Leadership, Passion & Purpose Through Vietnamese Student Association

Cindy stands next to the Science Hall sign.

A Highlight of Student Life at Rowan University Meet Cindy Nguyen, a rising senior biochemistry major, with minors in neuroscience and psychology. She is a commuter from Voorhees, New Jersey, and is here to discuss her role as president in the Vietnamese Student Association. Can you describe the goals of the Vietnamese Student Association? “With VSA, […]

International Student College Juniors Reflect on Their Journeys and Goals at Rowan University

A campus beauty photo showing bright autumn colors on Rowan University's campus.

This story is one within a multi-part series highlighting the aspirations, hopes and dreams of a few of Rowan University’s international students. Read the other stories.  Meet rising seniors Aayush Kapri from Nepal, Doménica Gusqui Gavidia from Quito, Ecuador, and Abigail Jones from Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.  What is your long-term professional goal […]

75 Things Out-Of-State Students Love About Rowan University

A student wearing a Rowan yellow dress and Rowan brown graduation gown tosses her graduation cap in the air in front of the Rowan University arch sign.

This story is a part of Rowan’s centennial series to celebrate 100 years of Rowan University. Rowan Blog contributor Jordyn Dauter, a junior from Quakertown, PA, double majoring in elementary education and dance, collected these insights from fellow students.  David Martinek, a graduate student in the MS Teaching: Theatre program from Glen Burnie, Maryland:“I like […]

Transfer Nutrition & Dietetics Majors Share Their Professional Goals

A stock image from Pexels showing a close up of a variety of densely packed fruits and vegetables.

What internships, clubs, networking, etc. are you involved in and how do they support your goals? “Wellness Center Intern, Vice President at Nutrition Care Club, Success Coach with Rowan Student Success Program, Apart of Cohort 7 in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.” – Kathleen Ramos, senior transfer student from Brookdale Community College “I don’t participate much […]

My Favorite Class: Teaching Concepts of Dance in Physical Education [VIDEO]

Mackenzie Saber dancing with a partner inside of Esby Gym

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Interested to see what it’s like to be part of the health & physical Education major? Check out this feature on this upper-level course “Teaching Concepts of Dance in Physical Education.”

“Teaching Concepts of Dance in Physical Education” (HPE 00316) is a course that teaches students how to integrate social dance and culture dance inside of a physical education classroom. This course occurs once a week during a 3-hour block. During the first part of the class, students learn about different dance styles and methods of instruction. During the second part of the class, students actively engage in executing the dances that they’ve learned. They review between three and four dances per class period.

As students are learning these dances, they have the opportunity to practice their teaching methods on preschool students, at the on-site Rowan University Early Childhood Demonstration Center housed within James Hall, the education building. “It’s learning how to be hands-on, which goes into depth on how to teach step-by-step so a preschooler can understand,” says junior health & physical education major Rachel Dubois of Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County.)

This course is usually taught by Professor Merry Ellerbe-McDonald. “It is a required course for health & physical education majors because students are required to take teaching concept classes during their last two years in the program,” shares Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County) junior Mackenzie Saber, who was a dancer for 15 years. 

Senior Nicholas Seibel, of Mount Holly, NJ (Burlington County), shares: “I don’t have a background in dance. I never danced before. I’m not a great dancer to begin with, so this course gave me a lot of confidence.”

This class allows for students to be goofy with each other, while accomplishing work and having fun. Teaching Concepts of Dance in Physical Education gives student a chance to get an active education with an encouraging professor. 

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Written by: Jordyn Dauter, junior double major in dance & elementary education

From North Jersey, What These Students Love About South Jersey’s Rowan University

Two students peer into a giant telescope in the planetarium.

This story is a part of Rowan’s centennial series to celebrate 100 years of Rowan University. Rowan Blog contributor Jordyn Dauter, a junior from Quakertown, PA, double majoring in elementary education and dance, collected these insights from fellow students. 

There’s a lot of different activities to participate in Rowan. You can always keep yourself busy and meet new people. There are a lot of different ways South Jersey is different from the North. One of the more obvious ways is the sports teams each side represents. In North Jersey, it’s all Giants, Knicks and Devils. In South Jersey, it’s Philly-based sports like the Eagles, Phillies and Flyers. Another way they are different is the population. There are more densely populated towns and cities in North Jersey than South. More people are out and about in places like Hoboken and Newark.” – Nick Carney, senior biomedical engineering major from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County)

The commitment shown by teachers toward students. Any student that wants to learn could easily thrive at Rowan University. I enjoy the daily life pace of South Jersey. North Jersey is a lot more on-the-go, and South Jersey is a lot more relaxed.” – Brian Osterlof, senior public relations major from Oakland, NJ (Bergen County)

Brian Osterlof sitting outside at a table.
Brian Osterlof

I love the university and the diversity of things around the campus. One of the two favorite things about campus are the classes and the student-to-teacher ratio. Great opportunity for us students to interact in class and gain connections with our professors. The Student Center is my other favorite place on campus. We get to meet a lot of different people there and it’s a great place to socialize and make friends.” – Aaliyah Owens, junior law & justice major from East Orange, NJ (Essex County)

“Some things I love about Rowan are living in a dorm, being close to my friends, taking interesting classes in my major, small class sizes, and the professors in my major really care about teaching.” – Alianna Bronstein, senior environmental science major from Franklin, New Jersey (Sussex County)

Alianna Bronstein sitting outside, with the Rowan Prof statue in the background.
Alianna Bronstein

“Some of my favorite spots on campus include my freshman dorm Willow Hall. Also, the scholarship I have is the parent plus loan and the PEL grant. My favorite club I’m a part of is rugby, and I love my teammates. My favorite spot is Discovery Hall green and the woods trails behind Engineering Hall!” – Hunter Kupersmith, senior health & exercise Science major from Cresskill, NJ (Bergen County)

I love the opportunities and friendships I’ve been able to obtain through Rowan. There is a chillness and quietness to South Jersey that I love.” – Natalia Peralta, a master’s student in the strategic communication program from Belleville, NJ (Essex County)

Natalia Peralta and John Hunter peer into a giant telescope at the planetarium.

I am forever indebted to Rowan University for the amazing people I’ve met and befriended in my time here. In addition, I’ve been able to work with incredibly intelligent professors that I will soon be able to call colleagues.” – Taylor Bailey, senior vocal music education major from Roxbury, NJ (Morris County)

“Rowan has brought me complete independence and the ability to make my own choices and learn to live with them. I love its proximity to Philadelphia.” – Daniel Myers, senior finance major from Phillipsburg, NJ (Warren County)

I love how the faculty is invested in the future of each of their students and makes themselves available for each student’s individual needs. I also love meeting up with my friends from my program after class at Mexican Mariachi or Chickie’s and Pete’s.” – Rachel Rumsby, a master’s student in the strategic communication program from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County)

Rachel Rumsby outside on Rowan Boulevard
Rachel Rumsby

“I love the feeling of being on campus. The rush of meeting new people daily and having thousands of stories pass you as you walk through halls. I love the relationships Rowan has brought me.” – Juliana Elliffe, senior radio television & film major from Ridgefield Park, NJ (Bergen County)

“My favorite parts about Rowan are the Outdoors Club and the cheesesteaks around campus.” – Richard Russo, senior civil engineering major from Fredon, NJ (Sussex County)

Richard Russo walking outside of the Henry M Rowan College of Engineering
Richard Russo

I love being part of Social Justice, Inclusion & Conflict Resolution (SJICR) as a front desk worker and as a Harley E. Flack Mentor. South Jersey is a little more suburban than North Jersey where there are way more buildings and not much greenery.” – Monica Torres, senior computer science major from Jersey City, NJ (Hudson County)

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Rowan University Anthropology Majors Share Their Professional Goals

A close up of Mexican communication on a stone from an ancient civilization.

Anthropology is the scientific and humanistic approach understanding human origins, and biological and cultural diversity. Potential career paths can include becoming an anthropologist, archeologist, forensic science technician, curator, medical scientist, museum technician and conservator or geographer. What internships, clubs, networking, etc. are you involved in and how do they support your goals? “I am currently […]

Rowan University Entrepreneurship Majors Share Their Professional Goals

A student stands in front of a wall with the word "Idea" behind him, with his arms crossed across his chest.

What internships, clubs, networking, etc. are you involved in and how do they support your goals? “I currently sell cars at a local Ford dealership, which helps with developing a stronger understanding of how the business industry works.” – Brendan Liebenow “Networking with other students and professors at Rowan has helped me realize how much […]

National Book Month: Writing Arts & Journalism Students, Faculty Share Favorite Reads

A female student browses a bookshelf at the bookstore.

The month of October is known as a time centered around witches, pumpkins, and candy of course. However, as werewolves howl at the moon and that first October moon rises, National Book Month also begins! With only 31 days to celebrate Rowan students and faculty weigh on their favorite current and past reads on their […]

My Home Away from Home, The United Latino Association

Student clubs and organizations fair.

Julianna Wells, a junior political science major from Oak Ridge, NJ (Passaic/Morris Counties), shares this first-person perspective on how joining the The United Latino Association at Rowan University helped her rewrite her experience and find a home away from home. In addition to her major, Julianna will earn certificates of undergraduate study (known as CUGS) in Spanish, public policy and public relations and the news. 

Julianna poses for a beautiful portrait in front of the owl statue on campus, with her hair curled, wearing a white shirt and blank pants.

For the entirety of my life prior to attending Rowan University, I lived in a predominantly white town. As a Latina, this experience came with its own challenges. I never saw anyone who shared my own culture, my own language, or even looked like me. Needless to say, it was a very sheltering experience. At times, I even experienced harassment due to my own ethnicity. I would receive anonymous messages telling me I would end up selling drugs and mowing lawns in my future. I was even told to go back over the border. Yet, besides the harassment, all I ever wanted was to feel less alone. So many people value having at least some friendships and connections that share the same culture and backgrounds. With that being the thing I craved all those years, I was looking forward to starting my life on a college campus and meeting a whole new world of people. 

United Latino Association board members with Minority Association for Pre-Medical Students board members & Pre-Law Society board members.
Julianna (back row, third from left) with United Latino Association board members and Minority Association for Pre-Medical Students board members & Pre-Law Society board members.

Once I finally left my hometown and came to the Rowan University campus, I was determined to rewrite my experience. It was at the student organization fair where I met my home. The United Latino Association caught my eye as it was the only Latine organization I saw as I combed through the rows of tables. I wrote my name and email on their sign-up sheet immediately. From there, I attended a handful of events and made the decision to run for their electoral board.

Julianna and a friend look at each other candidly in the Student Center with lights behind them.

As a result, I was the new treasurer for the last academic year and couldn’t have been more grateful for that opportunity. Throughout the year, the friends I made in this organization were no longer just friends, but family. From meeting those who share the same cultural background, to learning how to dance to Latin music better, to even bettering my own second language, my life on campus and in general had been forever changed. Due to how sheltered I felt in high school, I didn’t have too many friends but this was no longer the case at ULA. For every event I attended, I felt l a bit closer to home. 

Julianna stands with a friend in front of the iconic owl statue on campus, with yellow balloons by her side and a classic "first day of school" blackboard with chalkboard for the date September 5, 2023.

What’s more is that with being on the board, I was able to help this organization grow and prosper, myself included. I saw our family go from just 30 members to around 160 members. I think my favorite memory with all of the members was when we all came together for a dance night to learn salsa, bachata, cumbia, and other dances that people wanted to share. I have loved my time being a part of this organization and board so much that I decided to run for president for the upcoming academic year, and I won! The shy, alone Latina I once was prior to university was now a figment of my imagination. It has been practically mind-boggling to reflect on the difference between my experience from high school to my experience at Rowan University all because I was able to join just one organization. Needless to say, ULA has become my home away from home. 

ULA Valentine’s Day Speed Friending Event.
ULA at last Valentine’s Day speed friending event.

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Written by: Julianna Wells, junior political science major

Story edited by: Valentina Giannattasio, junior dance and marketing double major

Finding My Home Away from Home at Rowan University Through the Student Organization Fair

Students walking around the Rowan clubs fair event featuring different clubs and organizations on campus.

Nicholas Wright, a junior health science communication and communication studies double major, from Gloucester County, NJ shares this first-person perspective on how he found a home away from home on Rowan campus.

As a freshman at Rowan University, I was nervous about the transition from high school to college. I had heard stories from friends and family members about how difficult it can be to adjust to a new environment, but I was determined to make the most of my college experience.

One of my biggest concerns was finding my place on campus. I wanted to get involved in activities and clubs, but I didn’t know where to start. Luckily, during my first week at Rowan, I stumbled upon the student activities fair.

The student activities fair is an event where all the clubs and organizations on campus set up tables to showcase their group and recruit new members. I was amazed at the variety of groups available, from academic clubs to sports teams to service organizations. As I walked around the fair, I was struck by the passion and enthusiasm of the students involved in each group.

A Rowan student walking around the Student Activities fair event featuring different clubs and organizations.

After talking to a few club representatives, I decided to join the International Student Association. As an international student myself, I was excited to meet other students who shared my background and interests. Joining the club was one of the best decisions I made during my freshman year. I was able to make friends, learn about different cultures, and participate in fun events and activities throughout the year.

In addition to the International Student Association, I also joined the Rowan Ambassadors program. The Rowan Ambassadors serve as official hosts and representatives of the university at events such as open houses and campus tours. Through the program, I was able to develop my leadership skills, meet other students who were passionate about representing Rowan, and gain valuable experience in event planning and public speaking.

Aside from the clubs and activities, I also found a sense of community through my professors and academic advisors. Whenever I needed guidance or support, they were always there to offer their expertise and advice. They helped me navigate the transition to college and provided me with the resources and support I needed to succeed in my classes.

Looking back on my freshman year, I am grateful for the opportunities and experiences that Rowan University has provided me with. From joining clubs to building relationships with professors, I have found a home away from home on this campus. If you’re a future college student or parent, I encourage you to explore all that Rowan has to offer. It may seem daunting at first, but with an open mind and a willingness to try new things, you can find your place on this campus too.

Read this story for another perspective of the student organization fair from upperclassmen involved on campus. 

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Written by: Nicholas Wright, junior health science communication and communication studies double major

Story edited by: Valentina Giannattasio, junior dance and marketing double major

Discovering My Passion: Taking A New Class Changed My College Experience

Two students playing the piano.

Alaina Lieze, a junior music and advertising double major from Swedesboro, NJ (Gloucester County) shares this first-person perspective on how joining Rowan Choir helped her rediscover her passion for music, improve her academic performance and feel a sense of belonging on campus.

As a freshman transfer student at Rowan University, I was initially unsure about how to get involved on campus. With so many clubs and activities available, I felt overwhelmed and didn’t know where to start. However, I decided to take a chance and join the music program. Rowan Concert Choir is open to all majors and is a one-credit course that helps to satisfy the Rowan Core educational requirements for artistic literacy. Many students choose to take Concert Choir three times, so that they earn three credits to finish the Rowan Core requirement – and without any textbooks or tests!

Although I was nervous about auditioning for the choir, I was quickly put at ease by the welcoming and supportive members. Through my participation in the Rowan Choirs, I rediscovered my love for making music. I had enjoyed singing in various choirs in the past, but this experience was different. The choir explored various genres of music and performed pieces with social justice themes, such as songs related to The Black Lives Matter Movement and African American spirituals. Singing with this group allowed me to see the world in a new way, and I was grateful to have found a community of people who shared my passion.

The Rowan University Concert Choir and University Chorus rehearsing in Pfleeger Concert Hall.

Joining the choir also helped me feel a sense of belonging on campus. As a commuter student, it was easy to feel disconnected from the university community. It was also difficult to join a college community a semester late as a transfer student. However, being a part of the Concert Choir gave me a reason to come to campus on weekends and meet new people.

But, the benefits of joining a new ensemble didn’t stop there. As I became more involved in the choir, I noticed improvements in my academic performance. I was more motivated to attend class and complete assignments because I had something to look forward to outside of my coursework.

Pictured: The Rowan University Concert Choir Singing in their final performance of the spring 2023 semester.

Looking back on my college experience so far, joining the Rowan Concert Choir was one of the best decisions I ever made. It allowed me to discover my passion, make meaningful connections, and develop important skills that will serve me well in my future career.

If you’re a current or future college student, I encourage you to take a chance and join a club or activity that interests you. It could be photography, dance, politics, or anything in between. College is the perfect time to explore your interests and find your passion, and joining a club is a great way to start.

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Written by: Alaina Lieze, junior music and advertising double major

Story edited by: Valentina Giannattasio, junior dance and marketing double major

The Life of a Full-Time Student Army National Guard Service Member

Three military students walking and talking outside the Business Hall.

Nicholas Wright, a rising junior advertising major from Mercer County, NJ shares this first-person perspective on his life as a full-time student who is in the Army National Guard.

My name is Nicholas Wright and I am a full time student here at Rowan University. While being a full time student I am also In the Army National Guard. While balancing both can be hard at times you quickly learn to balance your workload and make time for yourself as well. I have been in the National Guard for three years now and as soon as I got done training I enrolled into Rowan.

This transition was easy and probably the best thing I have ever done. I have saved so much money with the Tuition Aid Grant, which is a grant all National Guard service members get here at Rowan for 100% free tuition. This has saved me so much money and the Military Services office here makes everything so much easier. Although I do have to leave from time to time to do my National Guard duties, my professors are very understanding and support my work.

Two military students sitting outside the Business hall talking to each other.

My typical drill week while being a full time student consists of 4 days of class and typically 3-4 drill days. During class days they are both online and in person. In between classes I like to go to the gym, hang out with my friends, and get on top of my studies.

Drill weeks are usually once a month and one of my busier weeks because I like to try and get ahead of my work and finish before I leave for drill. If I can’t get my work done during these weeks my professors are always understanding and give me time to make up assignments when I come back. A drill weekend starts on a Thursday or Friday depending on the month. The day before is prep day. Prep day consists of gear layout, packing, looking at the timeline for the weekend and re-checking my packing. The day of drill is a 3 am wake up, breakfast, a Wawa stop, and about an hour drive to our armory for first formation. From there we will get our gear and weapons and get transported over to Fort Dix. There we do anything from team, squad, or company training. This training can be learning new weapon systems, battle drills and tactics, or going to the range for target practice. I have been a 240 gunner on our plattoons weapon squad for all three years and I love it. I am in the infantry and I have had the opportunity to work with medics, combat engineers, and other MOS’s in our military.

Two military students walking outside with their black backpacks.

Being in the military wasn’t my first choice but it is by far my best. I couldn’t imagine where I would be if I hadn’t gone this route. Not only am I getting my degree for free, going to school close to home, and learning new traits, I have also made so many connections to help set up my future for my dream occupation. I honestly recommend this route for anyone who either doesn’t know what they want to do after college or wants to get a head start on their future.

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Written by: Nicholas Wright, a rising junior advertising major
Story edited by: Valentina Giannattasio, junior dance and marketing double major

Dance & Elementary Education Major Gets Ahead Through Summer Classes

Dramatic lighting on Jordyn's back during a performance.

I started my Human Exceptionality (Course: SPED 08130) course a few days after finals ended for the spring 2023 semester, and I have loved every second of taking this course. Human Exceptionality is centered around disability within education, specifically, undoing the concept of ableism inside of the education system. Each reading, lecture video, assignment, & […]

Veterinary Innovation Gives Fortunato the Goat a New Lease on Life [VIDEO]

Fortunato on a work table getting measurements done with a student and vet tech with a Studio 231 sign in the background.

An interdisciplinary, collaborative space, Studio 231 within the School of Innovation & Entrepreneurship helps to bring the best ideas to life – including, this time, giving a new lease on life to a baby goat who was unable to walk.

The story of Fortunato the goat highlights the ingenuity – not to mention the impact – of leveraging this student-led and student-run experiential learning lab and makerspace within the Rowan community. A hub for collaboration, ideation, rapid prototyping and research, the newly created Schreiber School of Veterinary Medicine partnered with Studio 231 to create working legs for this Nigerian Dwarf goat with septic arthritis in his hind feet, which caused him to lose the feet. 

Dr. Matthew Edson, founding dean of the veterinary school, had previously toured Studio 231 and knew that this resource would be valuable for their work, opening up the possibility of printing 3D models for the vet school.

Fortunato’s owners were told he should be euthanized. Dr. Edson had a different recommendation. 

With an email entitled “Goat Legs” Dr. Edson reached out to the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, asking to partner with Studio 231 to create new working legs for Fortunato. That email found its way to Addison Deckert, a sophomore mechanical engineer major from Gannett Park, MD, and Vincent Gallo, a junior mechanical engineering major from Cinnaminson, NJ, who then worked on the project. 

Fortunato getting measurements with vet tech and Addison done.

Even with a team put together and the drive to create a perfect model, a series of obstacles remained in the way. How would they build legs that would expand as Fortunato grew? How could Addison and Vincent, who rarely worked the same shifts, best collaborate? Which approach, which idea, was the right one to pursue?

The emotional attachment to Fortunato, the intensity of working toward saving a life, and working with a deadline certainly brought out the best in all involved. Several questions needed to be answered for success to be achieved. Vincent shed some light on some of them, “What should we keep in mind? What part of the leg should we try and stay away from? So that’s not like a big pressure point when the goat is walking; how much support does it really need?”

The shape of Fortunato’s body created an interesting challenge that needed to be addressed. Addison revealed, “One of the hardest things we had with designing was figuring out how to keep the boot on because sometimes just like a friction fit and wrapping it real tight isn’t the best solution. And he actually has a tendon running along the upper part of his leg, so we couldn’t attach anything to it. So we went through a lot of different designs.”

Another element of the challenge the project posed was what materials could and could not be used, as they had to be animal friendly. After looking at several different options that combine plastic and 3D printing materials, they opted for TPU, a material that would hold up in the sun, in water, and still remain comfortable for Fortunato. 

After switching the material for the laces to a thinner material, Fortunato was ready to test out the design. Because his leg hindered him from going outside, he was hesitant to touch the world outside, but on a beautiful day, dreams came true. Fortunato came to life running around and hopping on his new prosthetic – the design worked.

The joy for the team was moving, even though Vincent missed the moment due to having to take a test; Addison had this to say about the moment, “Actually being able to see a prototype that I made on Fortunato and working and actually giving him something he didn’t have before is indescribable.” The collaboration not only saved a life but opened the door on saving more down the line. Both students and the rest of the team were showered with praise from the new dean, “We couldn’t be happier with the whole team that worked on this. We came in the first day to a back of a goat’s leg drawn on the board. They had researched the anatomy. They had already come up with a couple of different models that they planned to use. They were really well prepared, but I think they were also able to be creative and entrepreneurial in their approach and adjust to the challenges and come up with a really nice finished project.”

Addison taking notes.

In terms of what comes next, different answers were given. The success of creating a prosthetic certainly opens up opportunities for students to work with the new school, Dean Edson says, “This is the sort of project that we want to do. We want to think outside of the box, involve other departments, other agencies, and all come together to solve problems like this for the betterment of both animal health and human health. And again, this was a perfect example of how we want to do that.”

This project certainly captured the mind of Addison and what she thought was possible, even expressing an interest in working ducks for similar projects in the future. Accomplishing the ability to help aid an animal to walk extends the reality of what is deemed achievable and with students such as Vincent and Addison leading the way in innovation, no project is too big to dream about at Rowan. 

None of this would have been possible without not only Dean Edson, Vincent and Addison but several professors, faculty, and others who helped guide the project along. Working as a team to achieve a goal for something greater than an individual’s ambition helps kindle the wonder in students. This is summed up through Addison, ““It was really amazing and it makes me really want to do engineering because sometimes you doubt it after doing 15 hours of homework and three all-nighters and failing a test and all those types of things, it really makes you doubt. But do I want to actually design something new and build something that actually helps people? Yes. I think Rowan’s really trying to push that mindset.”

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Story by:

Thomas Ubelhoer, sophomore political science and international studies double major 

#PROFspective: Student Leader Arianna Granda Talks Clubs, Music Education & Faith

Arianna Granda lays on the grass with musical scores surrounding her.

Today we feature Arianna Granda from Morris County, NJ. She is a rising senior studying Music Education with a vocal concentration and pursuing a CUGS in Jazz Performance. She currently serves as the president of both Rowan’s NAfME (National Association for Music Education) chapter and Profecy A Cappella group, as well as a leader of […]

Co-Founder of Interdisciplinary Learning Lab for Creatives and Entrepreneurs Shares Her Experience

Isabella Shainline posing in a work space.

Today, we hear from Isabella Shainline, a junior English Education major, Photography minor, and John H. Martinson Honors College student from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County). Isabella co-founded Business Hall’s Creatives 230, which is an interdisciplinary learning lab for creatives and entrepreneurial students. “Last year, my photography professor Jenny Drumgoole and I went over to Business […]

Let’s Normalize Body Image

Riya Bhatt poses for a portrait.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Body image deals with how an individual perceives themselves, how they think about themselves as well as how to view themselves when looking directly at a mirror. Body image is not just a single aspect; it is various, especially with aspects such as height, weight, and skin color that hold weight in society. It’s crucial in the case of body image to have a positive understanding of the self as it creates a sense of ease in addition to promoting a positive outlook on a person’s mental and physical health. Having a negative body image is proven to have dangerous effects to the aforementioned features as it “can lead to a lower self-esteem which can affect some areas of a person’s life“ Body Image, 2022). 

Riya is leaning on a pillar and smiling.

People can start building towards having healthier body image by practicing positive thoughts about themselves rather than thinking negative toward their body. A person will build confidence if they exhibit a healthier mentality towards their own specific body image. Body positivity is when individuals love their bodies regardless of shape, color, gender, size, and ability. Body neutrality doesn’t involve always loving your body but it is more about accepting it. For example, body positivity would be, “I love arms, scars and all, they are beautiful” while an example of body neutrality would be, “I love my arms because they help me write.” 

Some tips to practice building body positivity!

  1. Think healthier, not skinnier
  2. Cut negative self-talk
  3. Positive affirmations
  4. Do not Compare Yourself to others
  5. Focus on the Things that you love about yourself

These tips will help a person think more positively about their body. If a person is having negative thoughts, then, they should practice these five healthy tips on boosting self confidence. 

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Story by:
Riya Bhatt, junior biological sciences major, Wellness Center intern

Edited by:
Lucas Taylor, English education graduate student

Sources

Source: Body image. NEDC. (2022, July 19). Retrieved January 28, 2023, from https://nedc.com.au/eating-disorders/eating-disorders-explained/body-image/ 



Self-Advocacy

Sedrick is playing Uno with friends and is smiling at the camera.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

More times than not, whenever we’re experiencing a personal hardship of some kind we tend to retreat into our shells like a turtle and let the issue continue to persist rather than making a stand and finally addressing it.

The topic of self-advocacy is especially compelling considering that it can be applied to many different facets, whether it be mental or physical health, periods of stress, as well in situations of anxiety and depression.

The core aspect of self-advocacy is in its prefix, “self.” Only you can speak on account for the thoughts, feelings, and emotions that you’re currently experiencing; you’re the one who is able to tell how these emotions impact you in a positive or negative way.

Sedrick is with friends and is walking around on campus.

The textbook definition of self-advocacy is “the action of representing oneself or one’s views or interests.” Once a student enters college, self-advocacy can be seen as a training ground for students to begin to speak on their own behalf after half a lifetime spent having their parents and guardians advocating for them on behalf of their well-being (Rogers, 2022)

One form of self-advocacy that we see at the start of each and every semester, even if it’s usually glossed over really quickly, are the accommodations that are ingrained in every professor’s syllabus.

While it may not seem like it, making your professor(s) aware of the accommodations that you need in order to ensure your success in the class is a form of self-advocacy that not many students take advantage of. Accommodations don’t have to be specific to resources or materials, sometimes it’s taking one “mental health day.”

Sedrick is with friends, sitting on one of the lawn chairs on campus.

Life gets extremely arduous at times. Sometimes missing one class during the semester allows one the chance to recuperate your mental stamina, especially if it’s the week before an exam or quiz that you’re feeling especially stressed about. You can spend this mental health day just letting all the tension you’ve had building up over the semester finally ease a bit before throwing yourself back into your studies.

Putting yourself first has remarkable results, it gives you the chance to finally take a breath of fresh air for yourself and get back on track. 

Sedrick is getting ready to play Uno.

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Story by:
Sedrick Golden, junior health and science communication major, Wellness Center intern

Edited by:
Lucas Taylor, English education graduate student

Sources

Rogers, L. T. A. (2022, September 22). Self-advocacy: A tool for Success. CollegiateParent. Retrieved February 1, 2023, from https://www.collegiateparent.com/student-life/self-advocacy-a-tool-for-success/#:~:text=Self%2Dadvocacy%20is%20a%20student,this%20is%20not%20the%20case.

Rowan Engineering Major Benjamin Busler Achieves Dream of Interning for NASA [VIDEO]

Electrical and Computer Engineering major Benjamin Busler is representing Rowan University this semester as a Pathways Intern with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Benjamin, a junior from Somerset County, is among a select group of students nationwide in NASA’s Pathways program, which offers internships and a direct avenue to future employment with the […]

#PROFspective: Getting to Know Health and Science Communication Major Sedrick Golden

Sedrick Golden is a junior student here at Rowan University originally from Pleasantville, NJ (Atlantic County). Sedrick is a Health and Science Communication major with a minor in Public Health and Wellness. Sedrick is breaking down barriers as a first-generation college student commuting to Rowan after transferring from Atlantic Cape Community College. On campus, he […]

Connecting with Kids: An Elementary Education and Literacy Studies Student’s Story

Rowan College of Education student Isabella stands next to the Reading Clinic room inside James Hall.

Today we feature Isabella Muchler, a junior in Rowan University’s College of Education. Isabella, a dual major in Elementary Education and Literacy Studies, hails from Franklinville, NJ (Gloucester County). She enrolled as a transfer student, having attended Rowan College of South Jersey at Gloucester. Could you share a few on-campus activities, clubs, or pre-professional activities […]

#PROFspective: An Introduction to Tammy Nguyen, Leadership and Social Innovation Major

Rowan Leadership and Social Innovation major Tammy stands in front of James Hall.

Today we feature Tammy Nguyen, a junior in Rowan University’s College of Education. Tammy, of Camden County, NJ, majors in Leadership and Social Innovation and is also pursuing a Certificate of Undergraduate Study (CUGS) in Access, Success, & Equity for Educational Innovation. Please share an “aha!” moment you’ve had within your major that made you […]

Breaking Barriers: How Perseverance and Family Found Kayla College Success

Rowan University Law and Justice major Kayla stands outside on campus near Hollybush Mansion.

Meet Kayla Molinaro, a junior Law and Justice major with minors in and Sociology and Psychology from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County). Kayla is a member of the first class of Rowan’s National Honor Society for First Generation College Students, and her sister now joins her studying at Rowan. Kayla shares what it’s like to be […]

#PROFspective: Liberal Studies, Languages and Law with Junior Alexzia Lyons

Today we feature Alexzia Lyons, a junior Liberal Studies major. Alexzia is from Durham, North Carolina and previously went to North Carolina Central University, where she dual enrolled as a high school and college student. She discusses how she decided to come to Rowan, her experiences and involvement around campus, and advice to other students […]

Beyond the Classroom: Emerson Harman, Graphic Design Intern at Stantec

Emerson standing in Westby Hall.

Today we spoke to Emerson Harman, a junior Biomedical Art and Visualization major with minors in Biology and Technical and Professional Writing, a concentration in Honors, and a certificate of undergraduate study (CUGS) in Paleo-Art and Visualization. They are an on-campus resident from Dodgeville, Wisconsin. Emerson tells us about their internship, how Rowan helped prepare them for the internship, and where they see themselves in a future career.

Emerson posing for a portrait outside under a tree.

Tell me about your internship. What was your day-to-day like?

I interned for the summer at Stantec, an architecture, design, engineering, and environmental science design and consulting firm. The company is based in Canada. The company had 23,000 employees across 23 countries. I was the graphic design intern for the summer, and it was an 8-week program. I worked 40-hour weeks.

I worked on a few different projects both within the Philadelphia office and with interns from across North America. I worked on two projects with two elementary schools in Philadelphia that are getting renovated and added to. One has an existing mural through the MuralArts program of Philadelphia, and I made designs for the new main entrance and cafeteria based on their existing mural. That school is in the very initial design phase and once they get further in with the client, they will present my designs to the client as possible design options for the space. I made designs based on murals that already exist in the other school, as well. On the second to last day of my internship, the people working on this project with me presented my designs to that client, and they actually went forward with my designs, which is pretty exciting.

I did a few smaller graphic projects for different proposals for different projects that people were working on and the intern-wide project. There were 91 interns from across North America on ten teams this summer, and we got paired with an organization in North Carolina that is creating a farmstead summer camp for people with learning disabilities, particularly teens and adults with autism. Five teams worked on each half of the property. As the only graphic design intern, I helped create the presentations and the final booklets that were given to the client and created renderings and animations of the final architectural plans. At the end of the internship, all 10 groups presented our work both internally to the broader Stantec community, and to the client. Throughout this internship, we also had groups and seminars on a variety of topics just for the summer interns, including a counter transition from school to the workplace or innovative technologies and urban planning and climate change adaptation and how they structure sustainability into such a large global company.

Emerson's design on a wall that was approved.
Emerson’s final design that was approved to be used by a Philadelphia elementary school.

Can you tell us a bit about Stantec as a company?

Stantec has many offices that work independently of each other, but sometimes they collaborate. They do architecture, so just like any other architecture firm, they do large and small-scale projects, and then they have design and interior design areas where they work on architectural projects and individual consulting-type projects.

The Philadelphia office where I work didn’t have any environmental scientists, but some offices have environmental scientists that worked with the construction crews or different building projects such as making sure that they’re not getting rid of habitat for endangered species, working near wastewater treatments, or doing anything damaging to the environment. There are many kinds of people working in one company. It’s an all-inclusive firm for these different areas. 

How did you find and secure this internship?

I first applied for Stantec’s Equity and Diversity scholarship last year, without really knowing who Stantec was or what they did. I ended up receiving the scholarship, and from there, they invited me to interview for an internship position. Stantec gives about 22 scholarships and from there they select some interns for the summer. During the interview, I met with the Senior Vice President of Design and Innovation of Stantec, the Director of the Office of the CEO, and one of the Principal Architects of the Philadelphia office, who ended up being my supervisor. I received the internship offer, and after school was out, I moved to Philadelphia for the summer.

How does this internship tie in with your major?

My major isn’t directly correlated with the architecture and design industry, but I found that a lot of the skills transferred into this internship as a graphic design intern. I worked a lot in software like Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign, all design software that I use in my classes. Often having to learn new software in my major helped me with learning AutoDesk, Revit, and Enscape that I used a lot during and needed for the internship. Having an outside look at a lot of the design problems my supervisors gave me brought a unique perspective someone trained in architecture might not have. 

Do you have any mentors at Rowan that helped you with this internship?

There are a lot of professors and faculty on campus that I definitely have close connections with, but the two that come to mind are initially Professor Amanda Almon, who is the head of the Biomedical Art and Visualization department, and Professor Jenny Drumgoole of the Photography department. I know I can go to them with questions I have. They’re helpful and supportive and help me with applications and just creating a professional profile for myself. When I’m applying for these opportunities, they can help me along the way. Professor Almon, and Professor Drumgoole, having people like them push you to develop your skills and encourage you to apply for internships, and find new opportunities that you might have otherwise missed is important. The most important thing you can do is to connect with those professors. They’re the start of your network, and from there they can help you with so much more. 

A screenshot of an interior design rendering
An interior design, created by Emerson.

How will this internship help you achieve your career goals?

I might apply for a master’s program in scientific illustration. Many people in this field wait and do their master’s after some years of experience in the workforce. Ideally, I want to work in infographic design and scientific illustration. I definitely lean more towards the natural science side, rather than the medical side of the biomedical art program, whether that’s working for a museum, a publishing company magazine, like National Geographic or Nature, or something along those lines. 

Through this internship, I gained a ton of new connections, met a lot of amazing people, and learned a lot. I went from living in a small town in Wisconsin to living in Philadelphia, which was a very good experience, and significantly different. Now I know I can feel comfortable living anywhere. I also learned new programs and new techniques that I might not have learned if I hadn’t taken the internship. I also learned how to communicate and talk to new people on all levels. 

Emerson is working on a project on their computer.

Do you have any advice for Rowan students that are looking for internships?

I would first reach out to professors who work in the areas that interest you and see if they know of any campus or external internships they would recommend applying to. Beyond that, look up companies and organizations in your field and see if they advertise internships on their website. If not, it’s worth emailing them to ask! Make sure you have an up-to-date resumé, and just keep applying. It’s discouraging to be turned down, but the more you apply, the more chances you have of being selected.

Now that you have completed this internship, what’s next?

I just received an offer for a nine-month internship (the duration of the school year) with the U.S. Forest Service. I will create illustrations and graphic design for a visual field guide to endangered species and communications about old-growth forests. It’s through the Virtual Student Federal Service program, so it’s a virtual internship.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, senior communication studies and public relations major

What Hispanic Heritage Month Means for Jeremy Arias

Jeremy is sporting a sweatshirt with his fraternity letters on it and is sitting down in some greenery with his arms spread open.

From Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, Hispanic Heritage Month is not only a celebration, but is also a time of recognition for the many people in the United States and beyond. In our conversation with Jeremy Arias, a junior majoring in Finance from North Bergen, NJ, we learned more of his own unique Rowan experience. In our dialogue with Jeremy we learned more of his leadership qualities as the president of a fraternity on campus (Alpha Phi Delta) as well as what his own Hispanic heritage means for himself. 

What aspects here at Rowan motivated your decision to spend your higher education here? 

The main thing was the environment. All my life I had been going to school with people I know. For example, the same kids I went to elementary school with were also in my high school. I think that’s why most people choose colleges that are so far away.

In my case, I transferred all the way from Indiana. I wanted to be away from home and meet new people. I think that going to Rowan, I was still home in New Jersey but I was still far enough from home where I could be around new people instead of surrounding myself with people I already knew. I still got the best of both worlds here at Rowan University.

Jeremy Arias is leaning against the Rowan Barnes and Noble with his fraternity letters on him.

What was the transition like transferring into Rowan? 

I can definitely say it was a decently difficult transition. When I transferred I did end up missing the spring orientation. At this time, Covid was especially prevalent too so I was put into the transfer floor of Holly Pointe on the 7th floor. There was nobody living there except for my one neighbor. I didn’t even have a roommate, I was living in a double room by myself. Even when I went to all the programs like RAH (Rowan After Hours), they would have bingo or other activities but it was still all online so you really couldn’t meet people in the usual way. It was hard to get in touch with people because of everything being online, but it was an experience nonetheless.

Why did you choose to major in Finance? 

The reason that I wanted to get into finance was because I grew up in a town that was across the water from New York. You see a city like that and you see how it’s run all by money, like Wall Street for example. It’s a big corporate town, but I knew that I wanted to be a part of something bigger like that one day. I wanted to be one of those people that have the distinction, the titles and of course, the wealth as well.

I feel like part of the reason that I wanted to be a part of an environment like that was because I’ve always wanted to be a part of a higher purpose. I’ve always wanted to be in places of greater importance and opportunity.

Jeremy can be seen hanging around the boulevard talking with friends.

What have you enjoyed the most about Rowan so far? 

What I’ve enjoyed the most about Rowan has to be the community. It’s not a big school but it feels so big because of the people. For me, it doesn’t matter how large or small a school is as long as the people there are large in personality or attitude. You always feel at home. There’s so many different people out there and they make the world larger than it is. Between the school programs and the boulevards and all the other opportunities that Rowan has to offer, it definitely is a close knit community.

The people here are larger than life itself. They want to involve you so much within the community. Even though you might feel isolated at times, you’ll always find a home in the community. 

Could you tell us a bit more about your Fraternity? 

I’m currently in the fraternity Alpha Phi Delta, which is an Italian heritage fraternity that was founded on Nov. 5, 1914. We chartered here at Rowan University in the 1970s. We were deactivated and then reinstated in 2017. While we may be one of the few fraternities that have been here for so long, we’re still building. As of now, we’re five years strong and excited for the future.

Even though we might not have as many brothers as other fraternities on campus there’s a beauty in it. All of the brothers are so close knit and really know each other. It’s just like a big family.

I definitely think it’s been quite a ride; I came in knowing nothing and then you come out and become a brother and you know everything about everyone. It’s like a circle of life. You have to learn everything about the brothers but eventually they become your best friends. As a new person comes in, you almost feel old. You were in the same spot as them only a few years ago. You become almost like the old wise guy. On another note, rush Alpha Phi Delta. 

Jeremy is holding up a soccer jersey and smiling at the camera.

How did you come into your leadership position within your fraternity? 

During elections, there were a couple of us running but I think that most people felt the most confident in me and my vision for the future. I ended up winning by only one vote but I had all the confidence in the world in myself that I had a shot at it but I understand why people were skeptical. I had just recently become a brother but I had a plan with how I wanted to steer the fraternity. A lot of the guys who had been in the fraternity at the time were involved during Covid, we were just getting out of it and there were certain things that unfortunately couldn’t work anymore.

But I knew the direction that I wanted to take everyone. I won the election by one vote and told everyone of my plans and really won them all over. I was one of the youngest presidents in the fraternity’s history. There’s definitely a learning curve and there is a much needed adjustment period. You think the whole presidency thing is all fun and dandy but there are so many different responsibilities. People depend on you. It’s still fun, but it was an awakening. I knew I wanted to be president. I wanted to shoot for the top. It’s everything I wanted out of it.

Jeremy is throwing peace signs and smiling at the camera.

How has your experience as President of your fraternity changed your framework of mind? 

I definitely feel like my leadership has steered the fraternity in the right way internally. There is a lot more work to be done, especially in the upcoming semester, but there’s a lot of things that we’re all really excited about.

My leadership is built upon a lot of values that I really believe in. I think that with hard work it gives you a sense of satisfaction. You work hard and when the job gets done you can sit down, reflect and enjoy the fruits of your labor.

What motivated you to take up a leadership position in your fraternity? 

My mentor in the fraternity was the previous president of the fraternity. I saw all the work that he had done and all the leadership qualities that he exhibited. At one point, he told me that he had “picked me because he thought that I was worthy of this.” It resonated with me. I always want to be a part of a higher purpose and that was my calling. It was great for my confidence and I knew I had people who knew that I had potential.

Could you tell us a bit about your hispanic heritage?

My mother is Venezulean, she grew up in Caracas. My dad is Colombian, he was born in Bogota. He moved with my Aunt and Uncle to Venezuela where he eventually met my mother. Together from there they made their way to the United States.

Jeremy is holding up a book and pointing to his families home country of Venezuela.

How has your family incorporated aspects of your hispanic heritage into your life? 

In every aspect of my life. The language, the values, the prevalence of family. Of course, especially the food as well. I’m a huge fan. I think everything really when it comes down to ethics and values. I attribute a lot of my drive and hard work to that type of upbringing. Everything they taught me was all I’ve ever known my entire life.

What does being Hispanic mean to you? 

To me, it means being a part and representing an ethnicity that is filled with culture and life. There are so many colorful things that go with being Hispanic, the culture especially. My parents came here with nothing and worked for everything that they have. It’s kind of a representation for the entirety of the Hispanic culture. Some of us have come from nothing. A lot of work, so hard for everything that we have.

That’s the Hispanic way. It’s a hardworking and yet such a loving, family-oriented community.

How do you involve your Hispanic heritage into your daily life? 

I think that I involve it in every way possible. For example, every morning I make a Hispanic breakfast. When I’m in class, I’m working as hard as I can so that eventually I can go home and show my parents, “Look at my grades, this is all for you guys.” The way that I’m around people, I treat them all like family. I love being around people, it’s amazing what happens when you treat people the way that you want to be treated.

Jeremy can be seen in the Rowan Barnes and Noble holding up books that discuss about different countries flags.

What are your favorite parts about your Hispanic heritage? 

It has to be the food, the language and the people. What I love the most about the Hispanic culture is that there is no such thing as one “Hispanic.” Even with dialect as well, Colombian Spanish isn’t the same as Venezuelan Spanish or even Ecuadorian, Dominican and Puerto Rican. They are all so different but at the end of the day there is one root for it all. There’s still enough similarities where you can understand what the other person is attempting to convey. We’re all so different but we’re also all the same.

How has your heritage influenced your identity as a person? 

I think that the part of my Hispanic heritage that has influenced my identity the most is probably the family aspects. It’s such a loving community, like I said earlier, I’m a people person, I treat everyone like family. That’s just how I am. The discipline and the hard work has ingrained itself into me. In my opinion, every Hispanic has had that ambition and drive at one point in their life. I feel like that’s something that makes up my identity. I’m always striving for better because I always want more out of life. I want that not just out of me, but also everyone around me.

I gotta say though, the Hispanic food has definitely made up a large portion of my identity. It’s my favorite! Lastly, I think the idea of always making someone proud has made up a huge chunk of my own self. With my parents, they continue to work hard and give me everything that I have to help me in life. They still are guiding me down this path for as much as they can. I just want to be in a position of success where I can say “Hey Mom and Dad, I did this for you and I hope you’re proud of me.”

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Story by:
Lucas Taylor, Rowan Global student in Graduate English Education program

Photos by:
Ashley Craven, junior sports communication and media major

    Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective: Public Relations Major Justin C. Sabio

    A photo of the College of Communication and Creative Arts building on Rowan's campus.

    Today, as part of our Hispanic Heritage Month #PROFspective series, we feature Junior Justin C. Sabio (he/him), from Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County). Justin is a first generation college student majoring in Public Relations, having transferred to Rowan University from Rowan College of South Jersey. He tells us about his experience as a Rowan student, his […]

    Inclusive Education Prepares Teachers to Meet the Needs of All Students [VIDEO]

    Gabriella Lugo is diligently working with a student in a classroom.

    Junior Gabriella Lugo defines inclusive education as a “special education combined with elementary education to make an inclusive classroom.” The inclusive education program prepares its students by providing them the opportunity to earn a license in Elementary Education as well as having them become certified as a Teacher of Students with Disabilities (TOSD). 

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    Men’s Track and Field Student-Athletes on Their Winning 4×400 Relay Season

    Athletes celebrate win.

    Today we are featuring Jah’mere Beasley, Nana Agyemang, and Amara Conte, three of the four Men’s Track and Field members who secured the national championship title in the 4×400 relay in their indoor season [editor’s note: the team would later finish second in the outdoor national finals]. 

    Jah’mere is a junior Sports Communication and Media major from Camden, NJ (Camden County) and ran third leg for the 4×400 relay. Nana is a sophomore Exercise Science major from Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) and ran second leg for the 4×400 relay. Amara is a sophomore Accounting major from Jersey City, NJ (Hudson County) and ran anchor for the 4×400 relay. All three share their stories on leadership, camaraderie, and express how competing in Men’s Track and Field National Championship has shaped their university experience. 

    How has your team’s camaraderie propelled you to success? What makes your team different from those around you?

    Amara Conte: Our team camaraderie is what makes us a great team, our bond and trust in each other’s ability to perform when it matters most helped us to focus on our own individual part of the relay and perform to the best of our abilities. What makes our team different from other teams is that we are more than a team, we are family, we are brothers, and we always have each other back. Knowing this makes up for our individual flaws and makes us a strong team. 

    Nana Agyemang: The team is like one big family. We go through so much pain and suffering at practice that it only makes us stronger and makes us care for each other even more. We keep each other accountable whether that’s making sure we are on time for practice or hitting the correct times for practice we just want to see everyone maximize their full potential. I think the difference from our team to other teams is that we’re really hungry and never satisfied. We always know we can improve on something so when we do good we smile, and celebrate it for the weekend but on Monday it’s back to work like we didn’t so we can always get better and moving forward. 

    Going into the race, what emotions were you feeling? Were you guys considered to be an underdog or favored within the 4×400 relay at the meet?

    Jah’mere Beasley: Going into the race everyone was laser focused and locked in. I had just taken third place in the 200m, so I brought that energy over to the other guys. We had been ranked #1 in the country all year, and we knew we had the chance to win it all. I would say we were the favorite to win, but there were a lot of other great teams who had solid chances as well.  

    Nana Agyemang: I was excited going into the race because of what was at stake. We knew what we had to do and how we were the team to beat from being the National Champion in outdoor so I was thrilled and excited to just get the race underway. We had the #1 time going into nationals but going into finals we were ranked third so most teams probably thought they had us beat because we were running three new people who weren’t on the outdoor national championship (me, Marquise and Jah’mere). In my head it felt like we were the underdogs, but we also knew that we were still the team to beat so we had to go out there and rise up to the occasion. 

    Teammates hand off the baton.

    What are your team’s biggest strengths? What are your team’s biggest weakness?

    Amara Conte: Our team’s biggest strength is the bond we have and our undying love for the sport of Track & Field. Our greatest weakness is that since we have such a diverse group when it comes to individual events, it becomes hard for us to put our all on the relay event, but we somehow make it work and compete at our best when we matter.

    How do you prepare for an event like this before race day? 

    Jah’mere Beasley: The day before a big race like this I try to stay off my feet as much as possible. I always make sure I eat a great dinner and snack the evening before. I take an ice bath and hot shower to help my legs feel rested. I roll out and stretch really well before bed. I always try to make sure I get 7-8 hours of sleep before a big race day. 

    Nana Agyemang: How I prepare for meet day is I usually wake up and instantly play some gospel music because I am a big believer in God so when I wake up I just wanna praise him. Then I go head and brush my teeth and shower and I usually have talks with myself to get my mind right because you are only as strong as your mind. Then I made my breakfast which is usually brown sugar oatmeal, eggs, a water and a granola bar. When I hop on the bus I do a little meditation to get my full body right. Then as we head on the bus approaching to the meet I’ll switch my playlist, attitude, and focus to a more serious tone and lock in on the task ahead.

    Beasley runs one leg of the race.

    How do you prepare for an event like this on race day? Do you have any race day traditions, meals, or specific actions you swear by? 

    Amara Conte: Once we get to the track on the day of the meet, I do my usual warm up while listening to my pre-made playlist that I have prepared just for track meet to help me stay focused and locked in. I don’t eat much on meet days because I run fast on an empty stomach. 

    How does winning the [indoor] national championship for the 4×400 meter relay shape your experience at Rowan? How are your track experience in general shaped your college experience? 

    Amara Conte: Winning the national championship in 4×400 meter twice now has made my experience at Rowan more pleasurable and has enhanced my experience in ways that I could only imagine. My track experience in general has taught me many life skills, for example: time management, networking, and discipline. Due to my experience as a track athlete, I’ve grown in more ways than I can possibly fathom and with more years these skills and experience will only sharpen and improve before I enter the real world. 

    Jah’mere Beasley: Winning the national championship in the 4×400 has made my time here that much more special. This is one of the closest teams I have ever been a part of, and winning that national title brought everyone closer together. Having a brotherhood like this is unmatched. I always cherish the moments I have on the track and that national title is something I will always remember. Those moments always motivate me to get faster and better than I was before. My track experience has shaped my college experience in a big way. Track has helped me make lots of new friends here at Rowan. Most of the the friends I have made are people that play other sports. Track is helping me stay focused in the classroom as well. It motivates to keep my grades up and give max effort with each assignment. 

    Nana Agyemang: It’s been cool seeing my friends repost it, having teachers come up and congratulate me has been a great feeling. It’s just made my Rowan experience better and more enjoyable. Track had taught me valuable lessons like when things don’t go your way you can either come back the next day and try again or quit. It has also taught me that life will get hard, like workouts, but if you keep going there is always a light at the end of the tunnel. It might look dark while you’re going through but sooner or later you will reach the end of the tunnel and be happy you did. We have had plenty of workouts that we feel like we aren’t gonna make it but we just gotta keep going and you gotta tell yourself your stronger than that you think.  

    Conte runs one leg of the race.

    Do you participate in both winter and spring track? What are the biggest disparities between the two? What the biggest challenges between the two different seasons? 

    Jah’mere Beasley: I run both winter and spring track. The biggest disparity between the two are the size of the tracks. The winter track is 200m and the spring track is 400m. During the 4×400 in winter track, each person runs two laps, as compared to spring track where each person runs 1 lap. Events like the 4×100 and javelin are only during spring track. The biggest challenge is running on the indoor tracks. The lanes are smaller and the turns are tighter. It take a lot of getting used to during the season. 

    Read our earlier interview with Jah’mere here.

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    Story by:
    Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major 

    Photos courtesy of: 
    David Dermer/Rowan Athletics

    #PROFspective: Noor Baig and Her Journey in Graphic Design

    Noor and a classmate review film.

    In our conversation with Noor Baig, a junior commuter from Cherry Hill (Camden County), we learn of her own career path in graphic design. Noor shares insights on her Studio Art major and details some of the expectations in the various classes offered. 

    Why did you pick Rowan? 

    For the most part, I had picked Rowan because it was nearby and commuting is really important for me since I have an older parent. Besides that, as an art major, I had gone through their website and viewed student work which was definitely super interesting for me, along with the fact that Jan, the (now retired) head of Rowan’s Graphic Design department was emailing me through high school during my application and interview process and was incredibly helpful, friendly and personable. I had really felt that Rowan would give me the best chance to become a better student and artist.

    What aspects here at Rowan made you know that this was the place you wanted to be?

    Rowan was super welcoming from the start as I had met and communicated with multiple professors before my acceptance. The professors really accepted me and believed in my potential to become a better artist. I was able to build a really great rapport with a lot of my professors as well which makes the learning environment super friendly and helps to build a great community within the studio.

    When I started attending classes, which usually for any studio courses are relatively small with 10-20 people maximum, I noticed how the professors are really open to learning about your artistic processes. The professors don’t just talk at you and expect you to just work, they really pull the best out of you and try to inspire you. 

    Noor is reaching for an item to help with her developing some film.

    What have been your favorite moments so far on campus?

    There are so many cool things to go and explore on campus. You’re coming out of high school, you’re a kid who was probably driven around everywhere and everything is really close by. With coming to Rowan and everything being so big you kind of realize you’re on your own now. I think that having that realization was cool but I think a lot of my favorite moments were the smaller ones. When you build up such a rapport with your professors and peers the class becomes more personable. You look forward to going to these different classes every week.

    Seeing people of similar interests and working together with them builds inspiration within the class. The camaraderie that I had with my classmates is something that I always look back fondly on. It’s really nice to have such a community and have it reinforced with everyone involved.

    Noor and a classmate review photo negatives.

    What drew you to Studio Art?

    Since I was young, most likely 11 or 12, I’ve been infatuated with art. Even now at home I have art in every room in my house, it’s kind of like an impromptu art gallery from the art that I’ve collected over the years. When I was in high school around my junior or senior year I had some friends who were also getting into the art scene, probably because they had a couple other art friends and we were all influencing one another. I had a couple of friends ask me if I would be interested in buying some of my art or set up commissions for creating art. I started to get into it. I’ve always been passionate about little details like fonts or calligraphy so I started getting routine commissions that dealt with painting or cards. I would advertise locally to my friends and teachers. Selling art was definitely a big thing for me.

    Before, I hadn’t even thought I was going to go to college because of finances and other reasons. But selling art and seeing how art brings people together and its impact was a huge game changer for myself. I started to realize how much I liked it; the entire process of creating something with other people. It just made me want to continue doing more and more. I had found out more about graphic design and what Rowan had to offer. I started to realize that this possibility was within my reach and it inspired me to keep going.

    However, art is always a hard thing. There’s always anxiety with job security but with graphic design, an applied art, it relieves that tension. Finding out about the opportunities that graphic design could give me and my own personal passions with the process of creating and discussing art pushed me forward to major in Studio Arts. The major is so welcoming. I knew that if I went to art school and had professors that were experienced enough, I would learn more efficiently than I would if I tried to manage it all by myself. Getting my degree would diversify my own abilities and make me better prepared to meet the goals I set out for myself. 

    Since the beginning, I always had my foot in every door that I could. I never really stuck directly to one thing. As cool as that was to experience, it prevents you from sticking onto one path. You have half-finished and half-learned skills. By going to college, it gave me the goal that I could run without having to stray from that path. Even that goal, the way that Rowan structures studio art, it’s very generalized, it forces you to try a little bit of everything. I feel a lot more confident in different things in comparison to before.

    Noor is standing in a doorway cupping a camera.
    Noor, a sophomore commuter from Cherry Hill, (Camden County) has recently developed an interest in photography from a class she took this spring semester.

    How do you view your major making a difference for others? 

    I think that art is so critical to culture, especially across time. People left different marks thousands of years ago that let us know so much now. I think that art is a hallmark of specific cultures, communities and people. The art that you make as an artist ultimately defines you. Your own art allows for others to try and peer into the type of vision that you have, what you see or are attempting to see, it marks you and defines you. By being an artist, specifically a graphic designer, I’ve always had this desire to help people out the best way I can. With graphic design, a lot of it has to do with solving problems. We solve visual problems and we help to express different ideas. We push ideas forward and help to conceptualize it and bring people together. Art as a whole is very communal, it bridges different gaps and illustrates solutions.

    What classes have left the biggest impression on you? 

    There’s one class that comes to mind. There’s an Expressive Drawing class with Dr. Appelson, we affectionately call him Doc, it’s like an art bootcamp. Usually, you take it in the spring semester of your freshman year and it’s quite a class. Dr. Appleson has you do a lot of work every single week and he’s teaching you so much as well. It’s stressful in the moment but you realize that it’s never just busy work. Everything that is assigned has you trying or learning something new. Dr. Appleson expects you to put your best foot forward.

    It’s tough, but you learn so much in the class. I really came into myself surrounding my style and everything. Funny enough, Doc has this saying where it’s one thing to see what’s on the paper or canvas, but it’s another when trying to figure out what’s going on in an artist’s head while you’re making the drawing. Doc is helping us to connect the art with the artist. While he’s tough in the class, he’s one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet. He’s the unofficial mascot for Westby Hall. He always gave me so much great advice in the class and I made a lot of great work for my portfolio. It’s hard, but it’s so worth it for developing your skill set.

    Noor is preparing some film.

    What are some of the different expectations in your classes? 

    Graphic design especially is really big on expectations. Specifically, the way that the curriculum is structured and organized. Eventually the last thing that you do in Graphic Design is called Portfolio. This is a class where you work together with students and plan the group exhibit. Every senior who is in the Art major has to have their own exhibit but in graphic design it’s more of a collective.

    Everything that you do in graphic design is about organizing yourself and building up your final portfolio. The portfolio is super important for artists because it shows exactly what you’re bringing to the table. You’re showing yourself to your employer. Everything that is in it shows how diverse you’ve become since you’ve started, it shows packaging, typography, infographics, publications and things of that matter. It’s super organized and every little thing almost builds off of one another. 

    Out of all the classes you’ve taken so far with your major, what’s worked the best for you in learning the material? 

    I take a lot of studio classes, it’s more of a work time to try and explore everything. I love a good studio class; it’s super relaxing. I get into a very specific type of energy and just start powering through. It’s very liberating. Of course, professors are around for guidance if you ever need anything but I like to just keep going. Because of my own work ethic, I do have that sense of responsibility when it comes to assignments. So just being able to be on my own and knowing I have someone in my corner is super reassuring. I’m also a big fan of group critiques because of how everyone gets to voice their opinions. You get a lot of different perspectives that you may have not seen. There’s different ways of conducting critiquing but I think that working in a group and getting that extra feedback helps even my own outlook.

    Noor is holding her camera and is looking off.

    Are there any professors that you’ve had that stood out to you? Why?

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been able to build such a rapport with a lot of my professors that it’s kind of hard to pick just one out. They all have their own unique outlook which reflects in the class. I really appreciate a lot of my professors who create such a cohesive work environment. Everyone is so respectful of one another and keeps it all so casual. For example, I had a class called Color Theory with Professor Alicia Finger and everybody was in such deep contact with each other. Prof. Finger is a great communicator and it resonated with the class. It’s casual, but such a friendly work environment. As for teaching style, again Prof. Finger was great. We were able to talk out some of the different theories in class. Being in college, there’s a lot of freedom to come into yourself and discover one’s own interests. The professors understand this in the art sector and allow us to try and explore our own self. With my professors’ help I was able to commit to myself and find my own style.

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    Story by:
    Lucas Taylor, Graduate Education Major

    The Value In Fighting: My Experience With Rowan MMA

    Today we hear from Rowan Blog guest contributor Demetri Moutis, a junior Sports Communication and Media major, who recounts the powerful effects of joining Rowan’s Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) Club. Demetri, of Roselle Park, NJ (Union County), is a transfer student from Ocean County College. After discovering Rowan MMA, I found myself doing things that […]

    ICYMI: Rowan University Dance Team Ranked Fifth in Nation

    Group photo of Rowan Dance Team at Nationals.

    This year, the Rowan University Dance Team competed at the Universal Dance Association (UDA) Nationals in Florida, where the team placed fifth in the Open Division Hip Hop category. Here, members of the Dance Team reflect on their time at the competition and talk about their dynamic as a team. 

    What makes the Rowan Dance team different? 

    Jordyn Dauter, a first-year Dance & Exercise Science from Quakertown, Pennsylvania says: “Everyone on the team has something unique to offer, whether that is something specifically to dance, or other elements like attitude or leadership skills. We all have something special to offer, which makes our team diverse.”

    Teammate Amber Schott, a junior Psychology major from Bayville, NJ (Ocean County), adds, “Definitely the dynamic of the team. I made my best friends here at Rowan through this team and I always feel super supported and encouraged in reaching my dance goals.”

    Rowan Dance Team outside at the Florida competition.

    Senior Kaya Snow, a double major in Dance and Theatre Arts with concentrations in Acting and Musical Theatre from Oak Ridge, NJ (Passaic County), says, “We’ve really gone through some huge changes in the last few years and we’ve come out stronger through it all. I’m so glad that we decided to pursue UDA Camp and Nationals my sophomore year because it really has changed the entire dynamic of the team for the better.”

    Kristin Mostrangeli, a sophomore Psychology major from Hamilton, NJ, (Mercer County) puts it simply: “Since we get to spend so much time together, we really become so close with each other as a team.”

    Dance team outside

    What is your most memorable memory with the team?

    Junior Inclusive Elementary Education Bianca Moffa from Maple Shade, NJ (Burlington County), shares, “Hearing our university get called as a finalist qualifier will definitely be a core memory for sure. I am so proud to be a member of this team and to see all our hard work pay off by becoming 5th in the Nation in Hip Hop.”

    Do you have a Rowan University or Dance Team experience you’d like to share?

    Nicholette Voci, a junior Law & Justice and Psychology double major from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), says that “being able to dance at football games, volunteer events, and be in Florida with my best friends is the best experience anyone could ever have in college.”

    Sophomore Sociology major Taryn Larsen from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), reflects on her time with the Rowan Dance Team by saying “it is the perfect mix of practice each week, meeting new friends and performing.”

    A member of the Rowan Dance Team smiles at Nationals.

    How was your experience at Nationals 2022?

    Reflecting on her experience, Mia Tabasco, a first-year Sociology student from Haddon Township, NJ (Camden County), says, “It was so incredible. I’ve been dreaming of going to UDA for the longest time and I’m so proud of our team for making finals. We’re a new team and we made our names known.”

    Sophomore Exercise Science major Adrianna Laezza from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County), shares that the journey to the UDA National competition was a big deal to her. “It was the best feeling in the world to perform on stage again. I got to compete at UDA which was a dream I have had since I was 12 years old.”

    Valentina Giannattasio, a first-year double major in Dance and Marketing from Buenos Aires, Argentina, says, “It was definitely one of the best experiences of my life. I still cannot believe we performed there with all those astonishing dancers. I am proud of how far we have gone. Now we are Top 5 in the nation for Hip Hop!”

    Dance team performing

    What is the best part of being a member of Rowan University Dance Team?

    Alyssa McAvoy, a sophomore Music Industry Technology and Business major from Shrewsbury, NJ (Monmouth County), says, “I love that I am still able to dance in college and the friends I have made through being on the team!” 

    Junior Engineering Entrepreneurship major Isabel Rivera from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County), puts it simply. She says, “The best part about being a member of the Rowan University Dance Team is “being surrounded by people who will motivate you no matter what.”

    First-year Spanish Education major Lily Cummings from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County), reflects on her first year on the Rowan Dance Team by saying, “It allows me to grow in my ability as a dancer and dance throughout college without it having to take up my whole life. It also provides so many exciting and memorable experiences along with amazing new friendships.” 

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    Story by:
    Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

    Photos by:
    Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

    Header photo courtesy of:
    Rowan University Dance Team ProfLink



    Unplug and Live a Great (Offline) Life

    Rachel is smiling upwards and is in-between some shrubbery.

    This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

    It’s no secret that people spend time on their phones. It just so happens that it is a lot. However, how much of it can be considered a bad thing?

    Considering the fact that excessive time spent online, specifically with social media, has resulted in increased mental health issues and distorted views on real life (Robinson & Smith, 2021), it can be wise to say that how a person uses and the amount of time spent online and through social media can impact their emotional health.

    Rachel is standing out front of Bunce Hall.

    Even if it’s for 30 minutes or an hour a day, there needs to be effort to unplug routinely. However, one might find it difficult to fill in the time spent online with something new.

    That being said, here are five tips on living a great (offline) life! 

    1. Develop a hobby: Feeling the need to check those social media notifications? Replace it with finding a new hobby to enjoy. Whether it’s a current hobby or something new to try out, focus on that hobby whenever there’s that compulsive need. 
    2. Go outside: Another simple tip is to just simply go outside. While spending time online frequently, spending time in nature is a great way to unplug. Even a simple walk can help lead to increased mental health benefits (Weir, 2020). 
    3. Spend time with friends and family: While it’s easy to connect with friends and family online, nothing can compare with connecting in person (Robinson & Smith, 2021). Whether it would be catching up over coffee or having a game night (safely, of course!), the time spent together can help foster an improved emotional and social well-being. 
    4. Learn to improve time management skills: Be intentional with spending time both online and offline by mastering time management. Try to divide up time between time spent online or scrolling through social media with dedicated times to unplug and just be. 
    5. Practice self-care: Trade in that screen time with self-care time! Several of the mental health issues can be helped with practicing mindfulness and self-care (Robinson & Smith, 2021). Recognizing that can help make better improvements on how a person can manage their screen time and live their best life. 

      Rachel is sitting on the Bunce Hall stairs.

        References

        Robinson, L. & Smith, M. (2021, October). Social media and mental health. HelpGuide. https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/social-media-and-mental-health.htm 

        Weir, K. (2020). Nurtured by nature. Monitor on Psychology, 51(3), 50. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2020/04/nurtured-nature 

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        Story by:
        Rachael Owen, junior public health and wellness major, Wellness Center intern

        Photography by:
        Ashley Craven, sports communication and media major

        Produced by:
        Lucas Taylor, senior English education major 

        Beyond the Classroom: Bryan Emery, Intern for Rowan’s Rohrer Center for Professional Development

        Bryan poses in front of Business Hall.

        Today we speak to Bryan Emery, a junior Marketing and Management double major from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County). Bryan is an Event Management and Marketing Intern with Rowan’s Rohrer Center for Professional Development. Read on as he tells us about his majors and what he’s learning from his internship experience. Why did you decide to […]

        Period Poverty is the Unspoken Crisis

        Logan is posing on a bench in front of one of Rowan's buildings.

        This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

        At any given moment, around 800 million people are menstruating. From this, we can determine that about 26% of the human population are menstruators. In addition, this number is trending to increase as the onset of puberty continues to occur at younger ages.

        Period poverty can be defined as a public health crisis that refers to the lack of access to menstrual hygiene and care products each month as well as inadequate education about the menstruation process.

        These deficiencies lead to unhealthy, or even dangerous, menstrual hygiene practices. The lack of menstrual products in circulation also leaves the well-being of millions of menstruators unable to execute their day-to-day tasks comfortably and even possibly lead to crucial harm to the body. As a result, menstruators across the globe are missing out on school or work activities, sometimes for the entire duration of their period. 

        Logan is sitting on the floor with her knee in between her hands while smiling at the camera.

        Period poverty is typically caused by menstruators being burdened with harsh impurity stigmas as well as suffering from economic inequalities. For example, in Pakistan, a 2017 poll indicated that 49% of young menstruators had no knowledge of menstruation before their first period. It is also common practice in Pakistan to use rags and cloths to take care of menses which are often shared between family members, leading to high risks of infection. In Ethiopia, 75% of menstruators do not have reliable access to products leading to 25% of menstruators simply going without using any. For most Ethiopian menstruators, sanitary products cost an entire day’s pay. The Period Poverty, which is already burdening Scotland, has undergone an increase due to the COVID-19 emergency, with 1 in 4 menstruators having experienced infection due to the lack of access to sanitary menstrual products. 

        A common misconception is that Period Poverty is a “far away” problem that only occurs in developing countries. In reality, Period Poverty is just as much of a public health crisis here in the United States with the main cause being due to impoverishment and economic inequality. In fact, 27 out of 50 states currently enact a luxury tax on menstrual products. As of 2020, 1 in 4 American menstruators struggle to afford period products leading to 1 in 5 menstruators missing school, work and day-to-day activities. COVID-19 has undoubtedly only inflamed these statistics along with the national poverty rates. 

        Logan has her arms crossed and her head tilted.

        So, what can be done to combat Period Poverty? There is a lot more to understanding why Period Poverty happens, such as policies, legislation, systemic and economic inequality, that complicate the process of rectifying these problems.

        Currently, there are countless organizations making efforts to ease the burden for impoverished menstruators. Some exceptional ones include Happy Period, Hate the Dot and Code Red Collective. Period Equity is a notable organization of lawyers who are dedicated to eradicating the tax on period products in the U.S. through policy, which would be a huge stride towards economic equality efforts.

        Logan is leaning against a railing in one of Rowan's buildings.

        Menstruation is such a common and relatable process that menstruators are typically told they should be ashamed of. Yet, it is quite literally the essence of human life that gave everyone existence. With that, everyone should be encouraged to remember that menstruator rights are human rights, and the unspoken burdens of Period Poverty are humanitarian issues that deserve to be heard.

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        Story by:
        Logan Johnson, junior biological sciences major, Wellness Center intern

        Photography by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

        Produced by:
        Lucas Taylor, senior English education major



        The Often Overlooked Importance of Sleep

        Rob is pretending to be asleep on a couch.

        This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

        College can oftentimes be perceived as an extremely stressful and busy point in a person’s life. More often than not, students can find themselves overwhelmed with an ever increasing workload. Between home life, classwork, employment outside of school and personal free time, it can be very difficult to find time in the day to fulfill all of these responsibilities while also attempting to find a balance with one’s personal life.

        Robert is attentively typing on his laptop.

        As a result, more students have been making the effort to make more time in the day as many students have been sacrificing their nightly amount of sleep to find more time. While this can increase available work time, decreasing the nightly sleep duration in actuality can become detrimental to every aspect of a student’s life and potential career in academia. 

        To state the obvious, sleep is a necessary component of our overall health. During sleep, our bodies release toxic wastes, restore energy and repair cells. These basic bodily functions serve as a refresh button for our bodies, allowing for that newly found energy after a refreshing night’s sleep.

        Robert's body is facing away from the camera but he is smiling directly at it.

        Not only does sleep benefit our physical health, but it is very closely connected to mental health as well. Inconsistent sleep patterns can cause strain on social activity and ability to focus on daily tasks and activities. The recommended amount of sleep for persons over the age of 18 is between 7-9 hours nightly; however, this can vary depending on the individual.

        Existing research on college students and their sleep habits suggests that a lack of sleep can be a common factor in increasing depressive symptoms. In addition, people suffering from depression also tend to have disrupted sleep patterns, leading to a cycle of worsening already existing depressive symptoms (Dinis & Bragança, 2018).

        The focus on the camera is panned on some academic material while Robert is in the background studying.

        Although college can be a busy time for the majority of students, time management is an important skill to have. Regardless of how tempting it can be, cutting down on nightly sleep will only cause more trouble than it’s worth.

        References

        Dinis, João, and Miguel Bragança. “Quality of Sleep and Depression in College Students: A Systematic Review.” Sleep science (Sao Paulo, Brazil) vol. 11,4 (2018): 290-301. doi:10.5935/1984-0063.20180045

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        Story by:
        Robert Zoroiwchak, junior psychology major, Wellness Center intern

        Photos by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

        Produced by:
        Lucas Taylor, senior English education major

        Samantha Midili and Bianca Jeremiah: Two Women Leaders in a Male-dominated Industry

        Samantha and Bianca ride their bikes outside the Rowan Tech Park area.

        Samantha Midili, a senior Mechanical Engineering major from Ocean City, NJ (Cape May County), and Bianca Jeremiah, a junior Mechanical Engineering major with minors in Physics and Music from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County), share their experiences as women in the Society of Automotive Engineers Club at Rowan University. 

        Samantha and Bianca are not just women in STEM: they are leaders and trailblazers in the engineering field.

        Both are on the e-board of the Society of Automotive Engineers club on campus. Bianca describes the club as “an opportunity to not only do research and create designs but actually manufacture cars and bring those designs to life.”

        She adds, “We get the opportunity to compete in an annual global competition. There are different areas of competition that your car can get judged on: the acceleration test, suspension test, maneuverability, endurance, and a business component that delves into the cost of building the car. This year, the competition is in Rochester NY, so we will have the opportunity to compete against other colleges in the area.”

        Society of Automotive Engineers club photo
        The Society of Automotive Engineers Club at a recent event.

        Samantha, the leader of the Baja competition team, talks about her first experience when joining the club. “When I walked in, there was only me and one other girl in the room. It was intimidating and I felt out of place at first, but I stuck with it and I started driving cars. I am so glad I did because now I actually feel like I belong and that there’s a space for me here at Rowan. I can do something I love and feel empowered that I am one of few women that do it.” 

        Bianca had a similar experience. “I joined the club as a freshman because I knew other people in the program recommended it. I remember my first project was to build a trebuchet for a pumpkin-chucking competition. After that, I was hooked. I started working on cars and began learning about machining, problem-solving and the importance of working with a team. The club has taught me how to work in intense situations and how to learn/think on the spot.” 

        Bianca Jeremiah posing in front of car
        Bianca Jeremiah

        The Society of Automotive Engineers Club has given Samantha and Bianca the opportunity to learn in the classroom and then apply it. Samantha says, “Rowan is so unique because the program is so hands-on. In many other schools, you don’t get past conceptualizing a design or reading about it in a textbook. Here, you almost always get to create the design and make it come to life by manufacturing it.” 

        Samantha Midili driving car
        Samantha Midili

        Bianca shares the same sentiment.

        “Being a mechanical engineer means designing to manufacture. At Rowan, you get to go through the entire process of research, design, and implementation; just like in the industry. It is so interesting to get to execute every angle from start to finish and actually create something,” she says.

        Although it may be difficult at times, both Samantha and Bianca are happy and proud to be leaders in a male-dominated industry. Samantha says, “My teammates respect me, look out for me, and have my back. We have a great sense of camaraderie, and we are always together. I really feel like we all come together as a team, regardless of our differences, because we just want to build a winning car.”

        “I feel fortunate to be a part of a community where I feel accepted regardless of my identity,” Bianca says. “Sometimes I might be the only girl in my classes and that is overwhelming, but I always try and tell myself that if I made it here, I belong here. I want to be that inspiration for other women in the program, too. I want to know they are accepted and belong. Creating that space and opportunity for everyone is important to me.”

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        Story by:
        Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

        Photos by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

        #PROFspective: Life Behind the Camera with Sports Communication and Media Major Ashley Craven

        Ashley holds a DSLR camera with a long lens inside Business Hall.

        In this edition of #PROFspective we learn of junior Sports Communication and Media major Ashley Craven. Ashley is a transfer student from Camden County College who commutes from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County). Showing great tenacity, Ashley is a single mother rising up to achieve her degree. Recently, Ashley was hired for Rowan Blog and exhibits a passion for photography. In this dialogue, we learn of Ashley’s own journey through academia as well as an inside look at her unique Rowan experience.

        What drew you to your major? 

        Being an athlete, I wanted a job in the sports industry. I was actually going to nursing school and when I got in, I realized it wasn’t for me; so, sports came to mind.

        I recently discovered my passion for photography. I thought of connecting the two. Now, I am taking on more cinematography and production assignments for the Rowan Blog. It just feels right.

        Ashley works on a laptop with her camera at her side inside Business Hall.

        How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

        Combining photography and cinematography is like conveying a story in silence, which I think is pretty powerful. It allows athletes to showcase their talents and emotions. Whether they’re winning a championship or so forth, I really want to emphasize the talents of other athletes. It is a form of storytelling, so those who weren’t at these events can see bit by bit.

        On the professional side, I want to get a job with the NFL or WWE. I’d feel a big sense of accomplishment if I got to do that because I would see my photos being out there around the world. I want to be an asset to a company and provide them with quality pictures to benefit them as well. It’s cool to think that photos are one of the only ways you can actually look back at the past. 

        Ashley sits and holds her knees on a bench inside Business Hall.

        Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a Rowan professor in which you felt like you were working with a visionary in your field. 

        I have Neil Hartman to thank, without a doubt. I even kept in close contact with him even when I was still at Camden County College. It took me a year and a half to come here, and I still keep in touch with him. He has just been so influential. Neil Hartman provides all the students networking opportunities, keeps up to date with upcoming events and job fairs. He definitely wants me to succeed because he saw how passionate I was. He even reached out to ask me to do a lacrosse tournament just because he knew I was willing to do anything to succeed in the world of photography. He is definitely great with guidance and he is going to be the one I thank at my graduation speech.

        What’s your fondest moment here at Rowan that involves your major?

        The best would have to be when Brianna McCay, who is involved in The Whit, asked me to photograph the Brian Dawkins interview. Because of her, I was able to take some awesome photos of an icon. Two of my pictures made it into the newspaper, and I realized that I wanted to keep doing it.

        I think photographing with the newspaper and seeing my photos published for the first time was one of the greatest moments. That was just an opening door to my future success. It’s still a new hobby of mine but it’s already got me here.

        Ashley is smiling with her two kids around her.

        Any words you want to give to someone interested in your major?

        Really, when you talk about the sports industry it’s all about who you know. You have to network, you have to promote yourself, you have to preserve. Every no will lead to a better yes. Albert Einstein said, “Imagination is everything, it is the preview to life’s coming attractions.” That really resonates with me. What you put out into the universe is what’s going to attract to you.

        How would you describe your academic journey so far? 

        So I absolutely love school now. I actually did not complete high school. Then, about eight years later, it kind of just came to me that I wanted to go back to school again. I wanted to better my life my kids and for myself, so I got my GED. I have worked relentlessly ever since. I wanted to get the degree, and I’ve just been so motivated.

        With my kids, it’s hard to get work done but I’ve always believed in self discipline and I think it’s huge. So I set up times where I wake up at five or six in the morning when they’re still sleeping just to get an assignment done. Or I’ll even get them to bed by 9:30 and stay up until midnight to do my work. It’s very challenging for sure.

        Because of them and how I want to better myself as an individual, it encourages me to stay on top of my assignments, get things done and get good grades. I value that, especially from someone who originally hated school.

        Ashley stands with her hand on her hip inside Business Hall.

        Is there any specific club or organization that has helped welcome you here at Rowan? 

        Pizza with the Pros, there you feel the togetherness. It’s just awesome the people that you get to meet. Everyone just wants to help — whether it’s a student, a professional in the industry or in my case, Neil Hartman. Those events are all about networking and hearing perspectives of people in the industry. The all give great advice. Those events really just make me feel welcomed and supported. 

        What has been the biggest challenge in transitioning to Rowan? 

        Learning where all of the buildings are located! I just think being new is the most challenging. Other than that, everything has been pretty easy to navigate, especially with Canvas. 

        Any final words you would like to give? 

        You’re never too old, and it’s never too late. Prioritize what’s most important to you and put self-discipline first. I’m huge on being mindful. I would also suggest writing everything down. It’s really important to write down all your thoughts and ideas just to reflect on them after. Don’t forget to date them as well!

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        Story by:
        Lucas Taylor, senior English education major

        Photography by:
        Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

        #PROFspective: A Support for Students, Paige Bathurst

        Paige sits on Bunce Hall steps.

        Today we feature Paige Bathurst, who has a passion for leadership and helping people. Paige is a double major in both Supply Chain and Logistics from the Rohrer College of Business and Leadership and Social Innovation in the College of Education with a minor in Management Information Systems. She is a sophomore from Mantua, NJ […]

        #PROFspective: Civil/Environmental Engineering Major, Rowan CHAARG Ambassador Trinity Good

        Trinity sits on a rock in front of trees.

        Today, transfer student Trinity Good shares her #PROFspective of being a junior Civil/Environmental Engineering major from Upper Township, NJ (Cape May County). Trinity is the Rowan Ambassador for CHAARG, a college health and fitness community. She works as a cook at Kirk’s Pizza in Upper Township, as well as serving at Brown’s in Ocean City. […]

        #PROFspective: Junior Advertising Major Missy Pavorsky

        Missy works on her laptop computer.

        Today we feature Missy Pavorsky, a junior Advertising major from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County). Missy is a photographer for Rowan Blog and speaks with us today about why she chose her major, her on-campus activities and more!

        What made you choose your major?

        I was originally an RTF major because I love movies, but going into the spring semester of my freshman year, it just wasn’t for me. My roommate said I should try advertising, so I did and I’ve been enjoying the program ever since.

        Are you in any clubs? 

        I work for Rowan’s enrollment management and marketing as a digital content contributor with a specialization in photography. I work with writers to take pictures of students, staff as well as campus. 

        What’s your favorite thing to do around campus?

        I love going to the basketball games. My roommates and I have a tradition where we go to every home game that we can.

        Missy poses for a portrait against a white backdrop.

        Do you have any hobbies or something that you like to do in your spare time?

        I like doing editorial style photography such as freelance and fashion. I also love taking photos of my friends.

        What type of music do you like to listen to?

        I like most 80s style music, like Earth Wind and Fire, also K-pop, I like it mainly for its uniqueness and high production value. Also, my favorite band is Bombay Bicycle Club.

        What’s your favorite memory while you’ve been a student here?

        The basketball games with my old roommate, but mainly this whole semester, I’m no longer stuck in my house which has been a huge plus. Also, I get to spend time with my wonderful current roommates.

        Missy poses for a photo as she sits in her dorm working on her laptop
        Missy smiles for the camera, taking a break from her schoolwork!

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        Story and photos by:
        Jack Maisonneuve, senior communications major

        Calysta Laurente’s European Study Abroad Experience

        Today we speak with Calysta Laurente, a junior Management and Marketing major who is also minoring in International Studies. Calysta took the fall 2021 semester abroad to Europe. She discusses her experiences abroad and reflects upon her time studying in France and visiting different countries.

        What made you decide to study abroad? Was it always your intention to study abroad?

        Studying abroad was something that I knew I wanted to do even before I chose Rowan as my university. I love to travel and it is something I hope to continue to do for a very long time. I grew up in a family that also loves to travel, always going on summer vacations and long roadtrips. Growing up traveling to different places and learning about different cultures was always something that I loved to do.

        Although I was a little indecisive of where I wanted to go because I had so many great options, I chose Paris, France. This is because I knew I wanted to be in Europe and I also have close family that live in Paris. This way, I was more comfortable going abroad knowing that I had family close by which I was especially thankful for when it came to the transition from America to France. 

        Picture of Calysta in front of the Eiffel Tower at night.
        Calysta in front of the Eiffel Tower at night.

        What program are you a part of: provider programs, exchange programs or faculty-led programs? 

        The program that I chose through Rowan is the American Institute of Foreign Studies (AIFS), an exchange student program. My study abroad advisor actually helped me choose my program since Rowan offers so many. She suggested AIFS because she had a really good experience abroad with the program when she had gone. 

        Calysta (left) with friend (Naomi) swimming during a boat tour from the Amalfi Coast to Capri in southern Italy.
        Calysta (left) with friend (Naomi) swimming during a boat tour from the Amalfi coast to Capri in southern Italy.

        How has studying abroad been beneficial to you and the major you are studying? 

        One of the factors that I was worried about when choosing to study abroad was if I was still going to graduate on time. Thankfully, through AIFS I had gotten to choose the university I wanted to apply to when coming to France.

        This fall I attended The American Business School of Paris. This is an international university located right in the heart of Paris. Choosing this school was very beneficial for me because I was able to take all the business courses I needed to stay on track to graduate. Also, all of my classes were in English, so there was no language barrier. Lastly, because it is an international university, most students were exchange students for the semester and came from all over the world which made the social aspect really fun because I had the chance to meet so many great people. 

        Can you talk about the different places you have visited while being abroad? Have you stayed in France the entire time or have you traveled elsewhere?

        While living in Europe it was fairly easy to travel to different countries. I was lucky enough to have traveled to Switzerland, Italy, England, Portugal and the Netherlands. I have also traveled to other cities within France. Thankfully, it was easy to travel within Europe; but unfortunately with Covid, the restrictions were different in each country.

        Planning a trip, I had to go through researching the different restriction rules for that specific country beforehand. But going through that process was always worth it for the visit. Each country I was able to see I loved. Getting to learn about the culture in each country was an unforgettable experience for me. 

        A picture of Calysta (left) with friend (Nadia) in front of Musée à Versailles in France.
        Calysta (left) with friend (Nadia) in front of Musée à Versailles in France.

        What has been your favorite part of studying abroad? 

        I love everything about what I had gotten to experience studying abroad. But what I loved the most about traveling is definitely the people I have met. I am so thankful that with my housing situation I was able to live with two other American students that I had gotten so close with in such a short period of time. Through the AIFS program, I was able to be a part of a close knit group of students from all over the U.S. whom I am lucky enough to call some of my best friends.

        Going to the American Business School, I had the opportunity to meet students from all over the world, which was really fascinating to me. Even just the little conversations I had with people during class, hostel stays in different countries, and walking down the streets of France had made such a big impact on my experience abroad.

        I am just so grateful to be able to say that I have friends who live in so many different countries around the world. 

        Was it hard to adjust to being abroad? Was it difficult to be in a different country where a different language was spoken? 

        Personally, it is not very often when I get homesick. At home, I live on campus and during the summers I work alot down the shore, not seeing my family too often. One of the biggest adjustments was living in my homestay. It was really nerve-racking not only knowing that I was moving  into someone else’s home, but also not knowing my roommates beforehand.

        I was completely blind about my living situation until that first day I arrived in France. My homestay family was an older French couple who spoke almost no English so it was very difficult to communicate with them most of the time. I had come to France knowing no French at all and not even having the comfort of your native language was hard to adjust to at first. Although, I was able to get through it. Even though it was hard to communicate with my homestay family, I always did my best. I have been taking a French course as well as studying the language on my own time and those little conversations I had shared with them and I know made them happy. 

        Picture Calysta took of the Louvre Museum.
        A photo by Calysta of the Louvre Museum in Paris.

        Can you talk about where you stayed while abroad and take us through a typical day in your life abroad?

        While abroad, I stayed with a host family – an older French couple with two other roommates who were also 20-year-old American girls (one from South Carolina and the other from Texas). My typical school day started with my first class at 8:30 a.m. Although I either had one or two classes a day, the school day was fairly long because the classes were three hours long. I would wake up around 7 a.m. to get ready for class and give myself time to get to the Metro because public transportation is the most convenient way to get around Paris.

        In between classes depending on how long my break was that day, I would grab food with friends (or alone), trying different cafes and different food places where I can get a quick meal for (hopefully) a reasonable price. I also enjoyed cafes to just socialize with friends or get work done. After my school day, I would take the Metro back home and if I was not having dinner with my host family, or going out with friends, I would be cooking my own meal at home.

        What advice would you give to students preparing to go abroad? Is there anything you wish you knew before you left? 

        The best advice I would give students who are preparing to go abroad would be to step out of your comfort zone and to say yes to doing things you may not be so comfortable with. Obviously, don’t say yes to things you absolutely don’t want to do. But try being social and participate in as much as possible because you are only going to get what you put into the experience abroad.

        Be the first person to start a conversation with someone you may not know, ask questions, try new food, visit as many places as you can — because the time you have abroad goes by so so fast. You are there to complete your courses, but a big part of the education abroad is being independent and figuring things out on your own.

        Something that I wish I knew before I left was how to pack. There were so many times where I felt that I didn’t have the right clothing for certain situations. Make sure to do research on what the weather will be like for the time you are abroad and how the people who live there may dress. I definitely under-packed for my trip. 

        Picture Calysta took of people sitting outside of a Cafe facing the Seine, a 777-kilometre-long river that flows through northern France.
        A photo by Calysta took of a cafe facing the Seine.

        How has studying abroad impacted your educational experience? What has the experience taught you that you may not have been able to learn from staying at Rowan University in the states? 

        I learned so much while living abroad. It was such a great learning experience for not only my field of study, but I was also able to learn so much about myself as well. I was able to learn so much about different cultures and what life is like for those who live in different countries. I felt so connected with so many people I met and it is crazy to think that you live a similar life to someone who lives on the other side of the world. I learned what it really means to be American, and through conversations with others learned their point of view of America which was very interesting. Everything that I have learned about different cultures, religions, and the history of our country and the world, really came to life when I was abroad which was such a surreal experience for me. 

        I always considered myself to be very independent but living on my own in a foreign country, knowing no one, not even the language was such a drastic change for me and there were times where I really had to depend on myself. At Rowan I am constantly surrounded by so many people. Going from living in a house off campus with so many of my closest friends, and my campus being such a short drive away from home — moving to France was quite the change. These are the kinds of things I may not have been able to learn from staying at Rowan. 

        What is your overall impression on this experience? What was the most challenging part of being abroad? What was the most rewarding part? Any other emotions?

        My overall experience of choosing to go abroad was one that I will cherish forever. I am so thankful for my family encouraging me to go to France, Rowan for helping me with the process, and AIFS for making me feel so comfortable abroad.

        Personally, the most challenging part going abroad for me was physically leaving to go to France. I had such a good summer with my family and friends, and by the time the fall semester came around and it was almost time for me to leave, I was having many second thoughts about my decision to leave for the semester. I really enjoy Rowan and watching all my best friends get ready for the semester made me scared that I would miss out. There were definitely hard days abroad where I had felt alone and missed friends and family but that was inevitable. 

        The most rewarding part about being abroad was the fact that I made the decision to come to France alone. Not knowing anyone coming abroad had really forced me to step out of my comfort zone and really get to know myself and those who I had met. I’m lucky enough that I was even getting this experience with the pandemic. It’s rewarding knowing that I am coming back to the U.S. open minded, with a new view on life, and have learned so much about our world. 

        Calysta (left) with friend (Naomi) during a tour of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii in Campania, Italy.
        Calysta (left) with friend (Naomi) during a tour of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii in Campania, Italy.

        What were some culture shocks you experienced while being a student abroad?

        There were many culture shocks I was unprepared for when I came abroad. Most of it had to do with the eating culture in France. To start, the portion sizes are way smaller in France than in America. My eating habits definitely changed abroad — I had found myself eating little portions throughout the day rather than huge meals. Another culture shock having to do with food is the eating times. I learned that in most parts of Europe, restaurants will tend to close during the day, around 3-7 p.m. and then re-open up for dinner, around 8 p.m (everything closed on Sundays). This is because the French people tend to follow a set schedule for when it is time for lunch/dinner. This was difficult at times for my friends and I, especially after long hours of class and found almost nothing to be open. There are other culture shocks I have experienced, but situations with food are what I found to be some of the biggest transitions, especially coming from America. 

        Is there anything else you would like to add or discuss for the article?

        If you have the chance to go abroad for a semester, do it!!!! It seriously changed my life!! Especially with the effect Covid had on my mental health, I realized how much I needed these past 3 ½ months. Going abroad completely alone was one of the bravest things I have ever done and the fear of traveling alone shouldn’t be a reason for a person not to go. I am so thankful for Rowan’s Study Abroad department, AIFS, my supportive family and friends, all of the beautiful places I had experienced, and the amazing people I had met throughout my journey. 

        Calysta in front of the Palace of Westminster and Big Ben in London, England.
        Calysta in front of the Palace of Westminster and Big Ben in London, England.

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        Story by: 
        Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

        Photos provided by:
        Calysta Laurente

        Header Photo courtesy of:
        Pexels

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        #PROFspective: Psychology Major, Psi Sigma Phi Multicultural Fraternity Member Zyaire Harkins

        Zyaire stands outside James Hall.

        Today we speak to junior Psychology major Zyaire Harkins of Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County). Zyaire shares his PROFspective on campus activities, service opportunities in Greek life and his future professional goals. What inspired you to choose your major? I chose psychology during high school. I feel that the mental health field is very undervalued, and […]

        My First Year as a Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management Major

        A Rowan SOM Vaccine Site

        Meet De’Chyna King, a junior transfer student from Cumberland County who is double majoring in Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management and Law and Justice.

        I’ve always liked humanitarian-type services and helping people. During high school I found myself in a lot of helping environments like working with the Red Cross. That was my first introduction to disaster preparedness, because I didn’t even know what the field was called.

        De'Chyna poses for a portrait.It made me think, “What is that major anyway?” So I did my research and fell into it. This is such a new field that not many people know about it, but there’s so much opportunity.

        When I came to Rowan I didn’t realize they were one of the only schools that teach this program in person. There’s such a variety of teachers on campus and after working with them and learning about what they do, I’ve realized this is really what I’m interested in. 

        I want to help people and direct people through national disasters, whether it be through food drive, blood drives, relocating people or through more of a director role.

        This is my first year at Rowan, and I’ve found that there are a lot of opportunities. Especially with COVID-19, there’s a lot of internships at Rowan’s mega-site.

        De'Chyna stands in front of Westby Hall.This pandemic was a new experience. Nobody was prepared to know how to handle it — exactly what Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management majors do. As an intern you could be involved from directing people, assisting with checking cards, organizing lines, checking allergies, even working with the military. It was a great experience with all these professional people. Working with first responders was a lot to experience my first semester here.

        All of my teachers are very hands on, as far as internships and involvement. Everything from internships and resumes to jobs after college. Especially on the East coast, there’s so many federal jobs with the White House and Homeland Security.

        If you know you like helping people, not even in a direct way, this could be great option for you. Emergency Management and Disaster Preparedness is such an umbrella of things. You can be working with logistics if you’re good with numbers. You can be working with directors for hands-on leadership skills. You can work with mapping, there’s geographical, there’s environmental sciences.

        This such a broad major that you can apply yourself wherever — you’re never out of a job, and you’re always needed. So it’s something that everyone can enjoy if they find the right space for themselves.

        If you do your own research and you enjoy logistics and humanitarianism, this is absolutely a great fit for you. This major is so broad that work-wise [it will] always be needed.

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        Sisters on SGA: Sarah and Madeline McClure

        Sarah and Madeline pose together in front of the owl statue.

        Today we speak to Rowan siblings Sarah and Madeline McClure. Sarah McClure, the Executive Vice President of the Student Government Association (SGA), is a senior International Studies and Political Science double major. Madeline McClure, the Assistant Vice President of Public Relations of the Student Government Association, is a junior Marketing major. They are from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County), and they live together in an on-campus apartment. Sarah and Madeline tell us about their positions in SGA and their experiences as being sisters at Rowan and in SGA together.

        Madeline and Sarah pose together at a white table.
        Madeline, left, and Sarah, right.

        Can you tell me a bit about your positions in SGA?

        Sarah: I am the Executive Vice President of SGA. I am in charge of club development. That means I oversee all the about 170 clubs on campus, as well as field new clubs.

        Madeline: I am the Assistant Vice President of Public Relations. I run all of SGA’s social media. I focus on Instagram the most. I make any promotional materials, and I write press releases. In the spring, I will run Back to the Boro, which is a community service event where we give back to the residents of Glassboro. My job is to make sure that people view SGA in a positive way. 

        Why did both of you choose to go to Rowan?

        Sarah: All of our cousins are much older. The youngest is about seven years older than me. When I was touring schools, one of them told me not to look at Rowan because it was just a bunch of buildings in the middle of nowhere. When she looked at Rowan, many of the buildings that are here now weren’t. But, I came, and I toured anyway because one of our mom’s coworkers works in admissions and she recommended I tour. So, we toured, we spoke to someone in admissions, and I just had a great feeling about Rowan. I went to an accepted student’s day, and I heard Richard Jones speak, who was the Dean of Students at the time. He spoke about the community here and how all the professors really care about their students, and that resonated with me in a way that no other college had. 

        Madeline: I had never heard of Rowan until Sarah began her college search. When we toured for Sarah, I immediately loved the campus and was interested in Rowan. However, when Sarah applied, I didn’t want to come here anymore because I didn’t want to go to college with my sister. But, I ended up here anyway. Now, we live in an apartment together, and we’re on SGA together. 

        Another big part of us both choosing Rowan was the financial aspect. We both wanted to make a good financial choice with our education. We both wanted in-state tuition, and there is a scholarship you can apply for if you have a family member that also goes here.

        Madeline and Sarah talk outside the SGA office in the Student Center.

        What’s it like being on SGA together?

        Madeline: Sarah is actually the reason I ran for this position in SGA. My whole idea of SGA, before I started, revolved around Sarah’s involvement in SGA. It’s amazing to be a part of SGA and be in this position. But, working with Sarah, she’s just another member of the board. Well, she’s so important, and I think she’s a genius, but it doesn’t feel like I’m working with my sister. I’m glad I get to experience this with her. 

        But being on SGA is really fun, but it’s a lot of work. It’s a lot more work than I initially expected. It’s very rewarding when you finish the work, especially because I didn’t think I could handle all of it.

        Sarah: Like Madeline said, it’s less like working with my sister, and more like a team member relationship with the added background of knowing each other for 20 years. Since I was involved in SGA last year too, sometimes people come up to me and ask me if Madeline is my sister. I was worried in the beginning that Madeline might feel out of place, but she proved to me quickly that I didn’t need to feel that way. She fit right in. She’s doing a great job. I’m proud of her.

        Sarah and Madeline hug outside Robinson Hall.

        How has going to college with your sister affected your college experience?

        Madeline: When I first started at Rowan, I wasn’t looking for a super involved college experience. I was expecting to get the degree, and that’s all. But, being here with Sarah has pushed me to be more involved, be a better student, and achieve so much more than I thought I would. Sarah is so smart and takes so much on her plate. I never would have joined something like SGA if I weren’t here with Sarah. It would have gone so differently if we had gone to different schools.

        Sarah: To add to that, it’s just nice to have someone who knows me on campus. I try my best, but in doing so much on campus, it can be hard to maintain a steady social life. To be able to go back to the apartment and have my sister there to crack jokes and hang out with is special. It makes it feel more like home in the apartment. 

        Madeline and Sarah pose in front of the SGA bulletin board in the Student Center.

        Do you have any advice for incoming students who are hesitant about going to college with their sibling?

        Madeline: I was definitely hesitant at first. As kids and teenagers, we had a lot of arguments. I was worried about that continuing if we went to college together, but in a short period of time you mature and you realize you aren’t so different and you have the same goals. Even if we get into little arguments in the apartment, we forget about it the next day. 

        Also, there’s no rule that you have to live together like Sarah and I. For the first two years I was here, Sarah and I barely saw each other. The campus can be so big. You do not have to be intertwined at all. Being at college with your sibling doesn’t have to define your experience.

        Sarah: To go off of that, Madeline and I are in two different majors and two different years. I maybe saw Madeline walking down the street once or twice and waved, but that’s all. It’s like going to the same college as someone random in your high school. You aren’t going to see them all the time, especially if you are taking different classes and are involved in different things. I used to get so excited to see her and walk past her, since we didn’t see each other that much. While you’re looking for independence, it’s nice to have someone to come to or fall back on, and it’s someone who has known you your entire life. I can be goofy with her like nobody else. I never expected to have this good of an experience with my sister. We were different as kids and teens, but now we are adults and we are much closer.

        For anyone who is contemplating going to the same school as their sibling, give it a chance. Think about how you feel about the campus, if you like the program, and if you feel the school is a good fit for you. Don’t let the fact that you may already have a sibling going to that school influence your decision. Chances are, your sibling probably won’t play much of a factor in your experience while you are there. 

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        Story by:
        Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

        Photos by:
        Missy Pavorsky, junior advertising major 

        Rowan University Geography Major Hopes to Create Change For Future Generations

        A landscape photo of the fountain behind engineering pond.

        Jaylen Shanklin, a junior Geography major from Gloucester County, shares why he chose his major and the environmental impact that he hopes to have.

        Jaylen poses for a portrait outside Science Hall.“I’ve always had an interest in geography. My dad is a major history buff and we’d watch shows together and it drew me in,” says Jaylen.

        His initial interest in the major drew him to the program, but the classes and professors are what made him know it was a good fit.

        “I’ve been lucky! All of my professors I’ve had, no matter the subject or the class, have all gone above and beyond the call of being a professor,” Jaylen explains. “They’ve made sure everyone succeeds professionally and personally.”

        Geography students research and present ways to build and manage resources in a more sustainable way. 

        “I want to make a positive change and I know this major will get me there. I want to know that I put my imprint on our local community and made this place a better, more sustainable state for my kids and future generations. My favorite class so far has been Geography in New Jersey, because it focuses on what I can do for my community.”

        Jaylen, a Rowan University geography major, looks at a globe.Jaylen is currently in his junior year and has been involved with extracurricular activities in addition to things related to his major. While he looks forward to the field work and internships, he finds a lot of value in networking and making friends.

        “I play Rugby and I wrestle, so my advice is to just get involved. Take classes in your major, even out of your major. Dip your toe in everything and take a wide range of exploratory classes. Do a bunch of clubs, even if you think it wouldn’t be for you. It all helps and makes you a better person, and that’s what college is about after all.”

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        Sports CaM Major, Navy Reservist and Mother Harley Sarmiento Shares Her Story

        Today we feature Harley Sarmiento, a junior Sports Communication and Media major with a concentration in Sports Journalism from Gibbstown, NJ (Gloucester County). Harley is a member of the Navy Reserve and mother to her 1-year-old son. Harley goes into detail on her experience within the military and as a transfer student at Rowan.

        Why did you choose to study Sports Communication and Media?

        I was an athlete growing up. During high school I competed in two different varsity sports and then I managed a varsity sport in the winter. Because of this, I always had a personal connection to sports. My family was also heavily involved in our sports programs back in my home town. Once I started journalism in the military, I decided I wanted to pursue it on the sports side while working on the civilian side. 

        Harley Sarmiento smiles near a tree-lined path on campus.
        Harley Sarmiento

        Why did you choose Rowan to study Sports Communication and Media?

        I am a transfer student from University of California San Diego. I was stationed there for four years, and I just moved back to New Jersey in May.

        Once I moved back to New Jersey and I was looking at schools, I found that Rowan was the best fit for me location wise and in regards to my academic goals. 

        How has Rowan supported you in being a mother, active in the navy and being a student?

        This fall semester is my first semester here at Rowan. The professors that I have had this semester have been extremely supportive. I have been taking both online and in person classes this semester and the professors have really been flexible with my schedule. For the most part, I have had really good relationships with all my professors to where if something comes up with my son, they were super easy to communicate with and understand that being a mother comes first.

        At my previous university, I did not have the support, understanding or flexibility from my professors. Rowan has been extremely helpful, especially during my first semester here as a transfer student. 

        Harley holds up her son Easton in front of autumn foliage.
        Harley with her son, Easton

        Can you talk a little bit about why you joined the Navy? What was your motivation to join?

        My grandfather and my uncle were both in the Navy. Because of this, I always heard about the military growing up. The year before I joined the Navy, my cousin, who was my best friend throughout my childhood, joined the Marine Corps. My cousin seemed to have a very positive experience and  this led me to deciding to join the Navy. I also did not want to give my parents the burden of paying for college. After weighing my options, I decided to join the Navy, travel the world for a time period, and then come back and finish my degree. 

        Can you talk a little bit about where you have been deployed to and your experience on duty? What is the longest time you have been away from home? Are you going to be deployed anytime soon?

        When you are active in the Navy, you know a timeframe of when you will be deployed. For instance, I knew a couple months ahead that I was going to be deployed because they are scheduled. However, now that I am on the reserve side, I kind of get to pick and choose if I want to go or if I want to stay home — unless something huge happens and they need me to go serve. My current title is Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class, Surface Warfare/Air Warfare. 

        When I was on the active side, I deployed to many different places. In 2018, I deployed for 10.5 months on the USNS Mercy. This was a hospital humanitarian ship where we provided medical care for many different countries. Some of the countries that I have been to were Japan, Indonesia, Guam, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, and some smaller islands owned by the bigger countries mentioned. I was a photographer journalist, so my job was basically to document everything we did for these countries while on these deployments. 

        Harley walking with her son on a walking path along Rowan Boulevard.

        Do you plan on having a future professional career in Sports Communication and Media or do you hope to stay involved with the naval academy and/or military in some way?

        My goal overall is to eventually separate from the Navy to pursue a more civilian career in Sports Communications. As much as I loved the military, it was not heavily family oriented. I want to see my son grow up and be available to attend all his events, and this is unlikely while being active in the Navy. 

        How do you manage to balance your education with your involvement in the Navy while also being a mother? 

        Coming back to New Jersey and my hometown has been extremely beneficial for my son and my family. My parents still live locally, my cousins, aunts, uncles and siblings all chip in and help, [my] boyfriend’s family helps, and everyone in my circle is willing to help whenever we need anything. I am really lucky that I have such a big support system. 

        Harley reading to her son at Rowan Barnes and Noble.

        What is your favorite part of being a mother?

        I think providing my child with everything I ever wanted is one of my favorite parts of being a mother. For instance, my son just turned 1 year old in August, and we took him to Disney with my family for his birthday. I think seeing his excitement everyday is so rewarding. The little things that make him happy like the Christmas tree and the lights are so rewarding. It is like I get to see the world through a kid’s eyes again. 

        What are your goals after you graduate?

        I am hoping that it works out that I can be a stay-at-home mom for a little bit since my boyfriend has a stable job [who is in the Army]. Once my son starts school, I plan on hopefully working for a local newspaper and cover the high school sports of the area. My boyfriend is 28 and I am 23 and we enjoy attending and watching the sporting events locally, so I think it would be interesting to cover those events for a newspaper. 

        Harley smiling while sitting on a bench on campus.

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        Story By:
        Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

        Studio Art Majors Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger Featured in Philadelphia Art Show

        Philadelphia skyline.

        Today we feature Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger, two Studio Art majors who recently displayed their work in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia. We interviewed Taylor and Abby on their experiences as young artists at the show and on how they developed their interests in creating art. 

        Taylor Brown, junior Studio Art major from Perry Hill, Maryland

        Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

        In high school I went to a magnet school in Maryland, which is a high school completely dedicated to the arts. They have classes focused on dance, acting, and the arts like painting. While I was at school there I focused on art so I developed a passion for creating artwork throughout those four years. Studio art was a great option for me because I did not fully know what I wanted to do, and studio art gives room for exploring your interests through a variety of classes. 

        Taylor Brown's setup at the art show.
        Taylor Brown’s display at the 2021 Rittenhouse Art Show.

        How did you first get interested in art? 

        In middle school I felt like I started excelling in art. I overall genuinely enjoyed attending art class and it was something I looked forward to on a daily basis. This is when I decided to go to high school at the magnet school and focus on art throughout my high school career. 

        What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

        I really like sculpture, graphite and oil painting. 

        Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.
        Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.

        Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life? 

        I like to create a mixture of everything. I love working with different mediums and get my inspiration from anywhere. Instead of thinking about creating art as a project or as “work,” I like to think I am creating something because I enjoy the process. My pieces are never the same, and it makes the process very interesting for me.

        How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

        I basically received an email in my student email sent to all art majors explaining there was an art show if I was interested. I immediately thought it could be a cool experience, so I made an application and submitted some art work. I then received an email that I was accepted and that’s how it all started!

        What is your favorite part of producing art?

        I really enjoy the process of producing art. 

        Taylor Brown's 14 x 14 in canvas oil painting of a plant.
        Taylor Brown’s 14 x 14 inch canvas oil painting of a plant sold at the art show.

        How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out art shows in the future?

        It was such an amazing experience. I got to speak to other artists where they gave me feedback on how I could grow and what I could work on. It was the first time I had my artwork in a show where attendees could buy my work. I sold six pieces and I think it is so cool how someone has my artwork in their house somewhere. I will definitely seek out future art show opportunities. 

        Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car.
        Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car sold at the art show.

        Abby Leitinger, sophomore Studio Art major from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

        Why did you choose Rowan to study Studio Art?

        I toured a bunch of schools junior year of high school. Rowan was actually the last school I toured because I did not have serious intentions of going there. I ended up touring Rowan because it was local and I have friends that went there. It wasn’t until I went on my tour that I realized Rowan was where I needed to be. My tour guide happened to be a Biomedical Art and Visualization Major, which I thought was very interesting. But Rowan was one the only school that thoroughly discussed art on my tour. I felt instantly that art was important and prominent on campus. 

        Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

        My advisor placed me in this major. I was informed that this major was a basic art major that would let me explore my options. I picked this major so I could eventually find what I love to do and select a concentration that best fits that.

        Abby Leitinger in her booth, engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.
        Abby Leitinger engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.

        How did you first get interested in art? 

        From a young age I was always interested in art. I was constantly drawing and I always had a box of Crayola crayons at an easy reach. I never thought of majoring in art until senior year of high school. I always thought I had to pursue art as a pastime on the side. My art teacher was the person that encouraged me to pursue art. She simply cared so much about art. She was the first person that looked at my art and then decided to put it in an art contest. She told me art is everywhere and I can be involved in so many different professions while being an artist. 

        What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

        I really like to use pen and ink. However, I do like to explore different mediums and I find myself using watercolor, acrylic, and charcoal as well. 

        Abby Leitinger's Great Dane", a pen and ink drawing part of her pets series.
        Abby Leitinger’s “Great Dane,” a pen and ink drawing, part of her pets series.

        Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life?

        I am an exploratory artist. I love trying different things and alternating between different subjects. I think I would get bored if I only created the same types of pieces. I like to keep ideas fresh.

        How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

        I received an email that I believe was distributed to all art majors. I am extremely grateful that I saw this email because this led me to this amazing experience. This is another reason of why I believe Rowan was the place I was meant to be — because of opportunities like this that are offered through Rowan. 

        I ended up submitting a portfolio for this process, which was looked over and judged. I later got notification that I was approved for the spot. 

        Abby Leitinger's "Cranes", a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.
        Abby Leitinger’s “Cranes,” a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.

        What is your favorite part of producing art?

        I love looking at the final result. I can be a perfectionist at times, so when I get to the final process of looking at what I accomplished and thoroughly enjoying it, it is really rewarding.

        How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out Art Shows in the future?

        It was stressful leading up to the show because of the constant preparation. I had to price my pieces out which was shockingly challenging. When I actually got to the show and got to just sit and observe, I began to relax and appreciate the moment. I ended up selling a lot of pieces which is more than I could have asked for. It is really cool to think about a person having my artwork in their house right now. 

        Abby Leitinger's booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.
        Abby Leitinger’s booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.

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        Story By:
        Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

        Photos provided by:
        Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger

        Related posts:

        Inside the Studio Art Major and Apprenticeship Program with Hannah Healy

        Beyond the Classroom: How Two Students Blend Art and Science

        Alumni Success: Felicia Brown Talks Career, Future Goals and Her M.A. in Arts Administration

        #PROFspective: Junior Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Omar Bedewy

        Omar stands in front of the banner at Rowan Hall.

        Today we speak to Omar Bedewy, a junior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Business. Omar is an off-campus renter from Paterson, NJ (Passaic County). He transferred to Rowan from Union County College.

        Omar poses in a wooded area.

        What inspired you to choose your major?

        Life is changing around us. Before I was an Electrical and Computer Engineering major, I was hoping to be a petroleum engineer. I switched to studying electrical and computer engineering because I believe this field will have a big impact on the future.

        Tell us something interesting you’ve learned in a class this semester.

        I am taking a class on electromagnetics. I found out that electromagnets are in everything, and I am really interested in the science behind it.

        Omar poses in front of Rowan Hall.

        Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.

        Wednesdays are usually my busiest days. I come to Rowan at eight in the morning. I have some coffee and check my email. After that, I head out to my first class at 9 a.m. I have a lab right after, but I have 15 minutes in between. During that time, I talk and chill with my friend. After the lab, I go for some tutoring and study for a bit. Then, I have another class. After this class, I go to the cafeteria for my lunch. I have one more class at 5, and then I go home.

        Omar poses in a wooded area.

        Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that makes you feel like Rowan is home.

        I really enjoy going to tutoring at Rowan. The people there make me feel like Rowan is home.

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        Story by:
        Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

        Photos by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

        Valentina Giannattasio, freshman dance and marketing double major

        Cyreelle Cruz, RIPPAC Member and Scholarship Recipient, Shares Her Story

        Exterior shot of the top of Bunce Hall.

        Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship (RIPPAC) member and recent scholarship recipient Cyreelle Cruz, a junior History major from Camden County, shares how the connections she has made with Rowan faculty have taken her to the next level. 

        What got you interested in your major?

        Since I was a freshman in high school, I was always really good at history. Everyone else dreaded history classes, but I always felt cool knowing I did well in the classes. Since I had a really good AP history test score, I was able to bypass a college course.

        I started as a Computer Science major because that’s what I thought I wanted to do, but when it came down to it, I decided to change it to something I knew I loved and I was good at.

        How did you find out about the RIPPAC internship scholarships? [editor’s note: these scholarships help offset the costs of taking on an unpaid internship]

        I was lucky enough to have Professor Dworkin in class, who happens to be the head of RIPPAC. He talked non-stop in the class about the scholarship and how to apply for it. I was hesitant at first because I work two jobs and didn’t know if I could take on another commitment. But after hearing about all of the benefits of the opportunity, I started to ask myself, “What if this would be more beneficial to my future than working two jobs?”

        After thinking about it for a while, I decided to apply for the James P. Fox Memorial Fund. 

        Cyreelle sitting while looking at her phone.

        Describe your internship and the work you do.

        I intern with the Addiego, Natale and Eckel campaign for State Senate and Assembly. The people are really great and I never feel overwhelmed or pressured with the workload. We do a lot of event research and will even start to attend events in the future. We are in the process of recruiting more members and making lots of phone calls. It’s been an awesome experience so far!

        What is your advice for other students who want to apply for internships?

        I would say it’s so important to utilize the connections with professors. I don’t know how I would have done it without the guidance and encouragement from Professor Dworkin. I remember I would try to find internships/jobs on Indeed and other external websites, but it would never work out. But your professors are there to help you and get you the opportunities you want, so don’t be afraid to ask for that help.

        A selfie of Cyreelle

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        Story by:
        Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

        Header photo by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

        Other photos courtesy of:
        Cyreelle Cruz

        #PROFspective: Finance Major, Management Information Systems Minor Sasmita Prabu

        Today we feature Sasmita Prabu, a junior Finance major who is also minoring in Management Information Systems. Sasmita works for the Office of Volunteerism as a Blood Services Coordinator and is also the secretary of the Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging in Business Club. She discusses her major and goes into detail about her involvement in several clubs around campus.

        Why did you choose Rowan to study finance?

        I chose Rowan because it quickly became my happy medium. It was a school that not only met my expectations in regards to academic opportunity, it also fit my desired needs for professor-to-student ratio. When deciding on a university to further my education, it was important to me to be able to learn in an environment where my professors could dedicate more time to engage with their students.

        I also believe that it is important to be located near a major city. The location of Rowan is a short drive to Philadelphia, where I have endless opportunities for internships and future jobs.

        Sasmita Prabu outside College of Business.

        Why did you choose to study finance?

        I wanted to study a major that utilizes my analytical and communication skills.

        What are your future plans and what is your dream job for working as a finance major?

        Currently, I am exploring my options for the future through hands-on internship experiences. Last summer I interned for AT&T’s Billing Operations department.

        This summer I am seeking an internship opportunity that will allow me to expand on my skill sets further and utilize them in my future endeavors. 

        Sasmita Prabu.

        What does your role as Undergraduate Coordinator of Blood Services for the Office of Volunteerism entail? How did you get involved with this?

        My role as Undergraduate Coordinator of Blood Services includes working closely with colleagues of the Office of Volunteerism team to help organize bi-monthly on-campus blood drives with the support of the American Red Cross.

        My freshman year I attended a series of volunteering events where I heard about this opportunity. However, my initial interest in volunteering and working with blood drives started in high school. While in high school, I was the president of my Red Cross club where I also helped facilitate blood drives. These opportunities have been a great way to give back to the community and build leadership skills while doing so.

        What does the day of a blood drive look like?

        There is so much preparation involved before the day of a blood drive. The work realistically begins many weeks prior with advertising the drive, contacting donors, and recruiting student volunteers. We have immense support from student organizations, clubs and faculty that make our bi-monthly blood drives not only possible but successful. I am organizing these blood drives, but I do have an entire family of colleagues and student organizations supporting and assisting me.

        Sasmita Prabu wearing red cross hat.

        Can you tell us more about the Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging in Business Club? What are your responsibilities as secretary of this club? How did you get involved with this?

        This is a newly founded student organization embracing diversity and promoting inclusion and belonging in the workplace. This club provides a sense of community and inclusive professional development resources to all majors. It is important to note that DIBB is not focused on just business majors.

        My responsibilities as secretary of this club includes communicating with our members and maintaining club records. I also assist our club Community Outreach Chair in event planning by scheduling guest speakers. Additionally, I look forward to taking on more responsibilities this semester as I was recently promoted to club Vice President.

        What is your advice for other women as finance majors that are simply trying to compete in a field that is male dominant? 

        I think it is important to have confidence in yourself and your questions. There will be times where you may be unsure of yourself, and asking questions and seeking help will only aid you.

        Sasmita Prabu outside of College of Business.

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        Story by: 
        Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

        Photos by:
        Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

        Confidence Is Not Always Consistent, And That’s Ok

        Sarah poses in Business Hall.

        This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

        Being confident is hard, especially as a college student. Transitioning into a competitive environment, navigating through your career goals and personal goals, as well as uncertainty about the future can have a significant impact on an individual’s self-esteem.

        College is a unique experience and with it comes a variety of obstacles and adventures. While being a college student can be a very rewarding journey, it can also come with a wide range of challenges that can result in a fluctuating self-esteem, and that’s ok.

        Sarah poses on a bench by trees near Rowan Hall.

        Self-esteem is rarely at a constant level, it fluctuates and develops throughout our lives. According to an article published by Mayo Clinic, “Self-esteem begins to develop and form in early childhood … depending on your circumstances it can begin to fluctuate throughout time” (Mayo Clinic, 2020).

        Factors such as life experiences, friendships, home life, school life, relationships, how we perceive ourselves and more influence our self-esteem. A majority of these factors are probably significantly different now compared to how they were in childhood. Throughout that time period, a variety of changes and overall growth occurs. The changes physically, emotionally, mentally and socially significantly and greatly impact self-esteem as growth and maturity develops and takes place.

        As young adults and adults, that growth has not stopped. During an academic career in college and higher education in general, a lot of changes will occur, both good and bad ones, throughout an individual’s time as a college student. It is ok to experience fluctuation in confidence and self-esteem.

        Sarah poses in front of Engineering Pond.

        Self-esteem is important and it is something that can affect individual’s greatly, especially if they are experiencing low self-esteem. It is ok to experience both healthy and low self-esteem. Most, if not all, college students go through times where confidence is high as well as times where confidence feels nonexistent. It is important, however, to reach out to trusted resources on and off campus if self-esteem and confidence is starting to affect daily life.

        Sarah poses in front of a tree outside Rowan Hall.

        From freshman to senior year of college, there is a significant difference in who individuals are when they first start college and who they are when they graduate college. That change from the first day of college to the last day just shows how individuals change and grow during their college experience. Fluctuations in self-esteem, both the highs and lows, is a part of that growth individual’s experience throughout their time in college. In the end, the high’s and low’s in confidence are valid and ok to experience throughout college and throughout life as well.

        Reference: 

        Mayo Clinic, Staff. (2020, July 14). Does your self-esteem need a boost? Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/self-esteem/art-20047976.

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        Story by:
        Sarah Mackenzie, junior biological sciences major from Gloucester County, NJ, Wellness Center intern

        Photos by:
        Joe Gentempo, art graduate

        Andrew Slowinski, 2021 Rick Rosenberg Jr. Memorial Scholarship Recipient

        Exterior shot of Robinson Hall.

        Today we feature Andrew Slowinski, a junior Political Science major. Andrew also minors in Economics and is from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County). Andrew shares his internship experience this past summer as a recipient of the 2021 Rick Rosenberg Jr. Memorial Scholarship.  

        According to the Rowan Institute of Public Policy and Citizenship (RIPPAC), the scholarship awards $2,500 for a student to take an unpaid summer internship “and aspire to pursue a future political career like the late Rick Rosenberg, Jr., the Republican political operative.”

          What got you interested in political science?

          Back in my junior year of high school I took a class called Political and Legal Education because the class I originally wanted to take was not available. I decided to take this class after having a few options to choose from. I quickly realized that I really liked learning about the political science field and I thoroughly enjoyed taking the class.

          During the class there was a legal chapter where we had to do a mock trial, which I thought was very fun. After that class I decided to make a career out of it.

          Andrew Slowinski.
          Andrew Slowinski

          How did you find out about the Rosenberg scholarship?

          Professor Dworkin introduced me to this scholarship and internship opportunity. I met Professor Dworkin through a club I am part of called the Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship (RIPPAC). He told me to check out the RIPPAC internship scholarships available, and that is how I found the Rick Rosenberg, Jr. Memorial Scholarship.

          What are your responsibilities in your internship?

          I interned at the New Jersey Office of the Public Defender, and I had several responsibilities for the summer. First off, my supervisor would send me documents, court reports and testimonies to look over and prepare for upcoming court that we had. I would outline key sections that would be of value to us, write questions for cross-examination and write memos. An example of a memo I have written was a memo for reconsideration and I would apply it to a case we currently have because the judge ruled it not the way we hoped … therefore we ask for reconsideration.

          The internship took place over the whole summer, and we had court at least five times a week.

          Andrew (left)with friends Brandon, Tyler, and Joey at Joey's sisters wedding.
          Andrew (left) with friends Brandon, Tyler, and Joey at Joey’s sister’s wedding.

          What are your professional goals?

          After undergrad I will be attending law school; I am not sure on where I want to get my law degree from yet. From there I am still deciding on whether I want to become a lawyer or a judge for my future profession. 

          What advice do you have for other students seeking political science internships?

          Networking is imperative when it comes to seeking out any internship or scholarship opportunities. I reached out to Professor Dworkin, and he helped me build a well-written resume. In high school I interned for a U.S. congressman because my mom’s friend is a supervisor and she assisted in helping me get that internship at such an early age.

          Networking and reaching out to friends or family that may work in your area of interest is huge when starting out. 

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          Story by:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          Photos courtesy of:
          Andrew Slowinski

          Header photo courtesy of:
          University Publications

          Beyond the Classroom: Legislative Intern, Scholarship Winner Nick Feldman

          Nick smiles, stands in front of Bunce Hall.

          Today we feature Nick Feldman, a junior Political Science major with Certificates of Undergraduate Study (CUGS) in Public Policy and Russian. An on-campus resident from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County), Nick transferred to Rowan from Rosemont College. He works as a photographer for Rowan Athletics and as a Multimedia Editor for The Whit. Nick interned at NJ State Assemblywoman Patricia Lampitt’s office (District 6) and NJ State Assemblyman William Spearman (District 5), and is one of eight recipients of the Dr. Bruce Caswell Scholars Fund. 

          Nick poses on the side of Bunce Hall.

          Could you share some backstory about yourself?

          When I first came to Rowan, in Fall 2020, we were in the middle of the pandemic. I went to campus reluctantly. At first, I thought there wouldn’t be a lot of opportunities, but as I got involved, I realized that there were. I’m really, really excited about this semester. I know there’s going to be so many more opportunities. 

          What got you interested in political science?

          I’ve always liked history. At Rosemont College, the college I transferred from, my major was history education. I was studying to be a high school history teacher. However, I’ve always been very interested in politics.

          During the 2020 election, I obsessed over the campaigns, the candidates, the policies, everything. So, I thought it was a logical choice to switch my major over to the political science, which is something that I’ve always really liked. I have always thought about how I can make a difference in the world. Well, if I major in Political Science, and I’m able to intern with the people who represent me, I get to know the ins and outs of the process. Then, hopefully, when I graduate college and go into the professional world, I can make a positive impact on the world. Therefore, it was a natural choice. 

          Nick holds a DSLR camera in front of Bunce Hall.

          How did you find out about the Caswell Scholarship?

          I received an email from the Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship (RIPPAC) about the Caswell Scholarship and other scholarships. The scholarship was enticing. I worked on two unpaid political internships this summer. I thought I might as well just apply for any of the scholarships in the email, in order to cover my expenses. I ended up getting the Caswell Scholarship, which is huge. The Caswell Scholarship helped with even just gas money to get from my house to the internships. 

          Can you tell me about your two internships?

          One of my internships was with Assemblywoman Patricia Lampitt, an assemblywoman in the sixth legislative district, where I live. This internship was remote, and more policy and analysis focused. I was given bills as long as 20 pages, and I read through them and categorized where money was being spent. While some people might find this kind of work boring, I found it fun.

          My other internship was in the fifth legislative district office in Woodbury with Assemblyman William Spearman. My internship with Assemblyman Spearman was in person. I enjoyed being in person and getting to talk with my co-workers face to face and learning from their experiences. Most of my responsibilities were focused on constituent services, such as answering the phone, transferring calls, and entering callers into our call system. Our call system keeps track of the reason for their call, so we can keep track of their concerns and their contact information. Unfortunately, many people are calling about unemployment, but we were able to track that and help them. I really liked this internship. 

          Nick poses in front of a tree.

          What are some policies that you worked on specifically?

          Many of the policies I worked on at my internship with Assemblywoman Lampitt were K-12 education based, since the Assemblywoman is the Chair of the New Jersey General Assembly Committee on Education. Something I worked on was keeping track of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority, which is the state agency for rebuilding and upgrading our schools and public school system. One project was looking through their massive portfolio and seeing where their money is being spent, and what it is being spent on.

          Also, the Assemblywoman did a lot of work regarding childhood poverty. I remember she had me looking at legislative proposals that worked to diminish the effects of childhood poverty in our state. New Jersey, unfortunately, has a high cost of living, so the cost to live here is a lot more than the federal guidelines say it should cost to live. Unfortunately, there are many people in New Jersey who are technically in poverty, but to the federal government, they are not, because the federal government’s guidelines are so low. So she’s working to see if there are any remedies to that so that people who need help can actually get instead of being frozen out of the system.

          How has the Caswell Scholarship impacted you?

          To be chosen for the Caswell Scholarship felt like validation of everything that I’ve been trying to achieve over these last few years. I hold it in the same regard as making Dean’s list. The scholarship feels like affirmation of those times where I’ve had trouble. I have ADHD, so I have had a really hard time with organization and whatnot. Getting these two internships was a huge moment for me, because it was wonderful to be out in the outside world working. It required great organizational skills so that I could have two different positions. The scholarship made me feel like all the work that I’ve been putting in has come to fruition. Feeling recognized makes me feel really good, not just about what I’ve achieved, but about myself. It makes me feel that even though I have this thing that makes me different and is pretty difficult sometimes with daily tasks, I can accomplish what I want to accomplish.

          Nick poses in front of a tree and the American flag.

          Could you describe your professional goals?

          I really, really want to be in [Washington] DC. DC is the place to be, but I would really love to be on a staff in the federal government, so that I can work on laws and legislation. State and local governments are important, but the federal government is a whole different animal. I would love to be down there, not only working, but continuing to advocate for the causes that I believe in, progressive education policy and progressive health care policies. Then who knows. Maybe one day, I would love to run for office, but that would be in the future. 

          What advice do you have for other students seeking political science college internships? 

          I would say don’t be scared and don’t be intimidated. That’s how I felt applying for a lot of these internships. I got rejected by a couple and that got me down; but overall, I was fine in the long run. Don’t get intimidated by the process. It might seem intimidating that someone who’s part of a staff is going to interview you for an internship. However, once you get in contact with these people, you’ll realize that they’re normal people just like you. The staff wants to hire somebody who works hard. They want to bring somebody in who’s affable, who will not be a negative presence in the office. They want somebody who’s going to be a hard worker and will do what is needed to help. If I had to do the process over again, that’s exactly what I would try to emphasize.

          Also, don’t be afraid to work at the state and local level. The federal government is cool and all. However, if you think about it, your local government takes care of daily things such as sewage. Your state government provides unemployment. So don’t knock working in the state or local government. It’s very important.

          Nick stands on the side of Bunce Hall.

          Final thoughts?

          I really wish that I had come to Rowan from the start. I love my experiences here, the people I’ve met, and just how welcoming the entire campus has been. I went to a smaller school to start out. There were probably 300 people at my previous school. I like that Rowan is bigger and feels more like a university. One of the best decisions of my life was transferring to Rowan. 

          I am also thankful for Dr. Dworkin and the entire RIPPAC team. When I first came to Rowan, I didn’t think there was anything for me to do. I got these emails from Dr. Dworkin saying, if you’re interested in Political Science, come on, come out. I thought, “I’ll just go, I have nothing better to do.” It was a brilliant decision for me to get involved with RIPPAC and get involved on campus.

          RIPPAC’s been great. They made me feel welcome. They have improved not only my professional development, but they’re also teaching me. Besides just the ins and outs of policy and legislation, they also have been having these great leadership seminars too. They’ve also been an extremely big help for me, and they’ve helped me grow not just in terms of my experience and what I can do, but also in terms of who I am. They’ve been a positive influence.

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          Organized and edited by:
          Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major 

          Photos by:
          Nick Flagg, senior theatre and advertising major

          First Person Perspective: Women’s Lacrosse at Rowan University With Natalie DePersia

          Rowan Blog contributor, Public Relations major and student athlete Natalie DePersia shares her experience as a member of the Rowan University Women’s Lacrosse Team. 

          Like many collegiate athletes, I developed a love for my sport in high school. However, I can easily say that I loved lacrosse in high school for a completely different combination of reasons than the reasons I love lacrosse now.

          My high school lacrosse team was ranked amongst the top five teams in the state. My graduating class consisted of nine players, and seven of us continued on to play lacrosse or field hockey in college.

          I loved lacrosse in high school for the social aspect, to fuel my competitive edge, because my team was simply … the team to beat. 

          Natalie DePersia Playing Lacrosse.
          Natalie playing lacrosse at Ursinus in spring 2020.

          My love for lacrosse in college became way more than a social experience. Yes, I met friends I know I will have for a lifetime. However, Rowan Women’s Lacrosse gave me a fresh start. Many individuals have a variety of different experiences when they commit to a university to play a collegiate sport. Some experiences are bad, some average, some good, and some are the once-in-a-lifetime … amazing experiences.

          As soon as I got to Rowan, I quickly realized I did not only love the sport, I loved the culture that was built up into the program. 

          Practice picture from preseason 2021.
          Full team picture after practice from preseason in spring 2021.

          There are always pros and cons of playing a sport in college. Cons may include waking up prior to 6 a.m. for Breakfast Club (a conditioning and running workout our team was required to participate in), not having as much time as a regular college student, needing to take classes at specific times in order to attend lacrosse commitments … all the normal things which in the grand scheme of things are minuscule compared to the pros playing a sport has provided me.

          I genuinely love practice, I love seeing my teammates, I love my coaches, I love being able to compete, I love how the sun sets as practice ends, and I love so many other things that lacrosse has given me. But simply enough, I mainly love lacrosse because I love the action of playing lacrosse. 

          Last academic year, my sophomore year, I developed heart complications from Covid-19. This resulted in my inability to play lacrosse for most of the year. As a competitor, this was difficult and mentally defeating. However, this is where I learned that I loved lacrosse even more than I knew. I attended practice with a bright smile and a big spirit. I could not attend physically but I sure attended practice mentally. I listened, I learned to be a good teammate, I tried to help others, I observed. I dedicated myself to being a great sideline leader, which would not have been possible if I was fully cleared. 

          Our lacrosse team volunteering at the Mens soccer games.
          Rowan lacrosse team volunteering at the men’s soccer games in fall 2020.

          As a member of the Rowan Lacrosse team, the past year from an outsider’s view could be looked at as a “wasted year” for myself. However, with the help of my coaches, teammates, trainers, and friends and family outside of lacrosse, my efforts were focused elsewhere, and I developed a deeper gratification toward the sport. I realized how much I care about the sport by not playing. I realized I how much I care about the program and the people around me by not being able to be on the field and by being on the sideline. 

          My absence last year has only made me more excited to come back to the program this year. I may have been unable to play, but regardless, I learned more about myself as a leader, more about the program and our culture, more about the coaches and their compassion, and more about my teammates and their support. 

          Rowan Lacrosse Team after the last fall season practice in 2020.
          Rowan lacrosse team after last fall season practice in 2020.

          You can follow the Rowan Women Lacrosse Team at the Instagram handle @rowanwlax.

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          Story and photos provided by:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Double Major Rachel Ricci Uses Her Voice for Theatre and Therapy

          Rachel sits at the Wilson amphitheater.

          Today we feature junior Rachel Ricci of Moorestown, NJ (Burlington County), who transferred from Rowan College of South Jersey. Rachel, trained in classical voice, is a double major in Musical Theatre and Music Therapy within the College of Performing Arts. She shares how she first learned of the Music Therapy program and her first impressions of Rowan life.

          How did you discover the Music Therapy program?

          I had been interested in it because I just heard about it through people for a while. But it was actually Morgan, a friend of mine who … was in the program, and we got to talking about it. She just was telling me about her classes, how much she loved all her professors. And I got even more interested in it from hearing that.

          I started looking into music therapy as a general concept, a lot more online research. I spoke to [Professor] Andrea Hunt, I had an interview with her. And they were all super helpful to give you a lot of information about it, hearing about the internships that come afterwards, and all that sort of stuff.

          Rachel sits near Wilson Hall.

          What got you interested in music therapy as a career option?

          I really love the combination of areas that it is. It’s all the things that I’ve been really passionate about and really interested in, from psychology to music, and just the different demographics of people that you get to work with. I love working with children. I’ve also spent a lot of times in assisted living facilities, and I love working with older people. And I just like that you have the option to go into a lot of different areas with it.

          What is your favorite part so far of being part of this program?

          For me, I mean, I’m very brand new to it all. But I love how much I get to do voice with it. Because my instrument … everyone has a different instrument for the program. And mine is classical voice, which I love studying. So I’m very excited about all the voice classes and the choirs, studio days and all that.

          How are you meeting people as a commuter?

          Actually everyone’s really welcoming. Just last night, I was at a meet-and-greet for my [musical theatre major] and people were very warm. And there’s a lot of clubs on campus and stuff. So it’s not hard to get to know people even as a commuter.

          How do you like Rowan so far?

          Oh, I love it. A really nice environment. I love the campus. And it’s fun because I’m around here so I have a lot of friends that I knew since before college who go here, so it’s nice to already have kind of a community.

          What are you looking forward to?

          Just the whole experience because I’ve only done community college so far. I’m very excited to be at a university. I get to spend time with the friends I already have here and to make new friends when I start taking classes here.

          Rachel sits near Wilson Hall.

          Have you thought about joining any clubs or organizations on campus?

          It’s hard as a commuter sometimes because you’re going back and forth so much, but I’ve been hearing about a lot of great ones and I definitely want to start looking into to get involved.

          Why Rowan?

          I really loved the school as soon as I when I was touring campus a few years ago. As soon as I was here, I liked the environment. I really liked it. It’s a medium-size school, you know, so you get the experience of being a bigger-feeling school without feeling too massive. I liked the community. I like the commute from where I live …  just a lot about it that was a really good fit for me. 

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          Photos by:
          Nick Flagg, senior advertising and theatre major

          In Case You Missed It: Favorite Classes At Rowan

          Tell us a little about what the class is. IMC goes over all the parts to an integrated marketing communications plan, such as advertising, public relations, direct marketing, digital/internet marketing, sales promotion and personal selling. You really get to work a lot of different muscles within the communications industry. Is there anything else that made […]

          Moods: Where To Go On Campus When You Feel A Certain Way

          Rowan Boulevard and the Glassblower statue.

          Rowan students and alumni reveal popular spots to eat, hang out and socialize on campus.

          Where to go on campus when you want to socialize with friends

          “When I want to socialize with my friends on campus, I like to go downtown to different restaurants like Playa Bowls and LaScala’s Fire.” – junior Supply Chain & Logistics and Marketing major Jenna Scarpa

          “When I am on campus, I love going to sporting events and the Student Center to get together and socialize with my friends!” – senior Psychology major Lucille Villani

          Richard Wackar Stadium where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track events take place.
          Richard Wackar Stadium, where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track and field events take place

          “I enjoy going to Holly Pointe Cafe to socialize with friends because the atmosphere gives off very welcoming vibes through the music and staff. Plus who doesn’t love to get something to eat while they are chatting?” – senior Math Education major CJ Barrett

          As you can see above, Rowan offers many different places to socialize with your friends. From sporting events and walkable restaurants to Holly Pointe Commons Cafe, there are so many communal spaces to sit back and enjoy quality time with friends. 

          Holly Pointe Cafe.
          Glassworks Cafe located in Holly Pointe Commons

          Where to go on campus when you want to study/sit in a quiet space

          “Whenever I need a place to study or somewhere quiet, I love going to the Campbell Library on campus or Barnes and Noble. It helps me focus and I find that I get a lot more work done when I’m there!” – sophomore Athletic Training major Hannah Lombardo

          Outside of Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard.
          Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard

          “Being a commuter, I would sit in my car and study in between classes. The best lot is by Bunce Hall because it’s small, less traffic, and there’s a nice view while working.” – senior Theatre and Advertising major Nick Flagg 

          “If I have a lot of work to get done or need to study for a test, I usually go to Campbell Library or a study pod in the Science [Hall] building. I work really productively in places that are quiet and aren’t that busy!” – junior Biological Sciences major Harley Rosenzweig 

          Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library.
          Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library

          Rowan has many options when seeking out a quiet place to study or have some alone time. Many students enjoy the library or Barnes and Noble downtown to tackle some work, and students can even find a good spot to relax on the lawn chairs in front of Robinson Hall and next to Wilson Hall. 

          Where to go on campus when you want to grab a bite to eat

          “Freshens was always a go to spot. Being able to customize a healthy option along with the convenience of being able to order on my phone made it a staple.” – alumnus and Liberal Studies major Daniel Corvo

          Student Center Cafeteria.
          Student Center Cafe

          “Freshens in the Student Center is my go-to place for food in between classes or after practice! The food is SO good and filling!! LaScala’s on Rowan Boulevard is also really good.” – senior Elementary Education and Biological Sciences major Johanna Diehl

          Lascala's Fire on Rowan Boulevard.
          Lascala’s Fire on Rowan Boulevard.

          “Whenever I need a healthier option I love going to Fresh off the Grill [Grill Nation] and ordering grilled chicken sandwiches. They have a ton of topping options so you can really make it yours.” – alumnus and Mechanical Engineering graduate Frank Cianciotta

          “The Boulevard has so many options of different restaurants to choose from! There’s such a great range of different kinds of food, no matter what I’m in the mood for they have it!” – senior Finance major Bethany Sansone

          Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard.
          Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard, a local favorite for breakfast, lunch and dinner

          There are many options available when students are looking for a bite to eat. Students can use a meal swipe at Glassworks Dining Hall located in Holly Pointe Commons, the Student Center, or Rowan Boulevard to restaurants like LaScala’s Fire, Dawn to Dusk, El Mariachi and more. 

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          Story By:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          Select photos by:
          RJ Wentzell, senior exercise science major

          Lexi Jubin Shares Her Experience as an Intern with Spencer’s and Spirit Halloween

          Lexi sits on a campus bench and looks over her shoulder.

          Lexi Jubin, a Management and Marketing major with a Certificate of Undergraduate Study in Entrepreneurial and Independent Media, spent her summer learning the ins and outs of e-commerce with national retailers Spencer’s and Spirit Halloween. Here, she shares her experience and how she interned through a pandemic. 

          What are your responsibilities as an intern with Spencer’s? 

          As the e-commerce intern with Spencer’s and Spirit Halloween, I did a lot of pulling data and work on different spreadsheets. In the e-commerce marketing department, I learned about paid search, SEO, affiliate marketing, and even worked closely with individuals in merchandising, copywriting and email marketing. I reported directly to the Senior Manager of E-commerce and got to know many people in the department very fondly. 

          When I first started, two full-time positions were vacant, so I got to have a hand in some of what those positions usually take care of, as well as gain so much brand-new insight and growth for the department during my internship experience as two new awesome individuals joined the team. Regarding my day by day, my mornings usually started off with a paid search report pulling from different analytics platforms. This was something I was super excited to learn about because I never would have thought I enjoyed paid search and going through the data that came with it so much and the only way to know was to try it.

          Selfie of Lexi in the car

          For the SEO side of things, I also did a weekly data pull for our dashboard, which was super cool to learn as well. When I wasn’t pulling numbers for our regular reports, I created a new format for tracking information on our current and new affiliates, and did some individual products and data pulls for specific ideas or problems we had to solve. I attended regular meetings each week, going over different data and getting a feel for the company, as well as going through training for all different facets of e-comm.

          Overall, I was completely immersed in the department. My supervisor, Greg, was absolutely amazing at teaching me piece by piece how to do different things. He ran through different platforms with me, taught me how he did the analysis for different daily reports, and was super patient when I didn’t know something. The paid search and SEO managers, which were brought on during my internship, were also so patient, helpful and kind when I had questions. Not only did I have my own responsibilities and tasks day by day, but the people I worked with really took the time to teach me and leave me with some valuable knowledge.

          Lexi at color run

          Do you feel like Rowan prepared you for the work you’re doing with the company?

          Rowan definitely prepared me in every way they could for this type of work. I think the part of my coursework that helped me the most were the classes that were required for my certificate of undergraduate study in Entrepreneurial and Independent Media. Two classes in particular “Entrepreneurial Media” and “Media Metrics and Analytics” were probably the closest to what I was doing. For my marketing degree, my statistics-based courses also definitely played a role. I did a lot with conversion rates, impressions and other different KPI’s [key performance indicators], so it was important that I knew what they were when I started the internship, and I definitely wouldn’t have without these classes. While Rowan killed it at teaching me the concepts, I learned so much from the hands-on work that I got to do with the company.

          Talk about your experience working during COVID.

          My internship was sort of hybrid, though the office was technically not fully open during my time there. The first time I got to go to the office was to pick up my company-issued laptop. From there, I generally worked from home most days and went in about once a week. Though I wasn’t there a lot, I really loved the vibe and look of the corporate office, so it was exciting when I did get the chance to go in. I also had the opportunity to help our team out at one of the Spirit stores before it opened, which was insanely exciting, as well as a nice opportunity to meet some of my coworkers in person. 

          Though I didn’t get to see everyone in person all the time, I still was welcomed to the team with open arms. We had plenty of virtual and in-person meetings, so I still got to meet everyone. Greg also scheduled some time for me to come into the office specifically so I could meet the team, and he was intentional about introducing me to people so I felt like I was included in things. Additionally, when all of the interns first started, we did some meet and greets with everyone in our department.

          Outside of normal tech problems you would see anywhere, I felt like Spencer’s did a great job of dealing with the circumstances they were presented with for their internship program, and it was still a super rewarding experience.

          Lexi standing outside

          What was your favorite part about being on the Spencer’s team?

          My favorite part about working for Spencer’s was honestly every single meeting I got to attend, especially the in person ones. We did some small team meetings, a few “Fun Fridays,” individual meetings, and even some department wide. I loved the team I worked with so much, and those meetings were so helpful for me to learn about the company, my job, what I wanted to do with my life, and about so many people I admire. Those meetings allowed me to see the human side of a larger company, and really feel secure in the path I was taking with my career.

          The content we were dealing with was stimulating and exciting, but also challenging in all of the right ways. I grew so passionate about the company and the work I was doing over the summer, and gained so much confidence in myself. While I always really loved Spencer’s and Spirit Halloween, the internship experience started out mainly as something to help me gain experience; but the day-to-day work, meetings, and absolutely amazing individuals left me with a career defining experience I’ll never forget.

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          Story by:
          Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

          Photos by:
          Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

          Select photos courtesy of:
          Lexi Jubin

          Back-to-School Bucket List of Rowan Juniors and Seniors

          Writing a list of goals

          We’re so close to the beginning of the new semester, let’s kick it off with a college bucket list by sharing some students’ ambitions.

          “I’m looking forward to everyone moving in and meeting more new people since my freshman year got cut short. One of my must do’s when I get back on campus this fall is to attend more basketball and football games. Also I can’t wait to go to the engineering building and go to the pond, I find it very relaxing.” – Anais Holguin, junior Marketing major from Perth Amboy, NJ (Middlesex County) 

          Anais Holguin sits near the Engineering pond.
          Anais Holguin

          “My friend and I are on a mission to find the best lunch specials for $15 or under around campus. So far Alaura Kitchen or Family Mediterranean (both located in Pitman) are the winners! There are so many different places to explore around campus and it is so much fun to do it with friends. Also thrifting is a hoot. The lunch spot I’m excited to visit again is Au Bon Pain, it’s opening back up and I NEED their croissants.” – Meena Young, senior Biological Sciences major from Sickerville, NJ (Camden County) 

          Exterior shot of Au Bon Pain.
          Au Bon Pain

          “I am extremely excited to be student teaching this year and to finally have in-person classes again. I miss interacting with my peers and being on campus. I miss studying at James Hall, the education building and the library and those are spots I look forward to visiting again.” – London Raikes, senior Inclusive and Elementary Education major from Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County) 

          London leans against a sign of James Hall.
          London Raikes

          “I am involved in quite a few organizations on campus. I’m most looking forward to continuing my role as the Blood Services Undergraduate Coordinator for the Office of Volunteerism. There are many things on my bucket list this year and that includes living in an on-campus apartment, seeing my South Jersey friends, walking near Town Square, taking most of my core Finance and MIS courses and exploring campus with my friends.” Sasmita Prabu, junior Finance major from Somerset County, NJ

          Drone shot of Glassboro Town Square.
          Town Square

          I’m looking forward to finally being in person again. Looking at a screen for 18 months has been really sad, it feels like so much of the college experience was lost. At least I’ll be less tempted to fall asleep during class. I am going to be an RA this year, so I am excited to meet new people and help others have a great return to Rowan. I have many things on my bucket list and that includes: going to the Fitness Center and working out with my friends, having movie nights with my friends in their apartments, going to Cookie Munchers and eating more calories in 10 minutes than you’re supposed to eat in two days, riding the shuttles to the movie theater, having an advisor meeting in person, taking free electives to pursue other passions rather than fulfilling requirements, plus eating at Smoked again.” – RJ Wentzell, senior Exercise Science major of Pilesgrove, NJ (Salem County)

          RJ Wentzell smiling outside of James Hall
          RJ Wentzell

          “A couple of things I look forward to this school year are my campus event Emo Night, planning concerts, writing music and finishing my junior year. I haven’t seen Dennis Diblasio [since before COVID], I’m looking forward to seeing him. – junior Malachi Prillerman of Palmyra, NJ (Burlington County), Music Industry major and transfer student from Hampton University

          Music industry major Malachi Prillerman
          Malachi Prillerman

          “This year, I hope to get accepted as a transfer ambassador. A must do is to visit a restaurant during a social hour. Academically, I look forward to receiving high grades, building connections with my professors and receiving a letter of recommendation.” – De’Ja Morris of Woodbury, NJ (Gloucester County), senior Finance major and transfer student from Salem Community College

          De'ja stands on the bridge near Business Hall.
          De’ja Morris

          “This September, I look forward to going back to regular class, walking around and seeing new faces. A few things I would like to do again this semester are seeing all my friends from freshman year, visiting the Rec Center, eating at the Student Center and playing sports.” – Hualsy Paredes, junior Construction Management major from Fort Lee, NJ (Bergen County) and transfer student from Utica College

          Exterior shot of campus Rec Center.
          Rec Center

          I am really excited to graduate. I’ve been working really hard since COVID to maintain my grades just for this moment. I really like the club fair every fall. I’m excited for that! I’m also really excited to study in the library again. I am most looking forward to in-person classes.” – Alexa Wentworth, senior Psychology major from West Windsor, NJ (Mercer County)

          Alexa smiles inside James Hall.
          Alexa Wentworth

          “Being able to go to clubs, meeting up at the Student Center and getting food together, being able to see my professors in person, and visiting Science Hall again.” – Andrew Pinto, junior Physics major from Hammonton, NJ (Atlantic County)

          Exterior shot of Science Hall from Route 322.
          Science Hall

          “I came into Rowan as a transfer so I haven’t tried anything yet. I’m sad because I lost a year so I want to be as involved as possible. This year, I’m looking forward to seeing my fellow peers, raising my GPA and attending football games.” – senior Tara Preston of Camden County, NJ, Economics major and transfer student from Delaware County Community College

          Rowan's football team enters the stadium.
          Rowan Football

          “A must do with my friends is going to RoBo and getting pizza. Academically, I look forward to staying busy with classes and making new friends in class.” Maria Espejo, junior Psychology major from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County)

          Rowan Boulevard featuring LaScala's Fire.
          Rowan Boulevard

          “I’m most looking forward to seeing Discovery Hall this year and to go to football, basketball and hockey games with my friends.” – Lauren Blaze of Branchburg, NJ (Somerset County), senior Civil and Environmental Engineering major

          Lauren smiles and stands in front of Discovery Hall.
          Lauren Blaze

          “Being able to socialize with new classmates and professors! I haven’t seen   Dr. Bhatia in person since before COVID, I am very much looking forward to seeing him on campus this fall. Looking forward to social events, clubs and  projects.” – senior Hayley Lomas of Woodbury, NJ (Gloucester County), a Mechanical Engineering major with a CUG in Aerospace Engineering and transfer student from Rowan College of South Jersey

          Exterior shot of the Campbell Library entrance.
          Hayley looks forward to going to Campbell Library again this fall.

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          Story by:
          Nene Diallo, senior public relations major

          Photos by:
          Reshaun Timmons, Stephanie Batista, RJ Wentzell and Anthony Raisley

          Rowan Football photo courtesy of:
          University Publications

          Out-of-State Students’ Returning to Rowan Bucket List

          Einstein Bagels storefront in Engineering Hall.

          Many out-of-state students are coming to campus for the first time since COVID, while some were able to come to campus last year. Here are some things that out-of-state students are looking forward to when campus opens up a bit more this semester. 

          Magdelyn Kelly is a senior Musical Theatre and Theatre Education major from Inwood, West Virginia. Magdelyn transferred to Rowan from Blue Ridge Community College. Magdelyn is a first-generation college student and an off-campus renter. She says she’s most looking forward to seeing all her peers and learning face to face again. When asked if there was someone she hasn’t seen in person since before Covid who she is very much looking forward to seeing on campus this fall, Magdelyn replied, “My voice teacher!” Magdelyn is involved with Campus Players and Rowan Lab Theatre, and she adds that Rowan Lab Theatre will be putting on some great shows this year. Magdelyn can’t wait to take part in Rowan After Hours (RAH) and Student University Programmers (SUP) events again, such as Bingo. She can’t wait to take senior pictures with her friends and hang out on campus on Bunce Green.

          People hanging out on Bunce Green, as Magdelyn looks forward to.
          Students hanging out on Bunce Green, as Magdelyn looks forward to.

          Nick Kreuz, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major from Quakertown, Pennsylvania, is looking forward to working back in the labs with other students. Nick says, “I am looking forward most to going back to a campus that feels alive,” and he notes being on campus last year felt less warm and welcoming than it has been in the past. Some campus must-dos for him include activities put on by the Rec Center (where he will work as a Building Manager) and shows returning to the Planetarium. Nick is also looking forward to visiting Einstein’s Bagels in the mornings for coffee.

          Nick poses in front of some trees.
          Nick Kreuz

          Petro Skrypnyk has never been to campus before, and he is excited to see the place he has been studying at for a year. Petro is a senior Computer Science major and commutes from his home in Philadelphia. Before attending Rowan, Petro transferred from Rowan College at Burlington County. Petro wants to get involved with Rowan’s Association for Computing Machinery and the Volleyball team. Petro is excited to earn his bachelor’s degree and meet up with people in between classes.

          Philadelphia, where Petro is from.
          Petro, of Philadelphia, is looking forward to the on-campus experience this semester.

          Samuel Jolade, senior Computing and Informatics major from Deer Park, New York, is excited to come back to the Rowan campus after nearly two years. He can’t wait to get back into Gaming Club and visit the Game Room in the Student Center. Samuel hasn’t seen his friend Max and a few other friends since before COVID, and he is excited to see them. 

          Samuel looks forward to hanging out in the game room like these guys are.
          Samuel (not pictured) looks forward to hanging out in the Student Center’s Game Room.

          Ashleigh Jankowski is a junior Biomedical Engineering major with a Chemistry minor from Catonsville, Maryland. Ashleigh is living off campus this semester. Ashleigh says while “virtual learning was a great way to proceed in learning while continuing to be socially distanced, nothing can replace the friendly, bustling campus atmosphere.” She is looking forward to taking classes that are major specific this year, and because most of them are engineering labs, hopefully having them in person! She is looking forward to Outdoors Club getting started again, as she is hoping to go on a few trips with them this semester. She’s also looking forward to RAH events like Bingo and SUP activities like Outdoor Movie Night. Ashleigh also can’t wait to hang out at Einstein’s Bagels again. 

          Ashleigh poses in front of Rowan Hall.
          Ashleigh Jankowski

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          Story by:
          Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

          Philadelphia photo courtesy of:
          Pixabay

          A Look Inside the Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team

          An athletic field as seen through a fence on campus.

          Today we feature three members of the Men’s Club Lacrosse team as they share their experiences and touch upon why Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse is a great extracurricular to participate in.

          Participating in sports at the high school level is important to students as it fuels their competitive edge, allows individuals to make new friends, and simply teaches students about leadership and confidence. However, being recruited by collegiate sports teams and continuing to play at college can be physically rigorous, difficult to manage socially, and requires an immense amount of time. 

          Team volunteering to help the youth players of Washington Township for a clinic.
          The Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team volunteers to help the youth players of Washington Township at a clinic.

          Rowan University does not have a collegiate Division III Men’s Lacrosse team; however, the university does offer a Men’s Club Lacrosse team. Today we feature several members of the team to hear their insights on the program. 

          Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.
          Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.

          Ryan Meiluta is a senior long stick midfielder majoring in Civil Engineering from Delran, NJ (Burlington County).

          Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

          I wanted to continue playing lacrosse and compete.

          What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

          The bonds we have with our teammates. 

          Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

          I started because I love the sport, but the social aspect makes it a lot better.

          How many days a week do you practice? 

          Two days a week.

          Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.
          Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.

          Christian Boylan is a senior midfielder from Hillsborough, NJ (Somerset County) majoring in Environmental Science and Sustainability and minoring in geology and environmental planning.

          Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

          I really enjoy playing lacrosse and wanted to continue to be a part of a team.

          What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

          My teammates.

          What is a pro of playing for the team?

          Winning games and winning the games without a coach is definitely a pro. 

          If Rowan had an NJAC/ NCAA men’s lacrosse team, would you pursue that or try to walk on?

          Yes.

          Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.
          Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.

          Ryan Collins is a junior defender majoring in Marketing and is from Lacey Township, NJ (Ocean County). 

          Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

          I chose to play lacrosse at Rowan because I wanted to continue playing the sport after high school. I felt it was a good way to meet new people and to continue playing.

          Do you travel and play other schools?

          Yes, we travel to different tournaments and colleges playing other club teams from all different schools.

          How competitive would you say the team is?

          I’d say the team is very competitive. Every practice and game we have we all give 100%, and our goal is to be the best we can.

          Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

          I’d say a little bit of both, they’re both great factors that come with playing on the club team. I’ve always loved lacrosse and have played my whole life so I knew I wanted to play in college. But, I think club lacrosse was the perfect thing to do because I am able to focus a ton on school while still playing the sport and spending time with teammates.

          Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.
          Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.

          To learn more, visit:

          https://rowan.campuslabs.com/engage/organization/mensclublacrosse

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          Story by:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          Related posts:

          Sports and Mental Health

          First Person Perspective: Women’s Lacrosse at Rowan University With Natalie DePersia

          Rowan RAs Share Tips for Creating a Positive Environment while Living with a Roommate

          two people sitting in apartment.

          For most people, college is the first time students live with a roommate. Resident Assistants (RAs), who are trained with mediation tactics, share some tips on how students can create and maintain a positive environment in their spaces. 

          Senior RA in Townhouse Apartments Alyssa Putiri thinks the key to a positive roommate relationship is “all about being open to communication. Discussing boundaries and personal preferences are crucial to making sure both you and your roommate are comfortable with each other. Remember, you don’t need to be best friends with your roommate, but it’s important to create a comfortable environment for the both of you to live in.” 

          Alyssa Putiri leans against an outdoor railing on campus.
          Alyssa Putiri

          Alex Jackson, a senior RA in 230 Victoria Nexus Apartments, says to “pick your battles. There’s always going to be disagreements, as people in general have different living styles. But if you and your roommate can learn to compromise on things that aren’t too important, you will both be sure to take important issues much more seriously.”

          Alex standing outside

          Whitney Center RA senior Mathew Mcgrath says “first and foremost, it is essential that roommates maintain respect for one another. Roommate agreements provide a framework for what roommates want and expect from one another. Having respect for each other will make developing personal bonds both a less complicated and less intimidating venture.”

          Mathew McGrath

          Sam Eloy, a junior RA in Rowan Boulevard Apartments, challenges students to “make sure they are as transparent as possible. Address any issues immediately rather than letting them simmer. Drawing lines of respect and understanding is important to make sure no one is ever offended or gets hurt.” 

          Selfie of Sam Eloy.
          Sam Eloy

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          Story by:
          Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

          3 Rowan RAs Share Their Favorite Programs

          Resident Assistants, or RAs, are tasked with creating programs to connect residents with each other and the greater Rowan community. Each program is designed specifically and intentionally by the RA of the floor to promote a sense of belonging in the residence hall. Here are some programs that RAs loved to host for their residents. 

          Junior Keianna Williams, an RA in Chestnut Hall, shared her favorite program titled “Self Reflection.”

          “I displayed a mirror outside of my room and then made a heart full of sticky notes. Each resident was asked to write something they loved about themselves in a sticky note displayed on the wall. I then handed out tiny pocket mirrors for them to keep. I told them that every time they opened the mirror, they should say something nice about themselves. This program helped promote self-esteem and self love. I also loved that it included Rowan Thrive, a wellness initiative on campus attributes of purpose.” 

          Keianna Williams
          Keianna Williams

          Sydney Ramos, a junior RA in Mimosa Hall, shared that her favorite program that she has done is a Black Lives Matter Brave space.

          “This was a program that encouraged an open discussion on issues surrounding racial injustice in our communities. It also was a space where those who did not know much about the BLM movement could understand what it was and gain information and resources to have a better understanding as to why the BLM movement is so important. I had a decent outcome with residents, and they were happy to be able to have a discussion on issues that sometimes are hard to talk about. I was even interviewed by The Whit for a featured article about my program.”

          Sydney Ramos
          Sydney Ramos

          Alyssa Salera, a senior RA in Holly Pointe Commons, described her favorite program that combined fun with important conversations about relationships.

          “We had a Bachelor finale watch party. My residents all loved the show, both my male and female students, so we all got together, snacked on a bunch of food and desserts, and talked about the show and everything it encompassed. I loved seeing how excited they got about who the star chose to get engaged to, as each of my residents had a personal preference. We then talked about toxic relationships and the importance of mental health in regards to how it pertains to the show, they were all so involved in the conversation! It was the most I’ve heard some of my residents speak and be engaged in all semester, so it was great seeing them come out of their shell.”

          Alyssa holding goat
          Alyssa Salera

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          Story by:
          Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

          Sneak Peak into the Theatre – Design/Technical Program and its Stagecraft Class

          Someone measures a line on a piece of wood.

          Today we share moments from our conversation with College of Performing Arts students Michael Landolfi and Jenna Hope during a session of their Stagecraft Fundamentals class. We asked them about their favorite parts of their majors and the course itself.

          Michael Landolfi is a sophomore Theatre major with a concentration in Theatre – Design/Technical

          Why did you come to Rowan?

          “I recently just transferred from the Music Industry program so it was actually the major that made me want to come to Rowan. I also like that it is fairly close to home but not too close. It was important to me to be close enough to home where I could see family but still be able to explore a new area.”

          In the Stagecraft Fundamentals course, have you found anything you are particularly passionate about that you did not think you would like? 

          “I definitely have taken an interest in woodwork and carpentry more than I thought I would have.”

          Michael in class.
          Michael Landolfi

          Can you tell me about the relationships you have between the staff here? 

          “Especially the staff in the theatre department and the staff in the music program … [t]hey all have been pretty open with communication. Several professors have helped me figure out what trajectory I am taking in terms of what I am learning here and what I want to do in the future.” 

          What made you change your major?

          “I personally did not like taking business classes … [t]here were quite a few of those classes I had to take. Also I have also always loved live sound, and that is mainly what I am trying to get a career in because those jobs are more secure than trying to land a job as a music producer or a performer in general.” 

          A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals.
          A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals

          What is your favorite class so far?

          “Stagecraft Fundamentals is pretty great. Starting to get involved in the theatre department and stuff has been a really good experience. I also enjoy a Social Problems class I have taken that is completely not related to my major. I just needed to take it for credits, but I heavily enjoyed it.”


          Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.
          Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.

          Jenna Hope is a transfer junior Musical Theatre major; however, she will be switching to the Theatre – Design/Techical major. 

          What made you want to change your major?

          “What made me change my major was the fact that I felt like I was not able to use my hands as much, and getting to take classes like Stagecraft Fundamentals in my first year was something that really made me realize that design and tech is something that makes me really excited. Things like carpentry and costuming are so interesting and also simply fun for me.”

          A picture of a power saw used in Stage Craft Fundamentals.

          Out of all the elements in design and tech, what would you say your favorite is?

          “Out of all of them I would say carpentry, but I really have a soft spot for costuming even though I have not gotten to do it yet.”

          Can you tell me about some things that you have made in your Stagecraft Fundamentals class?

          “We made a couple of different things … sadly most of the things we make in class are for productions we are holding in the semester, but with Covid we were unable to put on the amount of productions that we would have liked to so we did not have that many sets or props to make. With that being said, we have been making birdhouses this semester as a little project for everybody.”

          What advice would you give to a person who is interested in the major but unsure of design and tech?

          “I think they should just take Stagecraft because it gives total insight to the major. Asking for help is also so important. Just because you need assistance or help does not mean you cannot partake in something you enjoy.”

          Stage Craft Fundamentals students using a power saw.
          Associate Professor Tom Fusco (left) works with Jenna (center) and another student using a power saw.

          See more from the Stagecraft Fundamentals class in this video. 

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          Story By:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          #PROFspective: Brian Seay, Double Major and Rowan Admissions Twitch Streamer

          Headshot of Brian Seay against a black backdrop.

          Today we feature Brian Seay, a double major in Radio/Television/Film and Sports Communication and Media from Cumberland County. Brian also has a certificate in undergrad study (CUGS) in Esports. We interview Brian as he touches upon his involvement with the Rowan Admissions Twitch streaming account through his job as a Digital Content Contributor for Rowan’s Marketing and Enrollment Management team. 

          Why did you decide to get a certificate in undergrad study (CUGS) in Esports?

          “I love video games. My friends and I play very frequently, and during quarantine I got interested in competitive 2k (basketball video game). When I was looking at my Sports Communication and Media major and the credits I needed for it, I came across the CUGS for Esports. I quickly realized that obtaining a CUGS in Esports was only one more course in addition to all my courses I have already taken for my major in Sports Communication and Media, so I thought why not?”

          What is Twitch?

          “Twitch is simply just a place where you can stream something live — it does not necessarily have to be video games. It started off as ‘Justin TV’ where this guy named Justin just basically streamed his everyday life on this website that he created. It has now turned into a place where content creators can stream videos; Twitch is primarily used for videogames but can be used for anything.” 

          Headshot of Brian Seay.
          Brian Seay

          What do you do for Rowan as a content contributor?

          “My primary task is to create videos and to help Rowan’s Marketing team to draw students in. One of the projects we did a few weeks ago was that we went in a filmed some of the residence halls so we can create a video on all the different resident and housing options Rowan offers. These videos are our most popular because they appeal to a big population of students, while club videos and certain sport videos are geared to a smaller target audience.”

          What do you do to prepare for each Twitch stream?

          “Setting up for my streams takes a decent amount of time. I stream on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. so I usually start setting up at 5 p.m. This allows me enough time to make sure all my equipment and software is running smoothly before I go live. Set up consists of sound checks, microphone checks, controller checks and more.”

          Brian Seay playing a video game.
          Brian Seay playing a video game

          How does your CUGS in Esports help with your job for Rowan as a Twitch streamer?

          “As I stated previously, I only needed one class to obtain a CUGS in Esports because of all the classes I have already taken for my major in Sports Communication and Media. With that being said, my Intro to Esports class not only equipped me with a lot of knowledge on Esports but made me very interested in playing Esports.”

          What is your favorite part of streaming on Twitch?

          “As stated previously, I just love video games, so this job is honestly not looked at as work for me. I am doing something I enjoy, and it makes my streaming sessions go by so quickly.”

          Brian Seay.
          Brian Seay

          What is your favorite Esport game to play for Rowan Twitch?

          “First off, it is important to note that I have to play games that are educationally appropriate. However, I like to play games that are popular in Esport streaming. Therefore, I enjoy playing Rocket League as it is a very popular Esport game.”

          What is your favorite game to play on your free time?

          “I have to say, my favorite game of all time has to be Minecraft. I am very creative and I love how the game caters to what your needs are. I think it is so cool how you can spend weeks and months on a world and you create your own environment and atmosphere and I think it is really cool how you can truly make it your own.”

          Brian Seay's game controller.
          Brian Seay’s game controller

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          Story By:
          Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

          Photos courtesy of:
          Brian Seay