Accelerating Graduation and Building Stronger Connections Through Rowan’s Summer Classes

Richard Ricks touches a tree.

Today, we meet Richard Ricks, a senior biological sciences major on a pre-vet track, from Burlington, NJ (Burlington County), here to talk about his experience with taking summer classes at Rowan and how it’s been beneficial to him.   This summer Richard completed Organic Chemistry, Physics II, (both online) and Plant Diversity (in person) summer […]

Veterinary Innovation Gives Fortunato the Goat a New Lease on Life [VIDEO]

Fortunato on a work table getting measurements done with a student and vet tech with a Studio 231 sign in the background.

An interdisciplinary, collaborative space, Studio 231 within the School of Innovation & Entrepreneurship helps to bring the best ideas to life – including, this time, giving a new lease on life to a baby goat who was unable to walk.

The story of Fortunato the goat highlights the ingenuity – not to mention the impact – of leveraging this student-led and student-run experiential learning lab and makerspace within the Rowan community. A hub for collaboration, ideation, rapid prototyping and research, the newly created Schreiber School of Veterinary Medicine partnered with Studio 231 to create working legs for this Nigerian Dwarf goat with septic arthritis in his hind feet, which caused him to lose the feet. 

Dr. Matthew Edson, founding dean of the veterinary school, had previously toured Studio 231 and knew that this resource would be valuable for their work, opening up the possibility of printing 3D models for the vet school.

Fortunato’s owners were told he should be euthanized. Dr. Edson had a different recommendation. 

With an email entitled “Goat Legs” Dr. Edson reached out to the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, asking to partner with Studio 231 to create new working legs for Fortunato. That email found its way to Addison Deckert, a sophomore mechanical engineer major from Gannett Park, MD, and Vincent Gallo, a junior mechanical engineering major from Cinnaminson, NJ, who then worked on the project. 

Fortunato getting measurements with vet tech and Addison done.

Even with a team put together and the drive to create a perfect model, a series of obstacles remained in the way. How would they build legs that would expand as Fortunato grew? How could Addison and Vincent, who rarely worked the same shifts, best collaborate? Which approach, which idea, was the right one to pursue?

The emotional attachment to Fortunato, the intensity of working toward saving a life, and working with a deadline certainly brought out the best in all involved. Several questions needed to be answered for success to be achieved. Vincent shed some light on some of them, “What should we keep in mind? What part of the leg should we try and stay away from? So that’s not like a big pressure point when the goat is walking; how much support does it really need?”

The shape of Fortunato’s body created an interesting challenge that needed to be addressed. Addison revealed, “One of the hardest things we had with designing was figuring out how to keep the boot on because sometimes just like a friction fit and wrapping it real tight isn’t the best solution. And he actually has a tendon running along the upper part of his leg, so we couldn’t attach anything to it. So we went through a lot of different designs.”

Another element of the challenge the project posed was what materials could and could not be used, as they had to be animal friendly. After looking at several different options that combine plastic and 3D printing materials, they opted for TPU, a material that would hold up in the sun, in water, and still remain comfortable for Fortunato. 

After switching the material for the laces to a thinner material, Fortunato was ready to test out the design. Because his leg hindered him from going outside, he was hesitant to touch the world outside, but on a beautiful day, dreams came true. Fortunato came to life running around and hopping on his new prosthetic – the design worked.

The joy for the team was moving, even though Vincent missed the moment due to having to take a test; Addison had this to say about the moment, “Actually being able to see a prototype that I made on Fortunato and working and actually giving him something he didn’t have before is indescribable.” The collaboration not only saved a life but opened the door on saving more down the line. Both students and the rest of the team were showered with praise from the new dean, “We couldn’t be happier with the whole team that worked on this. We came in the first day to a back of a goat’s leg drawn on the board. They had researched the anatomy. They had already come up with a couple of different models that they planned to use. They were really well prepared, but I think they were also able to be creative and entrepreneurial in their approach and adjust to the challenges and come up with a really nice finished project.”

Addison taking notes.

In terms of what comes next, different answers were given. The success of creating a prosthetic certainly opens up opportunities for students to work with the new school, Dean Edson says, “This is the sort of project that we want to do. We want to think outside of the box, involve other departments, other agencies, and all come together to solve problems like this for the betterment of both animal health and human health. And again, this was a perfect example of how we want to do that.”

This project certainly captured the mind of Addison and what she thought was possible, even expressing an interest in working ducks for similar projects in the future. Accomplishing the ability to help aid an animal to walk extends the reality of what is deemed achievable and with students such as Vincent and Addison leading the way in innovation, no project is too big to dream about at Rowan. 

None of this would have been possible without not only Dean Edson, Vincent and Addison but several professors, faculty, and others who helped guide the project along. Working as a team to achieve a goal for something greater than an individual’s ambition helps kindle the wonder in students. This is summed up through Addison, ““It was really amazing and it makes me really want to do engineering because sometimes you doubt it after doing 15 hours of homework and three all-nighters and failing a test and all those types of things, it really makes you doubt. But do I want to actually design something new and build something that actually helps people? Yes. I think Rowan’s really trying to push that mindset.”

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Story by:

Thomas Ubelhoer, sophomore political science and international studies double major 

Friendship Toxicity

Kye is standing in front of Business Hall and smiling.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Friendships in adulthood can be difficult to navigate especially when it comes to recognizing a healthy friendship versus one with toxic traits. Growing older means meeting friends in many different ways, for instance, in college we meet them in class, club meetings or even as student workers. Throughout the years we are constantly growing and evolving and sometimes we may outgrow certain friendships. When we grow as a person, sometimes friendships do not grow with us. People grow in different ways and it is okay to let them go. 

Kye is standing directly in front of the camera smiling profoundly.

Healthy relationships look different for everyone but at its core they all consist of similar values. Having the ability to have open and honest communication with one another is the foundation for every friendship. When communicating, it is important to have respect and to practice active listening skills. Relationships have highs and lows and being able to stick through both of them can say a lot about the relationship. At the end of the day, regardless of which values and boundaries the relationship has set, what is important is that each person enjoys spending time with one another.

Boundaries are a vital part of every healthy relationship that help everyone feel comfortable. Just like relationships, boundaries are constantly evolving and they look different for everyone. An example of a boundary is that folks often believe that relationships consistently need to be 50-50; however, this is not always the case. Oftentimes it is okay if that number fluctuates because someone can’t always give everything all the time in a relationship. 

Kye is standing in front of the student center party-acting in an activity on the sidewalk.

We are all human and as humans we make mistakes, and that is okay. What really matters is how someone responds upon realizing a mistake. Mistakes can take many forms like snapping at someone, taking more in the relationship or accidentally pushing some of the boundaries a friend may have set. Upon realizing the mistake, it is important to be able to hold oneself accountable. Accountability can look different in various ways but the most well-known and appreciated is an apology and the willingness to learn and grow. 

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Story by:
Kye Binik, senior law and justice major, Wellness Center intern

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, dance and marketing double major 

Produced by:
Lucas Taylor, English education graduate student

References

https://www.today.com/health/behavior/toxic-friendship-warning-signs-rcna16665

#PROFspective: Civil Engineering Student and Clubs Enthusiast Kayla King

In this edition of #PROFspective, we learn more of Kayla King of Burlington County. Kayla is currently a senior and majoring in Civil and Environmental Engineering and in this excerpt we learn more of how Rowan provided opportunities to further her career as well as enriched her experience as a college student. 

What is civil engineering?

Civil engineering, to me, is the ability to design, build and construct all types of bridges, buildings, any type of infrastructure. Civil engineering also deals with maintaining all of that aforementioned infrastructure When you’re on a job site you’ll see that it’s not just all the construction workers that you see building things. It’s also all the design teams, consulting teams, the land surveying teams, there’s a bunch that goes into all of the different infrastructure that we see today.

Rowan University Civil Engineering major Kayla works on a project inside the concrete lab in Engineering Hall.

What made you choose engineering and more specifically civil engineering?

I’ve always known that I wanted to be an engineer; my father was actually in the construction industry growing up. My father was an ironworker, to put it into perspective, those are people that you see climbing all the high rises, putting up all that steel. Later in his career he switched into becoming an operating engineer with Local 825. I’ve always had a background in construction, which has influenced my decision, but I’ve also always loved math and science.

I was always a problem solver, I love to answer questions and come up with solutions with intricate questions or challenges. I’ve also really enjoyed engineering diving, that is something that I’ve learned all the way back in eighth grade. I would say that  because of my upbringing and just familiarity in the construction industry I’ve gotten some inner niche details within the industry. So I’ve just kind of always known that I wanted to do civil engineering.

What goes into civil engineer diving? 

They’re basically commercial divers, they do not have typical scuba equipment but you do have something similar to the whole helmet. There are a lot of intricate differences such as how you don’t have the air tank on your back it’s fed into a line to you. Throughout the dive, you have a tagline throughout. With civil engineer divers, these people are the ones that kind of will go in anything that has water. They’re certified to be able to go underground, and they end up taking special care into noticing how things are down below and then report that information to the people up above. That’s how they’re able to do underwater inspections on timber piles on bridges or foundations. So it’s really nice. It’s an interesting thing that a lot of people don’t know about.

Civil engineering major Kayla (left) and another student work on a project in the concrete lab in Engineering Hall.

What made you choose Rowan initially?

Rowan is close to home, but not too close. I’ve also been very fortunate to get a lot of scholarships to go here. Rowan has an incredible engineering program. In my opinion, it’s got to the point where you cannot even argue that it isn’t. I believe we’re 15th in the nation for the last year for our civil engineering program. So I’m very proud to consider myself to soon be a Rowan graduate.

Describe your experience here.

So I’ve been involved in everything since the start of my freshman year. I have been a Chamberlain Student Center building manager and before I did that I had a position working at the Information Service Desk.

Outside of work-related aspects, I’ve been involved in the Wrestling Club, which is something a lot of people wouldn’t think of. I had met a friend freshman year and we became really close. I kind of pinned him in his freshman dorm room and I’ve been going to the club ever since.

I’ve also been involved in various other clubs throughout my time on campus. I am ASCE president and have been for the past two years. Before getting that position, I was the senator of the club. I’m also involved with women’s engineering. I used to hold the workshop chair position as well as the senate chair position for that club as well.

What does ASCE stand for, and what does it represent? 

ASCE is the American Society of Civil Engineers and it is a worldwide organization. The ASCE national has different student chapter branches where we are able to compete in various different competitions with other regions of schools. So for example, we are hosting the ASCE Region One metropolitan symposium from April 21 to the 23rd this upcoming year. There is a lot of excitement around it because of how so many different students can get involved in it. The competition has a bunch of different challenges and tasks such as making things like concrete canoes with surveying competitions. It’s a whole bunch of things to help facilitate fun and learning at the same time.

Could you provide some insight on what went into Women in Engineering? 

WE (Women in Engineering) was definitely a club that I enjoyed being a part of. I wasn’t as involved as I have been in comparison with ASCE just because ASCE is more directly geared towards my major, so I decided to give more time towards that. But WE was definitely a great thing because it was under the I triple E which is the electrical engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering major club. And I just like WE slightly better than SWE (Society of Women Engineers) throughout my time here because I feel like the individuals that WE had were more personable while SWE was definitely more professional. So it kind of depends upon what you were looking for at the time. In my case,I decided to go the latter route because I wanted to make more friends. They also had really good baked ziti at the time. 

Profile picture of Rowan University Civil engineering major Kayla.

What is it like being a woman in the engineering field? How would you say your experience has been so far?

I love being a woman in STEM. I like the fact that I’m constantly expected to do less, because then I always do more and there’s always an element of surprise. I’ve grown accustomed to hearing things such as “What the heck? Where’d this come from?” I like to be able to prove myself and my worth.

So, talk to me about your most influential professor here.

So the most influential professor for me would definitely be Dr. Douglas Cleary. He’s a great teacher. You get an introduction to him in your freshman or sophomore year. Dr. Cleary has courses where you deal with statistics, which is a really fundamental civil civil engineering course. Right from the start, you definitely understand that he’s a professor who’s looking out for your best interest. As time went on, I got more involved with ASCE and I spent more time with Dr. Cleary and I definitely can say he is one of the best professors here.

The camera is panned in and zoomed in on what Kayla is working on.

What are some of the clubs that you’ve been involved with like? 

I’ve been a part of a  slew of different clubs. One of the ones that I’ve been involved in throughout my time here is ASCE, WE and SWE, but there are a million other different ones like Tau Beta Pi, which is an honor-based introductory society. For Tau Beta Pi, it’s invitation only, which is really cool. I’ve also been a part of the Rowan Environmental Action League, which is something where if kids are interested in the environmentally friendly side of civil engineering, it’s definitely a way to give back to the community and participate in a lot of campus cleanups.

We also have EWB, which is Engineers Without Borders, which is a club where a lot of the students can have opportunities to go out of the country and be able to work on small different tasks to help the communities there. Another club is 3D PC. So this one’s not technically engineering-based, but it is something to keep an eye on, because a lot of civil engineers might have some like niche interests. So say if they want to build something themselves, 3D PC allows you to print your own personal designs. You also have NSBE, which is the National Society of Black Engineers, or SAME which is the Society of American Engineers.

When you’re here at Rowan in my opinion I think you should try and give every club that you might be interested in the chance. In my experience, a lot of my peers were doing the same thing and it gives you the chance to separate yourself from others, they’re gonna be the things that get your name out there.

Being a part of different clubs and associations is gonna be the way that professors know you. And professors obviously have had their own life, their own network. So it’s really important to make sure that you are involved in the clubs, because it’ll set you apart from everyone else.

Kayla (pictured in center) and a group of her classmates are listening to the directions of a professor.

What are your goals for the future?

I would love to end up becoming an engineer diver. If that falls through I’d also be open to the idea of becoming a construction project manager, I don’t necessarily have a direct path right now. I’m in a place where I have a great amount of internship experience. I’ve done an excellent amount of work during my time at Rowan. So it’s kind of just kind of where life takes me so far.

What impact do you wish to have on the world?

I would love to be the “know it all” answer for everyone. That’s what I kind of did at Rowan, just being involved in everything. That’s what I really like to do is just being a leader and  being able to help anyone, no matter what it is. Even if I don’t know the answer, I would love to find out and help you with that. So that’s why I’ve always enjoyed being a part of all the clubs because of all the different mentoring opportunities that they include, there is definitely a great way to foster more relationships, and therefore more networking opportunities for a better job in the future.

What’s one piece of advice you would give an incoming freshman?

I would say don’t give up and keep your head high. You know yourself best. So if it is something that you want to do in regards to a club, Greek life, or if it’s something that you’re not sure about and you say you want a friend to go with, that’s ok. You don’t need a friend. Do it by yourself. You have the confidence. 

See our video with Kayla here:

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Story produced by:
Lucas Taylor, English Education graduate student

The Power of Connecting with Others: Miral Rawy’s Story

Biomedical Engineering major Miral walks down Rowan Boulevard with two friends.

Today we feature first-year student Miral Rawy, a Biomedical Engineering major who commutes to campus from Burlington County, NJ. Could you share a few on-campus activities, clubs, sports or events that you’ve attended so far? What was your favorite, and why? I have attended some RAHs [Rowan After Hours], which were a lot of fun, […]

Exploring the Community and Environmental Planning Major with Senior Jon Hansel

Jon smiles outside in on Glassboro Town Square.

Today we feature senior Jonathan Hansel (he/him) from Burlington County. Jon is majoring in Community and Environmental Planning and pursuing a master’s in Urban and Regional Planning through Rowan’s 4+1 program. Here, he discusses the importance of planning, his personal aspirations, and the opportunities he’s found in the program. Could you tell us a little […]

Beyond the Classroom: How 3+1 Student Rebekah Feinberg Is Pursuing Both Medicine And Law

Rebekah is working on a desktop computer at Rowan College of Burlington County.

Today we speak with Rebekah Feinberg, a senior who is a part of the 3+1 program with Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC), majoring in Biological Sciences with a minor in Law and Justice. We discuss her dedication as a student as well as her new role on the 3+1 team, assuming the position of Alumni Trustee on the Board of Trustees for the NJ County Colleges Council, and becoming project manager for the upcoming RCBC Science Slam.

What inspired you to pursue both Biological Sciences and Law and Justice?

In high school, I knew I wanted to go into medicine. Going into college, I knew I wanted my major to be something in the sciences, whether it was Biology or Chemistry. Typically with a traditional pathway, your major is Biological Sciences. So, that’s why I’m in the major I’m in right now. 

I had declared my minor this year for Law. It was because last year, during a domestic violence event at RCBC that I spoke at, I actually met with Burlington County’s Prosecutor’s office, and they offered me an internship. I declined it because I had other things going on, but that really sparked my interest in Law and understanding how exactly Law and medicine are connected through healthcare policies, medical malpractice. So that’s why I have my minor — I figured it would definitely help me once I’m in a hospital to really give my patients more of a well-rounded form of care because I will be knowledgeable in a field that [they may not be] expecting.

Are you currently involved in any work or volunteer opportunities regarding your fields of interest?

Currently, I’m starting a 3+1 position. I will be working in the 3+1 offices at RCBC, and it will be the 3+1 Rowan team who is stationed at RCBC. I will be the office assistant and advisor to some of the students, mostly pre-medical. My duties are mainly to assist the advisors and the staff in the offices, whether that’s through certain projects or being passed down students that they feel I could give advice to.

Also, I am assuming the position of Alumni Trustee on the NJCC (New Jersey County Colleges Council). That was a peer nomination by the Director of Marketing from RCBC, Greg Volpe. He peer nominated me since I was Alumni Trustee on RCBC’s Board of Trustees and I had fulfilled my term for the year. So, in that position, it’s voluntary and I can continue to advocate for the betterment of the student body at a state level instead of at a county level. We bring up student concerns from our campuses as well as discuss financial budgeting issues, such as more grant funding for research or for incoming freshmen. It’s more of, how can we help our students get an education if for some reason they’re financially not stable enough to?

I currently just assumed the position of project manager for the Science Slam, which is run by the RCBC STEM department. I am working directly with the associate dean of STEM — her name is Dr. Tiffani Worthy, and together we are recreating the essence of the Science Slam that RCBC has now done for the past three years. This event used to be marketed towards elementary/middle school kids to get them interested in the sciences and show them that, regardless of your gender, your race or your ethnicity, you can pursue a career in science, and it’s fun.

This year Dr. Worthy and I are looking to market a broader community, so we’re not only going to involve elementary school and middle school, we’re going to include high school students as well as our own college students. It’s going to be a very big event. We’re going to have experiments for the kids, advising will be there, 3+1 will be there, and it’s going to be a very market-friendly event to promote not only science, but for pursuing either RCBC or Rowan. It will probably be some time in early April.

Rebekah sits on a bench on the campus of RCBC.

How has the Rowan 3+1 program shaped your experience both as a student and now as a member of the advising team?

As a student, going into the program I had absolutely no idea what it was. I found out about the program by sitting on one of the park benches that had 3+1 advertised on it, which is really ironic. But, going into the program, it has opened up so many doors and opportunities to not only advance my undergraduate career but also propel me into a successful post-grad career, whether that’s through connections or through the experiences I was able to gain. The entire program has just made me a better student in my opinion. If I was not a part of the program I don’t think I would have excelled to the extent I have. 

Through this program, I was able to stay on with Service-Learning Scholars, which is a volunteering program at RCBC. I was able to stay with them for three years instead of two, which also allowed me to implement a Little Free Library on our campus. I was able to work at our food pantry 2 ½ years, I was able to just do a lot for long periods of times that I just wouldn’t have been able to do if I stayed there for only two years. Since I haven’t started the office position yet, I can’t really say how it’s going to shape me, but I can predict that it’s going to be very satisfying helping my peers in that role.

Rebekah on computer at Rowan College of Burlington County.

What inspired you to join the Board of Trustees for the New Jersey County Colleges Council? 

After completing my term with RCBC’s Board of Trustees as Alumni Trustee, it was a year term, and coming out of it I really enjoyed seeing how the policies of the college are not only implemented but created, and how exactly that impacts the students. I thought it was really important to maintain having my voice at that level as a student perspective. So, I didn’t even know it was a thing, and then when I was peer nominated and informed of it, I immediately took the position just because now I’m volunteering at a state level to advocate for the students, and I will always advocate for the betterment of the students.

I’m not that type of person where if I see something that’s wrong or can be done better I just look the other way — I want to fix it and really just try to make everything inclusive and equal. I want to make sure everyone has an equal opportunity and are equally heard. 

Do you have any plans to continue your education? If so, what are they?

Yes, I do have plans to continue my education. Currently, I am going through the application process for medical schools. I applied to both M.D. schools and D.O. schools — M.D. is allopathic and D.O. is osteopathic, there are two pathways of medicine. So, I am currently going through the process, which is primary application, secondary application, interviews and then acceptances. Of course, within those points of contact you can get rejected.

I essentially would like to be a cardiovascular surgeon, which is why pursuing medical school is necessary. If I don’t get into medical school this cycle, I plan to then pursue a master’s program in the interim year between now and having to reapply. The master’s program I will be pursuing will most likely be a highly specialized one, whether that’s medical anatomy or medical physiology. Something that will showcase that I am dedicated to medicine. 

In medical school, if I get in, I will be pursuing a dual degree program. So it’s either going to be M.D. or D.O. for the medical degree, then I am also looking at getting an MPH, an MBA, or a JD. So, for the MPH (Master of Public Health,) that will help me because as you age in the medical field, there will come a point in your career where you can’t perform surgeries because your dexterity and visual acuity declines. So in order to save myself in the future so I can still work in a hospital, the MPH will allow me to assume an administrative position. If I pursue the joint MBA, it will help me if I want to open up my own practice, because there’s a business side to that. The JD is actually a law degree, so I would be a doctor and a lawyer, but I would probably specialize in medical malpractice so it is still connected to healthcare. I just haven’t decide which one I actually want to pursue yet.

Front of Votta Pavilion on the campus of Rowan College of Burlington County.

How has your experience with Rowan shaped where you are now and what you wish to pursue? 

My experience with Rowan through the 3+1 program has shaped me to be a student who strives to do more than the bare minimum. I’m consistently trying to go above and beyond to not only meet the basic requirements, but to exceed past those and just really develop myself and my career. RCBC and Rowan University have given me the opportunity and the support to do so.

I plan to become a surgeon so having that level of support at the position I’m in right now as an undergraduate is something I appreciate, because some people don’t have that support.

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Story by:
Marlee Neumann, radio/TV/film major

Photos by:
Francesca Chiabella, Marketing intern at RCBC

Beyond the Classroom: How Two Students Blend Art and Science

Naman and Terry are sitting on the stairs of Bunce Hall.

In this edition of Beyond the Classroom, we discuss the founding of the ArtSci Symposium with Terry Nyugen, who recently graduated from the Biomedical Art and Visualization program, and Naman Srivisvatra, who recently graduated from the Biological Sciences program. While at Rowan, Terry was president of the Neurodiversity Club; Rowan Blog featured her in this interview. In our discussion with Terry and Naman, we learn of their ambition to blend the lines between art and science in order to create a more inclusive and understandable message within research exhibits.

What drew you to Biological Sciences? How do you think your program helped you transition to Biomedical Art and Visualization? 

Naman: For me at least, I picked biology mainly because I had an interest in it for such a long time. I mainly picked biology because it serves as an intersection point between a lot of different fields. I was mainly interested in the ecological and environmental side of it. At some point, I had chosen to pursue medicine but at the same time keep the same interest in environmental and ecological sciences.

With the medicinal aspect, there are parts of it that involve a lot of complex molecular biology along with other aspects that deal with organic chemistry and various other “hardcore” sciences. The Biological Sciences major presented the opportunity for me to get both of those things without having to compromise schedule or taking multiple majors.

The reason I ventured into Biomedical Art and Visualization was because of Terry. Terry had introduced me to the program back in our freshman year. I always had an interest in visual arts, so to me it seemed like a perfect fit where I get to practice science while also working in visual arts and communicating science. At the time I had thought this to be such a unique opportunity that I would not get anywhere else. 

How did you two meet? 

Terry: We met each other freshman year and quickly became friends. Naman just so happened to be in a practice room in Wilson Hall, and I just so happened to be getting ready for a concert that day. We started to introduce ourselves and we found out that we were both pre-med students and an untold bond was formed! That’s how we just got to know each other.

I didn’t really have a lot of pre-med friends at the time and I was looking for them. Naman and I got acquainted and we started signing up for classes together. From there our friendship just kept growing as we started involving each other more in each other’s lives. 

Terry is sitting on the ledge of a nearby building with flowers all around her.
Terry Nyugen, of Burlington County, is a recent graduate of the Biomedical Art and Visualization program.

How did you introduce Biomedical Art and Visualization to Naman? 

Naman: The way that I had found out about the program was the day we met when I was in the practice room. I did a lot of musical work as well, I was heavily involved with the Jazz Studies program and Terry was in Classical Piano. The day of that concert I was looking over the program booklet of the concert. In that booklet, it showed all the different names of the students that were involved in the concert as well as the major that they are affiliated with. When I saw Terry’s name and the major next to it, Biomedical Art, I had thought to myself, “I’ve never heard of that, especially at Rowan”. I started to do some research on my own and I found out that it was an entire major. I proceeded to ask Terry about the major and the different types of stuff that are involved with Biomedical Art and Visualization. I found an interest in it and then that following Fall semester I started taking those classes. 

How did you (Terry) and Naman get involved with Biomedical Art and Visualization? 

Terry: In high school I had a lot of different learning issues and curves that I had to overcome. For me, learning visually was a way for me to get the information and ingrain it into my brain. The reason why I specifically chose Biomedical Art was because deep down, I wanted to pursue medicine in high school but I didn’t have stellar performances. I still wanted to stick with science but not commit to it. My strengths were in art and I found ways, especially towards my senior year, to combine the two ideas.

My parents were the ones who found the Biomedical Art and Visualization program. My parents saw my efforts and wanted to find the environment that would put me in the best position to succeed. Even when I took AP Studio Art in high school, my portfolio was based around this idea of combining science and art. It wasn’t until I actually decided to commit to Biomedical Art that I found out it was much broader than I had previously anticipated. It deals with educating and creating different avenues of communication and not just creating beautiful illustrations.

Essentially, I chose Biomedical Art to help teach myself scientific information without outright saying “I go to medical school!” Eventually, once I feel more confident, I’ll say that. I had a love for art but also didn’t want to give up on the rigors of science classes.  

What clubs/projects are you two directly involved in right now? 

Naman: In the past, I was a founder of the American Physician Scientist Association, which was one of the main components of the ArtSci Symposium. Our goal was to help incorporate more vigorous research into medicine. A lot of the time with students that are going through the process of applying to medical school, they really do not have any scientific research experience. It’s not a prerequisite, but it is nice to have.

A lot of my friends, especially during the Covid period, were struggling to find space at labs and weren’t able to get the experience they needed for applying to medical school. And so, I had started working on setting out on an organization on campus that was dedicated towards getting students into research. For a lot of the time, what we figured out what was happening was that it was the students who did not feel comfortable directly reaching out to figures such as research supervisors. With getting into labs, it more than likely comes from word of mouth. It’s direct communication.

Especially since the pandemic hit, research took a huge blow. The pandemic created almost a vacuum, there were students who were actively looking for labs to participate in and you also had students who were leaving; there was no bridge between the two to get students into the labs.

I wanted to create an organization that was dedicated to helping students obtain the research experience that they needed, whether it was for medical school or just if they wanted to pursue science on a deeper level. That was one of the big initiatives that I had here at Rowan. 

Naman is standing profoundly in front of a brick wall with his blazer draped on his shoulder.
Naman Srivastava of Gloucester County, is a recent graduate of the Biological Sciences program.

Naman: Another one was my protein work over at MIT. Although it doesn’t directly involve Rowan, I still did a majority of the work on that here at Rowan as well as using a lot of the skills that I had learned at Rowan as well. What we did was look for new ways to communicate science. In this process called protein solidification, it was becoming more and more popularized by scientists and faculty members at MIT. I took an interest in it immediately.

As someone who has a music and science background, I thought that my perspective would bring an interesting way to communicate molecular biology. What we did was, it was me, Terry and a couple other of my buddies who were actual music majors and we sat down and looked at the different sequences of protein. Proteins are built out of these tiny pieces called amino acids and there are 20 of them total. We were able to categorize all of these different amino acids into musical notes. Each of them correlates to a different note and what we did was string all of the different notes together into a musical composition.

There’s a level of artistic literacy that is needed to get this to work because of the sheer amount of musician skills needed. I will say it was extremely complex mainly because you get a random string of notes and it was our job to make a cohesive composition out of it and make it sound coherent. We did a lot of work on that, the first time we started on it was back in 2020.

That was for the American Society of Microbiology. The society was doing a bit of an art contest. They had expanded the different forms of submissions that they would accept and so my friends and I saw this as our chance. We sat down and wrote up a composition and even filmed a music video for it. We did not win, but we did manage to get into the finalists category; which, I’ll take! After we were done that one, the following year we saw that MIT was hosting a conference that was built around biological communication and new ventures into science. We sat back down and decided to start back from scratch. We went back at it and selected a new protein, solidified it, and got all of the musical data to start writing our piece for submission. We were planning on actually driving up to Boston, but with covid that really put our plans in awry. It was held virtually but it was a really good experience to be able to talk to so many different people from that area and get an idea of their thoughts when it comes to different projects and ideas. I’m planning on going back again this year. Our group really wants to keep our ideas fresh so we’ve been thinking of integrating new ideas with the project like animation or even being able to communicate how our thought process worked. 

Naman and Terry are sternly looking directly into the camera while sitting next to each other.
Terry and Naman cofounded the ArtSci Symposium.

Could you tell us about the initiative, ArtSci, that you two co-founded?

Terry: It started off when we were having lunch outside the student center. I had approached the idea to Naman and said, “What if, and hear me out, we have a symposium where we revolutionize how research posters are presented?” We wanted to figure out a way to change the way in which research posters had been incorporated up to this point because at the time we were learning about having creative outlets for communicating certain things.

With research posters, we wanted to change the foundation of it and have them more focused on communicating the desired message in a more effective manner within the mathematical and graphic design portion of posters. For myself, I remember looking at the examples in classes versus the things that I see in the Science Hall.

I would just wonder what happened if you know, the traditional signs were posted? This mindset was an idea that came up before but it wasn’t as developed as we would have liked it. When I approached Naman with the idea I remember saying, “I really think you can do this.” I knew of Naman’s strengths and I knew that we both had skill sets that would complement each other as well compensate for our own weaknesses. After that lunch we decided to work together from then on. 

Naman: The original idea was something that was proposed a year or two back. We wanted to hold our own research symposium. But at the same time, because we cater to such a broad range of research, we were very self aware and questioned as to how we can make this interesting or something new. The main research symposium that was held on campus had been canceled for the past two years due to Covid, and the person that ran it, Dr. Gregory Hecht, had retired. So there was this vacancy and we saw that kind of as an opportunity to capitalize on.

Naman and Terry pose with campus greenery in the background.

Naman: During our discussions of the research symposium we knew that we wanted to make it unique in some way because a lot of the supervisions that are held on campus are a one-and-done type of ordeal where you make your poster, present and then you’re done. For both Terry and I, we wanted to put some sort of spin on it, something that would help people actually understand the message of what is trying to be conveyed.

If you go to a standard research symposium it has a lot of texts, a lot of diagrams and a lot of graphs. You’ll be standing there and trying to absorb all that information from somebody who’s not from that specific field which only makes it increasingly more difficult in such an arduous environment. If you’re looking at multiple research posters in the same day, that’s a lot of information for anybody to take in; so, we wanted to distill that process down and make it easier for anybody and make it more accessible for people from all backgrounds to understand the work that’s being put forth by the researchers and the artists.

Our rationale for this idea was to pair together scientists and labs with artists and graphic designers so that two to come can come together and sort of create posters and presentations that effectively communicate the type of work that the researchers are doing in a cohesive and synthesized manner. We sat on that idea for a long time. Before we could get to the point where we wanted to be we had to do a lot of pre-planning. Any idea after thinking critically on it is exceptional in theory, but the nuts and bolts of the idea is extremely intensive. For us, we had to think of ideas such as “Where is it going to be held and when is it going to be held? How much is our budget going to be? Where are we going to spend the money? How are we going to spend the money? How can we get other organizations at fault to potentially either help out, either on the artistic or the scientific aspects? What are additional sources of funding? What are other concerns?”

As most Rowan students know, the university is continuing to get larger within the most immediate sense as well as its general presence. We saw this as a potential joining of the Rowan University students and Glassboro community where people of all backgrounds regardless of circumstances can come and appreciate the work that other researchers have done in an accessible manner. For us, we wanted to make it so that anybody can walk in.  Our whole goal was to make it so that even someone as young as a  sixth grader can walk in and understand everything that’s being presented. This is a very unique opportunity for us to get engaged within the local community, specifically Glassboro and the different communities around it.

There was a lot of planning that we did and there were a lot of people that helped us out along the way. The team ended up being close to around 15 people. We had divvied up the work where there were volunteers who were strictly involved with just the planning committee. Thankfully, our head of volunteers, David Lee, did a lot of work in organizing potential volunteers who were there for both setup and teardown. David and his group helped with reaching out to different departments and finding different sorts of researchers, as well as people who can sort of help us out in this heavy endeavor. We did a lot of work in just [getting] the word [out] on our project and letting both communities know that the symposium was happening. 

Naman and Terry are standing on the Bunce Hall stairs.

You previously stated that accessibility is one of your core values. What made you come to this realization that the current standard of art and scientific diagrams are not as accessible as it should be?

Terry: I think one of the core motivators for us that I forgot to mention was this whole thing sort of was born out of the tension that was between health care and politics that sort of arose from the pandemic. With some people, they shared their own opinions such as not wanting to get vaccinated or not wanting to wear masks for several reasons, such as personal values and beliefs. Although people are allowed to think what they wish, there’s also a degree of not really understanding the scientific aspect of why it’s so important to have this certain action be done as a community.

There are some people you won’t be able to convince no matter what, but there are some who are willing to listen, as long as they understand what you’re trying to communicate. There is an abundance of research that’s being done and a lot of times, you don’t hear about it. Because for instance, you either don’t understand the ideas that are being argued or the information just isn’t accessible. For us and ArtSci, we want to sort of have a centralized place where the research was going to be presented in a way that people could easily understand it with no exclusions. 

You two provide an interesting perspective with Biomedical Art, what made you think of incorporating art into your studies? 

Terry: For me, it’s always been about how easily you can communicate things. If you think of an art museum, or even like a location such as the Natural Science Museum, everything that you see there, you’re not going to see paragraphs and paragraphs of texts. Instead, you’re going to see vibrant exhibits, diagrams and models which are all presented to help visually communicate what the researcher is attempting to argue or convey. At these sorts of spots, you’re not going there to read articles on whatever it is that they are presenting, instead it is presented in a physical concept. A lot of these creative disciplines are very linked to the way we think and the way we talk and the way we communicate with each other. If I say the word apple, you’re not going to think of the word apple; you would think of the actual physical object associated with the word.

Things like that are very important. Just in the way that we communicate as people, presenting things in a way that’s like all very technically correct, in terms of, you know, lots of text, lots of figures, diagrams, and statistics, it doesn’t always immediately click in terms of like, what’s actually being presented and it being completely understood. For myself, I’ve had experiences like this happen such as when I was sitting in a lab meeting, and I was being shown tons of graphs and charts. At the time, I was listening to my lab mates discuss the research that they were doing and I zoned out completely. I had no idea what they were talking about, even though everything was written I had retained none of the information. This is something that I face on a day-to-day basis, but with creative disciplines, it delineates from this monistic way of thought.

Naman and Terry are leaning against a railing standing side by side.

How do you feel as if you’re going to adapt and integrate new ideas into the art side? What is the vision like for that right now?

Naman: That’s a great question for our future team. They are very much interested in expanding our original vision. I will say our first plan was a little bit delusional and a little bit naive. We were thoughtful in our planning, but we were overshooting the hell out of it. But I think the new team realizes the mistakes that we made because the people who were on the new team also worked on the old team.

The new team was there to watch which steps we took in order to actualize our original vision. For example, the new team is already aware of hiring more people to help out with communication, because there are plenty of scientists and researchers at the University, but there’s not enough people to actually sit down and communicate the ideas. So being able to have a more diverse group of people to communicate that research to me, is very important. 

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Story by:
Lucas Taylor, graduate English education 

Photography by:
Ashley Craven, sports and communication major

Beyond the Classroom: Rowan Graduate Stephanie Ciecierski Pursues M.A. in Writing and Internship with The Rug Truck

Stephanie writes in her notebook on a bench on campus.

Stephanie Ciecierski (she/her) is a first-generation Rowan University 2016 graduate who majored in English and Subject-Matter Education. She was a transfer student from RCBC in 2013, and then commuted to Rowan from Medford, NJ (Burlington County). Now, after five years of being a high school special education teacher, Ciecierski is pursuing the second year of […]

Rowan University Student Zachary Rouhas on the Joint Degree Program That Pairs Environmental Studies with an MBA

Today we feature Zachary Rouhas, pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Environment and Sustainability Studies and a master’s degree in Sustainable Business. through an accelerated 4+1 program — the first of its kind in the state. Zachary, a veteran of the U.S. Army, discusses his journey to becoming a student within the accelerated program, his future […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Introducing Students from the College of Performing Arts

Today we feature incoming CPA first year students Katherine Lanzerotti (she/her), Grace Hoeltje (she/her), Bella Campo (she/her), and Jeszenee Turner. Katherine is from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County) and will be living on campus as a Music Education in Vocal Performance major. Grace is from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County) and will be living on campus […]

Senior Reflects: Carly Morton and the Power of Music Education

Carly with family at her graduation.

Carly Morton, a recent Music Education graduate from Burlington County, shares her meditation on her passion for music and the value of her student teaching experience at Washington Township High School. Carly Morton’s inclination for music has always been a prevalent aspect in her life. During elementary school, Carly began playing the flute; however, it […]

Passing the Torch: Future Public Health Educator Keyanna Meade

After transferring from Monmouth University, Nutrition major Keyanna Meade from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) found many opportunities at Rowan. 

Keyanna poses under the Rowan arch.

Keyanna enjoyed getting out into the community to do research.

“I joined Dr. Vaughn’s lab in my junior year in the fall semester, and I absolutely loved it. It is a little independent and a little teamwork-based. We meet weekly,” she said. “I think getting involved with research in the community is something different. Everybody knows about research within the lab, but it was nice to do research within the community and for the community. “

Beyond research opportunities at Rowan, Keyanna made connections and found an internship.

“I interned with New Jersey Food Democracy Collaborative (NJFDC) over the school year. I just got signed on to a project where we’re going to do a food audit for Atlantic City. Dr. Vaughn reached out to a colleague of hers and recommended me to work with them.

Keyanna walks in her graduation outfit.

Keyanna recommends that other students get involved with research where they can.

“If you can do research, definitely do research. Doctor Vaughn is always looking for people to help. Definitely surround yourself with opportunities like internships or a work-study that’s focusing on your majors so that it helps you in the future.”

Keyanna advises her high school senior self to be more involved.

Make sure you get involved. Make sure you speak to your counselors about different things that you’re interested in. Look at other opportunities that you’re interested in, and even if it’s just like an idea or a little thing, just see where it can take you because you never know what your interest is. It might take you into college and you never know if you might switch your major or decide that you no longer want to do that major. Definitely take advantage of internships and other opportunities.”

In the future, Keyanna would like to be a public health educator.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

ICYMI: Rowan University Dance Team Ranked Fifth in Nation

Group photo of Rowan Dance Team at Nationals.

This year, the Rowan University Dance Team competed at the Universal Dance Association (UDA) Nationals in Florida, where the team placed fifth in the Open Division Hip Hop category. Here, members of the Dance Team reflect on their time at the competition and talk about their dynamic as a team. 

What makes the Rowan Dance team different? 

Jordyn Dauter, a first-year Dance & Exercise Science from Quakertown, Pennsylvania says: “Everyone on the team has something unique to offer, whether that is something specifically to dance, or other elements like attitude or leadership skills. We all have something special to offer, which makes our team diverse.”

Teammate Amber Schott, a junior Psychology major from Bayville, NJ (Ocean County), adds, “Definitely the dynamic of the team. I made my best friends here at Rowan through this team and I always feel super supported and encouraged in reaching my dance goals.”

Rowan Dance Team outside at the Florida competition.

Senior Kaya Snow, a double major in Dance and Theatre Arts with concentrations in Acting and Musical Theatre from Oak Ridge, NJ (Passaic County), says, “We’ve really gone through some huge changes in the last few years and we’ve come out stronger through it all. I’m so glad that we decided to pursue UDA Camp and Nationals my sophomore year because it really has changed the entire dynamic of the team for the better.”

Kristin Mostrangeli, a sophomore Psychology major from Hamilton, NJ, (Mercer County) puts it simply: “Since we get to spend so much time together, we really become so close with each other as a team.”

Dance team outside

What is your most memorable memory with the team?

Junior Inclusive Elementary Education Bianca Moffa from Maple Shade, NJ (Burlington County), shares, “Hearing our university get called as a finalist qualifier will definitely be a core memory for sure. I am so proud to be a member of this team and to see all our hard work pay off by becoming 5th in the Nation in Hip Hop.”

Do you have a Rowan University or Dance Team experience you’d like to share?

Nicholette Voci, a junior Law & Justice and Psychology double major from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), says that “being able to dance at football games, volunteer events, and be in Florida with my best friends is the best experience anyone could ever have in college.”

Sophomore Sociology major Taryn Larsen from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), reflects on her time with the Rowan Dance Team by saying “it is the perfect mix of practice each week, meeting new friends and performing.”

A member of the Rowan Dance Team smiles at Nationals.

How was your experience at Nationals 2022?

Reflecting on her experience, Mia Tabasco, a first-year Sociology student from Haddon Township, NJ (Camden County), says, “It was so incredible. I’ve been dreaming of going to UDA for the longest time and I’m so proud of our team for making finals. We’re a new team and we made our names known.”

Sophomore Exercise Science major Adrianna Laezza from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County), shares that the journey to the UDA National competition was a big deal to her. “It was the best feeling in the world to perform on stage again. I got to compete at UDA which was a dream I have had since I was 12 years old.”

Valentina Giannattasio, a first-year double major in Dance and Marketing from Buenos Aires, Argentina, says, “It was definitely one of the best experiences of my life. I still cannot believe we performed there with all those astonishing dancers. I am proud of how far we have gone. Now we are Top 5 in the nation for Hip Hop!”

Dance team performing

What is the best part of being a member of Rowan University Dance Team?

Alyssa McAvoy, a sophomore Music Industry Technology and Business major from Shrewsbury, NJ (Monmouth County), says, “I love that I am still able to dance in college and the friends I have made through being on the team!” 

Junior Engineering Entrepreneurship major Isabel Rivera from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County), puts it simply. She says, “The best part about being a member of the Rowan University Dance Team is “being surrounded by people who will motivate you no matter what.”

First-year Spanish Education major Lily Cummings from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County), reflects on her first year on the Rowan Dance Team by saying, “It allows me to grow in my ability as a dancer and dance throughout college without it having to take up my whole life. It also provides so many exciting and memorable experiences along with amazing new friendships.” 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

Header photo courtesy of:
Rowan University Dance Team ProfLink



Making a Difference: Desire Forman in the Counseling in Educational Settings Master’s Program

Desire stands outside James Hall.

Desire Forman is a proud Rowan alumna from Pemberton, NJ (Burlington County) who graduated with a degree in Psychology and minor in education. She continues her graduate education here through Rowan Global. Read on as she shares her experience in the Counseling in Educational Settings master’s degree program.

Desire is planning to make an impact on students’ lives, just as her high school counselor did for her.

When asked why she wanted to pursue the Counseling in Educational Settings program, she says: “My high school counselor was the first adult in my life that really saw me. Without her, I wouldn’t be where I am today. I want to be that person for the students I serve. Rowan specifically stood out because I really enjoyed my undergraduate experience here and knew the Higher Education program was very hands on.”

Desire gets the chance to do make that impact through her practicum internship at Williamstown High School, where she helps students with class scheduling, preparing for the transition from high school to college, and the application process itself. 

Desire in front of of the statue outside James Hall.

When asked about a rewarding moment during her practicum experience, Desire shared a story about a student who was being really quiet in class. She called him down to check in. “He explained his hardships and actually opened up about a bully that had been bothering him for a few years. We gave him options to report the bully so that things would get better,” she says.

Along with high school students, Desire works closely with college students in her role as a Resident Director.

“Although it has been difficult learning/enforcing the university’s policies, getting to lead a staff of resident assistants makes it worth it,” she says. “They bring such joy to my life. It is so rewarding that I can give them someone to look up to and help support them during their journey as a student, RA and person.”

Desire with RLUH jacket sits outside Rowan Hall.

As for the Counseling in Educational Settings program itself, Desire loves it. “I feel so supported. The people in my cohort are so helpful and kind. The work I am doing is so rewarding, and I feel very fulfilled,” she says.

For others looking to get into the field, Desire stresses the importance of self care. “In this field, we give so much of ourselves to others, whether it’s students, other staff members, parents and even our peers. Being the person that everyone comes to is extremely rewarding, but it can be draining if we don’t take the proper time to reset. Finding that balance early on in your educational and career journey is going to make all the difference,” she explains.

In the future, Desire wants to work with either high school or college students. Her practicum experience and Resident Director role are helping her decide what the best fit will be for her in the future. 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

How I Found My Place at Rowan University

College of communication and creative arts building.

Today’s Rowan Blog guest contributor, Burlington County’s Matthew DuBas, reminds us that students don’t always stay in their first college major — and that’s ok! Matthew, a sophomore advertising major and photography enthusiast, shares his story as well as some of his own campus images. 

I started in the spring as a confused first-year student at Rowan University, wanting to go into the sales field, but not knowing where I belonged in the grand scheme of things.

I began my adventure as a marketing major; however, I quickly realized that marketing wasn’t the program I expected it to be. I wanted to be more on the creative side of the sales experience. After experimenting in a technology-based major, I landed where I am now, as an advertising major.

So far, the advertising program at Rowan has been far more beneficial to me personally. Learning about ways to inform target publics about new products, learning about public relations practices, and working on assignments about things I enjoy are just a few of the ways the advertising program has assisted me in my projected career path.

Snowy path by Rowan Townhouses at night.
Rowan University Townhouses in winter at night. Photo taken and edited by Matt DuBas.

I also went into my college career not thinking about what I wanted to sell, only that I wanted to sell. Through some personal exploring, I discovered a love for craft beer, and my new career goal is to become a sales representative for a microbrewery. When I tell my professors this, they encourage me to do my assignments on things related to this field, whether that’s writing a marketing plan for a local brewery, discussing how Budweiser has switched to sustainable practices,  or discussing a public relations strategy with a brewery owner.

As a student who struggles with ADHD, working on assignments that interest me makes my college career that much easier, as I find it easier to stay focused on my studies.

While I walked into Rowan without knowing a thing about my future, my professors have assisted me with furthering my education and my career path. I applied to Rowan due to its proximity to home; however even if I were farther, I wouldn’t reconsider my decision!

A Rowan walkway at sunset.
A view of the sunset from the Rowan University Campbell Library. Photo by fellow student Peter De Celie, edited by Matt DuBas.

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Story and photos by:
Matthew DuBas, sophomore advertising major

 

#PROFspective: Psychology Major, Psi Sigma Phi Multicultural Fraternity Member Zyaire Harkins

Zyaire stands outside James Hall.

Today we speak to junior Psychology major Zyaire Harkins of Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County). Zyaire shares his PROFspective on campus activities, service opportunities in Greek life and his future professional goals. What inspired you to choose your major? I chose psychology during high school. I feel that the mental health field is very undervalued, and […]

Air Force Veteran, Strategic Communication M.A. Student Alex Walpole on His Road to Rowan

Alex stands on one of the pathways along Rowan Boulevard.

Today we feature Alex Walpole of Burlington County, a student in the M.A. in Strategic Communication program through Rowan Global. Alex, a retired Air Force officer, shares his military transition from active to civilian life, his goals and challenges as a Strategic Communication student and the unconventional way in which he discovered Rowan. It was […]

Finding My Path and Passion with an English Degree

Rowan English graduate Nicole sits in front of fall foliage on campus.

Meet guest Rowan Blog contributor Nicole Tota of Marlton, NJ (Burlington County), who recently earned her degree in English from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. She now pursues her master’s degree in Higher Education: Advising at Rowan Global. Here, Nicole candidly shares her degree brought more career questions than answers until she ultimately […]

Studio Art Majors Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger Featured in Philadelphia Art Show

Philadelphia skyline.

Today we feature Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger, two Studio Art majors who recently displayed their work in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia. We interviewed Taylor and Abby on their experiences as young artists at the show and on how they developed their interests in creating art. 

Taylor Brown, junior Studio Art major from Perry Hill, Maryland

Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

In high school I went to a magnet school in Maryland, which is a high school completely dedicated to the arts. They have classes focused on dance, acting, and the arts like painting. While I was at school there I focused on art so I developed a passion for creating artwork throughout those four years. Studio art was a great option for me because I did not fully know what I wanted to do, and studio art gives room for exploring your interests through a variety of classes. 

Taylor Brown's setup at the art show.
Taylor Brown’s display at the 2021 Rittenhouse Art Show.

How did you first get interested in art? 

In middle school I felt like I started excelling in art. I overall genuinely enjoyed attending art class and it was something I looked forward to on a daily basis. This is when I decided to go to high school at the magnet school and focus on art throughout my high school career. 

What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

I really like sculpture, graphite and oil painting. 

Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.
Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.

Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life? 

I like to create a mixture of everything. I love working with different mediums and get my inspiration from anywhere. Instead of thinking about creating art as a project or as “work,” I like to think I am creating something because I enjoy the process. My pieces are never the same, and it makes the process very interesting for me.

How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

I basically received an email in my student email sent to all art majors explaining there was an art show if I was interested. I immediately thought it could be a cool experience, so I made an application and submitted some art work. I then received an email that I was accepted and that’s how it all started!

What is your favorite part of producing art?

I really enjoy the process of producing art. 

Taylor Brown's 14 x 14 in canvas oil painting of a plant.
Taylor Brown’s 14 x 14 inch canvas oil painting of a plant sold at the art show.

How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out art shows in the future?

It was such an amazing experience. I got to speak to other artists where they gave me feedback on how I could grow and what I could work on. It was the first time I had my artwork in a show where attendees could buy my work. I sold six pieces and I think it is so cool how someone has my artwork in their house somewhere. I will definitely seek out future art show opportunities. 

Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car.
Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car sold at the art show.

Abby Leitinger, sophomore Studio Art major from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

Why did you choose Rowan to study Studio Art?

I toured a bunch of schools junior year of high school. Rowan was actually the last school I toured because I did not have serious intentions of going there. I ended up touring Rowan because it was local and I have friends that went there. It wasn’t until I went on my tour that I realized Rowan was where I needed to be. My tour guide happened to be a Biomedical Art and Visualization Major, which I thought was very interesting. But Rowan was one the only school that thoroughly discussed art on my tour. I felt instantly that art was important and prominent on campus. 

Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

My advisor placed me in this major. I was informed that this major was a basic art major that would let me explore my options. I picked this major so I could eventually find what I love to do and select a concentration that best fits that.

Abby Leitinger in her booth, engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.
Abby Leitinger engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.

How did you first get interested in art? 

From a young age I was always interested in art. I was constantly drawing and I always had a box of Crayola crayons at an easy reach. I never thought of majoring in art until senior year of high school. I always thought I had to pursue art as a pastime on the side. My art teacher was the person that encouraged me to pursue art. She simply cared so much about art. She was the first person that looked at my art and then decided to put it in an art contest. She told me art is everywhere and I can be involved in so many different professions while being an artist. 

What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

I really like to use pen and ink. However, I do like to explore different mediums and I find myself using watercolor, acrylic, and charcoal as well. 

Abby Leitinger's Great Dane", a pen and ink drawing part of her pets series.
Abby Leitinger’s “Great Dane,” a pen and ink drawing, part of her pets series.

Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life?

I am an exploratory artist. I love trying different things and alternating between different subjects. I think I would get bored if I only created the same types of pieces. I like to keep ideas fresh.

How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

I received an email that I believe was distributed to all art majors. I am extremely grateful that I saw this email because this led me to this amazing experience. This is another reason of why I believe Rowan was the place I was meant to be — because of opportunities like this that are offered through Rowan. 

I ended up submitting a portfolio for this process, which was looked over and judged. I later got notification that I was approved for the spot. 

Abby Leitinger's "Cranes", a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.
Abby Leitinger’s “Cranes,” a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.

What is your favorite part of producing art?

I love looking at the final result. I can be a perfectionist at times, so when I get to the final process of looking at what I accomplished and thoroughly enjoying it, it is really rewarding.

How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out Art Shows in the future?

It was stressful leading up to the show because of the constant preparation. I had to price my pieces out which was shockingly challenging. When I actually got to the show and got to just sit and observe, I began to relax and appreciate the moment. I ended up selling a lot of pieces which is more than I could have asked for. It is really cool to think about a person having my artwork in their house right now. 

Abby Leitinger's booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.
Abby Leitinger’s booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.

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Story By:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos provided by:
Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger

Related posts:

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Beyond the Classroom: How Two Students Blend Art and Science

Alumni Success: Felicia Brown Talks Career, Future Goals and Her M.A. in Arts Administration

First Year Voices: Exercise Science Majors Kim King and Tyler DelSignore

Kim and Tyler with friends at Holly Pointe Commons.

Today, we feature two Exercise Science majors within the School of Nursing and Health Professions. Kim King calls Shamong, NJ (Burlington County) her hometown. Tyler DelSignore, a first-generation college student, is from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County). “I went with some friends to Welcome Week … and trivia. I’m looking forward to labs, getting into […]

Beyond the Classroom: On the Campaign Trail with Political Science Major Stephen Scheuren

Stephen with candidates and volunteers from the campaign.

Today we feature Stephen Scheuren of Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). Stephen has served in the Army National Guard for nearly six years as a Signal Support Systems Specialist and was on active duty in Puerto Rico during Hurricane Maria. He transferred to Rowan University in spring 2021 from Rowan College at Burlington County. A Political Science major, Stephen works as an intern on a state senate and assembly campaign in Atlantic County’s second legislative district. He earned a Rick Rosenberg, Jr. Memorial Scholarship, which offsets the costs to take an unpaid internship. Here, Stephen describes his internship experience and his plans for the future. 

Have you had time to join any clubs on campus?

I’m very involved in RIPPAC (Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship). I’ve gone to almost every event they’ve scheduled with Dr. [Benjamin] Dworkin. I also joined the Pre-Law Society so I’ve been going to their events as well, and Phi Alpha Delta with their LSAT studying. It’s a law fraternity [for] people who want to go to law school and people who are in law school. I would like to look at what other clubs are at Rowan, but I think due to COVID, you couldn’t really do that.

How did you find out about RIPPAC? 

Exactly how, why and where I’m at is because of Dr. Dworkin. ­­­I was talking to him, and he asked me, “What do you want to do in life?” I said, “I want to be a prosecutor.” He was asking me why. And then he started giving me advice: “Okay, here’s what you need to do. You need to do an internship now. You have three semesters left, go now. Now, now, now.” And he said, “Join my class, New Jersey Politics.” And I did, I took his class, took his advice and this is where I’m at, because of Dr. Dworkin, and so I attribute it to him, and RIPPAC is why I’m at where I’m at. RIPPAC is a very successful organization. It’s young, and it’s really hit the ground running.

Stephen (left) with Assemblyman Jon Brambick.
Stephen (left) with New Jersey Assemblyman Jon Bramnick.

What got you interested in political science?

I just honestly like the functions of government, and not only that, along the lines of foreign policy and domestic issues as well. The justice system is something that especially interests me. And partly economics and international relations, it’s kind of a mix of everything that interests me. I guess one word to sum it up is just government. Just government. 

How did you find out about the Rosenberg Memorial Scholarship? 

Yes, same answer through Dr. Dworkin, because I’m conservative. I’m interning with the Republican Party out of Atlantic City and their ticket. Well, Atlantic County, second legislative district. He told me, “You should apply for this, you should definitely apply for this.” And because I was new at Rowan, I couldn’t apply to it right away. And so the semester was over, because I had to have the generated GPA. And Dr. Dworkin would say, “Did you apply yet, did you apply yet?” I just finally did, because my GPA came in. And I was shocked when I received that … it was one of the first scholarships I got. It was great, I was very happy about it. 

Tell me about your internship. 

Stephen had originally interned for another campaign; but when the candidate resigned, the campaign manager connected him with his current campaign under a new manager named Brett Barbin.

I started doing the same thing for him, opposition research, public things, and then I started working more directly with him and the candidates. And I would go with Brett as an aide for Brett when he was aiding the candidates who are Don Guardian, Claire Swift and Vince Polistina.

And so, as more time went on, I was more direct with the candidates. And because my intention with going and interning here, I specifically sought the second legislative district because they looked like they had the highest chance of winning for a Republican nomination.

We had specific lists for people we’d reach out to to volunteer, and I would contact those people as well. And honestly, whatever Brett asked me, I was just jumping on. I wasn’t a volunteer, I was more of an intern because I was working with the candidates themselves. 

Whenever I’m at Rowan, and I’m still a representative of that campaign. Anywhere I go, I am a representative of that campaign. We’re still campaigning; I mean, my car is literally filled with literature for the campaign.

You’re right in the thick of it. There is no coffee grabbing for you for sure.

Yeah, actually, it’s funny you say that, because when we were door knocking, it was over 90 degrees. And so what I did was, I said to myself, alright, it’s going to be insanely hot. So what I did was I put in my backpack, like, six large tallboy waters. And then I put ice packs in between them. And I would walk around, I would just say to the candidate, “Don,” and I would just turn around, and he would [go to] my bag and just pull out a water, he would he would say to me, “Steve, you’re moving up in the world. You got water all ready for us.” And then I would have the candidates running over to my bag and just grabbing water out of my bag.

Stephen (at right) has water bottles and campaign materials at the ready while door knocking with the candidates.
Stephen (at right) has water bottles and campaign materials at the ready while door knocking with the candidates.

It would help get us through the day. Because when we were at the end, I mean, everyone was just, it was like we were in a rainstorm. We were all soaked. It was great because you kind of learn when you’re door knocking with them, you get the experience of how they’re trying to get someone to come to our side and vote. 

How has the Rosenberg Scholarship impacted your internship experience?

It impacted it significantly. I won the Rosenberg Scholarship and [was] very happy about it. But I was able to get the opportunity to introduce Assembly Minority Leader, Jon Bramnick, for the Republican Party, at RIPPAC’s political intern summit MAPIS [Mid-Atlantic Political Intern Summit]. And that helped me talk about the campaign from a public aspect and be a representative of the campaign for and talk to Jon Bramnick.

With the Rosenberg Scholarship it gave me more recognition and solidified that I’m a representative here in Atlantic County and outside of Atlantic County, because of the speech I was able to give and deliver with introducing Assemblyman Bramnick.

Stephen (at right) introduces Assemblyman Bramnick at the Mid-Atlantic Political Intern Summit.
Stephen (at right) introduces Assemblyman Bramnick at the Mid-Atlantic Political Intern Summit.

What are your professional goals?

This year that’s passing and next year are just all structured around going to law school.

And for anyone that wants to go to law school, I would highly recommend they have at least one campaign trail. Even if you don’t politically identify with anyone, just go with someone. I mean, it is technically a form of public service, in my opinion; I mean, you’re helping people having governments. It’s about following Dr. Dworkin’s advice and get your internships in; that way, I have a better law school resume. Same thing with the Army National Guard, helps me with my law school resume.

And well, doing prosecution, because that’s the one area I want to practice. And if I fall out of prosecution, I will look into whatever I would like to do for private practice.

What advice do you have for other students seeking out college internships, specifically, political science internships?

This is going to be kind of specific, it depends on where you want your career to be. So you kind of have to tailor it. I tailored mine. And, again, Dr. Dworkin helped me tailor it. I tailored mine to law school, and to help me have someone look at my resume and go, I want to interview him.

I would go through RIPPAC, and you can always ask Dr. Dworkin because he is a New Jersey guru on how the state works. And that’s how I went. But once you get in there, it’s a whole different ballgame. You’ve got to be reliable. I live an hour away from where the offices for our campaign and where we’re campaigning, but I’m always there. Whenever they asked me. Always there ready to go.

And I would say flexible would be another good word. But also, I think you should get a an idea, if you’re a Political Science major, where you want to work. You should really have that in your mind. And that will help you tailor to what internships you’re looking for. It’s kind of like a two-step process: tailor it and then just always say yes to what they need every single time.

Stephen (second from left) at a event for the state senate and assembly campaign he's representing in a political science internship.
Stephen (second from left) at a event for the state senate and assembly campaign he’s representing in a political science internship.

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Photos courtesy of:
Stephen Scheuren

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Double Major Rachel Ricci Uses Her Voice for Theatre and Therapy

Rachel sits at the Wilson amphitheater.

Today we feature junior Rachel Ricci of Moorestown, NJ (Burlington County), who transferred from Rowan College of South Jersey. Rachel, trained in classical voice, is a double major in Musical Theatre and Music Therapy within the College of Performing Arts. She shares how she first learned of the Music Therapy program and her first impressions of Rowan life.

How did you discover the Music Therapy program?

I had been interested in it because I just heard about it through people for a while. But it was actually Morgan, a friend of mine who … was in the program, and we got to talking about it. She just was telling me about her classes, how much she loved all her professors. And I got even more interested in it from hearing that.

I started looking into music therapy as a general concept, a lot more online research. I spoke to [Professor] Andrea Hunt, I had an interview with her. And they were all super helpful to give you a lot of information about it, hearing about the internships that come afterwards, and all that sort of stuff.

Rachel sits near Wilson Hall.

What got you interested in music therapy as a career option?

I really love the combination of areas that it is. It’s all the things that I’ve been really passionate about and really interested in, from psychology to music, and just the different demographics of people that you get to work with. I love working with children. I’ve also spent a lot of times in assisted living facilities, and I love working with older people. And I just like that you have the option to go into a lot of different areas with it.

What is your favorite part so far of being part of this program?

For me, I mean, I’m very brand new to it all. But I love how much I get to do voice with it. Because my instrument … everyone has a different instrument for the program. And mine is classical voice, which I love studying. So I’m very excited about all the voice classes and the choirs, studio days and all that.

How are you meeting people as a commuter?

Actually everyone’s really welcoming. Just last night, I was at a meet-and-greet for my [musical theatre major] and people were very warm. And there’s a lot of clubs on campus and stuff. So it’s not hard to get to know people even as a commuter.

How do you like Rowan so far?

Oh, I love it. A really nice environment. I love the campus. And it’s fun because I’m around here so I have a lot of friends that I knew since before college who go here, so it’s nice to already have kind of a community.

What are you looking forward to?

Just the whole experience because I’ve only done community college so far. I’m very excited to be at a university. I get to spend time with the friends I already have here and to make new friends when I start taking classes here.

Rachel sits near Wilson Hall.

Have you thought about joining any clubs or organizations on campus?

It’s hard as a commuter sometimes because you’re going back and forth so much, but I’ve been hearing about a lot of great ones and I definitely want to start looking into to get involved.

Why Rowan?

I really loved the school as soon as I when I was touring campus a few years ago. As soon as I was here, I liked the environment. I really liked it. It’s a medium-size school, you know, so you get the experience of being a bigger-feeling school without feeling too massive. I liked the community. I like the commute from where I live …  just a lot about it that was a really good fit for me. 

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Photos by:
Nick Flagg, senior advertising and theatre major

In Case You Missed It: Favorite Classes At Rowan

Tell us a little about what the class is. IMC goes over all the parts to an integrated marketing communications plan, such as advertising, public relations, direct marketing, digital/internet marketing, sales promotion and personal selling. You really get to work a lot of different muscles within the communications industry. Is there anything else that made […]

Beyond the Classroom: Nutrition Major Keyanna Meade on Her Community-Based Research

Keyanna sits on the steps by Engineering pond.

Today we feature Keyanna Meade, a senior Nutrition major and transfer student from Burlington Township, NJ (Burlington County). She is part of the Minority Association of Premedical Students MAPS and will be president of Helping Our People Excel through Wellness (H.O.P.E. through Wellness) this year. Keyanna shares her experience as a nutrition research assistant under the direction of Dr. Nicole Vaughn.

Why did you choose Rowan to study your major?

I chose Rowan because it was kind of close to home. After also hearing about all the great programs they had for my major, I decided Rowan was the best place to transfer to prepare me for my future endeavors.

Keyanna Meade.
Keyanna Meade

What does everyday life at Rowan look like for you? Can you walk us through a day in your shoes?

My schedule looked pretty similar day to day. I would often start my day by going to work, and then I would come to campus. When coming to campus I would attend class and then typically I would head to the gym. After leaving campus I would usually head home and cook myself something to eat. My day usually ends with completing homework and relaxing.

How did you start your research process? Why did you decide to start research in the nutrition field?

I have always been interested in being part of research and studies that were more community based rather than just conducting research out of a lab. By being a nutrition major, I’ve learned it is important to be educated on topics like, why individuals are food insecure and why certain diseases are more prevalent in certain communities … to name a few.  

I was thrilled to find when I was looking on the Rowan Announcer that Dr. Vaughn was looking for a research assistant. I sent over my resume and applied for the position, and that’s how this all started.

Keyanna laughing by Engineering pond.

Can you talk about what you are researching and why? 

This summer I worked on a project that basically created a food system flow chart of all the nutritional programs provided in New Jersey. I was a part of the summer undergraduate research program (SURP), and my day-to-day consisted of a lot of researching, interviewing directors of programs, participants and stakeholders, and I was even part of the funding process.

For the flowchart we used something called Lucidchart. Our chart basically starts off with the Farm Bill, then the USDA, the Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, and then the bottom of the flow chart is where it reaches the county level and the consumers.

This whole flow chart creation process took about 10 weeks, and we are currently still editing it and sending it over to stakeholders to approve the accuracy.

Can you describe the research methods you have used in the past or are currently using?

One of our data methods is qualitative. We also conduct a lot of interviews for the community-based research we conduct.

Portrait of Keyanna Meade.

What research skills have you acquired during your academic and/or research career?

Throughout this process my communication, critical thinking, writing and leadership skills have definitely improved.

What have you learned so far in your research process?

I have learned a lot through this experience. Specifically, I have learned how important it is to help out in your community and ways that you can give back because a lot of individuals are hungry, starving, homeless … and they are unaware of the programs available to them, so I think it is very important to not only give back to your community, but to spread knowledge on the programs available.

This whole process led me to wanting to get my master’s in Public Health. I want to help more on a community base and a whole population rather than just one individual at a time.

Keyanna Meade in front of Prof Statue.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industries major

Related posts:

#PROFspective: Nutrition and Exercise Science Major Caroline Lippincott

Community Garden: Fighting Food Insecurity From Home

From Teacher to Student: Career Change Brings Nutrition and Exercise Science Major Kerry Perez to Rowan

#PROFspective: Public Relations Major, Strategic Communication Minor Kayla Tucker

Today we speak with Kayla Tucker, a senior Public Relations major with a  Strategic Communications minor and a concentration in Public Relations in the News. Kayla, from Burlington County, is the Vice President of the Black Cultural League and a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated. 

Have you always wanted to study your major? At what point in time did you realize the major you decided to pursue was the one most adequate for your future goals?

“When I came to Rowan my original major was Marketing. I quickly realized that marketing did not align with my strongest assets. After deciphering my strengths, knowing I love writing, public speaking and everything involving communications; and knowing that Rowan’s Public Relations program is nationally ranked, I realized Public Relations was the major I wanted to study.”

Kayla Tucker standing and smiling in front of Bunce Hall.
Kayla Tucker

What is your dream profession?

“Working in an in-house public relations firm.”

How has Rowan prepared you for your future? What professors have impacted you the most as a student at Rowan?

“Ms. Cristin Kastner Farney is a professor that immediately stands out to me. I had her as a professor in Intro to PR and I truly enjoyed everything that class offered me. That class taught me interviewing skills and just the basics of PR and she presented all material in an amusing yet educational way. Cristin was also super helpful in terms of career development and assisting me in finding available internships.”

Kayla Tucker smiling up close.

What is the Black Cultural League?

“The goal of this club is to have conversations and discussions on issues concerning African-American studies outside of of the classroom.”

What advice would you give to your first-year self?

“My best advice would be to get involved early. Rowan offers countless amounts of club ranging from sports clubs, community and service clubs, clubs that promote diversity and inclusion, and many more. Getting involved around campus led me to meeting so many amazing different people.”

Kayla Tucker smiling in front of Gazebo.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

“I like to cook, listen to music, and spend time with family and friends. This year I also started a small business on campus named K. Kooks where I make and sell food to students.”

What makes you unique from others?

“Probably the fact that I love public speaking. I know many people that dread giving speeches or speaking in public, but I love everything about speaking in front of large audiences. It honestly is a big contributor to why I chose public relations as my major.”

Kayla Tucker smiling on Bunce Green.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

Finally Face to Face!

Three friends pose in front of Bunce Hall.

Today, we speak to Rowan students who are excited about being physically present in class when we return to campus in the fall. 

Rachel sitting outside the Rec Center.

“I’m really looking forward to going to more in-person classes and looking to join clubs. It’s been hard to get involved and talk to people in my classes because everyone is behind a screen. In the few classes that I have in person, I’ve already made connections, and it makes a huge difference. I can’t wait to make more friends next fall!” says Rachel Bonhomme, a Math and Education major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

Bri poses at the gazebo by Bunce Hall.

“I would really love to join a sorority next year. Just being part of a sisterhood sounds amazing!! I am really excited to open that chapter of my life at Rowan,” says Bri Solomon, a Biochemistry major from Brick Twp. (Ocean County).

Tammy posing for a picture in front of a city landscape.

“I’m currently in the Vietnamese Student Association at Rowan. I encourage people who’s interested in learning the culture/language or anyone down to have a good time to join. I really enjoyed being in this club so far,” says Tammy Nguyen, a first-generation college student and Early Childhood Education major from Lawnside, NJ (Camden County).

Jayshalie leaning and sitting by the Engineering fountain.

“I am most looking forward to being able to have classes and more activities in person. As a current [first year], I am really looking forward to in-person activities to be able to get the full college experience,” says Jayshalie Jennings, Secondary Education (Mathematics) major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County).

A selfie of Gabrielle.

“I am looking forward to dancing, of course. I could dance, thankfully, at home in my basement all school year, but I hope to dance in a studio. The last time I did that was March 10, 2020,” says Gabrielle Langevine, a Dance major from Middlesex County, NJ.

Sumayyah posing with a piece of artwork.

“Being able to work in the studios again and have more free time by doing so!” says Sumayyah Hayes, first-generation college student and Art major from Burlington County.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

Back-to-School Bucket List of Rowan Juniors and Seniors

Writing a list of goals

We’re so close to the beginning of the new semester, let’s kick it off with a college bucket list by sharing some students’ ambitions.

“I’m looking forward to everyone moving in and meeting more new people since my freshman year got cut short. One of my must do’s when I get back on campus this fall is to attend more basketball and football games. Also I can’t wait to go to the engineering building and go to the pond, I find it very relaxing.” – Anais Holguin, junior Marketing major from Perth Amboy, NJ (Middlesex County) 

Anais Holguin sits near the Engineering pond.
Anais Holguin

“My friend and I are on a mission to find the best lunch specials for $15 or under around campus. So far Alaura Kitchen or Family Mediterranean (both located in Pitman) are the winners! There are so many different places to explore around campus and it is so much fun to do it with friends. Also thrifting is a hoot. The lunch spot I’m excited to visit again is Au Bon Pain, it’s opening back up and I NEED their croissants.” – Meena Young, senior Biological Sciences major from Sickerville, NJ (Camden County) 

Exterior shot of Au Bon Pain.
Au Bon Pain

“I am extremely excited to be student teaching this year and to finally have in-person classes again. I miss interacting with my peers and being on campus. I miss studying at James Hall, the education building and the library and those are spots I look forward to visiting again.” – London Raikes, senior Inclusive and Elementary Education major from Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County) 

London leans against a sign of James Hall.
London Raikes

“I am involved in quite a few organizations on campus. I’m most looking forward to continuing my role as the Blood Services Undergraduate Coordinator for the Office of Volunteerism. There are many things on my bucket list this year and that includes living in an on-campus apartment, seeing my South Jersey friends, walking near Town Square, taking most of my core Finance and MIS courses and exploring campus with my friends.” Sasmita Prabu, junior Finance major from Somerset County, NJ

Drone shot of Glassboro Town Square.
Town Square

I’m looking forward to finally being in person again. Looking at a screen for 18 months has been really sad, it feels like so much of the college experience was lost. At least I’ll be less tempted to fall asleep during class. I am going to be an RA this year, so I am excited to meet new people and help others have a great return to Rowan. I have many things on my bucket list and that includes: going to the Fitness Center and working out with my friends, having movie nights with my friends in their apartments, going to Cookie Munchers and eating more calories in 10 minutes than you’re supposed to eat in two days, riding the shuttles to the movie theater, having an advisor meeting in person, taking free electives to pursue other passions rather than fulfilling requirements, plus eating at Smoked again.” – RJ Wentzell, senior Exercise Science major of Pilesgrove, NJ (Salem County)

RJ Wentzell smiling outside of James Hall
RJ Wentzell

“A couple of things I look forward to this school year are my campus event Emo Night, planning concerts, writing music and finishing my junior year. I haven’t seen Dennis Diblasio [since before COVID], I’m looking forward to seeing him. – junior Malachi Prillerman of Palmyra, NJ (Burlington County), Music Industry major and transfer student from Hampton University

Music industry major Malachi Prillerman
Malachi Prillerman

“This year, I hope to get accepted as a transfer ambassador. A must do is to visit a restaurant during a social hour. Academically, I look forward to receiving high grades, building connections with my professors and receiving a letter of recommendation.” – De’Ja Morris of Woodbury, NJ (Gloucester County), senior Finance major and transfer student from Salem Community College

De'ja stands on the bridge near Business Hall.
De’ja Morris

“This September, I look forward to going back to regular class, walking around and seeing new faces. A few things I would like to do again this semester are seeing all my friends from freshman year, visiting the Rec Center, eating at the Student Center and playing sports.” – Hualsy Paredes, junior Construction Management major from Fort Lee, NJ (Bergen County) and transfer student from Utica College

Exterior shot of campus Rec Center.
Rec Center

I am really excited to graduate. I’ve been working really hard since COVID to maintain my grades just for this moment. I really like the club fair every fall. I’m excited for that! I’m also really excited to study in the library again. I am most looking forward to in-person classes.” – Alexa Wentworth, senior Psychology major from West Windsor, NJ (Mercer County)

Alexa smiles inside James Hall.
Alexa Wentworth

“Being able to go to clubs, meeting up at the Student Center and getting food together, being able to see my professors in person, and visiting Science Hall again.” – Andrew Pinto, junior Physics major from Hammonton, NJ (Atlantic County)

Exterior shot of Science Hall from Route 322.
Science Hall

“I came into Rowan as a transfer so I haven’t tried anything yet. I’m sad because I lost a year so I want to be as involved as possible. This year, I’m looking forward to seeing my fellow peers, raising my GPA and attending football games.” – senior Tara Preston of Camden County, NJ, Economics major and transfer student from Delaware County Community College

Rowan's football team enters the stadium.
Rowan Football

“A must do with my friends is going to RoBo and getting pizza. Academically, I look forward to staying busy with classes and making new friends in class.” Maria Espejo, junior Psychology major from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County)

Rowan Boulevard featuring LaScala's Fire.
Rowan Boulevard

“I’m most looking forward to seeing Discovery Hall this year and to go to football, basketball and hockey games with my friends.” – Lauren Blaze of Branchburg, NJ (Somerset County), senior Civil and Environmental Engineering major

Lauren smiles and stands in front of Discovery Hall.
Lauren Blaze

“Being able to socialize with new classmates and professors! I haven’t seen   Dr. Bhatia in person since before COVID, I am very much looking forward to seeing him on campus this fall. Looking forward to social events, clubs and  projects.” – senior Hayley Lomas of Woodbury, NJ (Gloucester County), a Mechanical Engineering major with a CUG in Aerospace Engineering and transfer student from Rowan College of South Jersey

Exterior shot of the Campbell Library entrance.
Hayley looks forward to going to Campbell Library again this fall.

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Story by:
Nene Diallo, senior public relations major

Photos by:
Reshaun Timmons, Stephanie Batista, RJ Wentzell and Anthony Raisley

Rowan Football photo courtesy of:
University Publications

A Look Inside the Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team

An athletic field as seen through a fence on campus.

Today we feature three members of the Men’s Club Lacrosse team as they share their experiences and touch upon why Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse is a great extracurricular to participate in.

Participating in sports at the high school level is important to students as it fuels their competitive edge, allows individuals to make new friends, and simply teaches students about leadership and confidence. However, being recruited by collegiate sports teams and continuing to play at college can be physically rigorous, difficult to manage socially, and requires an immense amount of time. 

Team volunteering to help the youth players of Washington Township for a clinic.
The Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team volunteers to help the youth players of Washington Township at a clinic.

Rowan University does not have a collegiate Division III Men’s Lacrosse team; however, the university does offer a Men’s Club Lacrosse team. Today we feature several members of the team to hear their insights on the program. 

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.

Ryan Meiluta is a senior long stick midfielder majoring in Civil Engineering from Delran, NJ (Burlington County).

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I wanted to continue playing lacrosse and compete.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

The bonds we have with our teammates. 

Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

I started because I love the sport, but the social aspect makes it a lot better.

How many days a week do you practice? 

Two days a week.

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.

Christian Boylan is a senior midfielder from Hillsborough, NJ (Somerset County) majoring in Environmental Science and Sustainability and minoring in geology and environmental planning.

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I really enjoy playing lacrosse and wanted to continue to be a part of a team.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

My teammates.

What is a pro of playing for the team?

Winning games and winning the games without a coach is definitely a pro. 

If Rowan had an NJAC/ NCAA men’s lacrosse team, would you pursue that or try to walk on?

Yes.

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.

Ryan Collins is a junior defender majoring in Marketing and is from Lacey Township, NJ (Ocean County). 

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I chose to play lacrosse at Rowan because I wanted to continue playing the sport after high school. I felt it was a good way to meet new people and to continue playing.

Do you travel and play other schools?

Yes, we travel to different tournaments and colleges playing other club teams from all different schools.

How competitive would you say the team is?

I’d say the team is very competitive. Every practice and game we have we all give 100%, and our goal is to be the best we can.

Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

I’d say a little bit of both, they’re both great factors that come with playing on the club team. I’ve always loved lacrosse and have played my whole life so I knew I wanted to play in college. But, I think club lacrosse was the perfect thing to do because I am able to focus a ton on school while still playing the sport and spending time with teammates.

Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.
Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.

To learn more, visit:

https://rowan.campuslabs.com/engage/organization/mensclublacrosse

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Related posts:

Sports and Mental Health

First Person Perspective: Women’s Lacrosse at Rowan University With Natalie DePersia

5 Interesting On-Campus Jobs

Rowan Blog student worker Bianca on the job at a photo shoot.

Finding the right on-campus job can change your whole college experience, leading you to important connections, helping you discover your career goals or letting you find the right school/work/life balance. Five students share their experiences in some of the most interesting, beneficial and well-paid jobs on campus!

Summer Conference Assistant – Chase Campbell

Chase Campbell smiles for his portrait in front of Bunce Hall.

Advertising major Chase Campbell of Burlington County worked as a Summer Conference Assistant for the Office of Conference & Event Services in 2019. As part of a staff of eight students, Chase worked and lived with his teammates! This job offers a stipend and free summer housing. He found this job through the Rowan Announcer and attended an informational session.  

Some of the responsibilities in this job included helping people check into the conferences, preparing residential and event spaces and taking turns being the 24/7 customer service representative for the events. Chase learned the importance of being himself rather than just being the “perfect customer service representative.” He enjoyed speaking with clients and helping them feel welcome to the university with kindness. Look out for this job if you enjoy working on a team and assisting people! 

Academic Success Coach – Alee Rebillon

Alee works on her laptop and chats with a friend.

Alee Rebillon, a senior Psychology major from Mercer County, worked as an Academic Success Coach her junior year for one semester. She found this opportunity through an email listing Federal Work-Study (FWS) options. She also spoke to their department staff at the on-campus Fall Job Fair. As a psych major, Alee felt this would give her great experience in working with people one-to-one. Although, Academic Success Coaches come from all different majors and walks of life! 

Alee worked with fellow students who needed guidance in lots of different areas! Such as, who to speak to if they want to change majors, where to find a student organization, or even how to make a schedule for themselves. She learned so much about herself, other students, and the university from this job. She has helped people receive supports through the Wellness Center and Tutoring Services; she also walked students through how to use The Shop or Prof Jobs. If you want to help other students by being a relatable source of guidance, this job is for you! 

Picking Peppers with President Houshmand – Dyone Payne

Dyone holds a bucket of peppers fresh from the farm.

Public Relations major Dyone Payne, a senior from Gloucester County, worked for Dr. Houshmand, Rowan University’s president, on his local farm picking peppers and several other vegetables. They use the peppers to create the famous Houshmand’s Hazardous Hot Sauce, which is processed in a factory (by professionals) in Bridgeton. All proceeds from the Hot Sauce go towards the Student Scholarship Fund. The amazing part of this job is that they work to support students on all levels of operation in the making of this hot sauce. A team of students, Houshmand, and his staff go out to the West Campus farm throughout the spring and summer to begin the process. 

Dyone remembers enjoying the hands-on experience and learning so much about the different kinds of peppers and sauces. The ghost peppers went into the hottest flavor, the mushroom peppers were the mildest peppers, and jalapeno peppers also went into the mildest sauce. She also shared how kind the staff was, always making sure the students were hydrated and offering transportation to and from the farm. Another responsibility of this role was selling the Hot Sauce (and Hot Sauce merch) at university football games, basketball games, and university holiday parties. She enjoyed being able to connect with the university staff and see that they truly understand the students’ struggles. 

Dyone found this job through Rowan emails and contacted the president’s staff. She learned important life skills such as the importance of patience and taking your time. She also appreciates the president’s mission, even more, knowing that he is genuinely kind and interested in caring for Rowan students. Dyone also recalls the students having to leave their phones (because the pepper residue may get to your eyes and face through your phone). This helped the students to connect with each other and forge strong friendships. She absolutely adores plants and keeps a lovely mini garden oasis in her room now!

Engineering Intern – Jed Vergara 

Students working in the RU Sustainable Facilities Center with faculty.

Students working in the RU Sustainable Facilities Center with faculty (Jed Vergara not pictured).

RU Sustainable Facilities Center – Rowan University + NJARNG (NJ Army National Guard) Building Information Modeling (BIM) Intern

Jed Vergara worked as a Building Information Modeling (BIM) Intern for more than two years as a Rowan undergraduate. This internship was under Rowan’s Sustainable Facilities Center in contract with the NJ Army National Guard (NJARNG). It’s offered as both a part-time job as well as an engineering clinic on campus. He first discovered this role at the beginning of his sophomore year after a professor shared the opportunity because of Jed’s stellar grades. 

The internship also offers different roles in the operation. Some interns would inspect recruitment centers across NJ for the Army National Guard, and others like Jed worked on building information modeling (BIM). BIM is basically cataloging several parts of a building such as spatial measurements, construction materials, HVAC, electrical or plumbing. In the 50 years the buildings have been around, there have been so many refurbishments added that no single catalog of the buildings records all of the changes. Rowan was contracted to change this and catalog every NJARNG recruitment center in the South Jersey area. 

Jed was able to work with a 3D laser scanner and connect individual room scans into a large model of the building on a program called Revvit. The basic three-step process of his internship was to scan the building, consolidate all of the scans, and finally add the details. He greatly appreciates this internship experience because he works with images of building scans as a Structural Engineer. He also found that his experiences with different computer programs proved to be very valuable in his career. Many times, Jed had to quickly learn how to use a program and help others learn how to use it as well. Another valuable lesson he learned was how to plan effectively and efficiently. This internship is open to civil engineering majors, electrical & computer engineering majors (ECE) and mechanical engineering majors. This department is located within Rowan Hall (the original Engineering building).

Rowan Blog Digital Content Contributor – Bianca Torres

Bianca stands confidently in front of a brick building on Rowan Boulevard.

Lastly, we speak with Bianca Torres, a Music Industry major and senior from Morris County, who works as a fellow Digital Content Contributor for Rowan Blog. Bianca helps the blog run smoothly in so many different ways! She not only creates content for the Admissions page, but she also contributes to the Humans of Rowan Instagram and other Rowan social media platforms. Bianca finds ways to market the school to incoming first year and transfer students. She loves sharing the vibrancy of campus life through stories. She started off creating music for the background of Rowan’s YouTube videos. She has since branched out into photography, writing articles, interviewing leads and strategy (planning stories and Google Ads). Bianca appreciates how much knowledge she has learned about journalism and marketing in this role. 

She really enjoys working with fellow college students and diving into the campus culture (which helps her with networking). The schedule is super flexible and was perfect for working during the pandemic because it can be remote and you can work whenever you choose. She enjoys how much freedom she has gotten in this job, being able to pitch stories and share so many unique perspectives at Rowan. This real-world experience has taught her how to market effectively to different target audiences. Knowing that the skills she uses every day, such as blogging and creating graphics for social media, she feels confident in her career goals. Without this job, Bianca would not have known that she wants to do digital marketing for the music industry.  

Bianca found this job through an email from the program director of the music industry program. She advises students looking for student jobs to start looking as soon as possible and ask their professors if they know of any openings! Many professors have side gigs and know other connections on campus. She also says to check if you qualify for Federal Work-Study (FWS). If you enjoy connecting with people and making creative content, working for Rowan Blog is for you.

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Story by:
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

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Meet Transfer Profs: Computer Science Major Gregory Zacharko

Gregory with his brothers and Congressmen Andy Kim.

Today we speak with and welcome to Rowan first-generation college student and new transfer, Gregory Zacharko from Cinnaminson, NJ (Burlington County). Gregory is transferring from Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC) with an associate degree in Computer Science. While at Rowan University, he will be continuing as a Computer Science major with the ambition of becoming a software engineer or video game programmer.

Why did you choose to continue your education with Rowan?

It’s close to home, and the partnership Rowan has with RCBC helps me transfer over my credits with no problems and move forward with my education. I also saw a great value at Rowan; the tuition is affordable compared to other four-year universities. Seeing that Rowan’s Computer Science program is a top contender in the nation at a low cost and affordability is my number one priority. Plus, going to Rowan allows me to continue with my NJ STARS II scholarship, as well as any possible EOF scholarships or grants that I may receive. 

Headshot of Gregory

Have you visited the campus? What was your favorite aspect of it?

I haven’t visited the campus yet, but I have talked with someone at RCBC who told me a lot about what Rowan campus has to offer. I’ve heard about the student center and the gym that’s available to Rowan students. I’m most interested in the student lounge, the game room especially because I’m a big gamer. At RCBC, I was a part of the gaming and Super Smash Bros Club and we even held a big tournament for students. I hope that I’ll get a similar experience at Rowan, because that’s where I made a lot of my friends. 

Will you be living on or off-campus? 

I will be commuting. 

Have you set any goals for yourself during your time at Rowan?

To learn more about other people, what they like, to make friends, to get different perspectives, to learn about different cultures so I have a greater understanding of the world around me that I can apply to Software Development, which is what I want to get into post-college. 

Gregory at graduation

How did you become interested in Computer Science?

Back in 2007 when I was about seven years old, I got my first gaming console for Christmas, a Nintendo DS lite. That’s when I realized I wanted to make games and I wanted to make people happy through those games. I wanted to give people similar experiences that I had when playing video games. 

What was your favorite game on your Nintendo DS?

There were two. One, New Super Mario Bros. The other one was FIFA Soccer ‘08. I’m a big sports fan and a big sports gamer so that was one I really wanted and enjoyed. 

Gregory (left) with his brothers at graduation.

Early on, Gregory was diagnosed with ADHD, Asperger’s, anxiety and depression. Later on in his life, he was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. He survived a family house fire and was also put into Special Education classes up until intermediate school. Through everything he has undergone, Gregory persevered. He worked his way up to taking honors and AP courses in high school and graduated from RCBC with a 4.0 GPA and was elected co-valedictorian of the EOF program’s graduating class along with his brothers. We can’t wait to see Gregory and all he will accomplish this 2021-2022 school year back on campus.

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Story by:
Caitlyn Dickinson, public relations and advertising graduate 

Photos courtesy of:
Gregory Zacharko

Header photo: Gregory (second from right) and his brothers pose with Congressman Andy Kim at the Zacharko’s graduation from Rowan College at Burlington County.

My Favorite Class: Systems and Control

Alexandra sits and talks with friends on campus.

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Today we feature Alex Jackson, a recent graduate who majored in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a minor in Mathematics. Alex, from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County), is now pursuing her master’s and doctoral degrees at Rowan. 

Alex smiles and wears a RAH shirt while standing inside the Student Center.

What was the name of your favorite class at Rowan?

Systems and Control

What department was the class in?

ECE (Electrical and Computer Engineering)

Who taught the class when you took it?

Dr. Jie Li

Tell us a little about what the class is

It involves mathematical techniques to determine various properties of electrical systems for analysis which is necessary to the success of said systems.

Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting or special to you.

I absolutely loved the content of this class. I’m a big fan of tedious math and mathematical theory, and I loved seeing how this all connected to the ECE field. The labs were also fun and weren’t extremely difficult, though they taught me a lot about MatLab and its importance in the field.

What makes this professor great?

Dr. Li was fantastic and one of the best professors in the ECE department by far. She took time to answer questions, she was great at explaining difficult concepts, she was engaged with the students, and was clearly passionate about what she was teaching. Everything was clear and concise, and she would take time to review throughout the lectures.

How did this class help to support your academic or personal growth, or your professional goals?

I struggled with my choice of major a lot during my sophomore year, but after this class I felt like I belonged there with everyone else. It helped me gain a further appreciation for teaching and how important it is to be a teacher that can truly communicate with their students. It lead me to where I am today in pursuing academia.

Alex smiles and stands outside with James Hall in the background.

What are your professional goals?

I am currently enrolled at Rowan in the Ph.D. program for engineering with a specialization in engineering education and a master’s in BME. I want to broaden my understanding of engineering as much as possible and perform research that ultimately improves the way we teach future engineers. I hope to work in academia performing research and teaching various topics in engineering such as math, statistics and design.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, music industry graduate

Beyond the Classroom: Senior Jocelyn Reuben Selected as State Finalist for 2021 Miss New Jersey Pageant

Jocelyn sits and smiles in front of a wooded area of campus.

Today we feature Jocelyn Reuben, a transfer student from Burlington Township majoring in Athletic Training with a minor in Spanish. Rowan Blog previously featured Jocelyn focusing on her involvement around campus and her academic experience. Now we feature Jocelyn as she discusses her recent selection as a State finalist for the 2021 Miss New Jersey pageant. 

What made you interested in pageants? How did you get started?

“This is my first ever pageant. What made me do it … it sounds so funny saying it out loud but I just kept seeing these ads on my phone come up about these pageants and how they are looking for people to compete … It’s still a mystery to me today how these ads ended up on my feeds considering that I have never searched anything about pageants. The main reason on why I wanted to do this because I am always looking for ways to push myself out of my comfort zone, to expand my leadership skills, and to meet new people.”

Jocelyn standing on steps.

What do you think your favorite part about competing in pageants will be?

“I think my favorite part of the pageant will be the interview because I simply love talking. Because of leadership roles I have held in high school and even at Rowan, my public speaking skills have flourished over time. I like to think of confidence as a muscle; the more you work at it … the better you are going to have it and the better you will be able to utilize it at any moment.”

Do you need a talent portion in your pageants? What does your talent portion include?

“Unfortunately, this one does not include a talent portion. If there was a talent portion I would probably perform a monologue because in my spare time I write my own pieces. Fun fact: the longest monologue I have ever written took about 10-12 minutes to perform.”

Jocelyn smiling outside.

What is a misconception about competing in pageants?

“I would say that pageant girls are dumb or that the competition is all about physical appearances. In order to prepare for this pageant, I have been researching past contestants for all different types of pageants and based on what I have been studying from past winners — Miss Teen USA, state title winners, and even Miss Universe — when you look at these people’s credentials and accomplishments … these individuals are super intelligent, very philanthropic and truly inspiring.”

Do you have any advice for anyone who wants to compete in pageants or to try something new but is too scared to get out of their comfort zone?

“My advice has to be one of my favorite quotes. The quote is by Childish Gambino. He says, ‘If it makes you nervous, you are doing it right.’

“You know I figured out along the way that growth is uncomfortable and that is normal, and in order to grow you need to experience growing pains.”

How can Rowan students and fellow supporters follow your journey in the 2021 Miss New Jersey pageant in July?

Information is available on the website at https://missnewjerseyusa.com/pageant-information/

Jocelyn laughing up close.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

Passing the Torch: Rowan STEM Majors See All the Possibilities

Alyssa smiles and stands in front of the Rowan arch.

“One thing I like is that you have a lot of options. Once you graduate, there’s so many fields you can go into,” says recent grad Margot Clarke about the Chemical Engineering program.

“And it’s something that you can take on with an open mind. I would say my biggest lesson was learn as you go.” 

Margot stands in front of Bunce Hall.

Margot, from Burlington County, NJ, is looking at positions in the pharmaceutical industry. She says she hasn’t accepted an offer yet but is “considering something right now.” 

Margot smiles and stands in Bunce Green.
Margot Clarke

Alyssa Salera of Gloucester County, NJ, who graduated with a degree in Biochemistry, plans to continue doing research at Rowan while applying for jobs and focusing on her long-term goal of medical school. 

“Personally, some of my friends are going to medical school, some of my friends are going to be pharmacists. And then I have a lot of friends who are going to get Ph.D.s and … research in different aspects of chemistry. The major is very diverse and you can really do whatever you want with it, which is really nice,” she says.

Alyssa stands in front of the Rowan arch.
Alyssa Salera

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Meet Transfer Profs: Biology Major Stephanie Berdugo-Hernandez

Today we feature incoming transfer and first-generation college student Stephanie Berdugo-Hernandez from Rowan College at Burlington County. Stephanie will be commuting from Eastampton, NJ (Burlington County) and studying Biological Sciences. Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University? I am looking forward to continuing my education […]

My Favorite Class: Earth, People, and the Environment

Ross sitting outside on steps

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Ross Billig is a senior Geography major with a Planning minor. He is from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County.

What was the name of your favorite class at Rowan? 

Earth, People, and the Environment

What department was the class in?

Department of Geography, Planning, and Sustainability (GPS)

Who taught the class when you took it? 

Prof. Richard Federman

Joe sits and smiles inside Engineering Hall.

Tell us a little about what the class is.

This course revolves around the broader spectrum of geography both with the physical environment as well as social issues facing the world today.

Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting or special to you. 

I liked this class a lot because it’s a microcosm of what geography is. It includes earth science, sociology, regional issues, and so much more. If someone is considering Geography as a major, this is the class for you.

What makes this professor great? 

I took this class online, and the fact that Professor Federman can make an online course so engaging and so relatable is a huge testament to his teaching abilities. He has great lectures with very good visual aids and finds ways to make everything easy to understand.

Joe smiles and sits outside the Engineering pond.

How did this class help to support your academic or personal growth, or your professional goals? 

This was the course that let me know that I had truly selected the right major, and it was the catalyst for the rest of my undergrad experience.

What are your professional goals? 

After Rowan, I’m looking forward to attending grad school, initially for my master’s and possibly a Ph.D. program after that. My goal is to help protect the environment by better educating the public about how valuable and fragile our planet is.

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Story by:
Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

Meet #Rowan2025: Incoming Business Major Maddie Angradi

Exterior shot of Rowan Boulevard at night.

Today we welcome incoming first year student Maddie Angradi. Maddie plans on studying business and living on campus. Maddie is from Lumberton, NJ (Burlington County) and attended Rancocas Valley Regional High School (RVRHS). Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college? I’m looking forward to experiencing life […]

Senior Reflects: Donald Ivy Jr. Shares How Rowan Supported His Career Aspirations

DJ standing under Engineering Building

Donald “DJ” Ivy Jr. recently graduated from Rowan University in December 2020 with his bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. He is from Browns Mills, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County.

Could you please share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

One of my favorite classes that I would tell anyone to take is Computer Lab Techniques. It’s a class anyone can take because it teaches you all the ins and outs of shortcuts on the computer. We’re required to take it as Computer Science majors, but I think it’s a more universal class for anybody who wants to learn more about computers. We learned directories and even how to program a clock, like the ones found in microwaves. 

Could you please share your favorite social memory?

I made a lot of friends in Robinson, specifically in the computer lab. When I transferred to Rowan, I was already a junior and knew that there were already established friend groups made with people who have been here since freshman year. I’m a pretty shy person, so it took me a couple months; but once I opened up, my friends and I started going to the events at the Student Center. In high school and community college, I didn’t know a lot of Computer Science majors, so it’s been so cool meeting so many new people with the same major as me. 

DJ sitting on a bench outside Robinson Hall

What are your career aspirations?

I was fortunate enough to find a job right after college. I’m currently working at McKesson, we’re a pharmaceutical distribution company, but I want to do more. I want to work for a bigger company or maybe try and do a start-up, but that I need the experience first, I can’t just make a business out of nowhere. I have thought about coming back to Rowan to get an engineering degree. Computer science deals a lot with the software of computers and applications, and I want to be more well-rounded and involved in what the computers actually do and would want to know how to fix a computer if it ever breaks. 

How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

My advisor, Mike Schillo, was a really big part of getting me on the right path and figuring out what I wanted to do within my major. There are a lot of computer science classes that all count towards graduation, but if you wanted to specialize in something specific they have a lot of different avenues you could take. 

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors?

I want to thank my parents and shout out to two friends who also went to Rowan but I have lost contact with: Joe Barton and Siobhan McGuinness. They were two people in my life who made me want to come to Rowan in the first place. 

DJ sitting inside Engineering building

Who is your favorite professor and what class did you take them for? 

Professor Mansaray, I took him for Software Development. He was such a down-to-earth guy and very straightforward. He let us in about everything we’ll need to know. He made all my worries about post-graduation just go away. He told us to build up a portfolio, and what’s so nice about my program is that we do so many projects that by the time we leave, we already have things to put in a portfolio. 

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

Focus on what you really want out of life, this is the time to do it.

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Story by:
Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

Senior Reflects: Biomedical Art & Visualization Major Hannah Knight

Hannah poses outside.

Today, we speak to graduating senior Hannah Knight. Hannah is a Biomedical Art and Visualization major with minors in Art History and Biology from Shamong, NJ (Burlington County). She transferred from Rowan College of Burlington County and currently lives off campus. She shares more about her experience at Rowan and gives advice to incoming students.

A picture of Hannah taking a selfie while on a hike.

Could you share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

Being in and working thoughout the night in Westby Hall, specifically painting in the studio after mourning a death.

Could you share your favorite social memory?

Going to bingo or The Pit for events. Walking down the Boulevard and to the High Street Gallery.

What are your career aspirations?

Help the future of health care and science via biomedical arts.

How did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with your professional growth or career aspirations?

I work with professionals in the field who can give me real-world advice.

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors?

To Doc for keeping me in high spirits, Ryan Berardi for always understanding, and Amanda Almon for starting BMAV here at Rowan.

Who is your favorite professor? What class did you take them for? And why is this person your favorite?

Nancy Ohana. She teaches figure drawing and constantly reinforced freedom, diligence and the process of art.

What advice would you give to incoming first years or transfers about making the most out of their college experience?

Take an art class that you’ll actually enjoy, not just the “easy” ones. Go to RAH events because they’re pretty cool most times, and be kind to everyone.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Cory Monroe: Graduating Public Relations Major and Mother

Cory sits with her son on the Rowan Proud chair.

Today we speak to Cory Monroe, a graduating Public Relations major and mom from Medford, NJ (Burlington County). Cory transferred to Rowan from Rowan College at Burlington College. Corey is a first-generation college student.  

Cory poses in front of trees on campus.

If you could paint a picture of your time here at Rowan, what would that look like?

It would look like it’s come full circle, I suppose. I graduated from Rowan College at Burlington County and transferred to Rowan University in 2014. I was finishing up one semester and then the next semester would have been my final year at Rowan, but my mom got sick and was hospitalized the week of finals. I couldn’t even finish taking my finals because she was diagnosed with cancer. It was a chaotic time for me. She passed away quickly the next month. It took me a very long time to come back to school. I would say that I just feel like my time at Rowan, though chaotic, has come full circle.

What are some challenges you faced, being a student and a mother?

I would say that I experienced mom guilt sometimes. Sometimes I need to ask my husband, “Hey, I didn’t get everything done that I had to get done. During naptime or bedtime, I need a few hours to study or to write this paper,” and I feel bad. My husband is very supportive. I still feel bad segmenting off that time, even though it’s for the better. It’s for the best that I finish my degree. I would just say time management has become really important, and conquering mom guilt is very important.

Cory poses with her husband and son.

How has Rowan helped you achieve your goals?

I would say that Lori Brucker, the advisor for the Public Relations and Advertising department, has been very helpful. There were a few times I was going to come back to school, but then it just didn’t pan out. I was suffering with some depression prior to having my son, and the people at Rowan were really patient. They didn’t say, “Oh my gosh, this is like your third time talking about coming back to school, get your life together.” They were really patient and believed that I could graduate. Each time that I would come back and ask “Okay, what do I have to do?” and then I didn’t go through with it, they were always just very supportive of me finishing my degree and telling me what I had to do to get there. I appreciated that.

What was your inspiration for coming back to finish your degree?

My son, 100 %. Eventually, when he’s a little older, I want to go back to school for nursing in an accelerated bachelor’s program, and you have to have your bachelor’s degree to be in the program. I want to complete what I started and make my mom proud of me for finishing it, even though it wasn’t easy. 

How do you best balance school, life, and being a mom?

I take advantage of nap time. Luckily, my son still naps. During his nap time, I set a goal of getting something finished, and that’s when I do it. I actually find that I’m more proactive with deadlines now as a mom than I was before. I used to wait until the last minute and say that I don’t have any time, but now I finish assignments two weeks in advance. I try to get things done, so it’s off of my shoulders.

Cory looks on as her husband holds her son in the air.

What advice do you have for other mothers that are thinking about coming back to school or that are already here trying to finish their degree?

I would say that if it makes you happy, come back to school and complete your degree. You’re definitely going to be inspiring your son or daughter. They’ll be able to see that you made sacrifices and that you work towards an end goal that wasn’t easy. They’ll see that as an adult, it’s difficult to come back to school to finish a degree, or begin and finish a degree while having a child.

What is your favorite thing about being a mom?

I love absolutely everything about being a mom right now. I’m a stay-at-home mom. I love being a stay-at-home mom. My son is always happy to see me. As soon as he wakes up in the morning, he’s always so happy to see me. He is just full of like endless love and limitless fun. He’s my heart.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Interview by:
Kayla Tucker, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

Meet Transfer Profs: Liberal Studies Major Erin Finter

Photo of future Prof Erin taken outdoors.

Meet incoming transfer student and first-generation college student Erin Finter! Erin is an aspiring Liberal Studies major from Medford, NJ (Burlington County) who transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County. She shares more about what she’s looking forward to at Rowan University and she gives advice to other transfer students.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

New professors!

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

I’m currently the VP of the criminal justice club … I’d love the chance to continue that!

What majors are you considering and why?

I’ve chosen liberal studies with a focus in law.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

The 3+1 info event. It was well put together and full of great information!

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Figure out what you want to do after graduating and pick a school bed equipped to help you achieve it!

Where are you going to live next year?

Renting off campus!

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Meet Transfer Profs: Public Health & Wellness Major Heather Doerr

A photo of Heather outside at the beach wearing sunglasses.

Meet incoming transfer Prof Heather Doerr, a Public Health & Wellness major from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). Heather transferred from the University of Maryland Global Campus. She shares how she chose Rowan and what she’s looking forward to!

A selfie of Heather wearing glasses.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

I am looking forward to being involved in clubs and initiatives that advocate for wellness and support communities’ overall health.

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

I recently joined the Public Health Club.

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I have changed my major from IFSM to Public Health and Wellness, which is a new venture for me, but an interest I have had for a few years. I hope to combine my passion to advocate for our community’s good health with the skills and knowledge that I will be learning at Rowan and play an instrumental role in educating, empowering and improving the overall health of communities.

What majors are you considering and why?

I am enrolled in the Public Health & Wellness BS program. After working in the Information Systems realm for the last two years, I realized my work did not fulfill my desire to help users as I had intended when entering the field. Working in a stationary position in front of a computer for 8-12 hours a day was not conducive to my good health, both physically and mentally. When I took the Nutrition class in my first year, I was amazed by how uninformed I was in what my body needed for optimal health function. This sparked my interest and passion to play a role in improving not only the health of myself and my family, but also society.

Heather standing on the beach with her dog.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

Yes, I attended the Rowan self-paced tour. The Rowan campus was huge, the campus has grown into its own community, which is very inspiring and comforting. Although I was there on a Saturday during COVID restrictions, I was able to get a sense of the positive energy and support that exists at this school. The buildings that I was able to access were easy to find and had an abundance of resources.

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Review all the programs that Rowan has to offer as well as the career options within those programs. Rowan provides prospective students with information online, over the phone, and through various tour options of the campus. Everyone I have communicated with through email or virtual meetings were very informative and helpful.

Where are you going to live next year?

Commute from home.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

The abundance of resources to help achieve success.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Meet Transfer Profs: Psychology Major Rosetta Briscoe

An outdoor shot of Rosetta smiling and wearing reflective sunglasses.

Meet incoming transfer Prof Rosetta Briscoe. Rosetta is a Psychology major from Pemberton, NJ who transferred from Rowan College of Burlington County. She shares how she chose Rowan University and what she’s looking forward to!

Rosetta posing for a photo in a hot pink sun dress and reflective sunglasses.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

I’m looking forward to everything the school has to offer. I’m excited for the academic and personal growth that is to come.

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

I’m not active in any clubs, but I do have a hobby of jewelry making and singing. I would love to be a part of any club that inspires me to be creative and help individuals.

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I would like to explore my options and join clubs, be active, and perhaps try a new skill. I love learning something new and being able to apply the knowledge toward my degree.

What majors are you considering and why?

Psychology so I can help counsel, and perhaps business, so that I can have my own practice.

Rosetta wearing a black sequined mask.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

I attended a virtual event for Psychology, it was informative and wonderful. I would recommend it to students.

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Do your research, then see which schools are the best fit for you. Think about the financial requirements, your academics, and what would be best for you.

Where are you going to live next year?

Commute from home.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

I like that so far I have experienced people working together as a team to make sure students are able to succeed.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos courtesy of:
Rosetta Briscoe

Music Majors Share Music to Listen to While Studying

Photo of a student studying.

Need some tunes to help you study for finals? Here are some recommendations from upperclassmen music majors.

The "Spiegel im Spiegel" by Arvo Part album cover.

Spiegel im Spiegel – Arvo Pärt

“It’s one of my favorite minimalist pieces. It repeats over and over, so it’s good to listen to when you’re trying to focus. I love how delicate it sounds; it reminds me of a lullaby. A couple years ago, I was reading a book called ‘The Rest Is Noise’ by Alex Ross. Pärt was mentioned in it, so I wanted to dive into his music more,” says senior Kimmy Speers, a Music Education: Instrumental major from Morristown, NJ (Morris County).

The "3am Talk" by Icemann album cover.

3Am Talk – Icemann

“Chill vibe. I created the song myself,” says first-generation junior Justin Nunez, a Music Industry major with a concentration in Technology and a transfer from Kean University from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County).

Lisa holding a clarinet outside by the Rowan Hall pond.

Nocturnes (all 21) – Chopin

“It is very calming and relaxing. Chopin is very popular in the classical music world, and played very often by pianists,” says senior Lisa Harkisheimer, a Music Education Instrumental major from Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County).

Melissa wearing a Rowan sweatshirt while walking on the beach.

Etude No.2 – Phillip Glass

“Phillip Glass is a minimalist artist. His songs are thought provoking and stimulating to the ear. I studied minimalist artists in my theory course a year ago and found the compositions of Phillip Glass. I use his Playlist on Spotify to focus when I’m studying and thought it might help other students,” say junior Melissa Breslin of Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), a Music Education Instrumental major and transfer student from Rowan College at Gloucester County. 

Liz sitting on a bench.

Rêverie – Claude Debussy (or really anything by Debussy)

“It relaxes me without putting me to sleep. I discovered the song by researching romantic composers on my own and also hearing his music in my music classes,” says senior Liz Cicali, a Music Education major with a specialization in instrumental music from Absecon, NJ (Atlantic County).

Sunshine holding a guitar while smiling outside.

 The Brain Dance – Animals as Leaders

“This will stimulate your mind and senses in every way. You will be awakened to learn and receptive to new information. I discovered the song at a concert,” says senior Sunshine Jones, a Music Education Vocal Major and Classical Guitar minor from Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County).

The "Viberations" by Iman Omari album cover.

L.A. Vibes – Iman Omari 

“Iman Omari is the king of chill and loops. He’s a producer that makes dream like beats. He can chop any song up and claim it as his own. A lot of his music doesn’t contain words, he has a beat tape that has nothing but loops and it really helps me study. Hearing the beats allow me to read, think and focus on my tasks. I’m able to listen to music and concentrate, that’s all I need in this world. Music and focus,” says first-generation college junior Phinesse Scott, a Music Industry major and transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County

Phinesse adds: “I discovered Iman Omari through YouTube. You can really go down a never-ending hole on YouTube. I typically like to search for beats on there and I came across one of his old tracks and it was at that moment I became a fan and looked for every song I could find that he made.”

The "We the Kings" album cover.

Check Yes Juliet – We The Kings

“It’s a good song and catchy but by studying to this song it helps you to think back to what you read right before an exam if you listen to it again. It’s a popular pop rock song similar to artists I listen to,” says first-generation college junior Amanda Uretsky, a Music Industry major with a concentration in Technology and Business from Lumberton, NJ (Burlington County).

Emileigh smiling for a photo.

Imagine Paris – Daniel Paterok

“I find this song very relaxing, which I believe is important when doing homework or studying. Plus, I find the melody really pretty and catchy. I found this song on a public Spotify playlist that I sometimes listen to when I study,” says junior Emileigh Zane, a Music Industry major with a Business concentration who transferred from Rowan College of South Jersey and is from Penns Grove, NJ (Salem County).

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major 

Header photo courtesy of:
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Meet Transfer Profs: Human Services & Psychology Major NyEsha Cintron

An outdoor photo of a branded chair on campus.
A selfie of NyEsha in a botanical garden.

Meet incoming transfer student NyEsha Cintron. NyEsha is a first-generation Human Services and Psychology major from Maple Shade, NJ (Burlington County) who transferred from Rowan College of Burlington County. She shares how she ended up at Rowan and what she’s looking forward to!

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

I am looking forward to meeting new people, the ability to foster lasting relationships and grow in experience with my area of study. I am excited to see how school will impact my life as well as how I will impact the lives of others.

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

I’d like to get involved in the Human Services Club or a language club.

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I will be taking a Spanish class, and I’d like to see my knowledge increase in this language to speak it fluently.

What majors are you considering and why?

I am a Human Services and Psychology major through and through. I love learning how to better understand people in efforts to better serve them. These majors are very organic to how I am wired, and I feel that I can be my best by furthering my education in these areas of studies.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

I haven’t had the time to do so, but am awaiting orientation for transfer students, can’t wait!

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Do it and get started!

Where are you going to live next year?

Commute from home.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

I like that Rowan participated with community colleges to ensure continuity of learning to a accredited university.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Meet Transfer Profs: Advertising Major Paul Coppola

Stock image of brightly lit advertising on a wall.
Paul wearing a suit and posing with someone at a wedding.

Meet incoming transfer student Paul Coppola! Paul is an aspiring Advertising major from Riverton, NJ (Burlington County) who transferred from Bucks County Community College. He shares more about what he’s looking to discover at Rowan and offers some advice to other transfers.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

I’m looking forward to the general experience of going to school that isn’t a community college. The experience to me sounds like an enjoyable one and I couldn’t be more excited about it.

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I’ve recently become interested in writing. I had joined a Philadelphia Eagles blog and honed my skills there but I wish to increase those during my time at Rowan.

Paul wearing a Phillies mask.

What majors are you considering and why?

I will be majoring in Advertising because I enjoy the creative aspect behind it and that world in general just fascinates me.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

I attended a virtual orientation. I enjoyed the process a lot. They had made it sound like a much easier transition than I had originally thought it was going to be.

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Just breathe. You’ll find the school of your dreams. It may not happen immediately but you’ll get that acceptance letter and feel a sense of relief.

Where are you going to live next year?

Commute from home.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

The environment!

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior, Music Industry major

Meet Transfer Profs: Aspiring Law & Justice Studies Major Emerlyn Anderson

An exterior shot of the top of Bunce Hall.

Meet incoming Transfer student Emerlyn Anderson. Emerlyn is an aspiring Law & Justice Studies major from Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County) who transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County. She shares more about what she’s looking forward to at Rowan.

A close up selfie of Emerlyn.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward at Rowan University?

I look forward to furthering my education and meeting amazing people.

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club that you’re involved in that you’d like to continue at Rowan?

The EOF program.

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself at Rowan? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I would like to learn more about my education on a professional level.

What majors are you considering and why?

Criminal justice, because I have always wanted to be part of the justice system and help people on a different level.

Do you have advice for other transfers who haven’t committed to a school yet?

This is your life and education, do what makes you happy! Don’t stress yourself out either. Everything will work out for the better.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

It was an easy transfer from my two-year college.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Student photo provided by:
Emerlyn Anderson

We are #RowanPROUD to be included on Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s 2021 Transfer Honor Roll, which recognizes select nationwide colleges and universities that foster dynamic pathways for transfer students.

Leadership #PROFspective: Kalie VanDewater, Editor-in-Chief of the Whit

Kalie sits and smiles outside on campus.

Today we feature Kalie VanDewater, a leader at Rowan University. Kalie is Editor-in-Chief (EIC) of Rowan’s newspaper, The Whit. She is a senior Journalism and Modern Languages and Linguistics double major with a minor in International Studies from Mount Holly, NJ (Burlington County). Kalie is also involved in the Rowan Environmental Action League and ASL Club

This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month. 

Kalie stands on a walkway on campus.

What is your role in your organization?

As EIC of the Whit, I have a managerial role. I do a lot of coordination with the printer we work with, advertisers, and I usually write the editorial every week, and make sure all the other editors and writers know what they’re doing and answer any questions they might have. 

Kalie also adds that when she first started working for the Whit her sophomore year, the staff was mostly male. In her three years there, she’s seen a trend in more diversity with race, gender and majors. 

Can you briefly describe what your organization does?

We’re basically the independent student newspaper on campus, so that means we are the source of news on campus. We cover events that are happening and general university happenings. We get to dictate what content we put out. We’re student-run, so we don’t have faculty influence aside from our advisor who is there to make sure things are running smoothly. 

Kalie sits and smiles outside on campus.

What have you learned in your role as a leader?

I’ve learned to trust the people that I’m leading with their capabilities. I tend to be very particular about what I want to do. I started last year as our features editor, I would have an image in my head about what I thought an article should turn out like, but I’m not writing the article, someone else is. I had to get used to trusting my staff. It’s been a lot of learning when to step in and when to take a step back and let everyone do their own thing. You can be a leader without having control all the time. 

What’s the most significant barrier to women today?

It’s that we don’t say what we feel. I feel like it’s kind of been internalized to just accept what is happening. It’s that feeling of if I don’t do what everyone else wants, I won’t be accepted. I think because of that, ideas and feelings that are completely valid may not be brought to light. 

Kalie sits at a bistro table on campus.

What advice would you give to the next generation of leaders?

Be confident in yourself and confident in your abilities. Specifically for leading, be confident in the people that you are leading. Know the strengths and weaknesses of your team. It’s important to know.

Check out Kalie’s work at The Whit here.  

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Story by:
Caitlyn Dickinson, senior public relations major and 
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major



Leadership #PROFspective: Vanessa Livingstone, President of PRSSA

Vanessa kneeling outside near Bunce.

Today we feature Vanessa Livingstone, a leader at Rowan University. Vanessa is the president of the Anthony J. Fulginiti Chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA). She is a senior, first-generation college student from Palmyra, NJ (Burlington County) who double majors in Public Relations and Advertising. This story is part of a […]

#PROFspective: Junior Athletic Training Major Jocelyn Reuben

Drone shot of Route 322 portion of campus.

Jocelyn Reuben, a junior transfer student from Burlington Township, is an Athletic Training major with a minor in Spanish. She is very involved on campus and is a part of Improfs, Black Cultural League, and the Athletic Training Club. Here is a little bit about her Rowan experience thus far! 

Tell us about one club, organization, or group of friends that make you feel like Rowan is home.

My friends Keyanna Meade, Keianna Williams, Alex Brown, Rob Brown, Reena Patel and Liam O’Brien have made me feel like Rowan has been home since the day I step foot on campus. Keyanna Meade is my childhood best friend who transferred here; meanwhile, I met my other friends through being an RA and Rowan’s ASPIRE Leadership Development Program. They all inspire me to get out of my comfort zone and try new things. Furthermore, their dedication to education makes me work harder so we can thrive together. They have each been a part of the reason I’m glad I came to Rowan.

Jocelyn smiles, stands by a staircase inside an academic building.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you?

Last year, during Black History Month, Black Cultural League hosted a Speakeasy Night with [Rowan After Hours]. It was the most amazing event I had ever been to on campus. The Pit transformed into the well-known “Cotton Club” and even required a password to get in. Once inside, host, Treasure Cary was dressed perfectly to fit the 1920s theme and she looked amazing. The event had an open mic, a live jazz band, card games, and a raffle. It was nice to see Black talent showcased and celebrated.

I was debating going on stage because I was nervous and my phone battery was on 5% (all my poems were on my phone). This girl next to me gave me her charger without asking questions and once I had at least 20% I mustered up the courage to perform an original poem of mine and was met with so much love and support from the audience and the people who organized the event. I gave her the charger right back and thanked her. She said it was no problem and even complimented my poem. I had only wished I dressed up for the occasion.

A candid photo of of Jocelyn.

What’s your favorite thing about one typical day at Rowan for you?

Every day at Rowan you can meet someone or learn something new. There is always an opportunity on campus to network with other students and even faculty, and I learn new things in and out of the classroom setting at Rowan.

What is one thing about Rowan that was a happy surprise for you?

A happy surprise for me was definitely the Student Mental Health Conference. Mental Health is such an important issue/topic, it’s good of Rowan to allow students to share their stories and talk about them openly in a safe environment. I especially like that it was mostly student-led. “For students by students.” I had the pleasure of presenting at the conference two years in a row.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a professor or staff member in which you felt like they truly cared about your wellbeing.

Mrs. Laurie Dwyer, my academic advisor, is amazing! She’s definitely cared about me and my well-being on numerous occasions. When I transferred to Rowan she made the process easy and painless. Although I was a transfer, she helped me get right on track with all the requirements and classes I had to complete to even be eligible to apply to the Athletic Training Program.

She has always pushed me to be better academically and encourages me when I would get insecure about taking some of the harder classes in my major. I know she is the advisor for hundreds of students so for her to always show so much patience and care for me … I appreciate her for always having my best interest at heart. Even when I told her that I wanted to do a Spanish minor and it seemed like there was no room in my schedule to do so, she came up with a plan that allowed me to finish it right on time before it would possibly interfere with my Athletic Training classes. In short, I would not be as focused and prepared without her.

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

7 Economics Majors Share Their Professional Goals

Photo of a one dollar bill.

Seven students in the Economics program share with us how they’re dreaming big and where their major will take them in their professional goals.

Carolyn smiles in a wooded area.
Carolyn Cover

“My long-term professional dream goal is to be able to apply my knowledge of economics and business alongside my personal interests to find a career path best fitting for me,” says junior Carolyn Cover, a Rowan College at Burlington County transfer student and Economics major pursuing a minor in Business Administration from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County).

Headshot of Ryan Brubeck against a neutral background.
Ryan Brubeck

“In the short term, I plan to finish independent research essays on different Blockchain topics, which I can disperse through online platforms such as LinkedIn and Medium. Additionally, I am learning programming languages to supplement my education from university classes. Within the next two years, I will be working for an internship or entry-level job in addition to helping grow the Rowan Blockchain Club,” says junior Ryan Brubeck, an Economics major with a Mathematics minor from Westwood, NJ (Bergen County).

Dayne pets animals outside with clouds in the background.
Dayne Costa

Dayne Costa plans to go to graduate school and become a professor or a dean in the future. “I will use my economics degree to help teach others the wonders of economics,” he says. Dayne, from Hammonton, NJ (Atlantic County), also holds a Certificate of Undergraduate Studies in Public Policy and is a transfer from West Virginia University.

Portrait of Rachel Ricci with a plant in the background.
Rachel Ricci

“My short-term goal is to find a great entry-level job after I graduate that opens the door for promotions and growth,” says junior Rachel Ricci, an Economics major with a minor in Business Administration and Rowan College of South Jersey transfer student from Millville, NJ (Cumberland County).

Portrait of Amir Ross against a gray backdrop.
Amir Ross

“In the long term, I would like to be a Certified Accountant and professional farmer,” says senior Amir Ross, an Economics and Accounting major and Rowan College at Burlington County and transfer student from Palmyra, NJ (Burlington County).

Nick Scheurer wears a Rowan sweatshirt outside with woods in the background.
Nick Scheurer

“My dream is to be financially stable while still being able to challenge myself and grow in my field as my career advances. I want to feel secure but never stuck, bored or uninspired,” says first-generation senior Nick Scheurer, an Economics major with a minor in Business Administration and Certificate of Undergraduate Studies in Management Information Systems from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County).

Tamora smiles outside with an academic building in the background.
Tamora Hill

A transfer from Cumberland County College, senior Tamora Hill wants to work with personal finance, activism work, global economics and inequality. A first-generation college student and commuter, Tamora plans to attend graduate school. Her long-term goal is to start an economics firm and children’s book series.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Chemical Engineering Major David Aguirre

David outside of the Engineering building.

Tell us a little bit about your favorite class at Rowan so far. My favorite class so far is Chemical Process Component Design (CPCD). It’s a senior-level class where we apply many of the concepts and techniques from previous courses to perform sizing and specification of commonly-used process equipment. It’s really cool to see how […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Sociology Major LaDaysha White

LaDaysha standing outside near a bridge.

Today we feature LaDaysha White, a first-generation senior Sociology major from Florence, NJ (Burlington County). She also has a Certificate of Undergraduate study in Public Policy. LaDaysha is a transfer student from Ramapo College of New Jersey, and she tells us about her Rowan experience. Tell us a little bit about your favorite class at […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Environmental and Sustainability Studies JoAnna Contarino

JoAnna standing in between a a tree.

Today we feature first-generation college student and recent December 2020 graduate JoAnna Contarino from Elk Township, NJ (Burlington County). JoAnna is a Environmental & Sustainability Studies major and transfer from Rowan College of South Jersey. She has minors in Ethics, Planning, Political Science and a Certificate of Undergraduate Study in Environmental Policy & Economics. Tell […]

3 Environment and Sustainability Studies Majors Share What Excites Them About Their Major

Photo of trees.

Today, we speak to three Environment and Sustainability Studies majors from Rowan’s School of Earth and Environment about what gets them excited about their major.

Selfie of Joanna.

“I want to say that I am making a difference or at least attempting to. I am an environmental and sustainability major and there are a lot of issues revolving around that topic. I do want to make the world a better place,” says Joanna Janowski, a junior from Livingston, NJ (Essex County) who transferred to Rowan from Montclair State University. 

Selfie of Madison.

“The fact that there are all these ways to be sustainable in the world and we can all contribute to living in a sustainable world excites me. Also, how we can change the world to apply to all walks of life,” says Madison Kerr, a junior with a minor in Sustainable Built Environments from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) and transfer student from Rowan College of Burlington County. 

Headshot of Gabby Davis.

“How incredibly relevant it always will be. Cities are constantly growing, changing and evolving. They are living things that need constant attention. Knowing that I have to keep educating myself and can never be complacent in my field of study is exciting,” says Gabby Davis, a senior double major in ESS and Community and Environmental Planning with a CUGS in Food Systems Planning. Gabby, who transferred from from Montclair State University, lives in Manahawkin, NJ (Ocean County).

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Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

Header image courtesy of:
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Meet #Rowan2025: Law and Justice Studies Major Kiran Kaur

Exterior shot of campus.

Meet #Rowan2025 student Kiran Kaur! Kiran is an incoming freshman Law and Justice Studies major from Westampton, NJ (Burlington County). Kiran is excited to come to Rowan and shares what she looks forward to in college.

Kiran sitting on her steps while wearing a grey sweater.

Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college?

I am trying to make new good friends. I am studying Law and Justice Studies.

What is one hobby, activity, sport or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

I would like to be a part of a baking club if there are any. I like baking cupcakes, cake pops, cookies and cake!

Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

I just want to learn more about my major and develop new skills in the career.

What majors are you considering and why?

Law and Justice Studies. I’m trying to go in the pre-corrections path.

Kiran sitting and smiling for a photo while wearing a dress.

Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

Yes, it was a nice college!

Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

Rowan University is a pretty clean and nice campus. They should try applying and take a tour.

Where are you going to live next year?

On campus.

What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

The campus and restaurants near the campus.

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Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

Lifting Black Creative Voices

Desi smiles outside on campus.

Today we are highlighting Black students who major in creative fields at Rowan University. Each share insight on being a Black student in a major/field where there is not strong representation and tell us where they are headed in their professional careers.

Jabreeah smiling and wearing a grey Rowan sweatshirt with a burnt orange jacket.

“I really didn’t have an insight being a Black student coming from a predominantly white high school; however, when I got to college I was able to express myself about my views. In terms of my professional goals, I want to work behind the scenes in movies.” – Jabreeah Holmes, senior Radio/TV/Film major, Camden, NJ

Check out some of Jabreeah’s work on her YouTube channel.

An artistic photo of Giovanna with a halo over her head.

“Since Black women artists are not predominant in the art field nor get the representation that they deserve, it motivates me to stand out and make work that’s unique or different. Also, to make work that responds to Black issues and beauty. For my professional goals, I’m still debating about that. Right now, I’m considering a career in the museum field like a museum archivist, a curator or a crime scene technician in the forensic/ law and justice field.” – Giovanna Eley, senior Art major with a minor in Law and Justice and CUGS: Forensic Studies, transfer student from Rutgers Camden,  Plainfield, NJ (Union County)

Check out Giovanna’s portfolio here: https://giovannaeley.com

Sabrea posing for a photo on the beach.

“It feels really good to be who I am and be a part of this field that I think is also teaching me more and more of who I am. I was mainly the only Black person in my writing courses, there were maybe one to two more if that. My professional goals are to just write, to be happy in doing so, I hope to maybe get a book published of a selection of pieces I have written! Maybe even submitting a script to a production company!” – Sabrea Bishop of Newark, NJ (Essex County), junior, first-generation college student, Writing Arts (Creative Writing) major, transfer from Albright College, PA 

Check out Sabrea’s work here

Daija posing outside the student center while wearing a furry black coat.

“It gets a bit lonely, especially walking into a class and being able to count the Black students in the room on one hand. But with that it mind, it keeps me determined to make sure other Black creatives feel comfortable enough to be in the room in the first place. I feel as though creative fields aren’t taken as seriously, but people are always enjoying new books and shows and pieces of art. So, I feel as though by being confident in myself in my creative life, I can be an inspiration for others to actually go for their creative craft, instead of pushing it away because of fear. My professional goals are to write movies, books, and possibly television shows for people to enjoy. I also want to create different forms of art like paintings and sculptures and have my work displayed in galleries all over.” – Daija McNeil, junior, first generation college student, Studio Art major with a minor in Creative Writing, Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County)

See Daija’s artwork here.

Read Daija’s written piece, “A Love Letter To Black Women,” here.

Desi sitting outside the student center holding her book.

“It’s definitely difficult, when I come to class I am either the only Black student or it may be me or maybe two others, never more than five. In any field you want to see a model to follow and it’s hard when you have to be your own model. In terms of professional goals, I have so many; however, the one related to this field would be to start my own production company.”  – Desi Jones, junior Radio/TV/Film major, transfer from Camden County College, Camden County, NJ

Check out and purchase Desi’s book “Daily Dose of Desi, A Year of Light, Love, and Inspiration” here

Bryce outside the Campbell library wearing a yellow and black jacket.

“The writing industry is no stranger at all to minorities, but Blacks are rarely highlighted in that field. I think a part of that is due to both the immutable nature of the industry and Blacks being unaware of how much they can benefit from having a career in creative fields. I feel that Black students are the perfect participants for writing arts by the simple fact that we don’t go through the same experiences as everyone (even ourselves) and have a different view on life than most others. While I’m currently a freelance writer for an online publication (Screen Rant), I plan to expand my writing to an even greater professional level with my ultimate goal of working on a TV series or film.” – Bryce Morris, junior Writing Arts major, Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

Read one of Bryce’s published pieces here

A selfie of Mya.

“I feel like there’s a different type of pressure. I personally feel like I have to be better and focus more in order to do what. One reason I wasn’t interested in doing broadcasting was my hair. I didn’t want to have to wear it straight or certain way to look “professional.” I find it difficult on how to be myself yet also “professional” because the second you might sound rude you have an “attitude” or maybe you talk “too loud” and now you’re considered the loud Black girl with an attitude. For my professional goals, I hope to become a magazine writer, focusing on music!” – Mya Calderon, junior, first-generation college student, Journalism major with a minor in Psychology from Hanley Falls, Minnesota

A selfie of Khadijah.

“For my professional goals, I want to be a freelance concept artist for a video game one day. But I also want to make and direct on my projects and hopefully be financially stable. Some advice for Black high school students going into creative majors: Make sure you build your portfolio and be aware that traditional pieces are a must have when trying to get into the art program. Make sure you bring at least two traditional art pieces for your review! This was a hard pill for me to swallow when I first did an art portfolio review, and I only drew cute anime-inspired chibis. But trust me, your hard work will pay off! Cartoony/semi-realism stuff is okay to add too! If you do digital, I recommend coming in with a time-lapse of your workflow process on a tablet/laptop to show! Also, don’t listen to cynical individuals saying you drawing anime and character art, won’t get you a job. Sure, the market is competitive but there are plenty of art jobs out there looking for different art styles of all sorts! Anime included! Make sure you do your research!” – Khadijah Owens of Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County), junior Art major working toward a dual major in Art Education, transfer from Rowan College at Gloucester County.

Check out some of Khadijah’s work here.  

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

Photography not submitted by: Jabreeah Holmes, senior Radio/TV/Film major and Joe Gentempo, senior Art major

7 Students Share Why They Like Magnolia and Chestnut

Exterior shot of Chestnut Hall.

Two of Rowan’s on-campus residence halls, Magnolia and Chestnut, have a lot to offer. We spoke to a few of the residents to see what they like about living there. 

Leena Nesby, a freshman resident at Chestnut, says: “I like Chestnut because the lake is just outside my window, so I like my view. I like that it is really close to Holly [Pointe Commons], which is where my friends and I go to eat a lot of the time. I do like the courtyard, the benches and all the bike racks night there.” Leena is a Nutrition major from Tabernacle, NJ (Burlington County).

A selfie of Leena.

Griffin Roughgarden, a freshman Entrepreneurship major from Caldwell, NJ (Essex County), says that Chestnut is a quiet place to sleep, study and live.

Griffin poses in front of Chestnut.

Christopher Maestoso, a freshman Exploratory Studies major from Fairfield, NJ (Essex County), says that Chestnut is the perfect temperature once the heat of summer passes.  

Christopher poses in front of Chestnut.

Amanda Holzlein, a junior Human Resource Management major from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County) and a Resident Assistant at Chestnut, says that it feels like home. 

Amanda poses in front of Chestnut.

Bryce McMaster, a freshman Explorartory Studies major from Southampton, NJ (Burlington County) and a resident of Magnolia, says that he likes that he only has to share his bathroom with three other residents and that he has his own room, which he really likes. 

Bryce poses in front of Magnolia.

Andrew Mercurio, a freshman Music Education – Instrumental from Kendall Park, NJ (Middlesex County) and a resident at Magnolia Hall, says he likes that it sits right in the middle of where all his classes are and Rowan Boulevard. He likes that convenience.

Andrew poses in front of Magnolia Hall.

Samuel Poku, a freshman Music Industry major from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County), says: “The main reasons why I do like living at Chestnut are because it is a very cozy environment and quiet. Even though it is an older dorm it still has a great the environment with the people in and around it. I like the location, too, because it is between everything and easy to find everything. The Resident Assistants also do a very good job and make sure students are safe.”

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Story and photography by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major and Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

First student photo courtesy of Lena Nesby

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Marketing Major Harmanjot Kahlon

Harmanjot standing outside of Business Hall.

Today we feature first-generation college senior Harmanjot Kahlon, a Marketing major from Florence, NJ (Burlington County). Harmanjot is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County. She tells us about her time here at Rowan. Tell us a little bit about your favorite class at Rowan so far. My favorite class at Rowan was […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Jordan Jiosi

Jordan sitting at a table in Wilson with a window behind him.

Today we feature first-generation college student Jordan Jiosi from Medford Lakes, NJ (Burlington County). Jordan is a double major in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) and Mathematics (Statistics) and is in a Combined Advanced Degree Program for an MS in Computer Science. Jordan is a transfer from Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC) and tells us […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Elementary Education Major Mikayla Hiddemen

Mikayla standing at the bridge near the student center with snow behind her.

Today we feature Mikayla Hiddemen, an Elementary Education major from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). Mikayla is a senior, and this is her fourth semester at Rowan University. Mikayla transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County. Tell us a little bit about your favorite class at Rowan so far. My favorite class at Rowan so far […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Passionate About Inspiring Women in Male-Dominated Field, Talia Tomarchio

Talia poses against a dark background.

Today we speak to Talia Tomarchio, a senior Computer Science major with a minor in neuroscience and an honors concentration. A Burlington County native, Talia is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County, and a first-generation college student who lives off-campus in an apartment. Before COVID-19, she was a tutoring monitor for the computer science department and a front desk assistant. She is also a part of the Association of Computing Machinery’s Committee on Women, and Rowan’s Equestrian Team. Talia is also a winner of Rowan’s 2020 Idea Challenge.

Talia poses against a black backdrop.

What wakes you up in the morning?

Two things. One would be helping others. I really want to inspire women to be comfortable in a male-dominated industry. My other passion would probably be neuroscience, the subject I’m studying for my minor. I want to eventually get a job to take artificial intelligence or machine learning and integrate it with neuroscience and help the world that way. It’s a stretch, but my goal is to find a way to positively help people’s mental health through computer science. I would love to do that. That is my ultimate goal in life. Maybe I could analyze behavior patterns or create an app to help mental health. I am not sure exactly what I would do, but that is what I want to contribute to society.

How would you tell a fellow student interested in your major that they’re choosing a worthwhile field?

I think Computer Science is growing to be one of the largest majors at Rowan. We’re also accredited by the Computing Accreditation Committee of ABET. I really like the computer science department at Rowan because you know all your professors, so you don’t feel uncomfortable going to them. I think that computer science is a worthwhile degree to earn because there are so many options for fields to go into. For example, there are fields such as cybersecurity, data science, and artificial intelligence. There are many paths a computer science graduate can go down, and the degree is always going to be valuable.

What inspired you to know that you were in the right major for you?

I’ve always wanted to go into computer science, even as a little kid. I have always been good with computers. I wasn’t pushed toward the field, I just enjoy it. Nobody in my family ever had a technical background either.  I always wished I could learn how to program or code or become a software engineer, but I never had the confidence to do it. I traveled for a little while after my first year of college, and then I decided to “go for it” after I returned. I think that the support from the computer science department faculty at Rowan really helped me build my confidence. 

Talia poses against a black backdrop.

Has there been a faculty or staff member that’s really helped you to connect with the next step for your career?

The first one would be Dr. Anthony Breitzman, the Data Science Coordinator for the Computer Science Department. I performed research with him this semester on analyzing Myers-Briggs personality types through Twitter tweets. When you do research, you usually are a graduate student. I was a little intimidated because I was an undergrad, but Dr. Breitzman reassured me contrary to my perfectionist mentality, that I don’t have to know everything right now and that I will always be learning even after I graduate. I also asked him for career advice, on what kind of career path options I could go down.  Working with him really helped build my confidence. 

The second person would be Dr. Kristen diNovi, the Assistant Dean of the Honor’s College. She has been so supportive of me for all of my endeavors, and so helpful every time I asked her for advice. She connected me with Dr. Susana Santos and the Entrepreneurship Department in the Rohrer College of Business. They helped me grow Steminist Squad, my nonprofit organization that won the 2020 Rowan Idea Challenge. 

How was your transition into Rowan?

My first time going to college, I went to Rutgers out of high school. Then, I took some time off and I traveled the country. I lived in Florida and on the West Coast for a bit, and then I came back and decided to finish school. I am a bit older than the average undergraduate student, but I feel that it made me take my studies more seriously.  The transition to Rowan was really great. At first, I was a bit overwhelmed because I wanted to be involved in everything. I tried to take on more clubs and activities and classes than I could handle, but I overcame it with the support of the Computer Science Department faculty and staff. Micheal Schillo, my advisor, and Dr. Jennifer Kay, a professor in the department, told me it is okay to slow down. With their support, I was able to realize that I did not need to be involved in every single club and activity. From that experience, my advice to other students that feel overwhelmed is to seek support and utilize your resources, because they are there at Rowan, and know that it’s OK if you are not perfect.

Why Rowan?

I think it goes back to the fact that everyone knows everyone here. At first, I wanted to go to a big school, but I felt like I was just a number there. Rowan’s faculty to student ratio is perfect for me. I can get personalized help or tutoring or raise my hand in class at Rowan. I like the small school feeling at Rowan, even though Rowan isn’t small.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies, and public relations double major

Photos provided by:
Talia Tomarchio, senior computer science major

Black #PROFspective: Senior Art Major Ugonna Ugorji

Ugonna poses on the sidewalk in front of Westby Hall.

Today we speak to Ugonna Ugorji, a senior Art major and commuter from Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County). Ugonna is a transfer student from Mercer County Community College.

Thank you to Tatianna Addison, senior communications studies major from Browns Mills, NJ (Burlington County), for this series idea to honor Black students during Black History Month. 

Ugonna poses in front of a brick wall.

What is your student experience here at Rowan like, as a Black student at a PWI (Predominantly White Institution)?

My experience at this school has been pretty exciting. You may say that Rowan is a “PWI,” but in my opinion, it has just the right amount of diversity in an institution. Being a Black art major and having a series of professors left and right, they have all pushed me to be the best that I can and to hone my “still developing” artistic talents.

How did you find your friend group here at Rowan?

Well, I’ve interacted with people who have the same or even similar interests I have.

Ugonna holds up two of his drawings.

Are you involved with Black Rowan?

I’m not that involved with Black Rowan unfortunately, but I would love to do more!

How would you describe inclusion? Could you highlight a Rowan classroom or campus experience that was inclusive and made an impact on you?

I would say being a part of the Expressive Drawing class that is run by Dr. Appelson. That man wants all his students to be the best at what they can do, and he will not hesitate to harshly critique your work. Instead of [letting] that make me feel insecure about my art, it made me realize that everyone has their own way of expressing themselves. Some may not like what you do or understand it, but that shouldn’t stop you from being you.

Ugonna holds up a piece of his art work.

What advice would you give to a Black high school student considering your major here at Rowan?

If you’re an aspiring artist like myself and if you take Expressive Drawing with Dr. Appelson, don’t take it personally if he roasts certain assignments of yours. He knows you can do better, [you] just gotta push yourself.

What are your professional goals?

My professional goals are to become a full-fledged graphic designer/game designer. At my last institution, my major was Game Design, so I learned a few things here and there. I was disappointed when Rowan didn’t have a Game Design major so I initially went into Computer Science, thinking it was the same thing. I quickly changed my major to Art for the second semester. I feel I have a knack for character designs, in my own style, of course, so I can combine my graphic arts skills and create video game characters. That’ll be pretty cool.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

International Studies Majors: My Professional Goals

Today we speak with five International Studies majors. They tell us about their short- and long-term goals, how Rowan has prepared them for their field and how it all relates to their goals and dreams. “After graduation in the spring, I plan to go to law school. My long-term professional dream goal is to have […]

#PROFspective: Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rowan After Hours and More

Alex standing outside James Hall in the background.

Today we feature Alexandra Jackson, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major who minors in Mathematics, from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). She lives on campus and is a Resident Assistant, the treasurer of the College Diabetes Network, is involved in Out in STEM (oSTEM) and Catholic Campus Ministry. Tell us about one club, organization or […]

Keeping Houseplants In Your Dorm or Apartment

Close up of houseplants on a windowsill in Willow Hall.

Today we speak with three Rowan students about living on campus with plants in their living spaces.

Two green plants inside of small pots. The pot on the left looks like a cat. There is also multiple other items on the table.
Tara’s plants

Tara Lonsdorf, a senior Geology major from East Windsor, NJ (Mercer County) has three plants, all of which were given to her from different people. She says she has, “a tiny air plant given to me by my dad, an aloe plant given to me by my boyfriend, and a jade plant given to me by Lindsay Johnson at the Wellness Center after completing counseling with her.” Tara’s reasoning for her having those specific plants are that they are convenient for her. She explained, “All of the plants are small, easy to transport, and super low-maintenance.” Tara also advised, “Don’t get a plant just to have a plant. Get a plant that will be meaningful to you and fit your lifestyle.”

Three green plants sitting on a brown table. There is also a "groot" holding one of the plants.
Kalie’s plants

Kalie VanDewater, senior Journalism major from Mt. Holly, NJ (Burlington County) said, “I have three plants: an aloe, a cactus, and the other one is a vine plant.” Kalie said, “I just got them because I thought they were cool. I honestly can’t remember why.” Kalie’s advice is, “I recommend a cactus because that’s my most resilient plant and does well without a lot of water.”

Small green bamboo plant with mini pumpkins around it.
Rachel’s bamboo

Rachel Rumsby, a sophomore Communication Studies & Public Relations double major from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County) said, “I have one bamboo plant. My roommate, friend and I went to a Rowan After Hours event because we heard they were giving away pumpkins. They ran out of pumpkins so we were not able to get one. However, they had these bamboo plants so we each got one of those instead.” Rachel’s tip was, “Buy something easy to take care of and small to start off.”

Among the three of them they all are happy and enjoy living with their houseplants.

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Story by: Luke Garcia, junior music industry major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Exercise Science Major Taylor Fest

Taylor poses with her roommate, Rachel.

Today we speak to Taylor Fest, a sophomore Health and Exercise Science major. Taylor is from Cinnaminson, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from Rowan College of Burlington County. She lives on campus in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments

Taylor poses in front of a brick wall.

What wakes you up in the morning?

I am very passionate about animals. I have 3 pets of my own. I have a bunny named Cooper, a dog named Krimpet, and a cat named Primrose. I also take care of some of the cats in the neighborhood, and I take care of my neighbor’s four dogs sometimes. I love my pets so much that I decided I want to be an Animal Rehabilitation Therapist. 

Taylor's dog, Krimpet.
Taylor’s dog, Krimpet.
Taylor's cat, Primrose.
Taylor’s cat, Primrose.
Taylor's bunny, Cooper.
Taylor’s bunny, Cooper.

Tell us about your transition into Rowan.

I was nervous to be away from home for the first time. I overcame it by finding things to do on campus. I was able to go to events that I found on ProfLink. My brother is here working on his master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, so I was able to see him a lot too. 

Share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you.

I was looking through ProfLink for clubs to join, and the Crew Club Team caught my eye. I emailed the president, Kristen Wolfe, and she emailed me back telling me when the next meeting was. I went to the meeting, and everyone was very friendly and welcoming. I made a lot of friends through the club, and one of them is now my roommate. 

Taylor with her friends Rachel and Erwin from the Rowan Crew Club team.
Taylor, left, with her friends Rachel, center, and Erwin, right, from the Rowan Crew Club team.

Why did you choose Rowan?

I have a few family members that went here, such as my brother and my cousin. They had wonderful experiences here, and my whole family loves Rowan. Knowing that they had good experiences here made me want to choose Rowan. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo and photo of Taylor, Rachel, and Erwin by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Photos of Taylor and Taylor’s pets submitted by:
Taylor Fest, sophomore health and exercise science major

Thank you to New Jersey Digest for recognizing Rowan Blog as one of the best university blogs in the state.

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Advertising Major Chase Campbell

Advertisements in the city at night.

Today we feature senior Advertising major Chase Campbell. Chase also has minors in Communication Studies and Strategic Communication. He is from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from LaSalle University. The American Advertising Federation (AAF) recently inducted Chase as one of 2021’s Top 50 Most Promising Multicultural Students, one of the industry’s premier diversity, […]

7 Dance Majors Share How Their Degree Supports Their Dreams and Goals

Photo of dancer Grace Koller in an upward split.

Shoot for the stars. Seven Dance majors share how they’re dreaming big and how their degree is going to get them there. 

Grace dancing in a dance studio.
Grace Koller

“Being in a B.A. dance program gives me the opportunity to expand and customize my dance major. While I am taking dance classes weekly, I also have the opportunity to grow in my passion for business through my entrepreneurship minor. Some days I am in the dance studio all day working on my technique, and other days I am in the business building learning how to run my own business and how to create product prototypes in the lab. This degree supports my short term and long term goals by giving me the confidence to dance professionally and the knowledge to run my own business!” says first-generation college student Grace Koller, senior, Dance major with a Entrepreneurship minor from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County).

Gregory outside the student center wearing a Rowan sweatshirt.
Gregory Williams

“Having a degree in dance would help me expand my ideas so that I can become a more well-rounded dancer. I like to keep in mind the things that I am taught so that everything can intertwine with each other creating depth in my ideas,” says freshman Gregory Williams, a Dance major with an Entrepreneurship minor from South River, NJ (Middlesex County).

Katie dancing in a show.
Katie Fasbach

“As someone who has been dancing my entire life up until this point, there is no way I couldn’t include dance in my future – near or far. Through my dance degree, I will be able to accomplish all that I plan to because I have learned the necessary skills to go beyond in the real world of dance,” says senior Katie Fasbach, a Dance major from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County).

Brooke posing for a picture on a railing while wearing a yellow skirt with a lake in the background.
Brooke Foster

“A dance degree is the first step to reaching my goals of getting my master’s in dance.” says senior Brooke Foster, a Dance and Exercise Science double major from Burlington, NJ (Burlington County).

Abby holding a trophy from a dance competition.
Abby Lamb

“My dance degree supports my dreams and goals because I needed to be fully experienced and educated in dance to be able to continue and educate others. A dance degree shows my eligibility to teach dance in schools and show future members of my studio that I have a very good understanding,” says junior Abby Lamb a Dance and Business Management double major from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County).

Lesleigh posing for a picture on train tracks.
Lesleigh Emanuel

“Pursuing my dance degree has allowed me to study with so many amazing different professors and learn different techniques to broaden my horizons. I also study so many different styles of dance that I have become a more well rounded dancer,” says first-generation college student, freshman Lesleigh Emanuel a Dance major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County).

Gabrielle smiling on a cobblestone street.

“A dance degree will help me gain a possible dance company job after I graduate. Also, this degree allows freedom to possibly do other things such as, teaching or choreographing,” says freshman Gabrielle Langevine, a Dance major from Piscataway, NJ (Middlesex County).

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Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

5 Law and Justice Majors Share How They Became Interested In Their Major

A close up of marble columns at the top of a traditional looking state building.

Today, we speak to five Law & Justice Studies majors about how they became passionate about their major and why it was the right choice for them.

Shakira taking a selfie.
Shakira Harris

“As a Black woman I have lived a life where the justice system played a major part of my childhood. Being in an environment where anything you do could get you stopped by the police, from a parent of mine going to jail for something he did not do. I knew that there were so many injustices in the system and I wanted to change it,” says senior Shakira Harris, a transfer from Rowan College of Gloucester County (now RCSJ), from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County).

Josh wearing a police uniform.
Josh Abbott

“Since I was a kid, I wanted to be a police officer or fireman. Then the events of 9/11 cemented my interest in law and justice. I worked as a first responder for ten years and decided I wanted to finally complete my bachelor’s degree. This program most closely aligns with my passion and experiences,” says first-generation college student, senior Josh Abbot a transfer from Rowan College of Burlington County from Hainesport, NJ (Burlington County).

Carl taking a selfie.
Carl Watkins

“I have wanted to be an attorney since I was a child. It started with watching the old Perry Mason show while visiting my grandmother,” says junior Carl Shawn Watkins a transfer from Devry University, who is from Chicago, IL.

Teressa taking a selfie.
Teressa Stringfield

“My son was falsely accused of a crime, and exonerated. I started my interest with wanting to work with youth, and especially minorities, who are absorbed into the system and do not either have fair advantage or are wrongfully accused. That is what gave me my passion in law and justice,” says first-generation college student, junior Teressa Stringfield from Somerdale, NJ (Camden County).

Jamar sitting on a chair while wearing a red sweater and red bottomed shoes.
Jamar Green

“I want to be a criminal defense attorney,” says first-generation college student, junior Jamar Green, a transfer from Union County College who is from Linden, NJ (Union County).

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Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

I Learned How to Cook Falafel With The Arabic Culture Club

A few falafels in a bowl.

Today’s story is by sophomore Communication Studies and Public Relations major Rachel Rumsby from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County). Rachel is an on-campus resident currently living in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Here, she shares with us her experience going to a falafel making event with the Arabic Culture Club

I attended a “Learn How to Cook Falafel! with the Arabic Culture Club” event that I learned about through an email from Rowan with things to do.  I went to the organization’s table outside of the Student Center to pick up my falafel mix to prepare for the Zoom meeting that night. 

Marc sits at the table for the Arabic Culture Club.
Marc staffed the table where I picked up my falafel mix.

Box of falafel mix.

Later that evening, I logged onto the Zoom call for the falafel making program. At the beginning of the event Maria Mousa, the vice president of the club, described what the Arabic Culture Club is, and told us that food is a big part of Arabic culture. Then, we started to learn how to make falafel. The Arabic Culture Club (ACC) is a club for people that want to learn more about the culture of Arabic-speaking countries, as well as to help students that want to enter careers that require using the Arabic language. 

Club member Faiza Zaman led the lesson on how to make falafel. She showed us how to make our instant mix, but she also showed us how to make homemade falafel. First, we prepared our instant falafel. We mixed it with water and put it in the fridge. Then, she started to show us how to make homemade falafel. 

Falafel mix mixed with water.

Faiza showed us that to make traditional falafel, you need to boil about 2 cups of chickpeas, and mash them. Then, you add parsley and mix it, but you can add dill or cilantro if you want as well. You also add one diced onion, one squeeze of lemon juice, and one cup of regular flour or chickpea flour. You can leave them overnight if you want as well. 

Next, Faiza showed us how to cook falafel, which works for both the instant and homemade kinds. We rolled balls of falafel mix, to shape it.

Balls of falafel batter.

Then, we fried the balls in oil.

Frying the falafel in oil.

A bowl of finished falafel.
The finished falafel!

I enjoyed the program and I would definitely go back for another meeting!

John Georgy, the president of the Arabic Culture Club.

John Georgy, the president of the Arabic Culture Club.

I spoke to ACC’s president John Georgy, a senior Biological Sciences major with an Arabic minor from Giza, Egypt, who commutes to Rowan from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). He told me about his experience in the Arabic Culture Club. “The Arabic Culture Club (ACC) is a club for those who are interested in learning about Middle Eastern culture. Members are dedicated to spreading the Arabic culture in the Rowan community. Students who are interested in joining ACC will be able to help disadvantaged communities through donations or volunteering! Our main focus is to spread awareness of the Middle Eastern culture and the events that take place in Arabic countries as well as the rest of the world.

“I joined the Arabic Culture Club because I saw the opportunity to help the Rowan community. Since Rowan provided me with invaluable support throughout my college career, I wanted to give back by helping this club become more prominent which will allow us to hold events like the online falafel event, trips to different areas in NJ like the trip to Paterson, NJ, and fundraising events to help countries in a crisis like Lebanon.

“I love being in ACC because it helped me stay in touch with my cultural heritage as well as help others stay in touch with theirs. The connections that I made by being a part of this club will last till after I graduate. A major part of my participation in this club is being a part of the e-board which has opened my eyes to different types of experiences as well as helped me become a better-disciplined student. Getting to know new members as well as strengthening my relationships with existing members has been an extremely rewarding experience for me.”

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Thriving In My Faith As A College Student

The word "faith" written using stones.

Today we hear from Rowan students and how they are involved in their faith on campus. They are involved in clubs such as Catholic Campus Ministry, Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship, and Hillel.

Amanda poses with a bouquet of flowers.

Amanda McNally is a freshman Athletic Training major from Tabernacle, NJ (Burlington County). Amanda is involved with Catholic Campus Ministry. She says that “just going to the meetings alone, and the student masses every Saturday, I have had the opportunity to hear from speakers, such as religious sisters and a married couple, and talk with a bunch of other students who are my age and share the same beliefs as me. It is really nice to be able to talk about my faith with other people my age and go to mass with other people away from home. I have noticed in this first semester that all of the members are there by choice. In high school, people went to my youth group and their parents made them go, but it’s great to be with people who want to be there and follow their faith.”

Morgan poses in front of a garage door.

Morgan McRae a junior Music Therapy major from Forked River, NJ (Ocean County), is also involved with Catholic Campus Ministry. Morgan says that it was nice to connect and bond with people over something deeper than surface level. “I never really had Catholic friends before, I went to a public school, so that was a big change for me. I feel like I can talk about different aspects of my faith and feel accepted.” She also discusses the different kinds of activities and discussions they have. “Before March, we used to have different activities. When March came, everything moved online. Rebekah Hardy, our Director of Campus Ministry, and Father Rossi, the pastor at Saint Bridget’s University Parish, did a great job of picking topics that are just as impactful online as in person.”

Carley Robinson poses in her apartment.

Carley Robinson a junior Psychological Sciences major with a neuroscience minor from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) is involved with Catholic Campus Ministry, as well as Chi Alpha. “Catholic Campus Ministry has meetings every week to discuss different topics in the Catholic faith. We learn about one sacrament, belief, or doctrine in the Catholic faith in each meeting. We usually have a retreat every semester for a weekend, as well. On the retreats, we have many more Catholic activities such as mass, adoration, listening to talks, and getting to know other Catholics in the Rowan community in a special way. There is a college student mass on Saturday night at 4:30 pm at Saint Bridget’s University Parish. There is a bible study every other Thursday as well. I also am involved with the Christian club Chi Alpha. They have bible studies, and praise and worship every week.” She says that over quarantine, she was able to take time and make sure her foundation was in God. “During 2020, I was able to have the perception of it being a challenge, rather than something to destroy your faith, and I think that helped me. As a Catholic, you want to have God as your foundation, so being alone and separated from people is a good opportunity to work on that and see where your priorities really are and see if your foundation really is on God.”

Brianna poses near some trees and on a pathway.

Brianna Broadwater is a freshman Psychology major from Bel Air, Maryland, and a new Catholic. She completed the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) over the summer at a church in her hometown, and now she loves being part of the Rowan Catholic community. “Catholic Campus Ministry has honestly helped me make the most friends and helps me get to do a lot of things, especially during the pandemic. We haven’t gotten to do as much, but there is still Newman Night every Wednesday, and we have group chats. We have a whole freshmen group chat dedicated to freshmen from the club, and we all talk and eat good food. We get to help each other with anything we are going through and tell each other stories and make each other laugh. It is amazing.” I have gotten to thrive more in my faith this year because I have been able to go to Newman every Wednesday, and I go to the bible studies on Thursdays sometimes. I also go to the student mass on Saturdays, and I have been able to cantor for that. I have been very involved in church, and I have been able to have more of a prayer life. I have started a prayer journal about things that are important to me, and goals. I have started getting more involved in my faith.”

Steven poses against a white wall.

Steven Douglass a sophomore Chemistry major from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) is also involved in Catholic Campus Ministry. “Catholic Campus Ministry gives me a community of like-minded people and it helps to have a good friend group that has the same beliefs as you.”

Alex poses outdoors on her deck.

Alex Herschman is a junior Management and Marketing major from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County). She just finished her term as vice president of Hillel, and began serving as president. “I began going to Hillel as a freshman and loved it ever since attending my first event, which made me eager to join Hillel’s executive board. I started off as the organization’s social media chair, then served as the vice president and now president.” She says that Hillel gave her a sense of belonging at Rowan. “Hillel gave me that Jewish community and sense of belonging on campus. We are all super close, and I feel comfortable with them, and it is nice to have something in common with each other. If I am on campus and not at home, I can celebrate the Jewish holidays with the community at Hillel. During Passover, we do a seder, and for Yom Kippur, we were able to do an outside break fast event, which was very nice, because it was on a Monday and I was not able to go home. It was great to spend the holiday with my fellow Hillel members when I couldn’t go home and spend it with my family.” 

Christa poses in front of some trees.

Christa Ouellette a senior Civil and Environmental Engineering major from Delanco, NJ (Burlington County),  is also a part of the Catholic Campus Ministry. “Catholic Campus Ministry has opened up so many doors for me. One of the greatest things that Catholic Campus Ministry has done for me spiritually is the group discussions and retreats we do. These guided retreats we do one weekend a semester are just us and we get to step away from the world for a bit and reconnect spiritually. We also do different trips sometimes. In 2018 or 2019, we went to the border in Texas and we volunteered with the Humanitarian Respite Center, and we got to help refugees that were recently released by ICE. That was really awesome.”

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo courtesy of:
Pixabay

Beyond the Classroom: Ad Major Discusses Discord Recognition

Joseph poses next to some trees.

Today we speak to senior Advertising major and Marketing minor Joseph Laggy. Joseph is a first-generation college student from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County). He is a commuter student who graduated this semester.

Joseph poses by Business Hall.

Since 2018 I have been partnered with Discord, which is a platform dedicated to gaming communities. Through that, I have developed some of the largest online gaming communities dedicated to some of the world’s most popular video games. It is one of the most fun things I have ever done in my life. I have gotten recognition from Microsoft, and so many of the communities on there I have participated in. There’s just so much you can do through helping them grow their numbers. I have a website in development right now for people all over the world. The website is for Nintendo oriented discussion. Xbox’s social media manager will come in and hang out with us and a lot of the influential figures from Xbox’s marketing team come and hang out with us. I love all video games, every console, every game I’m just obsessed. It’s a lot of fun to be able to do stuff like that.  

I knew that I wanted to do something in marketing and advertising since I was about 14. I always had the ability to connect with people through social media, and I’ve always developed social media accounts throughout many platforms. I always developed them to have a lot of followers and to make an impact. However, I retired that a bit to focus solely on Discord and Reddit now. But that is only because those have been the most beneficial and fruitful. I would say every month or so there is a new game developer reaching out to me to promote their game and its so much fun to be able to do that not just with in house marketers, but with public relations agencies all across the world, just to have them reach out to me is so cool. My major has helped me with those things because it really shows you how to connect with people and target your audience, and how to make an impact. 

My advice for anyone who wants to get into the field would be that before one chooses a major like advertising and marketing, need to know where they want to work in the industry. You can pursue that, and there are a million routes you can take, but by specializing in a specific area, you will put yourself much further. Me in particular, while I was doing everything with Discord, I interned in healthcare. I didn’t particularly think I would work with newborn babies, I knew nothing about that. But I learned quickly, and I wanted to feel out everything, but people in this major definitely need to decide what they want to do in the future, and more importantly, think about what they themselves like. You enter the marketing field, and you’re doing marketing for something you aren’t interested in, it’s not gonna be a fun job because you won’t know how to sell it or interact with people if you don’t know much about it or care about it.

Joseph Laggy stands for a portrait while wearing a blue collared shirt and a black mask for covid. There are a few industries that I wouldn’t mind working in, but I already have had some game developers reach out to me, which is so cool to know that you play these games as a child, and 10 years later they recognize you on the internet. I never thought that would happen, but, that’s a testament that you can do anything. Don’t underestimate the power of social media. And a lot of these companies are online and looking at places like Reddit and Discord that help develop communities. They are looking at these places to say “this is what these people think”. Platforms are up and coming and all of these companies are looking to get involved. It’s easy for students to start getting involved with that, and next thing you know some of Microsoft’s most influential people are talking to you. It’s so cool what you can do. I have been doing this since 2017, and it has been very fruitful. 

Joseph poses by some trees.

Rowan has taught me through its marketing courses how to connect companies with their customers. Rowan has also shown me how fast things can change in just a short amount of time— and how I, businesses, and others can adapt to these changes. Over these past few years as I have developed communities with hundreds of thousands of subscribers, I have been able to understand people on a deeper, more personal level, which is important— and Rowan has taught me how to do just that.

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Aspiring Super Bowl Advertiser Kaela Moore

Kaela standing outside.

Today we feature Kaela Moore, a sophomore double majoring in Advertising and Public Relations and minoring in sociology from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County). She attended Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC) for one year then Rowan College of Southern New Jersey (RCSJ) for one year through Rowan Choice before transferring to Rowan University. What do […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Psychology Major Caitlin Morales

Caitlin standing outside of the library.

Today we speak to Psychology major Caitlin Morales, who also minors in Human Resources Management. Caitlin is from Chesterfield, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from Kean University. She shares with us her experience in her major and why she enjoys being a student at Rowan. How would you tell a fellow student interested in your […]

5 Geology Majors Share Their Short-Term Professional Goals

Kelsey and her friend talking about a fossil.

We spoke to five Geology majors about their short-term professional goals and plans.

A portrait photo of Kelsey.

“I am currently working on applying for summer internships. The internships I am looking into are research-based and field-based, but all revolve around Paleontology. I am set to graduate with my BA in Geology in the fall of 2021, and will be off to the graduate school I finally decide on in the fall of 2022.” – junior Kelsey Barker, a Geology major working toward a Certificate in Paleontology Foundations and transfer student from Rowan College of South Jersey (Gloucester Campus) from Hackettstown, NJ (Warren County)

Justin wearing a Jurassic Park t-shirt.

“In the short term, I would like to get into the Ph.D. program for Paleontology.” – junior Justin Vieira, a Geology major from Beachwood, NJ (Ocean County)

Mallory sitting and wearing a brown coat.

“I think this major at Rowan is really helpful in achieving my goals and will play such a huge role. We’re such a small major and we’re able to really be on good terms and close with all of our professors, which ends up leading us to great opportunities through their connections in the career field!” – first-generation college junior Mallory Osmun, a Geology major and transfer from Rowan College at Burlington County whose hometown is Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

A selfie of Cooper.

“My short-term goal is finishing my research project I’m doing for Rowan. I’m using mass spectrometry to figure out if 2 bone beds in Wyoming are the same. I’m looking at turtle, Hadrosaur, and Triceratops bones.” – sophomore Cooper Caputo, a Geology major with a concentration in Paleontology from Washington, DC

Zachary smiling and wearing tan outdoors gear.

“Currently, I’m only taking classes on Geology and, soon, Paleontology. Before the summer I plan on looking for internships that might help me. I am a member of the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society. I do have two family friends who are retired paleontologists whose advice I’ve taken.” – junior Zachary Armstrong, a Geology major with a concentration in Paleontology from Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Chemistry Major Serena Amador

Serena sitting on a bench outside.

Today we feature junior Serena Amador who majors in Chemistry. Serena is from Eastampton, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred to Rowan this past fall from Rowan College at Burlington County. Why Rowan? Rowan is very close and I thought it would be an easy transition from the community school that Rowan owns to Rowan University. […]

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Public Relations, Advertising Double Major Alana Walker

Alana standing outside.

Today we speak to senior Alana Walker who double majors in Public Relations and Advertising. Alana is from Browns Mills, NJ (Burlington County) and transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC.) She is involved in the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), the student-run firm PRaction, and Women of Color Collective (WOCA). Why […]

Kudos To Professors Who Made An Impact

Exterior shot of the side of Campbell Library.

We recently spoke to students who each picked a professor they’ve had at Rowan who really made an impact on them. Here, the students explain how these professors affected them and what made them truly enjoy their classes. Tiara Gbeintor, junior Psychology major Professor Lisa Abrams, Psychology: “She was a very understanding teacher. She made […]

PROFFAMILY: An Inclusive & Welcoming Group Of First Years

PROFFAMILY members stand amongst the trees during fall foliage.

Story header photo, from left: Tara Long, Brandon Sagbo, Jada Johnson, Poku, Aaron Brown, Dianna Schreidl, Jayshalie Jennings Today we speak with PROFFAMILY. Freshman founder Poku and first members of the group share how it began and how it has helped them transition into being college students. Creator and visionary, freshman Samuel Poku (who prefers […]

11 Art Majors Share Artists Who Inspire Them

Studio art major's artwork.

Some are famous; others, just under the radar. Today, 11 Art majors from Rowan’s Ric Edelman College of Communication and Creative Arts reveal artists whom they admire — perhaps they will inspire you!

Lotta Nieminen, submitted by Marysa Naiduk.
Lotta Nieminen

Marysa Naiduk is a senior, first-generation college student with a specialization in Graphic Design who transferred from Ocean County Community College. She appreciates the graphic design and modern unique style of artist Lotta Nieminen. “Through her work, Nieminen does an exceptional job of bringing visual identities to life. If you have any interest in art, Nieminen’s work is certainly worth checking out!”

Paul Rand Exhibit (credit: Catherine Cronin via Creative Commons).
Paul Rand

Artist Paul Rand is a favorite of Micah Husk, a senior with a specialization in Graphic Design and transfer from Camden County College. “As a chief of design, he made a difference to convert the publicizing industry by emphasizing the significance of realistic plans and visuals over composing. He created logos for huge companies, now recognizable ones, such as ABC, IBM and UPS. Paul Rand succeeded in changing the American commerce scene through his work. When it comes to style and vision, Paul Rand is certainly a master at it.”

Joe Gentempo wears a design by Justin "Fvller" Fuller.
Joe Gentempo wears a design by Justin “Fvller” Fuller.

Joe Gentempo, a senior from Monmouth County, NJ, Brookdale Community College transfer and first-generation college student, values the work of artist Justin “Fvller” Fuller. “He’s one of the most hardworking artists I’ve seen, always making stuff all around the clock. I have a few of the pieces of clothing he’s made and it’s all hand painted. I think a lot more people need to know about him and see what he’s creating,” Joe explains.

Maya Barton's art.
Maya Barton

Jessica Hedum (featured in this video), a Cape May County, NJ senior and Atlantic Cape Community College transfer, recognizes artist Maya Barton. “Maya is a truly talented person. She does everything from screen printing her own etchings, lino cuts and t-shirts for the Women of Westby to any graphic design work. She has created business cards, websites, flyers and more! Maya is a wonderful artist that produces beautiful work in a timely manner with flawless digital layouts and designs.”

Giovanna Eley's work.
Giovanna Eley

Giovanna Eley, a senior, Law and Justice Studies minor and Rutgers transfer from Union County, NJ, shares her own work. “The artist is me and this is part of the work I’ve done at Rowan University and my art and talent have grown so much since studying here. So, I want to share my art with others.” 

Paula Scher (credit: Ben Terrett via Creative Commons).
Paula Scher

Senior Jana Jackstis, a Rowan College of South Jersey transfer student from Gloucester County, NJ, admires artist Paula Scher. “Paula Scher is one of the most influential graphic designers alive. She’s created so much recognizable stuff, like the Microsoft Windows 8 logo and the Citi logo, for example. She was also one of the first female principals at Pentagram, one of the biggest design firms in the world.”

Mucha (credit: Sofi via Creative Commons).
Alphonse Mucha

Senior Abigail MacNeill of Cumberland County, NJ, who transferred from  Rowan College of South Jersey, and also majors in French, values artist Alphonse Mucha. “He had a revolutionary treatment of subject matter and style that defined art nouveau as a movement and ushered Paris into the golden age of poster art.”

Meg Lemieur.
Meg Lemieur

Melissa Powell, a senior, from Mt. Laurel, NJ (Burlington County), Camden County Community College transfer and first-generation college student, respects artist Meg Lemieur. “Meg Lemieur creates beautiful illustrations that carry powerful messages. I always look forward to what she will represent next.”

Friday Kahlo (credit: Steven Zucker via Creative Commons).
Frida Kahlo

Kaitlyn Davis, a Gloucester County, NJ senior and transfer student from Winthrop University who specializes in graphic design, admires artist Frida Kahlo. “I believe Kahlo to be the definition of perseverance. She is an inspiration and through her pain she created many beautiful paintings.”

Hayao Miyazaki (credit: Domenica Vescio via Creative Commons).
Hayao Miyazaki

Senior Chelsea Herrmann, of Gloucester County, NJ appreciates artist Hayao Miyazaki. “He is a mastermind of storytelling through his art of these movies. He incorporates traditional art with animated art and his stories are so beautiful.”

Keith Haring (credit: Heinz Bunse via Creative Commons).
Keith Haring

Charlotte Steinman, junior, Art major, Washington Township/Gloucester County, Rowan College South Jersey transfer, admires artist Keith Haring. She explains: “Keith Haring was an influential pop artist in the 80’s that started out drawing graffiti in New York City subways and grew in popularity until he became an influential public figure. His work commented on relevant social and political themes like homosexuality and AIDS. Not only is his art beautiful and striking, it also conveys important messages.”

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Max M. Morgan, senior radio/television/film major

3 Geographical Information Systems Majors Share Their WOW Moment

USGS map courtesy of Unsplash.

Today, we speak to three Geographical Information Systems (GIS) majors and seniors from Rowan’s School of Earth and Environment about when they knew this was the right major for them.

Elly leaning against a railing overlooking a city scenery.

“I like [this] department as a whole because of the sense of community that it provides. Because we are a small department I have gotten to know my professors well throughout my time here at Rowan and thus they have made the learning experience fun and engaging. Because of the size of the department the professors get to know students and their interests and in my experience have been able to adapt their classes accordingly so that the learning is relevant to what the classes interests are.” – Elly Thomas, senior, GIS major with minors in Environmental and Sustainability Studies, Community and Environmental Planning, Geography CUGS: Adventure Education, Spanish, Food Systems Planning, from Monroeville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Khrissy taking a selfie.

“I very much enjoyed creating my final project for my Intro to GIS class. I would come home feeling happy about all the new things I was learning.”  – Khrissy Seay, senior, GIS major with minors in Geography and Planning, transfer student from Atlantic Cape Community College, Mays Landing, NJ (Atlantic County)

Taryn smiling for a portrait photo.

“When I transferred to Rowan, I initially went in as an Environmental and Sustainability Studies major and was minoring in GIS. After two semesters, I realized I was more interested in GIS. It was something new and different. I ended up switching my major to GIS and my minor to Planning. I’ve always been a fan of art, the environment, technology and science in general. I feel like GIS is a perfect blend of all of these. I knew GIS was right for me when I didn’t have to force myself to learn or concentrate. I was genuinely interested in the material being taught. It also came fairly easily to me as well.” – Taryn Brickner, senior, GIS major with a minor in Planning, transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC), Medford, NJ (Burlington County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major 

Header photo courtesy of:
Unsplash

3 Anthropology Majors Share How They Became Interested In Their Major

Exterior shot of campus walking paths.

Today, we speak to 3 Anthropology majors from Rowan’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences. They tell us what sparked their interest in the major. 

Kasia posing with a grad cap and gown.

“I took a Human Variation class as an elective for, at the time, my Biology major that I later switched. I loved the class and the teacher so much that I decided to make it my minor, but as time went on I decided to make the full commitment to make it my major.” – Kasia Krzton, senior, Anthropology major, Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County)

Jessica taking a selfie with friend.

“I love history and learning about cultures, so anthropology was a natural choice.” – Jessica DeJesus, junior, Anthropology major, transfer student from Rowan College of South Jersey, Millville, NJ (Cumberland County)

Selfie of Kimberly.

“[I became interested] through a TV show I used to watch when I was younger. The main character was a forensic anthropologist, and I thought that was the coolest job out there.” – Kimberly Proctor, junior, Anthropology major with minors in Law & Justice Studies and Sociology, Burlington County

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

English Majors Share What They are Reading over Winter Break

Snowy scene on campus.

Rowan students and English majors from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences suggest some good reads for Winter Break.

Senior Superia Ryan from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County) recommends “Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin. She thinks the book “shares a powerful story that I believe others should hear.” To read, Superia enjoys sitting and reading in Starbucks with a cup of coffee.

Superia Ryan pictured outside.

Senior Fatima Khalid from Brooklyn, NY recommends “For One More Day” by Mitch Albom because it is one of the only books to make her actually cry! Fatima’s spot to read is her room with a candle lit. 

Selfi of Fatima Khalid.

Junior Brianna Benfield from Gloucester County, NJ recommends “A Darker Shade of Magic” by VE Schwab. Brianna describes the book as a “fantastic new adult/adult fantasy novel with a well-developed new world and magic system and ample LGBTQIA+ representation. This is the first book of a trilogy that keeps you hooked until the very end!” Brianna’s favorite way to read is in bed with headphones in. 

Brianna Benfield sits on a stone bench outside.

Senior Chris Finnegan (seen below, left) from Wyckoff, NJ (Bergen County) recommends “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury because of its prescience and relevance in regards to today’s digital culture. To read, Chris needs natural lighting and a hot drink! 

Chris Finnegan and friend on campus.

Senior Dominique DiGiacomo from Atco, NJ (Camden County) recommends “The Wind Up Bird Chronicle” by Haruki Murakami. Dominique has begun reading the book in Japanese! Dominique thinks the book is super interesting and that there are translated versions of it as well! To read, Dominique gets in a quiet area and wears her favorite loungewear.

Dominique in front of bridge

Junior Hannah Roselli from Bordentown, NJ (Burlington County), recommends “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott. Hannah loves Little Women. She explains: “While it is a timeless classic, it also brings the reader into a time before the world went crazy.  It is a sweet and endearing novel with an amazing meaning. It may seem to be too old for our generation to read, but when they say that this book is a timeless classic, they mean it.” Hannah enjoys reading while snuggled up with a cup of tea in the evening and my dog and fiancé by my side.

Selfi of Hannah Roselli.

Sophomore Sam Grasso from Sicklerville in Camden County, NJ recommends “Inkheart” by Cornelia Funke. “If you really want to get lost in a fantasy world where characters from your favorite books can plop into the real world, this is the perfect book to dive into,” she says. To read, Sam tends to wait until she’s alone, usually at night, curled up on the couch with her puppies right beside her. 

Samantha Grasso

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major




  

History Majors, Professors Suggest Historical Sights to Visit Over Winter Break

Building at Arlington National Cemetery.

Today we feature History majors and their professors, who suggest historical sites to visit over winter break. 

The statue of liberty.
Statue of Liberty

Kaan Aktas, a senior education and history double major from Fairview, NJ (Bergen County), is a transfer student from Bergen County Community College and a first-generation college student. He recommends that Rowan students visit the Statue of Liberty, or Ellis Island, because “Ellis Island has the Immigration Museum, which is also indoors and can get pretty empty during the wintertime. The Statue of Liberty is very beautiful and breathtaking. It shows the relationship between France and the U.S., and also the importance of immigration to our country.”

Anthony poses against a backdrop, wearing a suit and tie
Anthony Raisley

Anthony Raisley, a senior history major with minors in international studies, entrepreneurship, and new media studies and a CUGS in Italian, is from Middletown, NJ (Monmouth County). He also recommends that Rowan students visit Ellis Island, as well as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City Transit Museum, American Museum of Natural History. He says “Much of what’s at these museums I feel that even if you are not a history major you can relate to and learn.” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “Ellis Island is my favorite. All of my great grandparents came to the United States from Italy through Ellis Island. It was very impactful to see the sight first hand and what other immigrants coming to the United States went through, and how immigration has enriched New York City, and the U.S. today.”

Jen poses in front of a mirror.
Jen Gruberg

Jen Gruberg, a senior history major with minors in education and international studies is from West Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County). She recommends visiting the James and Ann Whitall House Museum and Red Bank Battlefield. She says “The Whitall House sits on the side of the Delaware River and was a private plantation since 1748. It was used as a field hospital in 1777 during the American Revolution. It’s now a museum and park in Red Bank, NJ. My favorite part about the park is the artifacts left in the trenches and in the house itself. There are cannons, cannonballs, anchors, and medical equipment, but unfortunately due to COVID, you can only see things that are outside of the house.” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “It’s so hard to pick a favorite, but my favorite museum or historical site I’ve visited would be the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. I’ve been there a handful of times and I’m always in shock of the sheer beauty of the place.”

A photo from the Morris Arboretum.
The Morris Arboretum

Connor Hoagland, a senior history major with a minor in French from Mount Holly, NJ (Burlington County), is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County. They recommend visiting the Morris Arboretum in Philadelphia, or the Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ. They say: “Both of these places are primarily outdoors. I like the arboretum since it’s one of the last of its kind remaining, and I’ve been there a few times when I was younger. The Grounds for Sculpture has some really impressive works of art and it’s fun to just explore.” They also tell us about their favorite museum or historical site. “My favorite historical site would have to be Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The free tour and the knowledge that the country was literally founded in that building was pretty nice. History has always been my strongest subject, and I’ve always had an interest in the revolution, especially since it pretty much happened in my own backyard.”

Bobby poses next to a cannon at the Museum of the American Revolution.

Bobby Scott a senior secondary education major with history subject matter, is from Elk Township, NJ (Gloucester County). He recommends students visit the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA, or the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC. He says “Each of these museums or locations show true insight into what life was truly like for people who have through trying times of history, or pay remembrance to the sacrifices that others have made in service to their nation in the hopes of bringing freedom to others.” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “Pearl Harbor was perhaps the most significant sight I have ever visited, however, it is quite a distance from Rowan University and sadly out of reach for many college students. Arlington holds an even more impactful memory upon me, as seeing the thousands of graves of those who selflessly gave their lives for their friends and their country. Pictures cannot capture the emotions, and words are difficult to choose that convey the emotion and overwhelming presence of such a place. The Holocaust Museum, which is only a short distance from Arlington, gives a truly personal account of the horrors that Jews and other minorities were forced to endure during some of the darkest days of the twentieth century. Many who walk out of there are often in tears, as they finally come face to face with the odds that men, women, and children had to go up against. Each of these locations can often take even those who find history a dull and boring affair, and can turn it into a life-altering experience.”

Dr. Kelly Duke Bryant, history professor, recommends that students visit The Newark Museum of Art. She says “I teach African history, and this museum has a wonderful collection of African art. They are currently featuring the “Arts of Global Africa” in a special exhibition. Even if you can’t go in person due to distance or the pandemic, the online exhibition is worth a look. ” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “The National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian) is my favorite museum. I visited this museum a number of years ago, shortly after it opened, and was impressed by the range of historical artifacts on display and the complexity (and honesty) of the historical narrative presented. The building itself is gorgeous, too.”

George Washington's house in Philadelphia as shared by Dr. Emily Blanck.
George Washington’s house in Philadelphia.

Dr. Emily Blanck, history professor, recommends that students visit the Harleigh Cemetery in Camden/Collingswood (Camden County), Historic Germantown (Philadelphia), and Washington’s House (Philadelphia). She says “These two off-the-beaten-path destinations have interesting aspects. I love Walt Whitman, and in the COVID environment, it is good to stay outdoors. Bundle up and go visit Walt Whitman and many other souls in Harleigh Cemetery in Camden. It is one of the oldest with lots of prominent folks with interesting headstones. Historic Germantown is great because they have worked to engage with the past of slavery as well as feature important elite homes. There are many small and medium historical sites here, and they’re not well-trod, so the chance that you’ll be in a crowded indoor space is slim. The Johnson House is especially a gem, but there are a couple of small museums dedicated to understanding and remembering the black experience too. Another COVID-friendly outdoor spot is Washington’s House near Liberty Pavillon in Philadelphia. It is just the frame of the house and it focuses on the interpretation of George Washington’s slaves when he was President. Great stories and it’s really accessible. ” She also tells us about her favorite museum or historical site. “I can go on the Independence Hall tour over and over. I don’t know why. I like hearing the different interpretations from the rangers and hearing the outlandish stories folks have about America’s founding.”

Dr. Hague poses at a book signing for his first book.
Dr. Hague at a book signing for his first book that he wrote. One of the sites he recommends, the Stenton Historic House, is featured extensively throughout the book.

Dr. Steven Hague, history professor, recommends that students visit The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, PA; the Wharton Esherick Museum in Malvern, PA, and Stenton historic house in Philadelphia. He says “As a former museum director I would suggest three great and very cool hidden gem museums in the Delaware Valley: The Mercer Museum in Doylestown, PA; the Wharton Esherick Museum in Malvern, PA, and the Stenton Historic House in Philadelphia. Imagine a giant concrete castle built as a museum filled with objects from the early time of America, everything from a whaleboat hanging from the ceiling to a gallows. Chock-a-block filled with great stuff. That is the Mercer Museum. Wharton Esherick was an American artist who worked in wood and built his own house. Quirky, fun, and absolutely worth the visit. Call ahead. The Stenton Historic House is one of the best-preserved 18th-century historic sites anywhere. Off the beaten path with remarkable collections and history. And a Rowan grad runs their award-winning educational programs!” He also tells us about his favorite museum or historical site. “There are so many (in addition to the regional ones mentioned above): Art Museum: The Louvre in Paris – stunning – with a close honorable mention for the Met in New York and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which is world-class. Historic site: two houses – Beauport, a rambling house filled with amazing collections, in Gloucester, MA. Similarly, Sir John Soane’s Museum in London. Both were put together by quirky, eccentric individuals with lots of flair.”

Dr. Dack poses outdoors.

Dr. Mikkel Dack, history professor, recommends students visit The German Resistance Memorial Center. He says “The memorial’s (virtual) permanent exhibition provides extensive documentation of the motives, aims, and forms of the fight against the Nazi Dictatorship. This is an important topic of German and WWII history that most students are unfamiliar with.” 

Denis Long, a senior history major with a minor in American Studies, is from Point Pleasant, NJ (Ocean County). They recommend that Rowan students visit the Monmouth Battlefield in Freehold, New Jersey. They say “While I’m not sure if its Visitors Center will be open, Monmouth Battlefield in Freehold, New Jersey is a beautiful, scenic location filled with historical significance to the American Revolution. Since its Visitors Center is likely closed, I recommend reading up on the Battle of Monmouth Courthouse beforehand, it’s a really wonderful piece of American history!  I’ve been going there most 4th of Julys ever since I was young. I have many great memories there of traversing the fields and Comb’s Hill with my family, taking in the history. I also did research on the battle that I presented for an undergraduate research workshop at Penn early this year and to be able to spread my love for this event makes it even dearer to my heart.” They also tells us about their favorite museum or historical site. “Besides from Monmouth Battlefield, Ellis Island struck a chord when I visited it last summer. It was a beautiful museum packed with information and stories about immigration to the United States that helped show the importance of immigrants and diversity to this nation. People of all races, ethnicities, and other walks of life were there and to see people come together to learn about all of this honestly made me emotional.”

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos of Morris Arboretum and the Statue of Liberty and header photo courtesy of:
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3 Entrepreneurship Majors Share How They Became Interested In Their Major

Sunshine and Business Hall.

Today, we speak to three Entrepreneurship majors from the Rohrer College of Business on what sparked their interest in their major.

Jerah Siegal folds his arms.

“During Economics class freshman year, I had an idea for a business which I decided was what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to be able to solve real-world problems to make others lives better through business.” – Jerah Siegal, senior, Entrepreneurship major, transfer student from Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

Tanvi smiles while walking up a set of stairs.

“Ever since I was young, I wanted to start my own company. I always had little projects going on when I was younger, but as I got older I realized working on a business that is my own full time was something I was really passionate about.” – Tanvi Koduru, senior, Entrepreneurship major, Somerset, NJ (Somerset County)

Kevin sits, wears sunglasses while eating a pasta dish.

“I noticed that the people who make the most money in this world are business owners. I want to be successful and make good money like any other person you might talk to. My father is a very successful business owner, and I want to follow in his footsteps.” – Kevin Dorlon, sophomore, Entrepreneurship major with a minor in Spanish, Long Valley, NJ (Morris County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

5 Women in Engineering Share Insights on Being Females in a Male-dominated Field

Engineering senior Alex Jackson poses outside on campus.

Today, we speak to five seniors from the College of Engineering about their experiences as women in a predominantly male field.  

A portrait photo of Lia.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field can feel intimidating at times. I want to be seen and treated as an equal but I am aware that people will never treat me like a male, therefore I’ll never be treated like the majority. Even though I have not experienced any out right discrimination I still have my guard up. And it can be very intimidating to be the only female in a class. But I also feel more motivated to do my best and aim high. Being a strong female engineering can be just as or more intimidating as a room full of men.” – Lia Mahoney, senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

Alex posing against a wall and smiling.

“It’s fantastic. Honestly, it’s great. The professors and students all know me, it is easy to make friends because I stand out, I know a lot of people, and I have better relationships with my professors. I have also had the opportunity to connect with the other women which is fantastic. I feel like the department is really rooting for me.” – Alex Jackson, senior, Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a Math minor, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) 

Caroline sitting and smiling on her bed in her bedroom.

“Being the only person who looks like you in a classroom is tough, especially when you also have to provide the feminine insight for a product or service you’re designing. Impostor syndrome kicks in, and you constantly feel like you’re not good enough or you’re the only person who feels anxious or intimidated. It feels like everyone else knows way more than you and is constantly studying and you feel like you need to overcompensate to feel adequate. It’s very frustrating, but being able to bring a fresh perspective and excelling for yourself is incredibly rewarding.” – Caroline Thistle, senior, Mechanical Engineering major with a Honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Julia posing for a photo.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field is rewarding and allows us to show we are capable of doing any career we want. It is important to stand your ground and remain confident in yourself.” – Julia Bally, senior, Biomedical Engineering major with Honors concentration, Sparta, NJ (Sussex County) 

Alexa smiling and holding an apple in an apple orchard.

“My one piece of advice for women entering a male-dominated field like chemical engineering is to be confident in your abilities. If you find yourself the only female in the group, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty — set off the bottle rocket, build the turbine, test the reaction! Henry M. Rowan once said, ‘What this country needs is not more engineers, but more great engineers.’ Rowan has taught me that great engineers, both male and female, share their knowledge and skills to ultimately achieve their goal as one.”  – Alexa Lynch, senior, Chemical Engineering major, Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) 

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

#PROFspective: Bio Major Alyssa Putiri Talks Campus Life, Diversity of Clubs

Alyssa standing outside.

Today we feature Alyssa Putiri, a senior Biological Sciences major with a Pre-Med concentration from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County). She is a part of the Minority Association of Pre-Medical Students (MAPS), Pre-Health Society, Leadership Rowan (LR) and Residential Learning and University Housing (RLUH). Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that […]

Best Advertisements of 2020, According to Ad Majors

2020 spelled out in papers.

Today we feature senior advertising majors from Rowan. They tell us what they think the best advertisements of 2020 are.

Melanie poses in front of a white bakground.

Melanie Gross Melanie, a senior advertising major with a strategic communications minor from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County), says that the best advertisement of 2020 is the Burger King-“Bullying Jr.” advertisement. She says, “In this Burger King ad, a complex idea is expressed. Burger King stages a social experiment where a “High School Jr.” is bullied in one of their Los Angeles area restaurants. It depicts overseers who do not do a thing are then served a “bullied” Whopper Jr. This sandwich is squashed and mangled. Some 95% report their mangled sandwiches to management. They are then asked if they would have intervened had they seen an employee “bully” their burger. Their collective response is “yes”. The focus then shifts to the 12% of customers who stood up for the High School Jr. We hear their words of encouragement which console the High School Jr. This spot shows that inspiring ads can be crafted out of social experiments and possibly make a change to take action when we see unkind acts.” 

Doug poses outdoors.

Doug Weinstein Doug, a senior advertising and public relations double major from Cranford, NJ (Union County), is a transfer student from Union County College and a first-generation college student. He says “the most impactful ad of 2020 so far for me has been from BMW. The video ad release took creativity to another level that BMW as a brand has not expressed in the past. The new 2 series is introduced into a new genre of consumers as “option two,” a BMW that is different from the competitors in an expressive and bold way as the better option. BMW brought a new type of advertising technique that focuses more on the new genre of consumers, rather than the BMW itself. The company is changing drastically for the better, becoming more aware of their consumer demographics and lifestyles. BMW is bold in this ad with video movement, colors, sounds and tells a story of who consumers are and why this is the car for them.

Caitlyn poses at a restaurant.

Caitlyn Dickinson Caitlyn, a senior advertising and public relations double major from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), is a transfer student from Ocean County College and a first-generation college student. She says that the best advertisement of 2020 is the “Loretta” – Google Super Bowl advertisement. She says, “Loretta is the perfect example for an emotional appeal, which for me is why I find it to be so memorable. It’s effective, it’s compelling, and overall heartwarming.” 

Alana poses outdoors.

Alana Walker Alana, a senior advertising and public relations double major from Browns Mills, NJ (Burlington County), is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County. She also says that the best advertisement of 2020 is the “Loretta” – Google Super Bowl advertisement. She says, “This advertisement came out in the beginning of this year. I feel like it’s important for the times because the older generation is learning to adapt to the new technology created. This particular advertisement shows how it can be beneficial for them but also is heartfelt. They layout and execution of the ad gives you something to relate to.” 

Matthew poses with a "Rowan Alumni Welcome" sign.

Matthew Isaacs Matthew, a senior advertising major from East Brunswick, NJ (Middlesex County), is a transfer student from Georgian Court University. He says that the best advertisement of 2020 is the The “Cardboard Fan” by Bud Light advertisement. He says, “It’s so memorable and unique. When do you ever see a cardboard cutout come to life? Especially when it can’t enjoy it’s favorite beverage while watching football. It’s weird without the crazy energetic fans you’re used to seeing on TV. I appreciate what the producers did here. They made something out of nothing, literally. During a depressing time like this, why not have a little fun with those cutouts?” 

Jenna poses against a brown background.

Jenna Greenlee Jenna, a senior advertising and public relations double major from Wilmington, Delaware, is a transfer student from Temple University. She says that Beats by Dr. Dre had a beautiful ad called “You Love Black Culture, But Do You Love Me” that was so impactful and great especially with the BLM movement in America right now. She says, “It makes it the best because a lot of companies have posted its support of the BLM movement, but Beats by Dr. Dre was started by a black man which is so inspiring. It has a star studded cast of popular African American figures but doesn’t harp on WHO they are, but rather just them being Black people in general. It’s artfully done, simple and impactful.” 

Kristin poses in front of sun flowers on a swing.

Kristin Jennings Kristin, a senior advertising and public relations double major with a CUGS in PR in the News, from Woodbury Heights, NJ (Gloucester County), is a transfer student from West Chester University. She says that the best advertisement of 2020 is the Match.com – Match Made in Hell advertisement. She says, “This ad combines a common interest of wanting to connect with others with comedy in a funny yet charming commercial. The commercial also features an exclusive recording of Taylor Swift’s Love Story which drew in her fans as well.”

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo courtesy of:
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