community College. She appreciates the graphic design and modern unique style of artist Lotta Nieminen. “Through her work, Nieminen does an exceptional job of bringing visual identities to life. If you have any interest in art, Nieminen’s work is certainly worth checking out!”

      Paul Rand Exhibit (credit: Catherine Cronin via Creative Commons).
      Paul Rand

      Artist Paul Rand is a favorite of Micah Husk, a senior with a specialization in Graphic Design and transfer from Camden County College. “As a chief of design, he made a difference to convert the publicizing industry by emphasizing the significance of realistic plans and visuals over composing. He created logos for huge companies, now recognizable ones, such as ABC, IBM and UPS. Paul Rand succeeded in changing the American commerce scene through his work. When it comes to style and vision, Paul Rand is certainly a master at it.”

      Joe Gentempo wears a design by Justin "Fvller" Fuller.
      Joe Gentempo wears a design by Justin “Fvller” Fuller.

      Joe Gentempo, a senior from Monmouth County, NJ, Brookdale Community College transfer and first-generation college student, values the work of artist Justin “Fvller” Fuller. “He’s one of the most hardworking artists I’ve seen, always making stuff all around the clock. I have a few of the pieces of clothing he’s made and it’s all hand painted. I think a lot more people need to know about him and see what he’s creating,” Joe explains.

      Maya Barton's art.
      Maya Barton

      Jessica Hedum (featured in this video), a Cape May County, NJ senior and Atlantic Cape Community College transfer, recognizes artist Maya Barton. “Maya is a truly talented person. She does everything from screen printing her own etchings, lino cuts and t-shirts for the Women of Westby to any graphic design work. She has created business cards, websites, flyers and more! Maya is a wonderful artist that produces beautiful work in a timely manner with flawless digital layouts and designs.”

      Giovanna Eley's work.
      Giovanna Eley

      Giovanna Eley, a senior, Law and Justice Studies minor and Rutgers transfer from Union County, NJ, shares her own work. “The artist is me and this is part of the work I’ve done at Rowan University and my art and talent have grown so much since studying here. So, I want to share my art with others.” 

      Paula Scher (credit: Ben Terrett via Creative Commons).
      Paula Scher

      Senior Jana Jackstis, a Rowan College of South Jersey transfer student from Gloucester County, NJ, admires artist Paula Scher. “Paula Scher is one of the most influential graphic designers alive. She’s created so much recognizable stuff, like the Microsoft Windows 8 logo and the Citi logo, for example. She was also one of the first female principals at Pentagram, one of the biggest design firms in the world.”

      Mucha (credit: Sofi via Creative Commons).
      Alphonse Mucha

      Senior Abigail MacNeill of Cumberland County, NJ, who transferred from  Rowan College of South Jersey, and also majors in French, values artist Alphonse Mucha. “He had a revolutionary treatment of subject matter and style that defined art nouveau as a movement and ushered Paris into the golden age of poster art.”

      Meg Lemieur.
      Meg Lemieur

      Melissa Powell, a senior, from Mt. Laurel, NJ (Burlington County), Camden County Community College transfer and first-generation college student, respects artist Meg Lemieur. “Meg Lemieur creates beautiful illustrations that carry powerful messages. I always look forward to what she will represent next.”

      Friday Kahlo (credit: Steven Zucker via Creative Commons).
      Frida Kahlo

      Kaitlyn Davis, a Gloucester County, NJ senior and transfer student from Winthrop University who specializes in graphic design, admires artist Frida Kahlo. “I believe Kahlo to be the definition of perseverance. She is an inspiration and through her pain she created many beautiful paintings.”

      Hayao Miyazaki (credit: Domenica Vescio via Creative Commons).
      Hayao Miyazaki

      Senior Chelsea Herrmann, of Gloucester County, NJ appreciates artist Hayao Miyazaki. “He is a mastermind of storytelling through his art of these movies. He incorporates traditional art with animated art and his stories are so beautiful.”

      Keith Haring (credit: Heinz Bunse via Creative Commons).
      Keith Haring

      Charlotte Steinman, junior, Art major, Washington Township/Gloucester County, Rowan College South Jersey transfer, admires artist Keith Haring. She explains: “Keith Haring was an influential pop artist in the 80’s that started out drawing graffiti in New York City subways and grew in popularity until he became an influential public figure. His work commented on relevant social and political themes like homosexuality and AIDS. Not only is his art beautiful and striking, it also conveys important messages.”

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      Story by:
      Max M. Morgan, senior radio/television/film major

      5 Juniors Share Why They Changed Their Majors

      These students recognized their majors weren’t the right fit and took the time and energy (which isn’t much) to make the switch. If you don’t absolutely love what you’re studying, it might be good idea to make a switch to improve your college experience!

      Selfie of Bria Riley.

      “I was exploring a couple different paths such as addiction counselor, teacher and community health educator, but I realized they weren’t for me. Then what really drove me to add world religions was just my own personal experiences with spirituality, and I realized that I really value critical thinking and multicultural competency … everyone having peace with one another and getting along.” – Bria Riley, junior Psychology major (previously Writing Arts) from Washington Township (Gloucester County)

      Outside headshot of Michaela Navarro.

      “I wanted a place where I could do music business and not have to deal with the recording and playing an instrument. My ex-boyfriend took me to see ‘Wicked’ and that was the deciding factor for me. I wanted to do theatre and I wanted to make amazing theatre like ‘Wicked.’ I just always really loved the technical aspect of everything. I do live sound, so I mix musicals here and I do lighting.” – Michaela Navarro, junior Musical Theatre-Design/Technical major (previously Music Industry) from Howell, NJ (Monmouth County)

      Jackie Carlton sits on a purple chair outside.

      “I was a Mechanical Engineering major up until the fall of my sophomore year. I wasn’t really enjoying the classes that were more specific to it, I was trying to go to the clubs to figure out more what to do. But all the career stuff wasn’t really stuff I wanted to do. I want to get as much diverse experience as I can, I’m not really sure what I specifically want to get into, but I kind of want to learn a little bit of each field.” – Jackie Charlton, junior Civil & Environmental Engineering major (previously Mechanical Engineering) from Boonton, NJ (Morris County)

      Shirley stands in front of a tree and a nearby academic building.

      “I changed a bunch of times. I came to Rowan as a Biochem major, then I switched to Psychology, then I was undecided for like two seconds, then I was Physiological Sciences, and I became an Anthropology major and I recently doubled majored in Modern Language & Linguistics. Spring semester [sophomore year] I had to take an Anthropology class and I was given Natives of South America with Dr. Maria Rosado, and she changed my perspective on everything. Coincidentally, the major just became a major that same semester, if I’m not mistaken. – Shirley Celi-Landeo, junior Anthropology / Modern Language & Linguistics dual major (previously Biochemistry) from Newark, NJ (Essex County)

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      Story by:
      Luke Garcia, junior music industry major

      Photos not submitted taken by: 
      Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major
      Quintin Stinney, sophomore Radio/TV/Film major

      History Majors, Professors Suggest Historical Sights to Visit Over Winter Break

      Building at Arlington National Cemetery.

      Today we feature History majors and their professors, who suggest historical sites to visit over winter break. 

      The statue of liberty.
      Statue of Liberty

      Kaan Aktas, a senior education and history double major from Fairview, NJ (Bergen County), is a transfer student from Bergen County Community College and a first-generation college student. He recommends that Rowan students visit the Statue of Liberty, or Ellis Island, because “Ellis Island has the Immigration Museum, which is also indoors and can get pretty empty during the wintertime. The Statue of Liberty is very beautiful and breathtaking. It shows the relationship between France and the U.S., and also the importance of immigration to our country.”

      Anthony poses against a backdrop, wearing a suit and tie
      Anthony Raisley

      Anthony Raisley, a senior history major with minors in international studies, entrepreneurship, and new media studies and a CUGS in Italian, is from Middletown, NJ (Monmouth County). He also recommends that Rowan students visit Ellis Island, as well as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City Transit Museum, American Museum of Natural History. He says “Much of what’s at these museums I feel that even if you are not a history major you can relate to and learn.” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “Ellis Island is my favorite. All of my great grandparents came to the United States from Italy through Ellis Island. It was very impactful to see the sight first hand and what other immigrants coming to the United States went through, and how immigration has enriched New York City, and the U.S. today.”

      Jen poses in front of a mirror.
      Jen Gruberg

      Jen Gruberg, a senior history major with minors in education and international studies is from West Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County). She recommends visiting the James and Ann Whitall House Museum and Red Bank Battlefield. She says “The Whitall House sits on the side of the Delaware River and was a private plantation since 1748. It was used as a field hospital in 1777 during the American Revolution. It’s now a museum and park in Red Bank, NJ. My favorite part about the park is the artifacts left in the trenches and in the house itself. There are cannons, cannonballs, anchors, and medical equipment, but unfortunately due to COVID, you can only see things that are outside of the house.” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “It’s so hard to pick a favorite, but my favorite museum or historical site I’ve visited would be the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. I’ve been there a handful of times and I’m always in shock of the sheer beauty of the place.”

      A photo from the Morris Arboretum.
      The Morris Arboretum

      Connor Hoagland, a senior history major with a minor in French from Mount Holly, NJ (Burlington County), is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County. They recommend visiting the Morris Arboretum in Philadelphia, or the Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ. They say: “Both of these places are primarily outdoors. I like the arboretum since it’s one of the last of its kind remaining, and I’ve been there a few times when I was younger. The Grounds for Sculpture has some really impressive works of art and it’s fun to just explore.” They also tell us about their favorite museum or historical site. “My favorite historical site would have to be Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The free tour and the knowledge that the country was literally founded in that building was pretty nice. History has always been my strongest subject, and I’ve always had an interest in the revolution, especially since it pretty much happened in my own backyard.”

      Bobby poses next to a cannon at the Museum of the American Revolution.

      Bobby Scott a senior secondary education major with history subject matter, is from Elk Township, NJ (Gloucester County). He recommends students visit the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA, or the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC. He says “Each of these museums or locations show true insight into what life was truly like for people who have through trying times of history, or pay remembrance to the sacrifices that others have made in service to their nation in the hopes of bringing freedom to others.” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “Pearl Harbor was perhaps the most significant sight I have ever visited, however, it is quite a distance from Rowan University and sadly out of reach for many college students. Arlington holds an even more impactful memory upon me, as seeing the thousands of graves of those who selflessly gave their lives for their friends and their country. Pictures cannot capture the emotions, and words are difficult to choose that convey the emotion and overwhelming presence of such a place. The Holocaust Museum, which is only a short distance from Arlington, gives a truly personal account of the horrors that Jews and other minorities were forced to endure during some of the darkest days of the twentieth century. Many who walk out of there are often in tears, as they finally come face to face with the odds that men, women, and children had to go up against. Each of these locations can often take even those who find history a dull and boring affair, and can turn it into a life-altering experience.”

      Dr. Kelly Duke Bryant, history professor, recommends that students visit The Newark Museum of Art. She says “I teach African history, and this museum has a wonderful collection of African art. They are currently featuring the “Arts of Global Africa” in a special exhibition. Even if you can’t go in person due to distance or the pandemic, the online exhibition is worth a look. ” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “The National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian) is my favorite museum. I visited this museum a number of years ago, shortly after it opened, and was impressed by the range of historical artifacts on display and the complexity (and honesty) of the historical narrative presented. The building itself is gorgeous, too.”

      George Washington's house in Philadelphia as shared by Dr. Emily Blanck.
      George Washington’s house in Philadelphia.

      Dr. Emily Blanck, history professor, recommends that students visit the Harleigh Cemetery in Camden/Collingswood (Camden County), Historic Germantown (Philadelphia), and Washington’s House (Philadelphia). She says “These two off-the-beaten-path destinations have interesting aspects. I love Walt Whitman, and in the COVID environment, it is good to stay outdoors. Bundle up and go visit Walt Whitman and many other souls in Harleigh Cemetery in Camden. It is one of the oldest with lots of prominent folks with interesting headstones. Historic Germantown is great because they have worked to engage with the past of slavery as well as feature important elite homes. There are many small and medium historical sites here, and they’re not well-trod, so the chance that you’ll be in a crowded indoor space is slim. The Johnson House is especially a gem, but there are a couple of small museums dedicated to understanding and remembering the black experience too. Another COVID-friendly outdoor spot is Washington’s House near Liberty Pavillon in Philadelphia. It is just the frame of the house and it focuses on the interpretation of George Washington’s slaves when he was President. Great stories and it’s really accessible. ” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “I can go on the Independence Hall tour over and over. I don’t know why. I like hearing the different interpretations from the rangers and hearing the outlandish stories folks have about America’s founding.”

      Dr. Hague poses at a book signing for his first book.
      Dr. Hague at a book signing for his first book that he wrote. One of the sites he recommends, the Stenton Historic House, is featured extensively throughout the book.

      Dr. Steven Hague, history professor, recommends that students visit The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, PA; the Wharton Esherick Museum in Malvern, PA, and Stenton historic house in Philadelphia. He says “As a former museum director I would suggest three great and very cool hidden gem museums in the Delaware Valley: The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, PA; the Wharton Esherick Museum in Malvern, PA, and the Stenton Historic House in Philadelphia. Imagine a giant concrete castle built as a museum filled with objects from the early time of America, everything from a whaleboat hanging from the ceiling to a gallows. Chock-a-block filled with great stuff. That is the Mercer Museum. Wharton Esherick was an American artist who worked in wood and built his own house. Quirky, fun, and absolutely worth the visit. Call ahead. The Stenton Historic House is one of the best-preserved 18th-century historic sites anywhere. Off the beaten path with remarkable collections and history. And a Rowan grad runs their award-winning educational programs!” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “There are so many (in addition to the regional ones mentioned above): Art Museum: The Louvre in Paris – stunning – with a close honorable mention for the Met in New York and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which is world-class. Historic site: two houses – Beauport, a rambling house filled with amazing collections, in Gloucester, MA. Similarly, Sir John Soane’s Museum in London. Both were put together by quirky, eccentric individuals with lots of flair.”

      Dr. Dack poses outdoors.

      Dr. Mikkel Dack, history professor, recommends students visit The German Resistance Memorial Center. He says “The memorial’s (virtual) permanent exhibition provides extensive documentation of the motives, aims, and forms of the fight against the Nazi Dictatorship. This is an important topic of German and WWII history that most students are unfamiliar with.” 

      Denis Long, a senior history major with a minor in American Studies, is from Point Pleasant, NJ (Ocean County). They recommend that Rowan students visit the Monmouth Battlefield in Freehold, New Jersey. They say “While I’m not sure if its Visitors Center will be open, Monmouth Battlefield in Freehold, New Jersey is a beautiful, scenic location filled with historical significance to the American Revolution. Since its Visitors Center is likely closed, I recommend reading up on the Battle of Monmouth Courthouse beforehand, it’s a really wonderful piece of American history!  I’ve been going there most 4th of Julys ever since I was young. I have many great memories there of traversing the fields and Comb’s Hill with my family, taking in the history. I also did research on the battle that I presented for an undergraduate research workshop at Penn early this year and to be able to spread my love for this event makes it even dearer to my heart.” They also tells us about their favorite museum or historical site. “Besides from Monmouth Battlefield, Ellis Island struck a chord when I visited it last summer. It was a beautiful museum packed with information and stories about immigration to the United States that helped show the importance of immigrants and diversity to this nation. People of all races, ethnicities, and other walks of life were there and to see people come together to learn about all of this honestly made me emotional.”

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      Story by:
      Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

      Photos of Morris Arboretum and the Statue of Liberty and header photo courtesy of:
      Unsplash