Leadership, Passion & Purpose Through Vietnamese Student Association

Cindy stands next to the Science Hall sign.

A Highlight of Student Life at Rowan University Meet Cindy Nguyen, a rising senior biochemistry major, with minors in neuroscience and psychology. She is a commuter from Voorhees, New Jersey, and is here to discuss her role as president in the Vietnamese Student Association. Can you describe the goals of the Vietnamese Student Association? “With VSA, […]

Dance & Elementary Education Major Gets Ahead Through Summer Classes

Dramatic lighting on Jordyn's back during a performance.

I started my Human Exceptionality (Course: SPED 08130) course a few days after finals ended for the spring 2023 semester, and I have loved every second of taking this course. Human Exceptionality is centered around disability within education, specifically, undoing the concept of ableism inside of the education system. Each reading, lecture video, assignment, & […]

Co-Founder of Interdisciplinary Learning Lab for Creatives and Entrepreneurs Shares Her Experience

Isabella Shainline posing in a work space.

Today, we hear from Isabella Shainline, a junior English Education major, Photography minor, and John H. Martinson Honors College student from Pitman, NJ (Gloucester County). Isabella co-founded Business Hall’s Creatives 230, which is an interdisciplinary learning lab for creatives and entrepreneurial students. “Last year, my photography professor Jenny Drumgoole and I went over to Business […]

#PROFspective: A Closer Look At PULLA Tracker and its Founder Siena Rampulla

Rowan University Psychology major Siena stands underneath the art installation Time Sweeps by Discovery Hall.

Siena Rampulla is a senior student here at Rowan University, originally from Holmdel, NJ (Monmouth County). Siena is a Psychology major, with an honors concentration and a minor in Journalism.  When asked to share more about her major, Siena explained she originally planned to go on the pre-med track, which was a long-term dream of […]

Beyond the Classroom: Emerson Harman, Graphic Design Intern at Stantec

Emerson standing in Westby Hall.

Today we spoke to Emerson Harman, a junior Biomedical Art and Visualization major with minors in Biology and Technical and Professional Writing, a concentration in Honors, and a certificate of undergraduate study (CUGS) in Paleo-Art and Visualization. They are an on-campus resident from Dodgeville, Wisconsin. Emerson tells us about their internship, how Rowan helped prepare them for the internship, and where they see themselves in a future career.

Emerson posing for a portrait outside under a tree.

Tell me about your internship. What was your day-to-day like?

I interned for the summer at Stantec, an architecture, design, engineering, and environmental science design and consulting firm. The company is based in Canada. The company had 23,000 employees across 23 countries. I was the graphic design intern for the summer, and it was an 8-week program. I worked 40-hour weeks.

I worked on a few different projects both within the Philadelphia office and with interns from across North America. I worked on two projects with two elementary schools in Philadelphia that are getting renovated and added to. One has an existing mural through the MuralArts program of Philadelphia, and I made designs for the new main entrance and cafeteria based on their existing mural. That school is in the very initial design phase and once they get further in with the client, they will present my designs to the client as possible design options for the space. I made designs based on murals that already exist in the other school, as well. On the second to last day of my internship, the people working on this project with me presented my designs to that client, and they actually went forward with my designs, which is pretty exciting.

I did a few smaller graphic projects for different proposals for different projects that people were working on and the intern-wide project. There were 91 interns from across North America on ten teams this summer, and we got paired with an organization in North Carolina that is creating a farmstead summer camp for people with learning disabilities, particularly teens and adults with autism. Five teams worked on each half of the property. As the only graphic design intern, I helped create the presentations and the final booklets that were given to the client and created renderings and animations of the final architectural plans. At the end of the internship, all 10 groups presented our work both internally to the broader Stantec community, and to the client. Throughout this internship, we also had groups and seminars on a variety of topics just for the summer interns, including a counter transition from school to the workplace or innovative technologies and urban planning and climate change adaptation and how they structure sustainability into such a large global company.

Emerson's design on a wall that was approved.
Emerson’s final design that was approved to be used by a Philadelphia elementary school.

Can you tell us a bit about Stantec as a company?

Stantec has many offices that work independently of each other, but sometimes they collaborate. They do architecture, so just like any other architecture firm, they do large and small-scale projects, and then they have design and interior design areas where they work on architectural projects and individual consulting-type projects.

The Philadelphia office where I work didn’t have any environmental scientists, but some offices have environmental scientists that worked with the construction crews or different building projects such as making sure that they’re not getting rid of habitat for endangered species, working near wastewater treatments, or doing anything damaging to the environment. There are many kinds of people working in one company. It’s an all-inclusive firm for these different areas. 

How did you find and secure this internship?

I first applied for Stantec’s Equity and Diversity scholarship last year, without really knowing who Stantec was or what they did. I ended up receiving the scholarship, and from there, they invited me to interview for an internship position. Stantec gives about 22 scholarships and from there they select some interns for the summer. During the interview, I met with the Senior Vice President of Design and Innovation of Stantec, the Director of the Office of the CEO, and one of the Principal Architects of the Philadelphia office, who ended up being my supervisor. I received the internship offer, and after school was out, I moved to Philadelphia for the summer.

How does this internship tie in with your major?

My major isn’t directly correlated with the architecture and design industry, but I found that a lot of the skills transferred into this internship as a graphic design intern. I worked a lot in software like Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign, all design software that I use in my classes. Often having to learn new software in my major helped me with learning AutoDesk, Revit, and Enscape that I used a lot during and needed for the internship. Having an outside look at a lot of the design problems my supervisors gave me brought a unique perspective someone trained in architecture might not have. 

Do you have any mentors at Rowan that helped you with this internship?

There are a lot of professors and faculty on campus that I definitely have close connections with, but the two that come to mind are initially Professor Amanda Almon, who is the head of the Biomedical Art and Visualization department, and Professor Jenny Drumgoole of the Photography department. I know I can go to them with questions I have. They’re helpful and supportive and help me with applications and just creating a professional profile for myself. When I’m applying for these opportunities, they can help me along the way. Professor Almon, and Professor Drumgoole, having people like them push you to develop your skills and encourage you to apply for internships, and find new opportunities that you might have otherwise missed is important. The most important thing you can do is to connect with those professors. They’re the start of your network, and from there they can help you with so much more. 

A screenshot of an interior design rendering
An interior design, created by Emerson.

How will this internship help you achieve your career goals?

I might apply for a master’s program in scientific illustration. Many people in this field wait and do their master’s after some years of experience in the workforce. Ideally, I want to work in infographic design and scientific illustration. I definitely lean more towards the natural science side, rather than the medical side of the biomedical art program, whether that’s working for a museum, a publishing company magazine, like National Geographic or Nature, or something along those lines. 

Through this internship, I gained a ton of new connections, met a lot of amazing people, and learned a lot. I went from living in a small town in Wisconsin to living in Philadelphia, which was a very good experience, and significantly different. Now I know I can feel comfortable living anywhere. I also learned new programs and new techniques that I might not have learned if I hadn’t taken the internship. I also learned how to communicate and talk to new people on all levels. 

Emerson is working on a project on their computer.

Do you have any advice for Rowan students that are looking for internships?

I would first reach out to professors who work in the areas that interest you and see if they know of any campus or external internships they would recommend applying to. Beyond that, look up companies and organizations in your field and see if they advertise internships on their website. If not, it’s worth emailing them to ask! Make sure you have an up-to-date resumé, and just keep applying. It’s discouraging to be turned down, but the more you apply, the more chances you have of being selected.

Now that you have completed this internship, what’s next?

I just received an offer for a nine-month internship (the duration of the school year) with the U.S. Forest Service. I will create illustrations and graphic design for a visual field guide to endangered species and communications about old-growth forests. It’s through the Virtual Student Federal Service program, so it’s a virtual internship.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, senior communication studies and public relations major

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

ECE major Jack Campanella sits with robots from the Rowan club from which he is president.

Today we feature Jack Campanella, a senior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Computer Science and a concentration in Honors. Jack is a lab assistant and peer tutor, and he also serves as president of Rowan’s Robotics and Automation Society (RAS). He hails from Monmouth County, NJ. Here, Jack shares more details […]

Passing the Torch: How Tiana Howard Made the Most of Her Time at Rowan

Tiana poses in the garden.

Looking back at these past four years, first-generation college student Tiana Howard from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County) is grateful for her time at Rowan.

Tiana throws her cap in front of the Rowan arch.

I want to say that Rowan has shaped not only my four years since I’ve been here, but the rest of my life. I think it was a great experience as a whole,” she says.

Tiana looks back at who she was as a high school senior and advises her to love herself. She ended up as a Communication Studies major with concentrations in honors and rhetorical criticism.

“I felt that coming into Rowan, I had to change who I was and create a personality for myself that was different from who I was. I switched my major five times, trying to fit into what society tells us we’re supposed to do after we graduate. But, I ended up majoring in Communication Studies and finding something that I loved when I was true to myself. So, I would just tell her to love herself and be content with who she is.”

She reflects on the best way she found to make friends. 

“The summer before my freshman year, I met many friends at the Pre-College Institute through the ASCEND program. While at Rowan, I found that meeting friends was easier when I was in a club or at an on-campus activity.”

Tiana shows off her graduation cords and stoles in a garden.

Although she had to say goodbye to her clubs, Tiana enjoyed the festivities that came with it. 

“My favorite moment of being involved on campus is probably at the end of my senior year when every single club or organization that you’re a part of gives out the stoles or cords and you get mini graduation ceremonies. Even though saying goodbye is sad, it’s really great to just be in a community with all the people that you’ve been with for four years. They wish you well for the future.”

Tiana was involved with many clubs and organizations on campus, including being part of Strong Tower Family, president of Mu Sigma Upsilon Sorority, Incorporated, and being an Admissions Ambassador

Tiana is looking forward to her internship over the summer with the ASCEND Office as an Interpersonal Counselor. She is hoping to start a dual master’s degree program in social work and public health in the fall.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

Passing the Torch: Outgoing SGA President Matthew Beck’s Parting Advice and Rowan Legacy

Matthew Beck stands in front of Bunce Hall.

“Put yourself out there, take those opportunities, because if you ask for them and are looking for them, then the opportunities will come.” From leading the student body to interning for the company he will now join after graduation, Mechanical Engineering major Matthew Beck of Monmouth County stayed open to new possibilities throughout his Rowan […]

Passing the Torch: Outgoing Student Government Vice President Sarah McClure

As a graduating senior, Sarah McClure reflects on her time as a Rowan student. Sarah was an International Studies and Political Science double major and on-campus resident from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County). 

Sarah poses under the Rowan archway.

Sarah held positions on the Student Government Association and Honors Student Organization executive boards. 

“My executive boards, through the Honors Student Organization and the Student Government Association, especially this year, left me with lifelong friends. These are people I’m going to come back and visit next year and check-in with. I’m really lucky to be blessed with such amazing people I was able to work alongside that I could eventually call my friends.”

Sarah is passing her Executive Vice President (EVP) position on SGA to one of her newfound lifelong friends.

“I’m so thrilled with my successor that was elected, Emily Lowe. She was on the board with me this year and she was the Vice President of Student Affairs. She is so lovely, so nice, and I’m really confident that she’s going to do a really good job.”

Sarah stands in a garden in her cap and gown.

Although she is thrilled with her successor, Sarah will miss being in the Executive Vice President role.

“I really loved the position of EVP. I enjoy engaging with all the clubs and getting to see what they all do on campus. When clubs did really cool things, I celebrated their successes with them, whether it was like a really awesome event or a great fundraiser. It’s hard saying goodbye, but I know Emily will do great things. SGA is something I will really miss,” she says.

Sarah reflects on her Rowan experiences and leaves a piece of advice for incoming students. 

“I just got a letter from my freshman year self through a mentorship program I did through the Honors College and the end of the letter said, ‘I hope you become someone that we can be proud of.’ It really moved me reading that because I think I have become someone that I would have been proud of because I got involved and that was something that I didn’t do freshman year.”

She adds, “I think one of my biggest regrets in college is not getting the jump on that sooner and looking at clubs and organizations during my first year of college. I would say to put yourself out there and don’t let your past experiences define who you’re going to become in college.”

Sarah is looking forward to starting her M.A. in Political Science in the fall through Rutgers University’s United Nations and Global Policy Studies program.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior business management major

Senior Reflects: Engineering Major Danielly DeMiranda Ribeiro on the Campus Opportunities that Shaped her Rowan Experience

Danielly celebrates commencement with her family.

Peer Tutor. Women in Engineering Club Treasurer. AIChE student chapter class representative. Chemical Engineering major Danielly DeMiranda Ribeiro stayed active on campus and online as Covid-19 surged through her college career. Now, with her degree in hand and a position with the pharmaceutical company Merck, Daneilly shares her best Rowan memories and her words of […]

First Year Voices: History Major Abbigail Ealer

Today, we feature Abbigail Ealer, a first year History major from Washington Township, NJ. Abby is in the Honors program and a mentee of the Bantivoglio Leadership and Service Training (BLAST) peer mentoring program, which pairs upperclassmen with incoming Honors students to help guide them through their first semester in Honors and at Rowan. Abby speaks with us about her experience in the program and her first year of college. 

What was the transition to college like for you? How did you push through any challenges? 

I was definitely nervous. This was the first time where I’m going to school with people I don’t know. I’ve gone to Catholic school my whole life, so from grade school to high school I’ve known everybody. It was very weird going to classes like American Government where most of the students were upperclassmen and I didn’t know anyone. 

On your busiest day, what responsibilities do you find yourself juggling? 

Wednesdays are definitely my busiest day of the week. I have three classes and I have BLAST at night. As a commuter, I drive all the way to campus for my classes during the day, then have to drive back home at night. My BLAST group gets out around 7:30 p.m., so I don’t get back home until late. It’s really hard to get any work done that day. 

What are the three classes you have that day? 

I have Western Civilization at 9:30 a.m., American Government at 12:30 p.m., then Honors Comp II with Prof. Flocco at 2:00 p.m. I have a break in the middle of the day between classes and BLAST and I usually spend that time with my sister (who is also a Rowan student) or with my friends. 

What have you enjoyed most about BLAST?

Honestly, friendships are the most valuable things. The mentors give us really great and helpful advice, but I’ve made some really great friends that have been super supportive and helpful. I’ve talked to them regularly outside of our group after finding out that we have classes together. They’ll even walk me to my car after our meetings. They always invite me to come with them to different events on campus, which is really sweet and inclusive. 

Abby leaning against Science Hall.

How are your mentors? 

Our mentors are great and they are also becoming my really good friends. I think it’s helpful to have friends who are upperclassmen because they can serve as a guide to us younger students. 

Tell us about a moment that made you feel like Rowan was a good fit for you?

There was this Honors event that I went to where we were able to meet the deans of our college. I’m a history major, so my college is the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. I met this girl at the event who was in the same college. She overheard me talking about how I was interested in Museum Studies, which happened to be an area of interest for her as well. She said to me, “I’m doing the same thing! Let me get your number,” and she spent thirty minutes just giving me all the information she could about the program and typed it all up in a google document.  That moment made me realize that this university isn’t just a school. It’s a community. People want me here, they want to help me succeed. Not just faculty but the students as well. It was just a really wonderful moment and made me feel like I belonged. 

What advice would you give to a high school student about choosing the right college?

Go with your gut. That’s what I did. I almost went to community college to save money, but I just felt like that wasn’t the path for me, so I came to Rowan. I don’t think if I went down any other path that I would be as happy as I am now. 

Abby holds the Hoot, spreading his wings
Abby’s friend, Hoot, steals the show!

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Story By: 
Bianca Gray, English graduate

Photos By:
Nick Flagg, senior theater and advertising major 

Student Leader Lauren Repmann on Biomedical Engineering Major, 3D Printing Club Success

Lauren sits on a bench next to a white, sphere sculpture.

Today we speak to Lauren Repmann, a senior Biomedical Engineering major with a minor in Chemistry. Lauren is an on-campus resident from Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County). She is the 3D Printing Club founder and co-president, president of the Women in Engineering Club, and a student mentor for the Engineering Learning Community. Lauren works off campus at Tranquility Path Investment Advisors as an Administrative Assistant, and on campus at the Office of Admissions as an Admissions Ambassador.

Lauren poses in the woods.

What inspired you to choose your major?

My mom works as an engineer at AT&T, and I always knew that I wanted to follow in her footsteps. When it came time for me to choose my college major, I wanted to pursue a field that combined engineering with medicine, and Biomedical Engineering was the perfect choice.

As I look back on this decision, I see that there are so many other benefits of choosing Biomedical Engineering that I wasn’t aware of. I’ve developed a genuine understanding of how to approach problems and sticky situations from a logical perspective, and this skill will be useful for all aspects of my life. I’ve also gained confidence in my technical abilities, so much so that I founded a 3D Printing Club at Rowan University.

Most importantly, I’ve recognized the importance of using engineering to set an example for younger female generations. Engineering is known to be a male-dominated field, and reaching out to elementary, middle and high school girls about a potential career in engineering can help to reduce this stigma.

Lauren poses in front of a fountain.

Tell us something interesting thing that you’ve learned in a class this semester.

It’s my last semester as a Rowan student, and I wanted to take a fun class to celebrate! I’ve always enjoyed taking pictures, so I chose to enroll in Honors Digital Photography with Jenny Drumgoole. The coolest thing I’ve learned so far is how to take long-exposure photos. This type of photography is great for taking night-time photos because the camera shutter stays open for a long period of time to record the light. Even if the area where the photo is being taken seems dark, the long exposure photography style will allow light to creep in from peripheral areas. I’ve made lots of awesome photos with this technique, and I’ll definitely continue to use this skill after this course.

Lauren poses in a clearing.

Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.

My typical day at Rowan starts at Engineering Hall. I serve as the co-president of Rowan’s 3D Printing Club, so I’m always in the 3D printing lab to make sure everything is running smoothly. While I’m in the lab, I usually make finishing touches on my homework assignments and get ready for my classes. After about two hours in the lab, I leave for my 11 a.m. classes. My biomedical engineering course load this semester is very heavy, but I’m thankful to have my friends who always want to collaborate on homework and assignments! I usually spend some time with them after my classes are over at 2 pm.

After that, I run back to Engineering Hall to make progress on my engineering clinic project. I work in Dr. Staehle’s Systems Biology and Neuroregeneration laboratory, and my project focuses on assessing the toxicity of exogenous chemicals, including DEHP and BP-3, on planarian flatworms. After catching up on my experiments, I run down the hall to one of the engineering clinic classrooms to teach my Engineering Learning Community seminar. I currently have 18 freshmen engineering students as my mentees, and we have done lots of fun and productive activities together. My favorite has been the icebreaker bingo tournament. It really helped me to get to know my mentees! Once my seminar ends at 5 p.m/, I run down to the first floor of Engineering Hall to close the 3D Printing Lab, then my day is over! Finally getting back to my apartment after each long day is rewarding! I change into my comfy clothes, eat dinner and ice cream, call my parents, do some homework, then start all over again the next day!

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that makes you feel like Rowan is home.

Whenever I step foot in Rowan’s 3D Printing Lab at Engineering Hall, I feel like Rowan is home. When I was a sophomore, I became very interested in 3D printing. The ability to take an idea and turn it into an object that I could hold intrigued me. I taught myself how to use OnShape, a popular CAD software, and I produced lots of cool models that I wanted to 3D print! When I approach one of Rowan’s 3D printing labs to ask about printing my models, I was told that the printers are primarily used for academic purposes. I knew I was not the only student who wanted to print personal models, and I also knew that Rowan University’s 3D printing lab had the resources to offer a personal printing service.

With that knowledge, I worked with a friend to draft a 3D printing plan to present to the technicians at the Engineering Hall 3D printing lab. The technicians were completely on board with our idea, and we then began the club petitioning process through the Student Government Association. On October 12, 2020, we officially became a Rowan club, and in January 2021, we received funding to purchase filament and supplies.

Since then, Rowan’s 3D Printing Club has grown at an exponential rate. We have 75 members who consistently attend our meetings and events, and we even won Rowan’s Outstanding Student Organization Award for the Spring 2021 semester. I’ve always felt that home is a feeling that you have the power to create. Through this club, I’ve not only created the feeling of home for myself, but also for all the other Rowan students who want to become more engaged in 3D printing. There is a genuine sense of community and passion that one can sense immediately upon walking into the room during one of our general meetings or workshops, and that is my Rowan “home” feeling that I will cherish for my entire life.

See Lauren and learn more about the 3D Printing Club in this video. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

Related posts:

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

Inside the M.S. in Biomedical Engineering Program with Rowan Global Student Brennen Covely

Beyond the Classroom: Jack Campanella Takes Club Leadership, Engineering Skills to Internship with Robotics Company

A Day in the Life of Communication Studies Major, Admissions Ambassador Coordinator Tiana Howard

Tiana poses in front of a wooded area.

Today we speak to Tiana Howard, a senior Communication Studies major with concentrations in Rhetorical Criticism and Honors. A first-generation college student from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County), Tiana is president of her sorority, Mu Sigma Upsilon, and a member of Rowan’s EOF program. Tiana works as an Ambassador Coordinator for Rowan Admissions, and she also […]

Finding My Path and Passion with an English Degree

Rowan English graduate Nicole sits in front of fall foliage on campus.

Meet guest Rowan Blog contributor Nicole Tota of Marlton, NJ (Burlington County), who recently earned her degree in English from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. She now pursues her master’s degree in Higher Education: Advising at Rowan Global. Here, Nicole candidly shares her degree brought more career questions than answers until she ultimately […]

A Series of Chances Led Biomedical Engineering Major Brandon Hickson to His Perfect Fit

Brandon works in a biomedical engineering lab.

Meet senior Brandon Hickson of Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), a Biomedical Engineering major and member of the Honors College. A last-minute change of plans brought Brandon to Rowan University’s College of Engineering. Later, a cancelled research experience sparked a new passion and career path for Brandon in the medical field. Read on to learn more about Brandon’s story and future plans. 

What made you choose biomedical engineering?

Growing up, I was fascinated with LEGOs and building things and constructing something out of nothing. And as I got older and got into middle school in high school, I realized that I had a passion for people as well. And I knew that I couldn’t live and do something for the rest of my life without incorporating both of those things into my life.

And I found out that biomedical engineering was really the thing that was perfect for me, because it combined the human component of biology and interacting with patients and people. But then also the mathematical and technical side of engineering meant a lot to me. And I feel like I found my perfect fit here at Rowan.

Brandon stands next to a Henry Rowan quote.
What impact do you hope to have in your field?

No matter how big or small it is, on every single level, I hope to impact the patient directly. Patient interaction is huge with me. I have had a family history of medical issues where over the years, we’ve had several different doctors and engineers who have had profound impacts on our lives. And I think that is something that goes very much unsaid that the people who work behind the scenes have a profound impact on the way that people live their lives and the success that they encounter. And I would love to be a part of that success in different people’s lives.

Share an “aha” moment that you’ve had within your discipline that made you feel passionate about your major.

My “aha” moment, believe it or not, happened when COVID was at its peak. I had a cancelled Biomedical Engineering research program at the University of Delaware. And through that cancellation, I ended up working at a doctor’s office in the area. Through that experience, I realized that medicine is actually my true calling.

The work that I have done in biomedical engineering has allowed me to have an appreciation for the overall holistic view of health in the human body, and to one day integrate that into a practice that I will hopefully have on my own. So as of now I’ve wanted to shift over to pre-med studies in addition to biomedical engineering, and I can’t wait to see what that’s going to bring.

Close up of Brandon in the lab.

Can you give one piece of advice for any student who is looking into this major and aren’t sure if it’s right for them?

I would say learn from me, and don’t come in with a very closed-minded approach. I graduated high school and thought that I knew what I wanted to do for the rest of my life and had the next 10 to 15 years planned and ready to be executed. And I had a giant curveball thrown my way. And I feel more at peace now with my professional career than I ever have. So definitely have an open mind when it comes to deciding what you want to do with your future and how you live your life because you’re only going to have one college experience. And you’ll hear this a million times, but live it how you would want to live it. Don’t let other people dictate what it is that you’re going to do with your life.

Portrait of Brandon leaning against a chair.

Why did you choose to come to Rowan?

I chose to come to Rowan because of the size of it. Believe it or not, I originally planned on going to the University of Maryland, and at the last minute decided to come here because of the streamlined approach that the engineering program takes with its students.

The class sizes are extremely small, so much so that the faculty can have a one on one relationship with multiple if not all of their students. And that is not really the case at any other university, especially any other university that has a program as prestigious as this one. Any other university, you would be simply a number on a page, or a name in a book. But here you’re a person who has wants and needs and desires for their future, and the faculty here make sure that that happens. 

Brandon works in the biomedical engineering lab.

The engineering program starts day one [your first] year and is meant to cultivate you to what you would eventually want to do for the rest of your life as you graduate. And you have faculty that are always pushing you along the way for excellence to make sure that you attain all that you seek out to achieve in life.

See our video with Brandon here.  

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Related posts:

Beyond the Classroom: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski Interns for Biotech Startup

Reaching New Heights: AJ Pingol Shares His Experience as a Biomedical Engineer

Student Leader Lauren Repmann on Biomedical Engineering Major, 3D Printing Club Success

Interacting with the World Through Video Games

Lauren works on her computer.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Playing video games is a popular pastime for people of all ages, especially for younger generations who have grown up experiencing the rapid evolution of video games.

They often receive a bad rep from people saying that they rot our youth’s brains and lead them to become antisocial or violent. While different types of video games can have varying effects on one’s behavior, it is not fair to group all games together as detrimental to society.

Especially in a time that has been as isolating as the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to find ways to combat feelings of loneliness to protect our mental well-being. In fact, modern video games in particular give us an opportunity to connect with others in a new, innovative way that wouldn’t have been conceivable just a few decades ago. 

Lauren sits with her laptop.

Just as with other modern technological advances such as texting and social media, some video games allow the player to interact with other players from around the world. This can include speaking through typing or voice chat in order to complete in-game missions together or play against one another.

Many video games with online play are unique to other forms of communication because it is often goal-oriented, meaning that players must work as a team and go through a series of steps to achieve a certain outcome. When you are stuck inside your house running out of things to do, having a goal to reach in mind can give you a sense of purpose and having other people constantly available to help can also give you experience with problem-solving skills and working in a team. 

Lauren works on her computer.

Existing research on video game usage supports the idea that playing video games is linked to a reduction in stress and depression. When combined with the opportunity for global interactive play, online video games can help decrease feelings of loneliness in addition to stress and depression (Marston & Kowert, 2020).

Therefore, whether you prefer a single player experience where you can take things at your own pace or enjoy meeting new friends to play with without leaving your own computer or console, there are proven benefits to playing video games. In a time where people have felt more disconnected than ever before, don’t discount the vast digital world that video games open, allowing us to interact with others through a very unique kind of lens.

Reference:

Marston, H. R., & Kowert, R. (2020). What role can videogames play in the COVID-19 pandemic?. Emerald Open Research, 2, 34. https://doi.org/10.35241/emeraldopenres.13727.2

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Story by:
Lauren Vitale, senior psychological science major, French minor, honors concentration from Middlesex County, NJ, Wellness Center intern

Photos by:
Jack Maisonneuve, senior communication studies major

Alumni Success: Julia Reilly, Chemical Engineer at Dupont

Rowan hall and Engineering Pond at night.

Today we feature Julia Reilly, a Rowan Chemical Engineering alumna who graduated in 2019. Julia is currently a chemical engineer at Dupont, a specialty company that makes products in the safety, healthcare, electronics, mobility, and construction spaces. Julia is from Bucks County, Pennsylvania, but she currently lives in Washington, D.C. 

A headshot of Julia.
Julia Reilly

Why Rowan?

My guidance counselor suggested I look into Rowan. Being from Bucks County, I had never heard of it. I went to Rowan’s Honors Accepted Students Day, and Rowan was better than I thought. I met many people at the event, and I loved it. 

Did you have any internships while you were at Rowan?

I had an internship at FMC Corporation, an agricultural sciences company, as well as an internship at Dupont. After my internship at Dupont, they interviewed me for a full-time role in the company during the fall semester of my senior year. I got the job, and it was nice to not have to worry about finding a job during my second semester of senior year. The job was in the Field Engineering and Supply Chain Development Program at Dupont, where I still currently work. 

Julia poses in front of some trees in a blue shirt.

Do you have any advice for Chemical Engineering students at Rowan?

I’d advise students to reach out to professors early on and offer to work in their labs. I started working in Dr. Joseph Stanzione’s lab my freshman year, and it was a great opportunity. I built a good relationship with him and gained valuable experience as I was trying to build my resume. This definitely helped me to secure an internship early on.  

How did Rowan help to prepare you for the job you have today?

Rowan has great chemical engineering classes that teach good fundamentals. My favorite part of the Chemical Engineering department are the special topics classes, such as mixing and process safety courses. These classes are not commonly offered at other schools and help Rowan’s Chemical Engineering program and Rowan alumni to stand out.

Julia poses in front of some trees and shrubbery in a blue shirt.

What do you hope to see in the future of Rowan?

I personally hope to see Rowan expand the Chemical Engineering program. Also, I hope they’ll continue to make diversity, equity and inclusion a priority in the engineering department specifically. It is important to me that they improve the diversity of both students and faculty and make the department an inclusive space for all to thrive.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Alumni Success: Mitch McDaniels on Finding Your “WHY”

Mitch poses at the Holly Pointe Commons sign.

Today we speak with Mitch McDaniels, who graduated from the Honors Concentration with a degree in Biochemistry in 2020. Mitch also minored in German Studies throughout his time at Rowan University. He grew up in Hammonton, NJ (Atlantic County) but now lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Mitch was a Resident Assistant (RA) for three years and lived on campus for all four years. He was also actively involved in the Honors College, B.L.A.S.T. Mentoring, the Keck Behavioral Lab at Cooper Medical Schoolthe Academic Associate Program at Cooper University Hospital, Rho Alpha Sigma, and Alpha Epsilon Delta. He was also a volunteer at the Kitchen of Hope Food Bank (Glassboro), and a Chemistry Learning Assistant for four semesters.

What did being an RA and Assistant Resident Director (ARD) mean to you?

Res Life [meaning RLUH or working for Residential Learning and University Housing as an RA, ARD, graduate role, or professional role] is such a unique field and it’s such a diverse and unique group of people that come together to do so much more than just run a building. I absolutely loved it throughout my time at Rowan — the opportunity to be a part of flourishing communities of residents in their first year of college, and hopefully being that go-to guy for my residents for the good, bad and everything in between.

My experience through Res Life has definitely been one of my favorite memories at Rowan because I met so many new, and now lifelong, friends through it. I love when my residents come back and tell me how much fun they had their freshman year or a favorite memory they had from their year in our pod. A few even went on to go into Res Life themselves; it makes me so happy to hear that!

For me, it was really special to see the ways in which my communities grew together, and the ways they found to make a difference together. 

Mitch poses under the "Pork Chopper" statue in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
Mitch poses by the “When Pigs Fly, Pork Chopper” Statue which is part of the Sculpture Walk in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

What advice do you have for current students?

I think every first year student should take a little bit of time to find what it is they want to do at Rowan, until they really find their “why,” both on campus and off. I’m still learning exactly what that is for me, honestly. No matter what you do, who you hang out with, or the classes you take, I’ve learned that it’s best to keep an open mind because those moments came when I was least expecting them.

My first year, I was really quite quiet, but I thought that being an RA would be a really unique way to meet people and be part of a community. Lots of people become hyper-focused on the free housing and food, which is pretty sweet, to be honest, but I also wanted to find a place to help in building that welcoming environment I found on campus. I often forget that I had a meal plan and free housing as an RA because I just enjoyed getting to meet everyone and get connected and involved in a way that was different from any other role on campus because their home also becomes yours. 

No matter what you do at Rowan, you really have to take the time to find your “why” [your purpose] at Rowan. There’s this proverb: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” I really believe that Rowan’s spirit comes from that small-campus community, where friends, colleagues, and professors all have your back.

My best advice would be to enjoy college for the people and experiences you’re surrounded by — go together, not alone. I’ve found that the best way for me to get things done is when I’m passionate about it and that I want to see it through to the end, together. For me, the Res Life community was that “thing.”

Now stepping into the real world and getting off of the college campus, finding your “why” comes with the territory for everything you do.

Mitch poses confidently in front of a Sioux Falls sign.

Where do you work now?

Now, I work as a Clinical Research Coordinator at Sanford Health, a big hospital system in the Midwest, but mostly in the Dakotas and Minnesota. I’m on a team of four coordinators that are working on a portfolio of COVID studies. We have two different studies that we are mainly working on for the moment. One is for different treatments that focus on outpatient settings, where patients actively have COVID and are sick, but they’re not sick enough to be hospitalized. This study, sponsored by the National Institute of Health, is an Adaptive Platform Study, which means that we are evaluating multiple investigative treatments that can change from time to time, to quickly and safely identify medications that could significantly improve a patient’s COVID-19 diagnosis.

We’re also doing inpatient work with people who are in the ICU on ventilators, high flow oxygen or other life-saving measures to support them throughout their battle with COVID-19. It’s another adaptive platform study evaluating various medications for people suffering more severe COVID, and who have received advanced life-saving therapeutics or interventions to keep them alive or better support them.

I was always asking myself “why” because I wanted to pour all that I could into any activity I was doing. I didn’t want anything to be just a checkbox for my resume. It really needed to be something that I cared about and believed in.

Part of my “why” for medicine is that I want to be a resource for people wherever I go. That’s something I saw in my family with my father being an FBI agent. I want to be able to carry my skills into underserved areas at some point in my career and make a difference within those communities.  

Mitch wears a light blue shirt and stands in front of a waterfall.
Mitch loves the famous Falls Park in his new hometown of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

What do you hope to do in the medical field?

It really hit when I had the chance to really immerse myself in the Camden community through Cooper, first as a student at MEDacademy at Cooper Medical School, and later as an Academic Associate at Cooper University Hospital. I really began to see that a physician doesn’t work in a bubble, they are someone who’s active and embedded within the community that they are trusted to serve. Ever since, I saw medicine as an opportunity to expand upon the skills, mindset and joy that Res Life has brought me, to help better build a community.

Of course, Rowan has always supported and nourished my curiosity for science and the human body; it’s also helped me to find my voice in leadership. But what my time at Rowan and Cooper has gifted me with has been the opportunity to think, grow excited and imagine how I wanted to give back to the community at the intersection of science, leadership, education, research and policy. 

Part of my “why” for medicine is that I want to be a resource for all people wherever I may go. That’s something I saw, and valued, in my family with my father being a Special Agent in the Federal Bureau of Investigation. I hope to be able to carry my skills into communities (especially those underserved) throughout southern New Jersey, our nation, and the world throughout my career and in hopes of making a difference within those communities by empowering the people of those communities through all I learn from them. No matter what field of medicine I pursue, there’s nothing more important to me than to help these communities I hope to serve to thrive and grow.

A gorgeous blue and orange sunset shines above a majestic waterfall in Minnesota.
Mitch captured the beauty of Falls Park with just his phone.

Tell me about your favorite memory from Res Life? 

My favorite moments were those that were unscripted where I would just hang out with my residents on a random Tuesday night in a hallway or lounge of Holly Pointe. We would have the best conversations! I would always leave my door open because I wanted people to be able to walk in and just sit down. I wanted them to know my room was theirs too, and that it was a safe space where they could unwind, have fun, or talk anything over. The most organic moments were the times when I felt true friendship forming between myself and my residents, and it was not any longer just me “supervising” their freshman experience.

One of my favorite memories in these communities as an RA and an ARD was bringing my residents to the food pantry. I really loved the idea of getting into the Glassboro Community and all of us volunteering together and seeing the ripple our pod could make in the greater community. I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention the awesome staffs I worked with throughout my three years in Res Life. I couldn’t think of a better group of people to program with, spend time with, or occasionally deal with those 3 a.m. fire alarms. Those unscripted moments, with my residents and RAs alike, made every moment worth it. I owe it to them for helping me to find my why throughout undergrad. 

Waterfalls and tower in Sioux Falls, Minnesota
Another gorgeous sunset by the Queen Bee Mill in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

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Story by: 
Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

Photos courtesy of:
Mitch McDaniels, biochemistry graduate

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Profs Abroad: Stephanie in Paris (and Other Parts of France)

Stephanie wears glasses and a red beret smiling at the camera with a green forest in the background.

Today we speak with Stephanie Ibe, who graduated in the Spring of 2020 and majored in Biological Sciences with a minor in French and an Honors and Pre-med concentration. Stephanie stayed in Le Havre, France for seven months while working as a teaching assistant through the TAPIF Program. Stephanie comes from Franklin Park, NJ in Somerset County. She was involved in MAPS (Minority Association of Premedical Students), Res Life as an RA/ARD, research labs, tutoring, RUPAC (Rowan University Philippine American Coalition), Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED – Premed Honors Society), University Chorus, and mentoring through the Dr. Harley E. Flack program.

What happened after you arrived in France?

After I arrived, I had to go through all these different transportation modes to go from Paris to Le Havre and my phone wasn’t working! I had to navigate the entire thing just by talking to people and from reading signs. I don’t know how I ended up making it to Le Havre. It was raining, too. It was a bit of a shock to just be thrown in and use [only] French right away. 

I had a Prof Référente (Referent Teacher) with whom I could communicate through Facebook. She was so helpful. She helped me find my place to stay because the high school that I worked at didn’t have housing available for me. So she asked another high school nearby if I can stay there and it ended up working out. She picked me up from the train station once I arrived. She gave me bed sheets and a week’s worth of groceries. I was lucky to have good support over there.

Picture of “La Funiculaire” (little train Stephanie had to take to get up to her apartment). It is about 5 feet wide and maybe 6 feet tall with paintings of flowers on the side.
“La Funiculaire” (little train) Stephanie had to take to get up to her apartment.

Was it scary having to talk in French to French people? 

I was honestly really scared when I first arrived because it wasn’t the same as “classroom French.” I’ve never studied abroad before, so I never knew what it was like to actually speak French in France. I went to France once when I was in high school, but I always had my teachers there to help us. This time, I was by myself. I had to use my French, especially when I had to explain things to my students. Sometimes they didn’t understand what I was saying in English, so I would have to translate in French.

You get used to it after a while. There’s a lot of slang I need to learn as well as very technical vocabulary. I had to open a bank account in France and I didn’t know any banking vocabulary, so it was a bit difficult. I also observed the biology lab classes in one of the high schools. Even small things, like DNA, were switched. It was ADN.

Stephanie wears a red beret in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

Your brain automatically switches to your second language after being immersed in it for a while. It’s also easier to learn different languages when you are able to see the connections between languages. When I was there, I tried to practice my Spanish with the Spanish assistants. It’s a lot easier when you’re talking to someone that’s native to that language. They can tell when I am making a mistake and they don’t feel shy to correct me and give me feedback because they are teachers. It’s what they do. 

What other countries were your fellow assistants from?

I met assistants from Spain, Germany, England, Northern Ireland, Los Angeles, Colorado, New York, Kenya, Russia and Jordan.

Stephanie and the other TAPIF assistant poses by a giant building in Normandy, France.
Stephanie (bottom, right) at Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy

What was your favorite memory (outside of being a teaching assistant)?                 

Spending all of my time with the assistants because that’s all we really had. Everything was closed after one week of me being there. We didn’t have museums or restaurants to go to. All we had was each other. I was lucky to live right next to the beach, so I had a lot of beach days. It was only a 20-minute walk to the beach. Having that space to get out, explore new places, and take my beach days were fun.

Fancy French food on a white plate prepared by a culinary student in France.
Meals from the student restaurant

I worked 12 hours a week, 5 days a week, a few hours each weekday. In France, they start school at 8 a.m. and finish at 5:20 p.m. They get two 15-minute breaks as well as an hour and 20 minutes for a lunch break. They can do whatever they want during their break, like walk around town and eat anywhere. A lot of my students would go home and eat lunch. They also take the public bus to school, not a singular school bus.

Fancy French dessert on a white plate prepared by a culinary student in France.
Dessert from the student restaurant

What was your favorite meal in France?

I ate a lot of vegan food because most of [the assistants] were either vegan or vegetarian. I really liked it because I never knew you could do so much with such little ingredients because the vegan diet is so restricted. They can’t eat any meat or dairy, or even honey. But, you can do so much with spice. We would always have potluck dinners. Also, the food at my high school was so fancy because [the students] are training to be proper chefs. They would practice making fancy French desserts and sophisticated dishes. French school meals are also very balanced and affordable.

Photo of French school lunch showing a well-balanced and delicious meal.
School lunch in Le Havre, France

What was the most interesting thing you learned about France?

I guess, how welcoming everyone was! I watched Emily in Paris right before I left and I had this idea in my head. “I’m going to be all by myself and they’re going to shoo me away because I’m American.” But no, everyone was so welcoming! When you’re walking down the street, everyone says “Hello, how are you?” Even though you’re complete strangers. When I first got back, I wanted to have a conversation with my cashier like in France.

Stephanie plays a ukelele while sitting on a beach in Le Havre, France.
Stephanie plays the ukulele at a beach in Le Havre

What was your favorite souvenir?

My favorite souvenir was a ukulele. I had to get rid of a lot of clothes and a pair of shoes to fit the ukulele! I only came with one suitcase, one carry-on, and one backpack. I ended up leaving a lot of shirts. I traded with other assistants. For example, I gave some of my Rowan shirts. I traded them for a Spanish white sweatshirt from Granada as well as a Spanish jean jacket. I also bought real lavender. It is really cool because it keeps its scent for a really long time. It made my luggage smell amazing!

Is there anything else you’d like to tell me about your time in France?

The overall experience made me think about how it felt like to be a foreigner in another country, which is something that a lot of us have not experienced. It made me really think about how it might have felt for my mom who came from the Philippines to the U.S.

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Story by: 
Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major and Stephanie Ibe, biological sciences graduate

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In Case You Missed It: Top 10 Most Popular Blog Posts This School Year!

Today, we will share our top 10 most popular stories from the blog for the 2020-21 school year. If you missed any of these great stories, be sure to check them out! 

1. Alumni Success: New Jersey State Police Sergeant Danyel Barnes

Headshot of Danyel in uniform wearing a mask.

“Danyel Barnes, a 1994 alumnus, shares his Rowan story and how it shaped his life today as a Sergeant with the New Jersey State Police.”

2. How to Apply for Scholarships at Rowan University

Wide exterior shot of Bunce Hall.

“Admissions counselor Amanda Kuster explains how scholarships work at Rowan and shares how prospective students can earn more money for college. “

3. TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Future Chemistry Teacher Trevor Jones

Trevor smiles outside of Science Hall wearing a white T-shirt.

“In this story, we feature Trevor Jones, a senior first-generation college student majoring in chemistry education. Trevor transferred his junior year and is from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). He is a resident assistant at the Nexus apartments and is involved with various clubs such as rugby, Men of Color Alliance (MOCA), and Student Organization for Caribbean Awareness.”

4. Alumni Success: Teacher and Soror Kathleen Gordy-Mathis

Kathleen smiles wearing a black leather jacket outside her home.

“Kathleen Gordy-Mathis, an alumna and current preschool teacher, tells us about her amazing experiences since graduating. Kathleen graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in Communications with a specialization in Public Relations in 1990.”

5. TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Studio Art Major Christine Stewart

Christine smiles while seated outside on campus.

“In this story, we welcome Christine Stewart, a transfer student from Cumberland County College. They are a junior majoring in Studio Art with a specialization in Graphic Design from Pennsauken, NJ (Camden County). They are also involved in Prism, Queer People of Color (QPOC), and Women of Westby.”

6. Faculty PROFile: Journey into the Entrepreneurial Mindset with Dr. Susana C. Santos, Rohrer College of Business

Dr. Susana stands by a railing inside Business Hall.

“Meet Dr. Susana C. Santos, assistant professor of Management and Entrepreneurship within the Rohrer College of Business. Rowan Global Learning and Partnerships awarded Dr. Santos its Excellence in Online Learning faculty award last year. Learn more about Dr. Santos, her teaching, and how she created an inventive, daily exercise to build online engagement with her students.”

7. Alumni Success: Student-Athlete, Trailblazer Brad K. Leak

Rowan alumnus Brad Leak poses by the Shady Rest Clubhouse sign.

“In this story, we feature alumnus Brad K. Leak ’94, who earned a bachelor of science degree in Business with a specialization in Accounting. He also led the men’s Track & Field team as captain from 1991 to 94. As a three-time all-American champion, Brad wisely balanced the many responsibilities of being a student, an athlete, and a leader.”

8. The Importance of Unstructured Time

Landyn posing outside Bunce Hall while wearing a Rowan jacket.

“This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Healthy Campus Initiatives. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options.” Landyn Bacanskas, a Biomedical Engineering major, wrote this piece on the power of a “mental recess break.”

9. 7 Dance Majors Share How Their Degree Supports Their Dreams and Goals 

Grace dancing in a dance studio in Memorial Hall.

“Seven Dance majors share how they’re dreaming big and how their degree is going to get them there.”

10.  Leadership #PROFspective: Yashaswi Parikh, Uplifting Leader, Cofounder, and Copresident of Rowan SASA

Yashaswi sitting on a Gazebo outside near Bunce.

“In this article, we speak with Yashaswi Parikh, cofounder, and co-president of the Rowan South Asian Students Association as well as sunshine chair of Alpha Phi Omega (APO). As sunshine chair, she works to bring joy and happiness to the organization! Yashaswi is a senior Biological Sciences major and Spanish minor who is part of the 3+4 BS/DO program and the Bantivoglio Honors Concentration. She calls Monroe Township in Middlesex County her hometown.”

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Stories and Photos by: 
Various Digital Content Contributors from the Rowan Blog

Post by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Alumni Success: Stephanie Ibe and How She Became a Teaching Assistant in France

Stephanie sits at the Giant Prof statue on campus while wearing a custom stole showing the Filipino and French flags.

Today we speak with Stephanie Ibe, a 2020 graduate who majored in Biological Sciences with a minor in French and Honors and Pre-med concentrations. Stephanie stayed in Le Havre, France for seven months while working as a teaching assistant through the TAPIF Program. Stephanie comes from Franklin Park, NJ in Somerset County. She was involved in MAPS (Minority Association of Premedical Students), Res Life as an RA/ARD, research, tutoring, RUPAC (Rowan University Philippine American Coalition), Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED – Premed Honors Society), University Chorus, and mentoring through the Dr. Harley E. Flack program.

What is the name of this program? 

It’s called TAPIF, which stands for Teaching Assistant Program In France and it’s through the French Ministry of Education. TAPIF was recommended to me by my French teacher, Dr. Maria Hernandez, a former Fulbright Program alumna.

What part of France were you mainly based in? 

Normandy! It has a mix of everything. It’s in the northwest of France. You can find suburbs, cities, small towns, beaches, cliffs and the countryside. It’s about two hours away from Paris. You could take a bus to Paris from Normandy for as low as eight euros (about $9). When we traveled to the south of France, we took a train ride from Normandy that took about six hours.

Stephanie poses in a gorgeous, tiny street in the French city of Marseilles.
Marseilles

My base city is really special. It’s called Le Havre. It is an urban city with a beach and a port. It is located right next to Sainte-Adresse, where Claude Monet created many of his paintings. What happened in Le Havre is that during the World War II bombings, the entire city was destroyed. The city was rebuilt not too long ago. It was rebuilt by Auguste Perret between 1945 and 1964, so Le Havre looks completely different from other typical French cities. The buildings are a little bit newer and more modern. They are boxier and made of concrete.

How many people again were in your program in France? 

According to the website, about 1,100 people participated in it and in my city there were 13 assistants.

How close did you live near each other? 

We were all within about 20 minutes of each other, whether by bus, tram or walking. Public transportation is really important in France so we all had our own public transportation card which was pretty affordable. I only had to pay 25 euros a month. It made transportation really easy. Most of us were within the city center, so it was very easy to walk to each other’s apartments.

Stephanie wears a dark red winter hat to the cold beach in Le Havre, France.
Beach of Le Havre

Could you describe what it was like going from graduation to the pandemic to going to France? 

It was such a stressful experience. From the time I graduated to the time I was actually on the plane to France, I didn’t know if I would still be doing the program. We didn’t get our acceptance letters until the end of June, because of Covid delays, and our actual placements until the end of July. And even though we got our acceptance letters, we still weren’t sure if we could leave the country because of the pandemic. The visa center did not open until mid-September. They were not accepting applications to apply for a visa until mid-September, and I had to be in France by mid-October. After I was able to schedule my appointment time for the visa center it took a little bit of time for my visa to process. I got my visa about one week before I had my flight to France. 

Even after I got my visa, I had a lot of other things to do before my flight to France. I had to get a background check, my fingerprints scanned, and I had to get my COVID test done 72 hours before boarding. Until I was on the flight, it was stressful, but I made it! Thankfully, it was a lot easier to come back to the US.

Stephanie poses under a transportation sign in Bordeux, France with a reflective structure in the background.
Bordeux

What did you do as a teaching assistant?

I taught English and American culture. I taught at two different high schools. One was a hotel and service trade school, where they taught things like culinary, restaurant service. All of the classes I taught for that school were centered around things like food and drinks, holidays and traditions, nutrition, and service dialogues. The other high school I taught at was a technical and professional high school, where they have programs for Biotechnology, Health, and Social Science. I got to talk a lot about things I was passionate about like U.S. healthcare, our education system, civil rights, nutrition, designing experiments, ethics, biotechnology, and general American culture and traditions. 

I incorporated a lot of things they were interested in learning about. I would do different kinds of presentations and activities about American culture. I helped them prepare for their oral presentations and would give them feedback.

Did you get to decide that or was there a guideline from TAPIF?                

When you’re filling out your application, you get to check off a few boxes about your background. I majored in biology and I did bench and clinical research, so that’s what I included in my application.

I think TAPIF also tries to decide your placement based on your hobbies. For example, I put on my application that I really enjoy cooking so they placed me in a school with a culinary program. For the most part, they put you where they think you’d fit in best and what high school you are able to give the most to.

Stephanie sits on a wall overlooking the whole city of Marseilles, France.
Marseille from Basilique Notre Dame de la Garde

What was your favorite memory as a teaching assistant?                             

I really liked getting to know all of my students and seeing their growth from when I first began teaching to the end. I remember when I first met them, they were so shy and scared to speak to me. By the end of the program, they were so excited to speak in class and we were able to have a lot of fun conversations together.

I loved being able to actually talk to them about what they’re interested in and seeing them build their confidence in being able to speak English. I had them pick what topics they’d be interested in learning. I really liked that because they also had a lot to teach me in return, through our discussions. I would always ask them about things like what kind of music, shows, food, stores, and activities they like. It was like an inside scoop to their culture.

Stephanie poses happily while holding a Rowan umbrella in the air in France.
Vieille Ville (Bordeaux)

How did Rowan’s French program help prepare you for this experience?

I loved how small Rowan’s French program was. I had a lot more opportunities to practice speaking with the students in my class because there were only five or six students. There’s also more one-on-one help from your professors.

The support I got from the faculty was huge. I wouldn’t have gotten the position if it wasn’t for Dr. Hernandez. She encouraged me to pursue the French minor and apply to the program. In the beginning, I was debating on whether or not I should go to France because I am also applying to medical school. Dr. Hernandez walked me through the pros and cons of going to France in the midst of a pandemic. Eventually, I made my decision to go based on the idea that I’ll never get to experience and learn about France the way I did in those seven months. It truly would’ve been an opportunity of a lifetime.

Stephanie wears a custom stole with the Filipino and French flags on the sunny and green Rowan campus near Bunce Hall.

In the end, I was honestly so thankful that I went this year. Even though everything was closed the entire time I was there, I don’t think I would have built such a strong bond with all the other assistants if everything was open. We would have each been doing our own thing. Being able to experience big cities like Paris with fewer people on the streets was also really cool.

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Story by: 
Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

and Stephanie Ibe, biological sciences graduate

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Calysta Laurente’s European Study Abroad Experience

We’re Not in Glassboro Anymore: Nadine El Maalem Shares Her Study Abroad Experience in Morocco

Beyond the Classroom: Idea Challenge Winner, Steminist Squad Founder Talia Tomarchio

The Steminist Squad leader and volunteers pose in front of Business Hall.

Today we speak to Talia Tomarchio, a recent graduate with a degree in computer science, a minor in neuroscience and an honors concentration. Talia is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County and a first-generation college student. Talia founded the Steminist Squad, an online community for women in STEM industries. Her business won first place at both Rowan’s 2020 Idea Challenge and the 2021 Rohrer New Venture Competition and was a semi-finalist in KPMG’s Ideation Challenge. 

Talia poses on the bridge behind Wilson Hall.

What kinds of career-related opportunities have you had beyond the classroom? 

I performed research with Dr. Anthony Breitzman (from the Dept. of Computer Science) this semester on analyzing Myers–Briggs personality types through Twitter tweets. I was planning on getting an internship last summer, which would be my first summer at Rowan. I applied for research for undergraduates (REUS) through the National Science Foundation, but because of COVID-19, all the opportunities I applied to got canceled. I reached out to Dr. Breitzman, and he allowed me to do research with him! We started our research over the summer, and we continued it through the fall. I also founded an online community for girls in STEM called Steminist Squad. 

Can you tell me more about the community? 

It started out as an online chat server on Discord where girls can talk about their major, post internships they found, share resources and help each other with homework. It has now grown into a professional development resource and supportive community of like-minded individuals. We also have an inspirational social media presence and a podcast that is coming soon. 

The Steminist Squad walks to Business Hall.

How did you come up with Steminist Squad? 

After coronavirus broke out and closed campus last spring, I was taking a few courses in the summer and realized the impact that online learning had on me as a student. I felt disconnected and missed the campus environment, and I’m sure that I wasn’t alone. That feeling inspired me to create a community to connect women from different colleges and communities, and that was the start of the journey to what is now Steminist Squad! 

What was your experience like entering the Squad in idea challenges and competitions? 

It boosted my confidence by practicing my pitch so many times! I met so many new people and learned a lot from the mentors and teachers. I also gained valuable insight on how to pivot the business direction to reach more women and help them. 

What knowledge or skills have you developed through The Idea Challenge and New Venture Competition that you will take with you for future endeavors? 

There are a few major takeaways that I learned from these experiences. I learned the basics of entrepreneurship, like business models, customer discovery and financials. I developed teamwork skills by leading a team of volunteers for two semesters, and my presentation skills have [dramatically] improved. 

The Steminist Squad sits in Business Hall.

Has there been anyone from Rowan that helped you start and keep this community going?

Jessica Vankawala, a junior Biomedical Engineering major in a PreMed program with Cooper Medical School, and Kayleigh Ostberg, a junior Bioinformatics major, have been essential volunteers from the Bantivoglio Honors College. Kadie Davis, a Biomedical Engineering major with a Chemistry minor, also volunteered in the Spring 2021 semester. 

Tapan Soni, once my cybersecurity teaching assistant and now a professional cybersecurity analyst, is an active and vital member of our online server. With the support of Dr. Kristen diNovi and Dr. Susana Santos [featured here], and guidance from Dr. Eric Liguroi [featured here] and Brandon Graham [featured here], I was able to transform this from an idea to reality. 

How do you feel you are helping others with the Steminist Squad? 

Being a first-generation student, I often think about the other girls who don’t have the support or confidence in themselves to be successful in school or in life. So, I feel like a part of me understands what they are going through and wants to give them a way to feel included and supported. If it doesn’t get any bigger than this and I end up helping one girl gain confidence in what she is capable of, I will be happy. 

The Steminist Squad sits in front of Business Hall.
Talia (second from left) with Squad members Jessica Vankawala, Kayleigh Ostberg and Kadie Davis.

What are your future plans for the Steminist Squad, now that you have graduated?

I am planning on taking this summer to grow Steminist Squad. I was accepted into the Rowan Center of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Summer Accelerator program, also known as StartupRU, where I will further develop my startup with the help of mentors and resources. I hope to have a fully functioning model by the end of the summer so I can start recruiting more Squad members for next semester!

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major, and Talia Tomarchio, computer science graduate

Photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo:
Talia (second from left) with Steminist Squad members Jessica Vankawala, Kayleigh Ostberg and Kadie Davis

Beyond the Classroom: Cultural Clubs and Landing Internships with JT Kurtz

JT leans against a tree on Bunce green, wearing a Rowan sweater with hands in his pockets.

Today we speak with JT Kurtz, a first-generation college student from Egg Harbor Township (Atlantic County). JT will be graduating this year with a degree in Computer Science and currently works as an ARD (Assistant Resident Director) on campus. He is also active in RUPAC (the Rowan University Philippine American Coalition) and is a Human Factors Researcher for the Psychology department. 

What clubs have you been a part of? 

I am part of the Rowan University Philippine American Coalition (RUPAC – the Filipino club). I am half-Filipino and half-Italian! 

I’m also a Human Factors Researcher for the Psychology department. Human Factors looks at processes (not just technical, anything with how a team operates or any technologies they work with). We try to find the most efficient way to make it better or redesign it so that it’s much easier for everyone.

When I was in the Honors College, my Comp II professor (Professor Flocco) was the coordinator for the Honors B.L.A.S.T. Mentor Program. I told her about my passion for computer science. I really like taking something, being innovative or redesigning it, and making sure it’s the best for someone to visually see and understand. That’s considered User Interface or User Experience Design (UI or UED). That segued into “Oh, she knows somebody at UPenn. Speak with them and see what opportunities you can get from there.” So, I went all the way to Philly, had a 30-minute conversation and that person was like “Hey, I know somebody that’s here at Rowan.” I came back and had an interview with my advisor, Dr. Tremoulet. She is fantastic without a doubt. She said “I’m going to bring you on board with my team. So I’ve been in her lab for about a year and a half now. We actually just published one of her researches. It was super awesome.”

JT smiles and points at the camera on Bunce green.

Tell me more about RUPAC!

I’ve been a part of that since my sophomore year. I went out my freshman year to the Org Fair, that was always an awesome opportunity. My friend and I went to high school together. He’s been in it since freshman year and was like “Hey, you should check it out.” I met some really great people and being part of that org has helped me start my DJ career because they always needed a DJ for any of their on-campus events. And from there, I was able to build my network because RUPAC is affiliated with major regional and national Filipino conferences [all under the organization called “Filipino International Networking Dialogue” (FIND) spanning colleges from Massachusetts down to Florida]. 

I believe it was last year, prior to COVID, I went to TCNJ. They hosted a big conference called “Dialogue” where all of these other Filipino organizations come together. They talk about what it’s like to be Asian American and how we can better our communities from all different kinds of perspectives. It was really cool, it’s always fun! You play games, share stories, and then you make new friends. With that, I was actually able to segue into being the DJ for their regional formal dance (hosting students from 7 out of the 8 regions in FIND). With RUPAC, it’s been really great to be on campus. I know they’re still working their best now even with the pandemic. 

JT stands in front of the Rowan University archway near Bunce Hall.

Are you part of any other clubs? 

I feel like I always do too much (everyone always describes me like that). Aside from that, nothing else on campus. I have my off-campus internship as a software developer for General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT).

Where are they located? 

They have a lot of different branches and offices. They’re a government contracting agency, similar to Lockheed Martin. I interned with them over the summer and I will continue interning with them throughout the school year. Thankfully, I just accepted a full-time job with them. 

When do you start working for them full-time? 

I believe I start with them in June. I have to smooth things out, fill out some paperwork with the manager. I’m super excited. The game plan from there is to work with them and hopefully, I would like to pursue my master’s in Computer Science. 

How did you find that internship? 

Every year since freshman year, I went to the Career Fair and that’s how I found GDIT. 

JT leans against a tree, looking solemnly across Bunce green.

Do you have any thoughts on what’s happening with Asian hate? 

We definitely live in a world where there’s hatred all throughout. It’s a shame that there are different groups that are being targeted. I think a lot of people try to work together to make things better. I know recently we had a march around campus [protesting Asian hate]. I encourage any group that has [been targeted] to come together and speak on how we can make our society better. We can acknowledge that things are happening in our world that is definitely wrong. At the same time, we need to work together and come up with solutions to prevent that from happening. 

Have you ever experienced any Asian hate on campus? 

Personally no, that’s actually an interesting topic now. I think about how when you walk around campus and how people can tell if you’re of a certain race. I don’t think that’s fair because you don’t fully know their background. You probably didn’t know I was Filipino because I don’t portray the common characteristics of a Filipino. I think that contributes to why I don’t experience much of that perspective. At the same time, I can still resonate with my friends, my family, and my culture. I’m sure there are other people in that same situation. Maybe they don’t contribute to the hate but they don’t understand it. I will definitely support this movement as much as possible with as much as I can. 

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Story by:
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Leadership #PROFspective: Yashaswi Parikh, Uplifting Leader, Cofounder and Copresident of Rowan SASA

Yashawhi standing behind Bunce Hall.

Today we speak with Yashaswi Parikh, cofounder and copresident of the Rowan South Asian Students Association as well as sunshine chair of Alpha Phi Omega (APO). As sunshine chair, she works to bring joy and happiness to the organization! Yashaswi is a senior Biological Sciences major and Spanish minor who is part of the 3+4 […]

Leadership #PROFspective: Catherine Nguyen, Cofounder of Rowan Vietnamese Student Association

Catherine against a railing at Bunce.

Today we feature Catherine Nguyen, a leader at Rowan University. From Washington Township, NJ (Morris County), Catherine majors in Biological Sciences and minors in Chemistry, Sociology and Thomas Bantivoglio Honors Concentration. She talks about her experience with the Vietnamese Student Association (VSA) and overall experience as a student leader. This story is part of a series spotlighting campus […]

My Favorite Class: Shakespeare I

Taryn poses outside the library.

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Today we speak to Taryn Guettler, a senior English major with minors in Women and Gender Studies and Writing Arts and concentrations in Honors and Shakespeare Studies from Succasunna, NJ (Morris County). Taryn is an on-campus resident at Whitney Center

Taryn poses outside the Campbell Library.

What is your favorite class at Rowan?

My favorite class at Rowan is Honors Shakespeare I. The class is in the English department, and Dr. Claire Falck was my professor.

Tell us a little about what the class is.

Shakespeare I is a required course for all English majors. Throughout the semester, students study six of Shakespeare’s plays (my section read: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Othello,” “Julius Caesar,” “Hamlet,” “Twelfth Night” and “The Tempest”).

Shakespeare I focuses on some of the more well-known plays, while Shakespeare II (an elective course) features those that are less often studied. Class discussion in Shakespeare I often focused on key moments of the plays, different interpretations of scenes or dialogue, and the history surrounding each play. We also watched one full production of each play, some being very true to script while others took a more out-of-the-box approach, which added a new perspective to studying Shakespeare.

Taryn poses in front of the Campbell Library.

Share with us a few details on why this class was interesting.

One of the main reasons that this course was interesting for me was because it went beyond just reading Shakespeare’s plays. We were able to watch productions (including one live performance from Rowan’s Theatre department), which gave us an understanding of the impact of different interpretations of the script on the characters, themes, and play as a whole. We even were able to try our hands at acting out a scene ourselves for our final project; both groups chose scenes from the same play but portrayed them with very different tones and moods.

Another reason that this course was interesting was because of the small class size. There were only a handful of students in my section, which allowed us to get to know one another better, and made the final group project much easier and much more enjoyable. Plus the group being more close-knit encouraged more participation in our daily discussions.

Is there anything else that made this class impactful?

I enjoyed getting to read a mix of plays — some that I was familiar with and others that I was not. It demonstrated the range that can be found in Shakespeare’s works. I went on to add a concentration in Shakespeare Studies, which I think speaks for itself in showing how much the course impacted me.

Taryn poses in front of vines.

What makes this professor great?

Dr. Falck is clearly very passionate about the subject. When a professor can share their enjoyment of the course material, it makes the course feel much more engaging and interesting. I have been lucky to have many professors in the English department who really enjoy what they teach, and that enjoyment shows throughout the course. Dr. Falck also went beyond to provide additional enriching experiences for the course, like an acting workshop, that made this course stand out from others that I have taken.

How did this class help to support your academic or personal growth or your professional goals?

Honors Shakespeare I certainly improved my writing skills by pushing me to be more critical of my own work and expand my thinking. I would definitely say that I am a better writer for having taken this course, which has been a great benefit as I continue with my English major courses. It also helped me to develop my critical reading skills, which have been useful in other courses and I think will continue to be useful as I enter the professional field. The class also introduced me to a subject area that I might one day be interested in studying further.

Taryn poses in front of Campbell Library.

What are your professional goals?

Currently, my short-term professional goal is to begin working in the publishing industry and work towards becoming an editor, preferably for children’s and young adult books. I think the writing and reading skills Shakespeare I helped me to develop will be key in this field. In the long-term, I want to earn a master’s degree, which will likely lead me to encounter Shakespeare once again. In this case, Shakespeare I will have provided me with a strong base of knowledge that I can use in furthering my education.

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Story and photography by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

#PROFspective: Senior Theatre/Marketing Double Major Says “Try New Things … You’re Only Young Once”

Erik during an acting class monologue.

Today we speak with Erik Kattermann, a senior theatre and marketing double major with concentrations in Acting and Honors from Montville, NJ (Morris County). Erik is a Resident Assistant and lives on-campus at 114 Victoria Street. He serves as the vice president of the Fishing Club.

Erik poses against a gray backdrop.

What inspired you to be passionate about your major?

I’ve taken classes with Professor Michael Dean Morgan, a theatre professor, since sophomore year, and he’s had a huge impact on me. He really showed me theatre and he showed me that anyone can be an actor, the work that has to be put in. When Professor Morgan showed me what theatre was about, it opened doors for me and motivated me. I truly love going to every theatre class I have, no doubt about it. I love going to class and watching my classmates, who are super talented and super hard-working, perform. I love getting the opportunity to perform and be in the environment of the Rowan Theatre Department. I’m so grateful. I always take steps back and realize how blessed I am just to have this opportunity to learn about something that I really am passionate about. Rowan also helped me find that passion. In high school, I had nothing to do with the arts or theatre, or acting. Professors, classmates, and friends at Rowan helped open that door to me, and I really love it. 

What would you say to a future student interested in a major?

Definitely don’t be afraid to try. Try new things and put yourself outside of your comfort zone. I can say from personal experience that if I never put myself outside of my comfort zone that I would not be where I am today with the goals that I have today. Something like acting or theatre or performing or even just talking in front of a group of people is something where, years ago, I would have never thought I would be doing, let alone enjoy doing, and it’s all because I put myself out of my comfort zone. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t get nervous at first. I still get nervous sometimes. But you’re at a time in your life when you’re young and we’re only doing this once. So just try new things, and every day, challenge yourself to do one thing that’s outside of your comfort zone. You’re going to have so much personal growth and find so many new passions and so many new journeys that you’re going to want to go on.

Erik poses in a Rowan shirt.

What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned this year in one of your classes?

I took a dialect class where we learn accents. This whole semester I got the opportunity to work on an Australian accent. Everybody gets to choose their own accent. I got to work on an Australian accent, which is by no means mastered. But it’s pretty good. And we also got to talk in a New York accent. And I got to listen to all my classmates do their own accents. Some people worked on French, British, Irish, and Scottish accents, among others. So that was definitely something cool I got to learn this year.

What’s one moment that made you feel like Rowan was the right fit for you?

I knew Rowan was right for me the second my parents dropped me off freshman year. I just had this overwhelming feeling of comfortability and knowledge that I had the freedom to do whatever I wanted. There is a feeling at Rowan of everyone wanting you to succeed. I immediately felt that, and I have felt it every day on and off-campus, for as long as I have been a Prof.

Eric during one of his acting class monologues.
Eric during one of his acting class monologues.

Could you share one moment that you felt that Rowan was a welcoming environment for you?

There definitely was a specific moment. I was originally just a marketing major, but then I took a theatre class. The theatre major is like nothing else. It is such a unique and diverse and connected family. Everyone knows everyone and supports everyone. Everyone makes such a big effort to get to know you as a person and to get to know your goals and make sure you feel supported and comfortable. That sense of community and family is what made me want to audition for the theatre department and become a double major. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies, and public relations double major

Photos provided by:
Erik Kattermann, senior theatre and marketing double major

Black STEM Majors Share Advice for Black High School Students Interested in STEM

Ylanda sits outside campus near Campbell Library.

Today, we’re highlighting Black STEM majors as they share some advice on where to start when looking into STEM.

Ylanda wearing a Rowan shirt and posing outside the Campbell Library.

“Attend as many events as you can to meet new people that has the same interests as you and to also carry out with your interests,” says Ylanda Souffrant, a sophomore, first-generation college student and Math Education major from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

Josephine wearing a lab coat and posing in the Science building.

“It’s alright if you know you’re interested in STEM, but you don’t know what you want to do with it in life. Carefully choose the school/program you join because that is how you will position yourself and expose yourself to experiences and individuals that will guide you along your journey,” says Josephine Babatunde, a senior Biochemistry major and transfer student from Union County College (Union County, NJ).

Dévon sitting and posing for a photo while wearing a dotted dress shirt and blue dress pants.

“One major key of advice I would give for high school STEM students is to not give up. I know this sounds a bit cliché, but you’re going to run into many obstacles and people who try to hold you down or stop your progress, but you can’t let nothing stand in your way. The road is going to be rough and tough but like my family always used to preach to me, ‘If someone already did it, you can too,'” says DéVon Malloy, a junior, first-generation college student and Biomedical Engineering major from Hillside, NJ (Union County)

Briana sitting and posing on the fountain stature outside Campbell Library.

“Hold your head up high! The courses may seem rigorous and tedious, but you are more than capable. You are just as competitive as anyone else around you; don’t give up! Ask for help if you need it, take advantage of programs that cater to your major whether it is directly or indirectly correlated with the unrepresented, be sure to make connections any chance you get, and try to get some some volunteer experience in the field if possible.” — Briana Davy, junior, first-generation college student and Biological Sciences major (planning on receiving a CUGS in Spanish), Honors Concentration, transfer from RCSJ Cumberland, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Akil leaning against the bridge and smiling outside Engineering Hall.

“Start early. Time flies really fast and you never know what the next day will bring you. Get involved in programs, especially offered by the schools you go to, because it not only looks fantastic on your resumé but also the skills and knowledge you acquire from it goes a long way. Get involved early too, don’t be afraid of clubs and participating, and don’t be afraid to reach out to people in college now and ask questions.” — Akil DeBruhl, junior Biological Sciences major with a minor in Psychology, South Orange, NJ (Essex County)

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

Photography by: Stephanie Batista, sophomore Music Industry major and Joe Gentempo, Senior Art major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Passionate About Inspiring Women in Male-Dominated Field, Talia Tomarchio

Talia poses against a dark background.

Today we speak to Talia Tomarchio, a senior Computer Science major with a minor in neuroscience and an honors concentration. A Burlington County native, Talia is a transfer student from Rowan College at Burlington County, and a first-generation college student who lives off-campus in an apartment. Before COVID-19, she was a tutoring monitor for the computer science department and a front desk assistant. She is also a part of the Association of Computing Machinery’s Committee on Women, and Rowan’s Equestrian Team. Talia is also a winner of Rowan’s 2020 Idea Challenge.

Talia poses against a black backdrop.

What wakes you up in the morning?

Two things. One would be helping others. I really want to inspire women to be comfortable in a male-dominated industry. My other passion would probably be neuroscience, the subject I’m studying for my minor. I want to eventually get a job to take artificial intelligence or machine learning and integrate it with neuroscience and help the world that way. It’s a stretch, but my goal is to find a way to positively help people’s mental health through computer science. I would love to do that. That is my ultimate goal in life. Maybe I could analyze behavior patterns or create an app to help mental health. I am not sure exactly what I would do, but that is what I want to contribute to society.

How would you tell a fellow student interested in your major that they’re choosing a worthwhile field?

I think Computer Science is growing to be one of the largest majors at Rowan. We’re also accredited by the Computing Accreditation Committee of ABET. I really like the computer science department at Rowan because you know all your professors, so you don’t feel uncomfortable going to them. I think that computer science is a worthwhile degree to earn because there are so many options for fields to go into. For example, there are fields such as cybersecurity, data science, and artificial intelligence. There are many paths a computer science graduate can go down, and the degree is always going to be valuable.

What inspired you to know that you were in the right major for you?

I’ve always wanted to go into computer science, even as a little kid. I have always been good with computers. I wasn’t pushed toward the field, I just enjoy it. Nobody in my family ever had a technical background either.  I always wished I could learn how to program or code or become a software engineer, but I never had the confidence to do it. I traveled for a little while after my first year of college, and then I decided to “go for it” after I returned. I think that the support from the computer science department faculty at Rowan really helped me build my confidence. 

Talia poses against a black backdrop.

Has there been a faculty or staff member that’s really helped you to connect with the next step for your career?

The first one would be Dr. Anthony Breitzman, the Data Science Coordinator for the Computer Science Department. I performed research with him this semester on analyzing Myers-Briggs personality types through Twitter tweets. When you do research, you usually are a graduate student. I was a little intimidated because I was an undergrad, but Dr. Breitzman reassured me contrary to my perfectionist mentality, that I don’t have to know everything right now and that I will always be learning even after I graduate. I also asked him for career advice, on what kind of career path options I could go down.  Working with him really helped build my confidence. 

The second person would be Dr. Kristen diNovi, the Assistant Dean of the Honor’s College. She has been so supportive of me for all of my endeavors, and so helpful every time I asked her for advice. She connected me with Dr. Susana Santos and the Entrepreneurship Department in the Rohrer College of Business. They helped me grow Steminist Squad, my nonprofit organization that won the 2020 Rowan Idea Challenge. 

How was your transition into Rowan?

My first time going to college, I went to Rutgers out of high school. Then, I took some time off and I traveled the country. I lived in Florida and on the West Coast for a bit, and then I came back and decided to finish school. I am a bit older than the average undergraduate student, but I feel that it made me take my studies more seriously.  The transition to Rowan was really great. At first, I was a bit overwhelmed because I wanted to be involved in everything. I tried to take on more clubs and activities and classes than I could handle, but I overcame it with the support of the Computer Science Department faculty and staff. Micheal Schillo, my advisor, and Dr. Jennifer Kay, a professor in the department, told me it is okay to slow down. With their support, I was able to realize that I did not need to be involved in every single club and activity. From that experience, my advice to other students that feel overwhelmed is to seek support and utilize your resources, because they are there at Rowan, and know that it’s OK if you are not perfect.

Why Rowan?

I think it goes back to the fact that everyone knows everyone here. At first, I wanted to go to a big school, but I felt like I was just a number there. Rowan’s faculty to student ratio is perfect for me. I can get personalized help or tutoring or raise my hand in class at Rowan. I like the small school feeling at Rowan, even though Rowan isn’t small.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies, and public relations double major

Photos provided by:
Talia Tomarchio, senior computer science major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Jennifer McGraw, Finding a Fit in Public Relations

Jennifer sits at a table at a bookstore.

Today we speak to junior Public Relations major Jennifer McGraw, who has a minor in Sports Communication and Media and an Honors Concentration. From Deepwater, NJ (Salem County), Jennifer is a transfer student from Salem Community College. She is a commuter student and a first-generation college student, and is involved with the Honors Murder Mysteries, the student newspaper The Whit, and she is the Honor’s College’s senator.

Jennifer poses with the Eagles mascot.

What inspired you to choose your major?

When I was transferring I originally wasn’t thinking about public relations at all or any kind of writing major, I was thinking of music production or the music business major. But that fell through because there was a portfolio that I had to submit for the application, and my portfolio wasn’t as strong as I thought the program would prefer. I wanted to major in something that I could fall back on that was still relatively similar to what I wanted to get into. But I found that as I started to try the public relations classes and the public relations major, I learned that I really liked it. I found something that I want to get into and was more passionate about than I did with the music business major. 

Has there been a faculty or staff member that’s helped you to connect what the next step is for your career?

The first person that comes to mind is Dr. Kristen diNovi. She is the Assistant Dean of the Honors College and she’s helped me branch out and gain as much experience as I can on campus that could be transferable into my career path. She has been a huge help.

Jennifer poses indoors.

What was your transition to Rowan like?

My transition happened in the middle of the pandemic. It was a little rough, but not on Rowan’s part. Rowan did everything they could to help make the transition smooth, especially under the current circumstances. Luckily, I have taken school trips to see the campus before so I didn’t not necessarily not know the campus. In the last few months of the process, I didn’t really have a whole lot of help with the transition into Rowan. So it was a lot of me finding out things and having to communicate with the different departments at Rowan. And it’s kind of challenging, but once the flow of things started, and everything gets started. Basically,  I found it was a lot easier. 

Why did you choose Rowan?

I wanted to pick a college that was close, and given the pandemic, I wanted to go to a school where something where I could commute and still feel safe. Also, for financial reasons, I wanted to choose someplace cheaper. It’s a perfect distance from Philadelphia and New York and all the major cities. So if I ever wanted to get an internship, the location is perfect.

Jennifer poses at a book signing at a book store.

How would you tell a fellow student interested in your major that they’re choosing a worthwhile field?

Public Relations is broad in a good way. It gives you an overview of the different career paths you can go into. There are so many different fields you can go into. Public Relations is a major where you can pick a minor or concentration and make it fit into what field you want to go into specifically. Also, if you like writing, the major is a perfect fit. 

Are there any times that you doubted that you were in the right major for you?

I would say that in the very beginning, I doubted my major. After all, I first picked it because I just wanted to get a degree and then move on, which is kind of terrible to think. I didn’t really have any interest in a minor or concentration, but after I got into writing, and got into the different things that Rowan has to offer, I realized that public relations is a good major for me. Like I said at the very beginning, I was kind of doubtful because I didn’t know if I would really like this, but I wound up liking it. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies, and public relations double major

Photos provided by:
Jennifer McGraw, junior public relations major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Elementary Education Major Paige Smith

Page standing behind greenery.

Today we feature first-generation college student Paige Smith, a junior Elementary Education major from Alloway, NJ (Salem County). She is a transfer from Salem Community College, and this past fall was her first semester at Rowan. Why Rowan? I have always dreamt of going to Rowan. For the area that I live in Rowan has […]

#PROFspective: Biochemistry Major Erin Gray

Erin sitting outside of the Science Hall.

Today we feature senior Erin Gray, a Biochemistry major from Mickleton, NJ (Gloucester County). Erin is involved on campus with sorority Theta Phi Alpha, employed as a student worker as an Admissions Ambassador, and participates in the Rowans Honors College. She talks about how she has made friends and her experience being on campus. Tell […]

Beyond the Classroom: Events and Publications Intern Jessica Newell

Jessica outside.

Today we feature junior Communication Studies major and Edelman College of Communication & Creative Arts events and publications intern Jessica Newell. Jessica also minors in Spanish and Women and Gender Studies, and holds an Honors Concentration. She is from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County) and lives on campus at 230 Victoria. Through my internship I am […]

Beyond The Classroom: Senior Liam Cutri-French On Engineering Opportunities

Liam sitting outside on the Engineering steps.

Today we feature Liam Cutri-French, a senior Civil and Environmental major with an Honors concentration. Liam is from Glen Gardner, NJ (Hunterdon County). He is the local project lead for Engineers Without Borders, a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the Engineering Honors Society. He also stays active on […]

5 Women in Engineering Share Insights on Being Females in a Male-dominated Field

Engineering senior Alex Jackson poses outside on campus.

Today, we speak to five seniors from the College of Engineering about their experiences as women in a predominantly male field.  

A portrait photo of Lia.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field can feel intimidating at times. I want to be seen and treated as an equal but I am aware that people will never treat me like a male, therefore I’ll never be treated like the majority. Even though I have not experienced any out right discrimination I still have my guard up. And it can be very intimidating to be the only female in a class. But I also feel more motivated to do my best and aim high. Being a strong female engineering can be just as or more intimidating as a room full of men.” – Lia Mahoney, senior, Mechanical Engineering major, Pequannock, NJ (Morris County)

Alex posing against a wall and smiling.

“It’s fantastic. Honestly, it’s great. The professors and students all know me, it is easy to make friends because I stand out, I know a lot of people, and I have better relationships with my professors. I have also had the opportunity to connect with the other women which is fantastic. I feel like the department is really rooting for me.” – Alex Jackson, senior, Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a Math minor, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) 

Caroline sitting and smiling on her bed in her bedroom.

“Being the only person who looks like you in a classroom is tough, especially when you also have to provide the feminine insight for a product or service you’re designing. Impostor syndrome kicks in, and you constantly feel like you’re not good enough or you’re the only person who feels anxious or intimidated. It feels like everyone else knows way more than you and is constantly studying and you feel like you need to overcompensate to feel adequate. It’s very frustrating, but being able to bring a fresh perspective and excelling for yourself is incredibly rewarding.” – Caroline Thistle, senior, Mechanical Engineering major with a Honors concentration, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Julia posing for a photo.

“Being a female in a male-dominated field is rewarding and allows us to show we are capable of doing any career we want. It is important to stand your ground and remain confident in yourself.” – Julia Bally, senior, Biomedical Engineering major with Honors concentration, Sparta, NJ (Sussex County) 

Alexa smiling and holding an apple in an apple orchard.

“My one piece of advice for women entering a male-dominated field like chemical engineering is to be confident in your abilities. If you find yourself the only female in the group, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty — set off the bottle rocket, build the turbine, test the reaction! Henry M. Rowan once said, ‘What this country needs is not more engineers, but more great engineers.’ Rowan has taught me that great engineers, both male and female, share their knowledge and skills to ultimately achieve their goal as one.”  – Alexa Lynch, senior, Chemical Engineering major, Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) 

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Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

6 English Majors Share How Their Major Supports Their Professional Goals

Six students from Rowan’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences tell us how their English major will support them professionally.

Reilly posing for a photo with pink flowers and a white structure in the background.

“I want to teach elementary school after college, and I feel like an English major covers so many important things that go alongside education. An English major explores racial issues, class issues, historical moments, gender, sexuality and so much more. I feel like that is so important in order to aid in the understanding of how history has treated your students differently.” – Reilly Stowell, Junior, English and Elementary Education dual major, Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Cat posing with an old blue police public call phone box.

“This major supports my professional goals because by analyzing literature, I can use that knowledge to better construct my own written works. Rowan also has a great Writing Arts department so by taking some creative writing courses as electives I can really feel at home in my major.” – Cat Reed, Junior, English major, transfer from RCBC, Pemberton, NJ (Burlington County)

Abigail posing for a portrait photo.

“I have made great connections with many of my professors, peers and other faculty members by being a part of this major. My professors have also helped me transform my writing over the years. I hope that because I’ve experienced such a transformation myself, I’ll be able to help my students transform their writing in the future as well.” – Abigail Brous, senior, English and Education (BA/MST) and American Studies major with a minor in History, West Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County)

Caroline posing in Central Park, New York City.

“My major will help me understand the material that I’d love to teach to middle school/high school students!” – Caroline Dillon, junior, Secondary Education and English major, Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County)

Taryn posing for a portrait photo.

“My career goal currently is to work as an editor in the book publishing field. English has helped me develop my writing and critical reading skills, which are both of key importance in this field.” – Taryn Guettler, Senior, English major with minors in Writing Arts and Women’s and Gender Studies with concentrations in Honors and Shakespeare Studies, Succasunna, NJ (Morris County)

Nicole posing for a selfie.

“I always get the question, ‘So what are you going to do with that major?’ My response is ‘Everything!’ I am going on to Rowan’s Master’s in Teaching: Subject Matter-English in May 2021 so that I can become a high school English teacher, but my major has taught me life skills that I know could be an asset no matter what profession I choose. Between critical thinking skills and communication skills, being an English major taught me to look at anything I encounter in new and creative ways and how to share my knowledge with others.” – Nicole Tota, Senior, English and History dual major with minors in International Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, and American Studies, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County)

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Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

7 Biomedical Engineering Majors Share One Cool Thing About Their Major

Biomedical engineering student in the lab.

Application, research and … a games competition? Upperclassmen from Rowan’s Biomedical Engineering program share what they’ve discovered in their major.

Lauren sitting outside on campus.

“The coolest thing about Rowan’s biomedical engineering department is the annual BMES [Biomedical Engineering Society] Games Competition! This outdoor sports competition is hosted annually during the fall semester, and it gives students and professors the ability to bond outside of the classroom.” – Lauren Repmann, junior, Biomedical Engineering with a Chemistry minor, Laurence Harbor, NJ (Middlesex County)

AJ studying on his laptop in a study room.

“One cool thing about my major is that there are different tracks you can follow as a BME to help guide what upper-level BME classes to take. But at the same time, the Rowan BME department understands that everyone is different and has different goals. If none of those tracks lines up with what you what you’re looking to do as a career, the advising staff at Rowan is always flexible in helping you figure out what the right path is for you.” – AJ Pingol, senior, Biomedical Engineering major (Pre-Med), Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County)

Hannah posing for a selfie.

“All of the microbiology and how it interacts with medicines and implants. You tend to only think of things on the big scale, so I thought it was interesting to learn how things work on the cellular level. It has definitely made me more curious, and I have started reading how medications work on the cellular level every time I learn about a new one.” – Hannah Doyle, Biomedical Engineering major, senior, Seaford, Delaware

Gatha smiling for a picture while wearing a Rowan Proud shirt.

“Biomedical Engineering has so much to offer including applications in tissue engineering, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, pharmaceutical engineering and therapeutic delivery, orthopedic engineering, and bio mechanics.” – Gatha Adhikari, senior, Biomedical Engineering major, first-generation college student, Begnastal, Nepal

Brandon posing for a picture while wearing his Rowan University PROS shirt.

“One cool thing is that we normally have a very small graduating class. Since there are so few of us, the faculty and staff develop a great personal relationship with each and every student.” – Brandon Hickson, junior, Biomedical Engineering major, Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)

Katie sitting on a bench with foliage in the background.

“One cool thing I’ve learned is how ears transduce sound. I was actually reading the wrong chapter in the textbook for a homework assignment and I was confused because we had been working on the muscular system and I wasn’t sure what hearing had to do with that but it was so interesting I finished the whole section. I definitely recommend doing some research about it because it is super complicated but really interesting.” – Katie Driscoll, junior, Biomedical Engineering major with minors in Chemistry, History, and Arabic and concentrations in Honors College and Global Health, Durango, Colorado

Danny posing with a friend in the rec center.

“That research can come from anyone, including undergrads.” – Danny Tepper (seen at left), senior, Biomedical Engineering major, transfer from Atlantic Cape Community College, Glassboro, NJ (Gloucester County)

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Music To Listen To While Studying, According to 7 Music Majors

Study area with earphones, laptop and notebook.

Need some study music recommendations? Let students from Rowan’s music majors give you some suggestions.

A selfie of Mia.

I really enjoy listening to NCT and Day6 when I study.

They have both nice songs for background music (ballads calm songs) and songs that are upbeat and fun to keep you awake and feel more energized.

How It Was Discovered: I’ve been listening to the K-Pop genre since 2011 so I knew about NCT since they debuted as a group and Day6 was one of the first groups I listened to when I got into the genre.

– Mia Visconti, Freshman, Music Therapy major, Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County)

The Chopin "Ballade no.1 in g minor Op.23" album cover.

Ballade no.1 in g minor Op. 23 by Chopin

Chopin was an amazing romantic composer and pianist whose pieces are very emotional and well written. It is great background music for studying or doing something important. I use it for tests all the time.

How It Was Discovered: From the movie “The Pianist”

– Anthony Jimenez, Freshman, Music Education and Music Performance major, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Samuel smiling for a photo on the Bunce Hall steps.

I suggest listening to Aladdin – Not3s.

This song has a very soothing vibe to help you vibe but still focus, with a little bit of Afro-beat tunes to groove to, very nice to study with.

How It Was Discovered: I discovered this song through the music streaming app AudioMack.

Samuel Poku, Freshman, Music Industry major, Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County)

The album cover for "Locket" by Crumb.

Plants – Crumb

It’s not too distracting and it’s soothing to listen to even when you aren’t doing homework.

How It Was Discovered: On my recommended songs in Spotify.

– Katie Alvarez, Sophomore, Music Education major, Passaic, NJ (Passaic County)

Nayyirah smiling for a selfie.

Darlin’ – Tobi Lou

It’s slow and I like his voice.

How It Was Discovered: From a friend

– Nayyirah Wood, Freshman, Music Education major, Philadelphia, Pa

The single cover for "walk but in the garden" by LLusion.

“walk but in the garden” – LLusion

Off the bat, you can recognize the chord progression remains in a major key. The melody has aspects of suspense and resolution, making it pleasing to the ear. A unique aspect about this song is that the melody and chord progression repeat consistently throughout the piece, easily making it uplifting background noise.

How It Was Discovered: I was editing a Spotify playlist of mine, and this song popped up in the recommended songs section. I find a lot of new music through this feature of Spotify’s playlists.

– Arianna Granda, Freshman, Vocal Music Education major, Bantiviglio Honors Concentration, Rockaway, NJ (Morris County)

The Nelson Rangell album cover "Blue."

Sweetest Somebody I Know – Nelson Rangell

The song just has a really chill vibe to it that you can just listen to in the background while doing other things.

– Tyler O’Shaughnessy, Sophomore, Music Education – Instrumental major, Atco, NJ (Camden County)

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Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

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8 Chemical Engineering Majors Share the WOW Moment in Their Majors

Chemical engineering student works in lab.

Today, eight Chemical Engineering majors share their “WOW! I’m in the right major for me!” moments.

Dylan sitting on the steps of the engineering building.

“Well, it turned out my physics teacher was right. Most of everything that I’ve learned is intuitive to me, whether it is in engineering or chemistry. Quite honestly, I catch myself accidentally memorizing equations and information before I go to study.” – Dylan Snyder, sophomore Chemical Engineering major from Wilmington, Delaware

Tori posing with a sign that says "AlChe".

“Once I visited Rowan and heard about the program I knew it was right for me.” – Tori Vanduren, senior Chemical Engineering major from Kutztown, PA

Margot smiling and wearing lab gear.

“Learning about how the healthcare industry and engineering can intersect in a chemical engineer’s career fascinated me.” – Margot Clarke, senior, Chemical Engineering major with a concentration in Biomedical Engineering and Honors Studies, minor in Chemistry, and CUGS in Spanish, from Delran, NJ (Burlington County)

Alyssa posing in a scenic area on a bridge.

“I love science and math.” – Alyssa Grassie, senior, first-generation, Chemical Engineering major and Mathematics minor, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

A black and white photo of Jenna smiling.

“I knew this was the right major for me by making friends in my major that love and get excited about the same weird things as me. Just when you walk outside and the humidity makes you think about the topics discussed in class, your mind goes on a tangent, and then you stop yourself (and think ‘Wow I am weird’). But the next day a friend tells you how they did a similar thing. When that happens, it just makes you feel understood and at home.” – Jenna Wyshinski, Senior, Chemical Engineering major with a minor in Business Administration, from Pennsville, NJ (Salem County)

Courtney posing with a Rowan shirt inside the Wilson Hall building.

“Sophomore year, I had the opportunity to work as a research assistant in Dr. Stanzione’s lab. Getting to experience so many applications of chemical engineering and material synthesis was such a cool experience and made me realize that I am right where I am supposed to be.” – Courtney Lemasney, junior, Chemical Engineering major, Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Rebecca sitting and smiling on the floor.

“When I started taking classes my freshman year and genuinely enjoyed what I was learning.” – Rebecca Hansson, senior Chemical Engineering major from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

A chemical engineering lab.

“Actually making alum in chem lab.” – Evan Harper (not pictured), sophomore Chemical Engineering major working toward minors in Chemistry and Mathematics, Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County)

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Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

#PROFspective: Meet Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Bhavik Malkani

Bhavik sits on the steps of Engineering Hall wearing a mask.

Meet Bhavik Malkani, a junior Electrical and Computer Engineering major with a minor in Systems Engineering and an Honors Concentration at Rowan University. Bhavik is a first-generation college student from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County). Bhavik is a part of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Phi Kappa Psi and Honors College. Here, he shares his experience as a Prof thus far. 

Tell us about one club, organization or group of friends that make you feel like Rowan is home.

One of the biggest organizations that made me feel like Rowan is my home is Residential Life and University Housing or RLUH. Ever since becoming a Resident Assistant (RA), I have felt like I truly have a home here. Everyone within RLUH has made me feel like family, and it was definitely one of the best decisions I have made so far in my college career.

Bhavik smiling on Engineering Hall steps.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you?

I think Rowan being a welcoming environment started with orientation, along with the PROS and other orientation staff who made that experience possible. I met people who immediately made me feel welcome and am still friends with today.

What’s your favorite thing about one typical day at Rowan for you?

My favorite thing about one typical day at Rowan is being able to see my friends.

What is one thing about Rowan that was a happy surprise for you?

One thing about Rowan that was a happy surprise for me was how active campus was along with how many events are put on throughout the semesters.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a professor or staff member in which you felt like they truly cared about your well-being.

I was a sophomore and concerned about my academic success as well as my choice of major. I talked to a couple professors together after class for a few weeks, and they gave me many study suggestions as well as encouraged me to stick with my current major. They showed me that I could earn my degree and be successful.

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major 

#PROFspective: Honors Bio Major Drusilla Appiah-kubi Sets Her Sights on Med School

Exterior shot of Science Hall

Today we feature Drusilla Appiah-kubi, a Biological Science major, Psychology minor and Honors concentration student wrapping up her junior year. Drusilla is a first-generation college student from Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County) who lived in the Townhouses.

Biological Science major Drusilla smiles in a ballroom wearing a colorful dress.

Academic or social clubs you are a part of: I’m the Vice President of the Rowan African Student Association

What inspired you to choose your major?

When I was little I would babysit my little cousins all the time, and I would play with them all the time until it was nap time. Even though taking care of babies is a pain :), I would always love putting a smile on their faces. I also loved it when I was younger my pediatrician would come to work so lively and energetically. At the end of the appointment, I would always receive a sticker and a lollipop, which always put a smile on my face. This showed me that they truly loved what they do and gave me a huge interest in that field.

Biological Science major Drusilla stands on a marble staircase wearing a colorful dress.What would you share with a future student interested in your major?

Being a Biological Sciences major isn’t easy, especially if your main focus is to go to medical school. One thing I’ve noticed is that if you like chemistry you’re not going to like organic chemistry so much. Every major consists of putting time into studying, but if you plan on majoring in science and going to medical school, you should put a lot of time into studying, be organized, and have friend groups where you guys can all study together.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

Being a pediatrician plays an important role in today’s world by taking care of children, making sure they’re well treated and healthy, and that their growth and development are where they should be in age. The kind of impact I’ll like to have on the world in my field is having my own office where kids will come and have fun.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a Rowan professor in which you felt like you were working with a visionary in your field.

A self-portrait of Biological Science major Drusilla.I felt like I was working with a visionary in my field when I attended [one of my professor’s] office hours. I felt like I was able to talk to her and build a great relationship. Exchanging conversations back and forth made me realize that she truly cares for students and is willing to help her students succeed. Over the semester, I told her that I was planning on furthering my education by going to medical school and becoming a pediatrician. 

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Story by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Photos courtesy of:
Drusilla Appiah-kubi

Senior Reflects: Biological Sciences Major, Future Veterinarian Kimberly Zullo

Biological sciences major Kimberly Zullo and friends

Today we feature senior Kimberly Zullo, a biological sciences major from Rockaway, NJ (Morris County) with an honors concentration.

Please tell us about your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? Working in Admissions, I’ve had the opportunity to get to know a lot of the professional staff in the Admissions department. Dr. Jessica Syed oversees the Admissions Ambassador program, and through my years at Rowan, I think my favorite moments were the conversations and meetings I had in her office. As a Coordinator, we have a LOT of meetings, but we always have fun and I will always cherish the time that I got to spend working with JP. 

Biological sciences major Kimberly Zullo poses with Rowan University friends.
Biological sciences major Kimberly Zullo (top row, middle) poses with Rowan University friends.

What was your favorite or most meaningful personal moment at Rowan? I think my favorite personal moments at Rowan were spent with my service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega. We have been able to participate in service projects both on campus and in the community, and the bond that I’ve created with my APO brothers is something that will last a lifetime. 

Biological sciences major Kimberly Zullo poses with Cornell t-shirt.What are your career aspirations and how did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with those aspirations? I have dreamed of becoming a veterinarian since I was a child, and next year, I will be able to pursue that dream at Cornell University! I think the programs at Rowan have definitely helped me pursue this dream because they’ve given me endless opportunities both within my field and in extracurriculars. The programs at Rowan have allowed me to hone my skills in the sciences but also remain well-rounded by staying involved in clubs and music! 

Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors? Thank you to my parents and grandparents for always believing me and supporting me in everything that I do. Thank you to all of my campus family: Admissions Ambassadors, APO, Pre-Vet Club, the Hecht Research Group, and my Holly Pointe A-Pod squad, for keeping me sane and making life at Rowan something I’ll never forget. I would also like to thank all of my professors, especially Dr. Hecht, for pushing me to be my best. 

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#PROFspective: Junior Reflects on Leaving Campus, Hopes to be “Back in Glassboro Soon”

Today, we feature Alexander Weisberger, a junior Biochemistry major from Fair Lawn, NJ (Bergen County). We were able to speak to Alexander just before he was getting ready to leave campus because of social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Next year he will live off campus, after living on campus in the Townhouses this year. 

How do you feel about leaving Rowan in the middle of the year?
I am definitely disappointed that we all had to leave Rowan in the middle of the year. I had a lot of personal and academic plans that ended up being cancelled due to the pandemic. What gives me some comfort though is knowing that we’re all in the same boat and that we’ll hopefully be back in Glassboro soon.”

Alexander walks down Route 322 with a box

What’s inside that box?
“The box I was carrying had supplies for the Pre-Health Society’s station at the Haunted Student Center event. Every year, the Pre-Health Society participates in a big Halloween event in the student center called “The Haunted Student Center,” where all of the clubs either decorate a stand or a room and hand out candy to some of the children in Glassboro in a safe and fun environment. It’s a fun event for the kids, and our club is happy to participate in it.”

What clubs are you a part of?
“This year I was part of the Rowan Pre-Health Society, Ambassadors, RUSSS (Rowan Student Scholar Symposium) and the Honors Problem Based Learning group.”
Alexander carrying a box outside
What fun things are you missing on campus right now?
“I’d say the biggest thing I am missing on campus is the Pre-Health Society Cooper Rowan Clinic Gala. The Gala is a charity event that we host yearly to benefit the Cooper Rowan Clinic that’s run by medical students at CMSRU. It’s a free clinic that gives medical treatment to the underserved population in Camden, and we host the event to raise money to assist them in buying supplies. Our second annual Gala was supposed to take place in early April, but we had to cancel it. My fellow executive board members and I had been working on setting the event up since mid-last year, so it was unfortunate that it ended this way.”

Any advice or words of encouragement to those missing school right now?
“I’d say that it’s important to recognize that we’re all in the same boat right now and the best thing to do is work on improving yourself with all of the free time we have. We’re not going to be stuck in quarantine forever, so it would be really cool to come out of quarantine in good physical health, with a few new hobbies, or even some new knowledge.”

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, junior music industry major

Degree in 3 Success Story: Amanda Devers, Radio/Television/Film

Amanda wears a Rowan shirt and sits on the ground smiling in front of a Rowan logo on the ground.

“Rowan was always in the back of my mind, since my mom went here for her undergrad and master’s,” says senior radio/television/film major Amanda Devers, from Gibbstown, NJ (Gloucester County). “We drove through campus all the time, so I was able to see it from a younger age.”

Amanda discovered at GCIT (Gloucester County Institute of Technology) vocational high school that she enjoyed working with film and audio, and kept that in mind as she began her college application process. She kept RTF in mind as she considered the universities she wanted to apply to, and discovered that Rowan met her needs. 

Amanda writes at a desk with a microphone and audio mixing equipment at the Rowan radio station.
Amanda on the job as operations manager at the Rowan Radio station, WGLS-FM.

“Rowan has a quality RTF program, and going [here] would allow me to mix that closeness to home with my passion for RTF,” she reflects.

Amanda’s acceptance letter to Rowan came with an option to participate in the Degree in 3 program, and RTF was one of the majors offered. “I talked it over with my parents, and we decided [Degree in 3] was a great idea. I wouldn’t have to pay for tuition, room and board, or dining for a whole additional year. I’d be saving a lot of money, and I could even live on campus,” she says, as a current resident of the Whitney Center apartments

Upon entering campus as a freshman, Amanda was interested right away in becoming a part of Rowan’s radio station, WGLS-FM.

“I knew I’d regret it if I didn’t get involved immediately, so I could have the longest time to be [at the radio station] throughout college,” she recalls, “this time last year, i applied to be operations manager, the highest position for students, and I got it! 

My responsibilities included helping the station manager and faculty-run Rowan Radio. It was such a professional environment, and I was surrounded by a lot of cool people who really love what they do. Rowan Radio was like my second dorm.”

Amanda and her friend, Alex, hold up their nametags at an event.
Amanda and Alex, her co-operations manager at Rowan Radio, at a radio event.

Amanda, who has a minor in audio recording and an honors concentration, knew that an accelerated program such as Degree in 3 would be challenging, but she felt that the workload was worth the money and time she’d save in the long run.

“For the program, we’re encouraged to take six classes per semester, instead of the typical five for traditional four-year students. As the years went on, I got a job and became more involved with the radio station, and had to learn to balance everything in my life,” she says. “Time management was definitely something I struggled with during my busiest semesters, but support from friends and my parents helped get me through the challenges.”

To stay organized, Amanda started keeping a bullet journal her freshman year, where she wrote to-do lists to prioritize and keep track of her assignments. 

“Being an RTF major, I had a lot of hands-on projects to do, so it helped to block off steps of each project for one day at a time. I would do a certain step one day, and another step the next. I looked at each part of the process as a separate task, instead of looking at the whole picture, to help me feel less overwhelmed.”

Amanda, wearing glasses, holds up the Rowan Radio Operations ManualAs Amanda wraps up her last year at Rowan, she recommends the Degree in 3 program for those who are interested. “It definitely has shaped the way I view my workload,” she says. “My whole mentality has changed when it comes to work, and I’m able to balance a lot of tasks and manage my time better. I feel like I work harder now and when it comes to my workload, I don’t have the same mindset anymore.”

And as for her future career plans? “I would like to continue work in RTF, especially radio and broadcasting. I’ve learned this past year that I like to manage people and projects, and would like a similar position at a radio station. I feel like I’m well-prepared for that now.”

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Story by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Photos submitted by:
Amanda Devers, senior RTF major

Degree in Three: Taylor Jachts, Law and Justice Major

Drone view of brick and white columns of Bunce Hall.

Why did you choose Rowan University?  “I actually chose Rowan University because of the Bantivoglio Honors Program and the Degree in Three Program. They are both things that look great on a resume!” What made you choose your major? “I chose to be a Law & Justice major because I wanted to go to law school. There are […]

#PROFspective: International Engineering Student Thai Nghiem

Thai Nghiem stands on the steps inside the Engineering Hall lobby

Name: Thai Nghiem

Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Minor: Computer Science

Year: Senior

Are you a first-generation college student? No

Hometown and county: Hanoi, Vietnam

Commuter: Yes. I’m commuting from Franklinville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Academic clubs you are a part of: Bantivoglio Honors Concentration, Tau Beta Pi – Engineering Honor Society

Social clubs you are a part of: Rowan Cru – Secretary

Thai sits in a round orange chair in the bridge connecting the two engineering buildings at Rowan University.Do you work on campus? I worked in the library as a Technology Desk Specialist for a year.

Share an “aha!” moment you’ve had within your major that made you feel passionate about your intended field. I was always good at math and physics in high school, and since Rowan offered an outstanding engineering program, I did not hesitate to choose engineering as my major. 

Describe an on-campus experience (academic or non-academic) in which you felt that your future goals are supported. I found the Career Fair on-campus very helpful, as I landed many interviews and two internships. The two engineering internships were with Ellenby Technologies and American Water. Both of them offered me competitive pay and treated me as a regular employee; they trusted and assigned me with great responsibilities. I had a great time interning with them and gained a great deal of practical knowledge and industrial experience. I would recommend everybody of all majors attend the Rowan Career Fair. 

Thai is pictured behind a handrail as he walks up the steps holding a red and black toolbox .
On a typical day, Thai brings his toolbox with him to work on projects in Engineering Hall.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? My freshman year (2015), Rowan Cru held a Halloween party at the International House, where I used to live. As an international student, I did not have a lot of friends back then, especially those who are American. The event was a great deal to me, as I got to meet and talk to new people who were very friendly and helpful. Since it’s hard for an international student to get a car and a driving licence, many of them offered me rides to ShopRite whenever I needed. Furthermore, they invited me to be a part of their club — Rowan Cru, where I continued to make new wonderful relationships and great memories.

Why did you choose Rowan? Actually, Rowan found and chose me. I uploaded my resume on a merit-aid website, and Rowan officials contacted me. Due to the generous international scholarship, I was able to attend Henry Rowan College of Engineering. 

Thai works on a project in the Engineering Hall lobby between classes.

On your busiest day, what academic, non-academic and social responsibilities are you juggling? On my busiest day, I am juggling between exams, my part-time job at the library, and leading a Bible study session at Rowan Cru. There are tough times, but those are what make us a better person. My friends in Cru, as well as my classmates, help each other through stressful times. I really appreciate these people and always enjoy spending time with them. 

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Story by:
Thai Nghiem, senior electrical and computer engineering major

Photography by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

#PROFspective: Vietnamese Student Association President Brianna Nghiem

Brianna Nghiem and members of the Vietnamese Student Association hang out on Rowan Boulevard

Today, we speak with Brianna Nghiem, a junior Biological Sciences major from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) who lives on-campus. Brianna will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof.

Name: Brianna Nghiem
Major: Biological Sciences (3+4 BS/DO Program)
Minors and concentrations: Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College
Year: Junior
Hometown and County: Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County)
Resident: Yes, I live in 220 Rowan Boulevard
Academic clubs: Bantivoglio Leadership and Service Training Program (Mentor)
Social clubs you are a part of: Vietnamese Student Association (President)

Biological Sciences major Brianna Nghiem sits on a bench outside of Barnes & Noble

Share an “aha!” moment you’ve had within your major that made you feel passionate about your intended field. One moment in my major that made me feel passionate about my intended field was in my Intro to Cellular Biology class with Dr. [Gregory] Eaton. Learning about the different cellular processes in life and its complexity was an extraordinary experience. Although I have always known that I wanted to go to medical school, this class truly furthered my love for medicine.

Describe an experience you’ve shared with a professor in which you felt like you were working with a visionary in your field. When I was a freshman, I had a biology professor who I was very intimidated by on the first day of college. However, upon getting to know him during class and visits to office hours, it was apparent that he truly cared for his students and genuinely wanted us to all succeed academically and personally. Over the semester, he helped me develop proper study habits, manage my stress and ease my transition to college. He really helped to shape me into the student I am today. I have nothing but appreciation to have had him as a professor.

Biological Sciences major Brianna Nghiem sits with members of the VSA at Kung Fu Tea on Rowan Boulevard
“I try to encourage friendships by having our meetings in fun spots,” Brianna (second from right) says.

Describe an on-campus experience (academic or non-academic) in which you felt that your future goals are supported.  When I was in high school, I was the President of my school’s Vietnamese Culture Club, where I developed passions for my culture as a Vietnamese American. During Summer 2017, as I was about to enter college, I always aspired to start a Vietnamese organization at Rowan with similar values to my high school club. The mission was to have an organization where interested students can unite and appreciate the beauty of the Vietnamese culture and traditions.

By fall 2018, three other students (Catherine Nguyen, Jessica Do, Jessica Liu) and I worked together to form the Vietnamese Student Association (VSA). Dr. Thanh Nguyen, our advisor, has been incredibly supportive with this journey and with all of VSA’s goals. I am so blessed to have met such amazing individuals who are my biggest supporters and who constantly push me to become a better person of myself. As a result, VSA has made me realize my true potential and capabilities as a leader, as well as becoming my platform to connect with and provide support to others. 

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? Through the Vietnamese Student Association (VSA), I was able to meet a family of unique yet compatible individuals, each of whom I am so grateful for. VSA embodies empowerment, inclusivity and cultural advocacy. Over this past year, VSA has become an outlet and safe space for not only my creativity, but also for my growth as an individual. The people I have met through VSA have helped mold me into the person I am today. I’m so privileged and honored to go through this journey in celebrating such a beautiful culture with them. Everyone in VSA has made me feel at home at Rowan.

Why did you choose Rowan? While I was applying to colleges, I had a close friend who was completing his education at Rowan. He shared with me his experiences and all of the wonderful opportunities he received through Rowan. As I researched more, I found that Rowan would provide me the best college experience in preparing me for medical school. The 3+4 BS/DO Program with Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine allows me to receive my bachelor’s degree and medical degree in seven years. Being here, I have met a community who is incredibly supportive of my dream and passion in becoming a physician. Deciding to come to Rowan was one of the best decisions I could have ever made.

Biological Sciences major Brianna Nghiem holds up a T-shirt with the Vietnamese Student Association logo on it.What’s your favorite thing about your typical Monday at Rowan? My favorite thing about a typical Monday at Rowan are the Executive Board meetings for the Vietnamese Student Association (VSA). Normally, our E-board meets on Monday mornings and everyone brings their favorite breakfast foods. At the meeting, we eat together, plan for upcoming events and bond with each other. My goals during these E-board meetings are not just to plan for events, but also to have time to connect and support each other on a personal level. VSA is more than a just club, it is family!

On your busiest day, what academic, non-academic and social responsibilities are you juggling? Along with a full course load, I am currently studying for the MCAT, which I plan on taking in January. On a typical day, after doing MCAT practice, I usually take time in preparing for Vietnamese Student Association events, where each task varies depending on the upcoming meeting. In addition, I am a mentor for the Bantivoglio Leadership and Service Training (BLAST) Program, where I have the privilege of mentoring first-year students in the Honors College. My hope is not only guide them, but also to encourage and support them in the best way I can. Lastly, as a Music Director of the South Jersey Vietnamese Alliance Church, I spend a portion of my day coordinating plans in preparation for the next weeks.

Interested in joining the Vietnamese Student Association? Follow them on Instagram to get connected!

Seven friends and members of the VSA eboard stand together at Kung Fu Tea on Rowan Boulevard

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Story and photography by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Exploratory Studies Student Finds His Passion: Political Science

Jason, wearing a Rising Rowan shirt, standing outside Bunce Hall

Rising junior political science major Jason Brooks, from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County) shares his journey with us on how Rowan’s exploratory studies major helped to connect him with the right major for him: political science. The on-campus resident, who recently wrapped up his sophomore year, lived in one of our newest residence halls on Rowan Boulevard, 114 Victoria. 

I always knew when I was visiting other schools that Rowan was the place I ultimately wanted to call home. When I was accepted to Rowan, I came in as an Exploratory Studies student, and was wrestling between becoming a student in the Rohrer College of Business or becoming a political science major within the College of Humanities & Social Sciences. I always had a knack for politics, but was unsure if that was what I wanted to make my living off of it.

After discussions with my advisor, and attending workshops for both Jason, wearing a Rowan Rising shirt, standing in front of a flagprograms, courtesy of the Exploratory Studies program, I decided to pursue a political science degree. In addition to declaring my major, I also applied for the honors program, and was accepted into that program. As a political science student at Rowan, I have accomplished so much in my two years here. I was selected to be a member of the Student Alumni Association where I have engaged with proud Profs from all generations. From there, I was awarded a job in the admissions office as an Admissions Ambassador, giving campus tours to prospective students.

I have also gotten involved with student government, and this past fall I was elected as a Senator At Large, and was recently elected as Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs for the 2019-2020 school year. In addition, Rowan has afforded me the opportunity to work in the political field as well. I have been fortunate enough to hold two internships during our last summer recess and the fall semester respectively.

I am also looking forward to starting my new internship this summer in the New Jersey State House. These internships would have not been possible without the help of the great faculty I have been surrounded with here at Rowan. Specifically, I would not be where I’m at without the help of Dr. Ben Dworkin and his program with the Rowan Institute for Public Policy and Citizenship (RIPPAC).

Overall, Rowan has afforded me with so many opportunities to expand my network and professional experiences. In the future, I am planning on using my Rowan degree to make an impact on our government and political landscape. But for now, I am looking forward to what the rest of my Rowan experience has in store!

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Exploratory Studies Student: Allison Cespedes

student Allison outside of cherry blossom tree in Rowan hoodie

Meet Allison Cespedes, who started off her Rowan experience as an exploratory studies major and discovered her interest in pre-med.

Allison sitting outside in a Rowan hoodie

“Hello! I’m Allison Cespedes, a first-generation college student who is a senior psychology major on a pre-med track with an honors concentration. I am from Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County) and have lived on campus all four years.

I’ve been a resident assistant and a student admissions ambassador for the past two years now and currently I am a resident assistant for the Whitney Center. I began my college career as an Exploratory Studies major after I took a career course during the summer, before coming into the fall semester. Starting off as this major gave me a good idea as to what I wanted to study for the rest of my time at Rowan.”

Allison wearing Rowan hoodie sitting on bench outside of Bunce

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Photography by:
Vanessa Vause, senior public relations and theatre major

#PROFspective: Translational Biomedical Science Major Zachary Padron

Your Name: Zachary PadronYour Major: Translation Biomedical ScienceYour Minors: Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College, Pre-Medical Minor, Neuroscience Minor, and Ethics Certificate of Undergraduate StudyYour Year: JuniorHometown and County: Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County)Resident: Yes, I live as a Resident Assistant in the Townhouse ComplexAcademic Organizations: American Physician Scientist Association (Research Chair Executive Board Member)Social Clubs: President of Colleges Against Cancer and Chi Alpha Christian FellowshipOn-Campus Employment: Resident Assistant for the Townhouse ComplexOff-Campus Employment: Research Assistant in the Neuroscience Research Lab at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia […]

#PROFspective: Mechanical Engineering Major Morgan Dean

Today, we speak with Morgan Dean, a senior mechanical engineering major who rents a house off campus with friends. Morgan will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof.

Name: Morgan DeanMorgan Dean sitting in Rowan's Engineering building.
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Minors or concentrations: Writing Arts, Mathematics; Bantivoglio Honors College
Year: Senior
Hometown and County: Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)
Off-Campus resident: Yes, I live in a house on University Boulevard with my five roommates!
Do you work on campus? If so, where/what do you do? I work as a tutor in the Rowan University Writing Center (in Campbell Library)

Morgan Dean sitting in front of the Engineering auditorium. What wakes you up in the morning? The thrill of getting to do and/or learn something new. Also, I love to have my morning coffee while reading!

What is one thing you wish people knew about your academic discipline or research focus? I find that being a girl in engineering, especially one of the five or six in the MechE undergraduate program, is more advantageous than most realize. Additionally, although mechanical engineering tends to be associated with cars/engines/etc., the possibilities of post-undergraduate work are endless. You’re in no way tied down to any one field of work.

What is one thing this field has allowed you to do, that you either Morgan Dean showing Rowan student something on her laptop.dreamed of doing or thought you’d never get to do? Through its interdisciplinary program, mechanical engineering sparked my interest in biomedical engineering. Although I once said I would never take another biology class again, I am now set to be a PhD Biomedical Engineering student come Fall 2019.

Could you share a moment you’ve experienced in which you have felt that Rowan is a welcoming environment for you? The Rowan Writing Center has provided me with a sense of belonging ever since I began working there. The staff took me in immediately as family and I always feel a sense of peace while in the space.

Morgam Dean posing in front of the pond in back of the Engineering building.Why Rowan?  I have made some incredible student-professor relationships here which have shaped my future by unlocking my potential. Professors Dr. Staehle, and Dr. Merrill and Writing Center Director Celeste DelRusso have exposed me to new areas of research through the engineering clinic curriculum, summer programs, and professional development conferences. Additionally, I would never have been accepted to graduate school if it weren’t for these valuable connections I made.

Like what you see, come visit us!

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Story and photography by: Alyssa Bauer, junior public relations major

#PROFspective: Advertising Major & Aspiring Nurse Practitioner John Brittin

Young man standing in front of a white and yellow Rowan EMS vehicle

Today, we speak with John Brittin, a junior advertising major from Upper Township, NJ (Cape May County). John will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student, how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof, and what helped him to choose Rowan University. […]

#PROFspective: Electrical & Computer Engineering Major DJ Stahlberger

DJ sitting inside electrical lab

Today, we speak with DJ Stahlberger, a junior electrical and computer engineer major from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County) who commutes. DJ will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: DJ StahlbergerMajor: Electrical and […]

Rowan Graduate Finds Dream Job Through Internship

Tyler Jiang on Rowan Universitys campus

“Put yourself out there for opportunities you are interested in. You never know what could come of it,” says Tyler Jiang, a Class of 2018 graduate from Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (Delaware County). His own advice certainly rang true throughout his undergrad experience as a History and International Studies double major at Rowan! Tyler quickly realized his […]

#PROFspective: Nutrition & Dietetics Major Brianna De la Cruz

Today, we speak with Brianna De la Cruz, a freshman Nutrition and Dietetics major from Hillsborough (Somerset County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Brianna will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience […]

Roommates Reflect: Living with your Best Friend from High School

orange gray and white Holly Pointe Commons at Rowan University with Glassboro water tower in view

Sophomore engineering majors Nick Cooper and Mark Hausman reflect on their experience as roommates in Holly Pointe Commons during their freshman year at Rowan. They were best friends throughout high school and took the risk living together in college, and made some great memories! They now live down the hall from each other at the […]

Poyani, Video Tour Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College

poyani on rowan university campus

Hey! I’m Poyani, a sophomore at the Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College. Welcome to my College, and to Rowan University. Like what you see? Register for a tour or open house.  Video Created By: Alexander Belli, public relations and advertising double major Vanessa Vause, public relations major Jayce Williams, music industry major

#PROFspective: Psychological Science Major Mark A. Ziegler-Thayer

Mark inside Campbell Library at Rowan on campus

Today, we speak with Mark A. Ziegler-Thayer, a junior psychological science major from Stratford (Camden County), New Jersey, who lives on campus, in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Mark will share their #PROFpective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how they’re getting the most out of their university experience […]

#PROFspective: English and Biological Sciences Major Kasey DiSessa

Today, we speak with Kasey DiSessa, a junior English and Biological Sciences major from Hackettstown (Warren County), NJ, who lives on campus in the Whitney Center. Kasey will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as […]

#PROFspective: Writing Arts Major Kaitlyn Gaffney

Writing arts major Kaitlyn at Rowan University Campbell Library

Today, we speak with Kaitlyn Gaffney, a junior writing arts major from Denville (Morris County), NJ, who lives on campus in the Whitney Center. Kaitlyn will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan […]

#PROFspective: Chemical Engineering Major Dylan Regan

Today, we speak with Dylan Regan, a freshman chemical engineering major from Toms River (Ocean County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Dylan will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a […]

#PROFspective: Mechanical Engineering Major Michael Stefanov

Michael with his fencing blade outside near a pond

Today, we speak with Michael Stefanov, a freshman mechanical engineering major from Rockaway (Morris County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Michael will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan […]

#PROFspective: Accounting Major Kyle Perez

Kyle in front of Rohrer College of Business sign

Today, we speak with Kyle Perez, a freshman accounting major from Robbinsville (Mercer County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Kyle will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. […]

#PROFspective: Geographic Information Systems Major Tim Lemon

Today we speak with Tim Lemon, a senior Geographic Information Systems major from Glendora (Camden County), NJ, who commutes. He will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Your Name: Tim Lemon Your Major: Geographic […]

#PROFspective: Philosophy & Religion, Biological Sciences Major Mahaa Ahmed

Mahaa stands in a dress, with arms outstretched

Today, we speak with Mahaa Ahmed, a junior philosophy and religion studies and biological sciences double major from Washington Township (Gloucester County), NJ, who resides on campus in 220 Rowan Boulevard. Mahaa will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out […]

#PROFspective PROS Edition: Civil and Environmental Engineering Major Marissa Ciocco

standing on bridge holding 12 sign

Today, we speak with Marissa Ciocco, a junior civil and environmental engineering major from East Greenwich, NJ, who resides on campus in the Whitney Center. Marissa will give us insight on her career as being a member of Rowan PROS and will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan […]

#PROFspective PROS Edition: Chemical Engineering Major Steven Schwartz

hands up in front of Holly Pointe

Today, we speak with Steven Schwartz, a senior chemical engineering major from Manahawkin, NJ, who resides on campus in Holly Pointe Commons as a resident assistant. Steven will give us insight on his career as being a member of Rowan PROS and will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University […]

#PROFspective: Chemical Engineering Major Nick Testa

student inside whitney center

Today we speak with Nick Testa, a sophomore chemical engineering major from Hainesport, Burlington County, who lives on campus in Whitney Center. Nick will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Nick Testa Major: Chemical […]

#PROFspective: Athletic Training Major Cassie Dennis

athletic training major works on a student's ankle

Today we talk with Cassie Dennis, a senior athletic training major from Edison, Middlesex County, who lives on campus at Whitney Center. Cassie will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Cassie […]

4 Rowan Scholarship Awardees Share Their Stories

Back in November I had a pleasure to meet with Steven C. Farney, Ed.D., senior director of administration from the Division of Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM), who shared information every Rowan student needs to know when applying for scholarships. If you had a chance to read that post, then you should be an expert in […]

#PROFspective: Communication Studies Major Maria Rivero

Today we speak with Maria Rivero, a junior communication studies major from North Bergen, Hudson County, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons residence hall. Maria will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as […]

#PROFspective: Management, Marketing & HR Management Major Ryan Klohr

Today we speak with Ryan Klohr, a senior triple major (management, marketing and human resources management) from Ocean Township, Monmouth County, who lives off campus. Ryan will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a […]

#PROFspective: Biomedical Engineering Major Shanna Davidson

Student stands in front of dorms

Today we speak with Shanna Davidson, a junior biomedical engineering major from Pretoria, South Africa, who lives on campus in residence hall Laurel Hall. Shanna will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan […]