75 Things Out-Of-State Students Love About Rowan University

A student wearing a Rowan yellow dress and Rowan brown graduation gown tosses her graduation cap in the air in front of the Rowan University arch sign.

This story is a part of Rowan’s centennial series to celebrate 100 years of Rowan University. Rowan Blog contributor Jordyn Dauter, a junior from Quakertown, PA, double majoring in elementary education and dance, collected these insights from fellow students.  David Martinek, a graduate student in the MS Teaching: Theatre program from Glen Burnie, Maryland:“I like […]

My Favorite Class: Puppetry [VIDEO]

Students in Puppetry class work alongside each other in class.

This story is a part of the “My Favorite Class” series.

Meet Grace Fox, a senior English major and Raven Vijayakumar, a sophomore environmental & sustainability studies major. They are sharing memories from their favorite class, Puppetry.

Puppetry (ART 02300) is a studio-based class where students have time to work on creating puppets. This course is a great fit for students who like a hands-on art experience. It gets students thinking creatively about how to design artistic work. 

This course is traditionally taught by Professor Patrick Ahearn. He provides his students with guidance, rather than strict instructions, giving students the opportunity to let their personal artistry flow. He educates his students on which techniques would give them the best results for the puppet they are trying to create. Rather than being an art piece that gets displayed on a wall, puppets can be used by anyone of any age, making it an interactive experience. 

A student working on constructing a puppet in Puppetry Class, held in Westby Hall.

Senior Grace Fox spends a lot of time on the opposite end of creativity, including time spent in writing and directing. Grace does more behind the scenes work for artists. She has found it very exciting to be fabricating her own puppets with Professor Ahearn’s guidance. Grace describes her experience in Puppetry as “real exciting and broadly applicable.”

Through Puppetry, sophomore Raven Vijayakumar realized that they need art in their lives. In high school, Raven was involved in Drama Club, where they worked on creating props for various performances. Raven likes engaging in artistic activities because of how fun they can be, and it gives them an outlet of expression.

“You should take this class because it is super fun, first of all, and because you get the opportunity to do something in a way that is practical.”

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Written by: Jordyn Dauter, junior double major in dance & elementary education

My First Day At Rowan University, Move In

Magnolia Hall during the fall with blooming trees.

Lucy Marks, a sophomore public relations major from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County) shares this first-person perspective on their move-in day as a first-year student last year. Welcome back, Profs, we hope you’re kicking off the year great!

Before I got myself settled at Rowan, I had been nothing but excited for months. From the moment I got my acceptance letter to the second I made the commitment deposit, I only had enthusiasm for the future. It was not until the night before my move in day where I found myself afraid of the unknown. The realization hit that I would be closing off an amazing year and taking a step toward unfamiliar things and more responsibilities. The fear that I would be starting the path to being on my own terrified me.

The morning of, there was no worry on my mind since I was too focused on instructing my brother and dad of where I wanted each of my duffle bags. I had six heavily packed bags that included all of my clothing and necessities. Everything was organized and labeled because I did not want to add another thing on the list of things that were stressing me out. Once everything was packed, My parents and brother made our way to campus in separate cars.

Rowan students moving their stuff during the move in day.

Parking was simple; we were instructed to empty the car while I went ahead and received the key. Getting settled was the difficult part because everything had to be dragged up three flights of stairs in ninety degree weather and I had to decide where everything should go. At that moment I had not been feeling anything besides, hot, sweaty, and out of breath. Once everything finally made its way in the dorm room that seemed so far away and unfamiliar, my parents helped me organize. Fortunately one of my good friends was also going to Rowan so she came and helped as well. It made me feel less alone and stable. All of the decoration and organization was fun in the way where it was the time of personalization and brought some comfort. However, the feeling that had been eating at me was the suspense of when my parents would leave.

Residential hall dorm with  blue decorations and 2 beds.

It was not until they stood in front of me as I sat on my bed looking at them inch closer to the door when everything I was holding in came to the surface. The knowledge that they were going to leave me alone in a new place felt surreal. I had never imagined I would have to face the feelings of being left behind.
Basically, it came out of nowhere and so did my tears. I felt so strange when they were gone. I did not know what to do with myself and kept asking myself what was supposed to happen. The day was excruciatingly long and ended with my floormates and I talking about the weird feeling we had while sitting in that hot lounge alone; just us. The most common description of this feeling was that it was like being dropped off at summer camp, except your parents were not coming back and there were no adults
telling you what to do. I never thought that feeling would go away. September felt like it was three months long and the rest flew by. I just finished my first year at Rowan University and this once unfamiliar place now feels like my home.

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How Autism PATH Program & College Compass Supported One Student’s Transition to College

Julie sits in front of Science Hall with yellow flowers in front of her.

Why did you choose Rowan University to study for your undergraduate degree? The two main reasons why I chose Rowan were that the engineering program seemed very good, but the biggest reason was Rowan’s support. They have an accessibility office on campus, and everyone in that office genuinely cares about the students and was very […]

Veterinary Innovation Gives Fortunato the Goat a New Lease on Life [VIDEO]

Fortunato on a work table getting measurements done with a student and vet tech with a Studio 231 sign in the background.

An interdisciplinary, collaborative space, Studio 231 within the School of Innovation & Entrepreneurship helps to bring the best ideas to life – including, this time, giving a new lease on life to a baby goat who was unable to walk.

The story of Fortunato the goat highlights the ingenuity – not to mention the impact – of leveraging this student-led and student-run experiential learning lab and makerspace within the Rowan community. A hub for collaboration, ideation, rapid prototyping and research, the newly created Schreiber School of Veterinary Medicine partnered with Studio 231 to create working legs for this Nigerian Dwarf goat with septic arthritis in his hind feet, which caused him to lose the feet. 

Dr. Matthew Edson, founding dean of the veterinary school, had previously toured Studio 231 and knew that this resource would be valuable for their work, opening up the possibility of printing 3D models for the vet school.

Fortunato’s owners were told he should be euthanized. Dr. Edson had a different recommendation. 

With an email entitled “Goat Legs” Dr. Edson reached out to the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, asking to partner with Studio 231 to create new working legs for Fortunato. That email found its way to Addison Deckert, a sophomore mechanical engineer major from Gannett Park, MD, and Vincent Gallo, a junior mechanical engineering major from Cinnaminson, NJ, who then worked on the project. 

Fortunato getting measurements with vet tech and Addison done.

Even with a team put together and the drive to create a perfect model, a series of obstacles remained in the way. How would they build legs that would expand as Fortunato grew? How could Addison and Vincent, who rarely worked the same shifts, best collaborate? Which approach, which idea, was the right one to pursue?

The emotional attachment to Fortunato, the intensity of working toward saving a life, and working with a deadline certainly brought out the best in all involved. Several questions needed to be answered for success to be achieved. Vincent shed some light on some of them, “What should we keep in mind? What part of the leg should we try and stay away from? So that’s not like a big pressure point when the goat is walking; how much support does it really need?”

The shape of Fortunato’s body created an interesting challenge that needed to be addressed. Addison revealed, “One of the hardest things we had with designing was figuring out how to keep the boot on because sometimes just like a friction fit and wrapping it real tight isn’t the best solution. And he actually has a tendon running along the upper part of his leg, so we couldn’t attach anything to it. So we went through a lot of different designs.”

Another element of the challenge the project posed was what materials could and could not be used, as they had to be animal friendly. After looking at several different options that combine plastic and 3D printing materials, they opted for TPU, a material that would hold up in the sun, in water, and still remain comfortable for Fortunato. 

After switching the material for the laces to a thinner material, Fortunato was ready to test out the design. Because his leg hindered him from going outside, he was hesitant to touch the world outside, but on a beautiful day, dreams came true. Fortunato came to life running around and hopping on his new prosthetic – the design worked.

The joy for the team was moving, even though Vincent missed the moment due to having to take a test; Addison had this to say about the moment, “Actually being able to see a prototype that I made on Fortunato and working and actually giving him something he didn’t have before is indescribable.” The collaboration not only saved a life but opened the door on saving more down the line. Both students and the rest of the team were showered with praise from the new dean, “We couldn’t be happier with the whole team that worked on this. We came in the first day to a back of a goat’s leg drawn on the board. They had researched the anatomy. They had already come up with a couple of different models that they planned to use. They were really well prepared, but I think they were also able to be creative and entrepreneurial in their approach and adjust to the challenges and come up with a really nice finished project.”

Addison taking notes.

In terms of what comes next, different answers were given. The success of creating a prosthetic certainly opens up opportunities for students to work with the new school, Dean Edson says, “This is the sort of project that we want to do. We want to think outside of the box, involve other departments, other agencies, and all come together to solve problems like this for the betterment of both animal health and human health. And again, this was a perfect example of how we want to do that.”

This project certainly captured the mind of Addison and what she thought was possible, even expressing an interest in working ducks for similar projects in the future. Accomplishing the ability to help aid an animal to walk extends the reality of what is deemed achievable and with students such as Vincent and Addison leading the way in innovation, no project is too big to dream about at Rowan. 

None of this would have been possible without not only Dean Edson, Vincent and Addison but several professors, faculty, and others who helped guide the project along. Working as a team to achieve a goal for something greater than an individual’s ambition helps kindle the wonder in students. This is summed up through Addison, ““It was really amazing and it makes me really want to do engineering because sometimes you doubt it after doing 15 hours of homework and three all-nighters and failing a test and all those types of things, it really makes you doubt. But do I want to actually design something new and build something that actually helps people? Yes. I think Rowan’s really trying to push that mindset.”

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Story by:

Thomas Ubelhoer, sophomore political science and international studies double major 

#PROFspective: First-Year Student Talks Exploratory Studies & Accepted Students Day

Close up of a smiling Kayla.

What is Exploratory Studies? “Exploratory studies means that you do not have a set major; you’re exploring what you want to do. You have the opportunity to take classes that you are interested in. I took a Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management course because it caught my interest. From there, if I decide that this […]

From Jersey City to Future Jersey Teacher, Jonathan Dale Shares What Fuels Him

Jonathan is sitting in a chair looking off in the distance.

In this edition of #PROFspective, we discuss with Jonathan Dale, an elementary education major, his intrinsic desire to go into education as well as the different motivations that have fueled him to go into the schooling system. Jonathan, a sophomore from Jersey City, NJ (Hudson County) also serves as marketing coordinator for Rowan After Hours (RAH).

So what was high school like for you in Jersey City?

I’m a product of the Jersey City public school system and I’m proud to be able to say that. There’s about seven public high schools in Jersey City. Where I went to school it was specifically for performing arts. Even though students were separated based on what they wanted to do, everyone still knew everyone. 

As a Black man, how often did you see teachers like yourself? 

All four years of high school; I can’t really complain. I think I only had one or two teachers that I couldn’t relate myself to. I think that because of that, it was one of the reasons as to why I knew that teaching was something that I could do. With me seeing other people being able to put themselves in such a position it helped me envision myself in the same spot. I was able to pick up so many different teacher mentors from my school experience. I think every year I had a teacher who was Hispanic, Black or even international, such as from India. My school did a pretty good job at making sure I could see myself as a teacher. 

Jonathan is standing in front of James Hall with his arms crossed.

How has your time been here so far at Rowan?

My experience has been good. I think now I’m getting more of the behind the scenes view. As I’m working through the school now I feel as if it’s become a lot better because of the friendships I’ve started to create with people. I’ve only been here a year, but I really do feel the appreciation and support here. I was just telling my coworkers about this, but just the other day it was my birthday and I had around 20 people text me and tell me “happy birthday!” I can’t remember how we met but just knowing that connection is there feels so gratifying. 

For yourself, you’re in the process of becoming a future educator.  What do you think is necessary for someone who’s thinking about going into the education field?

I think that at a certain point,  you feel like it’s something that you know you can accomplish. You have those understandings where you can kind of sit back and reflect on things like “I’m actually inspiring other people, what else can I do?” Of course, there are a plethora of different things that you can go into within the education field like becoming a counselor. I was fortunate enough to have teachers who were minorities, it helped me see myself in a similar career and know I’m not alone. I know that there are situations where a lot of people don’t have that same experience. However, I also think this brings out a great opportunity. You might not see people like yourself in school, if that’s the case do it yourself. Make a name for yourself. Instead of waiting for something to happen, start the next big trend of your city and start trailblazing different paths for young people. 

Jonathan is in James Hall sitting in a chair.

How did you come into RAH (Rowan After Hours)? How did that type of dynamic come to be?

I have a funny story about that. A while ago I was on the phone with my mom and remembered asking her for money. I still remember, my mom had told me “You need to find a job.” When she had told me that I remember I had looked down and I had an immediate response. I replied back to her and said “I think this is our lucky day”, the floor tiles were advertising for Rowan After Hours. It was probably one of the best moments that could have happened to me. I’ve made so many meaningful connections with RAH and it’s really helped me develop as a person and leader as the marketing coordinator. 

What drew you towards elementary education?

Going back to high school, I was a part of a mentorship program. They have students from my school go to other diverse schools around the area. I remember doing that my freshman year of high school. Another thing about Jersey City is that the school system is not that good. To put it lightly, we do have our rough places. But I remember going to one of the roughest schools in the district, at least in terms of trouble and behavior with students. I would go there and teach these students about different aspects that mean a lot to myself, such as bullying. You know, I’ve had family members that were personally affected by bullying and I would tell the students of the different experiences that go on. For the students, I think they knew I wasn’t just coming up with some generic story, they knew that I was being sincerely genuine. Because of my work with that, I think that was the beginning of when people, specifically kids that I talked to from before, would start coming up to me and telling me how my interactions had mattered to them. Kids come up to me all the time with things like “Jon, I remember you. Do you remember coming to my school? You taught me about bullying, drugs etc.” There’s something about that, I believe it to be the most gratifying part of imparting knowledge on people. Teachers will always say that they’re in it for the long run. With elementary education, I think this is the part of kids’ lives where they’re starting to make choices for themselves and you can really make a difference for them. 

What do you think of the lack of male teachers in the education field? 

At first, it was a bit shocking to me. I remember specifically last semester where I was one of the only guys in my class. I had thought it was a bit odd and I do feel as if there could be more males in the field. For most people, their male teachers are usually centered on physical education; but it doesn’t have to be like that. I just think that really constraining yourself into one field that you might not feel passionate about really isn’t the most optimal way to try and live your life. I’m actually apart of a project which is solely focused on increasing male practitioners and classroom teachers. It’s a program centered around men of color and enrolled students where they are paired off with a mentor. It’s not just like a very usual conversation with your mentor, it’s always extremely deep and eloquent in terms of context. Personally, I talk to my mentor just about every week. We discuss the different ways that we ourselves can improve ourselves and our mentors also help different parts of the education process that isn’t necessarily discussed enough; like finding clinical practices, data, networking with different school districts. I do believe that men are moving in the right direction and we’re starting to see more diversity in the field. 

Jonathan is looking off in the distance wearing a Rowan hat.

What drew you to Rowan? 

It’s such a funny thing. When it comes to me and my mom, almost everything that we do could be a coincidence. Covid had occurred during my junior year and I recall being with my mom and looking at all of the different college shows. At the time, virtual tours were especially big just because of how no one could get to any of the campuses. I remember doing research with her and something had caught my eye. I had known barely anything about the school but I was extremely perplexed over it. I remember seeing Rowan and asking myself how I never had heard of this university before. It was hitting all of my check marks at the time. In Jersey? Two hours away? I was extremely interested and was ready to sit through those three-hour virtual campus tours. I was mulling over a few other options like Moorehouse but after I had got to around the three-hour mark with the video, I was sold on the dream.

What attributes of Rowan made you know that was going to be your spot? 

One of the most important aspects that I was looking for with colleges was the emphasis on location and traveling. Knock on wood, but if anything were to happen, I think one of the biggest things that I need is the security of knowing I’m not too far from my family. When I was looking at different colleges the ones that I was really interested in unfortunately were in different states or many hours away. During this process of figuring out where I wanted home to be the next four years I figured that I had wanted to stay home in New Jersey. There’s something about it; I know that it’s somewhere I can build a life in and be successful for years after college. 

In regards to my parents, I didn’t want to make things difficult for them. Of course, I don’t want them to drive two hours to see me, but I think that it’s far enough and also close enough. If I ever get that feeling where I want to go and see my mom I’m fortunate enough to be able to get in my car and still do so. It’s really reassuring knowing I have that security. 

How do you envision yourself as a teacher? We talked about how you’ve been able to connect with all these kids. How do you envision yourself as a teacher? What do you hope to accomplish once you do become an educator? 

I always envisioned myself being that teacher where students could come to and know that everything is going to be okay. I want to be the teacher where I can hear things like “Mr. Dale I’m having a bad day. Can I stay in your room?” I want to create and cultivate a safe space for my students where they know they can come and see and we can come up with a solution together. That’s always been one of the biggest aspects of my life. I think that all my values are increasing for the hope that kids can get taught irregardless of what’s going on. I’m a teacher. It genuinely makes me really happy just to say things like that.

Jonathan is standing and smiling with his arms crossed.

How did your family react when you told them of your plans of pursuing education?

It’s funny because I feel like I was often told “your mom’s a teacher, therefore you want to be a teacher.” When we actually sat down and started discussing my future we had been going over a bunch of different career paths that might interest me, but never actually had a solidified route. I remember her saying “we have to figure out something you like.” I think that at the time we both knew that we couldn’t envision myself really enjoying anything outside of education. For my mother, she was just really happy that I had a sense of direction. I still remember when I had first told her that I wanted to go into education, she had just looked at me rather plainly and said “Yeah, it’s something that I thought you would do.” Mothers really do know best. 

Jonathan is smiling with his arms crossed.

What do you hope your lasting legacy will be as an educator? 

I want to be a contributor; I wouldn’t say change because change comes with time, but I want to improve the system as a whole. When I say I want to improve my school system, I want it to be specific. I want there to be more people of color in my position. I want the students to be able to envision themselves in the field and not feel disoriented. How can I make the students more comfortable? How can I improve the system? It’s these types of questions that I ask myself that fuel my mindset toward education. 

What words could you give to somebody who’s on the fence with majoring in education? What could you say to get them on board? 

Just go for it. Take advantage of all the resources and opportunities that your school provides. If you can go back and reflect on your own high school experience and still be able to name five teachers that had an impact on you, take a second and try to envision yourself in the same circumstances. Could I do something like that for someone else? It takes a lot of introspection and self awareness; this isn’t the field that you’re going in just for the money it’s a lot that you’re undergoing. If it’s something that you know you feel passionate about, I do think that education has a place for everybody. 

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Story by Lucas Taylor, Graduate English Education 









Rowan University Biological Sciences Major Mia Shute Shares Her Aspirations for the Future

Rowan University Biological Sciences major Mia Shute writes on a whiteboard in the lab.

Today we feature sophomore commuter-student Mia Shute from Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County). Mia is working towards her bachelor of science degree in Biological Sciences, as well as an Honors Concentration within the John H. Martinson Honors College. Mia is here to tell us about her college experience and aspirations within the Biological Science field. […]

Men’s Track and Field Student-Athletes on Their Winning 4×400 Relay Season

Athletes celebrate win.

Today we are featuring Jah’mere Beasley, Nana Agyemang, and Amara Conte, three of the four Men’s Track and Field members who secured the national championship title in the 4×400 relay in their indoor season [editor’s note: the team would later finish second in the outdoor national finals]. 

Jah’mere is a junior Sports Communication and Media major from Camden, NJ (Camden County) and ran third leg for the 4×400 relay. Nana is a sophomore Exercise Science major from Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) and ran second leg for the 4×400 relay. Amara is a sophomore Accounting major from Jersey City, NJ (Hudson County) and ran anchor for the 4×400 relay. All three share their stories on leadership, camaraderie, and express how competing in Men’s Track and Field National Championship has shaped their university experience. 

How has your team’s camaraderie propelled you to success? What makes your team different from those around you?

Amara Conte: Our team camaraderie is what makes us a great team, our bond and trust in each other’s ability to perform when it matters most helped us to focus on our own individual part of the relay and perform to the best of our abilities. What makes our team different from other teams is that we are more than a team, we are family, we are brothers, and we always have each other back. Knowing this makes up for our individual flaws and makes us a strong team. 

Nana Agyemang: The team is like one big family. We go through so much pain and suffering at practice that it only makes us stronger and makes us care for each other even more. We keep each other accountable whether that’s making sure we are on time for practice or hitting the correct times for practice we just want to see everyone maximize their full potential. I think the difference from our team to other teams is that we’re really hungry and never satisfied. We always know we can improve on something so when we do good we smile, and celebrate it for the weekend but on Monday it’s back to work like we didn’t so we can always get better and moving forward. 

Going into the race, what emotions were you feeling? Were you guys considered to be an underdog or favored within the 4×400 relay at the meet?

Jah’mere Beasley: Going into the race everyone was laser focused and locked in. I had just taken third place in the 200m, so I brought that energy over to the other guys. We had been ranked #1 in the country all year, and we knew we had the chance to win it all. I would say we were the favorite to win, but there were a lot of other great teams who had solid chances as well.  

Nana Agyemang: I was excited going into the race because of what was at stake. We knew what we had to do and how we were the team to beat from being the National Champion in outdoor so I was thrilled and excited to just get the race underway. We had the #1 time going into nationals but going into finals we were ranked third so most teams probably thought they had us beat because we were running three new people who weren’t on the outdoor national championship (me, Marquise and Jah’mere). In my head it felt like we were the underdogs, but we also knew that we were still the team to beat so we had to go out there and rise up to the occasion. 

Teammates hand off the baton.

What are your team’s biggest strengths? What are your team’s biggest weakness?

Amara Conte: Our team’s biggest strength is the bond we have and our undying love for the sport of Track & Field. Our greatest weakness is that since we have such a diverse group when it comes to individual events, it becomes hard for us to put our all on the relay event, but we somehow make it work and compete at our best when we matter.

How do you prepare for an event like this before race day? 

Jah’mere Beasley: The day before a big race like this I try to stay off my feet as much as possible. I always make sure I eat a great dinner and snack the evening before. I take an ice bath and hot shower to help my legs feel rested. I roll out and stretch really well before bed. I always try to make sure I get 7-8 hours of sleep before a big race day. 

Nana Agyemang: How I prepare for meet day is I usually wake up and instantly play some gospel music because I am a big believer in God so when I wake up I just wanna praise him. Then I go head and brush my teeth and shower and I usually have talks with myself to get my mind right because you are only as strong as your mind. Then I made my breakfast which is usually brown sugar oatmeal, eggs, a water and a granola bar. When I hop on the bus I do a little meditation to get my full body right. Then as we head on the bus approaching to the meet I’ll switch my playlist, attitude, and focus to a more serious tone and lock in on the task ahead.

Beasley runs one leg of the race.

How do you prepare for an event like this on race day? Do you have any race day traditions, meals, or specific actions you swear by? 

Amara Conte: Once we get to the track on the day of the meet, I do my usual warm up while listening to my pre-made playlist that I have prepared just for track meet to help me stay focused and locked in. I don’t eat much on meet days because I run fast on an empty stomach. 

How does winning the [indoor] national championship for the 4×400 meter relay shape your experience at Rowan? How are your track experience in general shaped your college experience? 

Amara Conte: Winning the national championship in 4×400 meter twice now has made my experience at Rowan more pleasurable and has enhanced my experience in ways that I could only imagine. My track experience in general has taught me many life skills, for example: time management, networking, and discipline. Due to my experience as a track athlete, I’ve grown in more ways than I can possibly fathom and with more years these skills and experience will only sharpen and improve before I enter the real world. 

Jah’mere Beasley: Winning the national championship in the 4×400 has made my time here that much more special. This is one of the closest teams I have ever been a part of, and winning that national title brought everyone closer together. Having a brotherhood like this is unmatched. I always cherish the moments I have on the track and that national title is something I will always remember. Those moments always motivate me to get faster and better than I was before. My track experience has shaped my college experience in a big way. Track has helped me make lots of new friends here at Rowan. Most of the the friends I have made are people that play other sports. Track is helping me stay focused in the classroom as well. It motivates to keep my grades up and give max effort with each assignment. 

Nana Agyemang: It’s been cool seeing my friends repost it, having teachers come up and congratulate me has been a great feeling. It’s just made my Rowan experience better and more enjoyable. Track had taught me valuable lessons like when things don’t go your way you can either come back the next day and try again or quit. It has also taught me that life will get hard, like workouts, but if you keep going there is always a light at the end of the tunnel. It might look dark while you’re going through but sooner or later you will reach the end of the tunnel and be happy you did. We have had plenty of workouts that we feel like we aren’t gonna make it but we just gotta keep going and you gotta tell yourself your stronger than that you think.  

Conte runs one leg of the race.

Do you participate in both winter and spring track? What are the biggest disparities between the two? What the biggest challenges between the two different seasons? 

Jah’mere Beasley: I run both winter and spring track. The biggest disparity between the two are the size of the tracks. The winter track is 200m and the spring track is 400m. During the 4×400 in winter track, each person runs two laps, as compared to spring track where each person runs 1 lap. Events like the 4×100 and javelin are only during spring track. The biggest challenge is running on the indoor tracks. The lanes are smaller and the turns are tighter. It take a lot of getting used to during the season. 

Read our earlier interview with Jah’mere here.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major 

Photos courtesy of: 
David Dermer/Rowan Athletics

ICYMI: Rowan University Dance Team Ranked Fifth in Nation

Group photo of Rowan Dance Team at Nationals.

This year, the Rowan University Dance Team competed at the Universal Dance Association (UDA) Nationals in Florida, where the team placed fifth in the Open Division Hip Hop category. Here, members of the Dance Team reflect on their time at the competition and talk about their dynamic as a team. 

What makes the Rowan Dance team different? 

Jordyn Dauter, a first-year Dance & Exercise Science from Quakertown, Pennsylvania says: “Everyone on the team has something unique to offer, whether that is something specifically to dance, or other elements like attitude or leadership skills. We all have something special to offer, which makes our team diverse.”

Teammate Amber Schott, a junior Psychology major from Bayville, NJ (Ocean County), adds, “Definitely the dynamic of the team. I made my best friends here at Rowan through this team and I always feel super supported and encouraged in reaching my dance goals.”

Rowan Dance Team outside at the Florida competition.

Senior Kaya Snow, a double major in Dance and Theatre Arts with concentrations in Acting and Musical Theatre from Oak Ridge, NJ (Passaic County), says, “We’ve really gone through some huge changes in the last few years and we’ve come out stronger through it all. I’m so glad that we decided to pursue UDA Camp and Nationals my sophomore year because it really has changed the entire dynamic of the team for the better.”

Kristin Mostrangeli, a sophomore Psychology major from Hamilton, NJ, (Mercer County) puts it simply: “Since we get to spend so much time together, we really become so close with each other as a team.”

Dance team outside

What is your most memorable memory with the team?

Junior Inclusive Elementary Education Bianca Moffa from Maple Shade, NJ (Burlington County), shares, “Hearing our university get called as a finalist qualifier will definitely be a core memory for sure. I am so proud to be a member of this team and to see all our hard work pay off by becoming 5th in the Nation in Hip Hop.”

Do you have a Rowan University or Dance Team experience you’d like to share?

Nicholette Voci, a junior Law & Justice and Psychology double major from Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County), says that “being able to dance at football games, volunteer events, and be in Florida with my best friends is the best experience anyone could ever have in college.”

Sophomore Sociology major Taryn Larsen from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County), reflects on her time with the Rowan Dance Team by saying “it is the perfect mix of practice each week, meeting new friends and performing.”

A member of the Rowan Dance Team smiles at Nationals.

How was your experience at Nationals 2022?

Reflecting on her experience, Mia Tabasco, a first-year Sociology student from Haddon Township, NJ (Camden County), says, “It was so incredible. I’ve been dreaming of going to UDA for the longest time and I’m so proud of our team for making finals. We’re a new team and we made our names known.”

Sophomore Exercise Science major Adrianna Laezza from Monroe Township, NJ (Middlesex County), shares that the journey to the UDA National competition was a big deal to her. “It was the best feeling in the world to perform on stage again. I got to compete at UDA which was a dream I have had since I was 12 years old.”

Valentina Giannattasio, a first-year double major in Dance and Marketing from Buenos Aires, Argentina, says, “It was definitely one of the best experiences of my life. I still cannot believe we performed there with all those astonishing dancers. I am proud of how far we have gone. Now we are Top 5 in the nation for Hip Hop!”

Dance team performing

What is the best part of being a member of Rowan University Dance Team?

Alyssa McAvoy, a sophomore Music Industry Technology and Business major from Shrewsbury, NJ (Monmouth County), says, “I love that I am still able to dance in college and the friends I have made through being on the team!” 

Junior Engineering Entrepreneurship major Isabel Rivera from Flemington, NJ (Hunterdon County), puts it simply. She says, “The best part about being a member of the Rowan University Dance Team is “being surrounded by people who will motivate you no matter what.”

First-year Spanish Education major Lily Cummings from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County), reflects on her first year on the Rowan Dance Team by saying, “It allows me to grow in my ability as a dancer and dance throughout college without it having to take up my whole life. It also provides so many exciting and memorable experiences along with amazing new friendships.” 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, senior public relations and advertising major

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

Header photo courtesy of:
Rowan University Dance Team ProfLink



Women in Leadership #PROFspective: Riya Bhatt, the AVP of University Advancement

Today we feature Riya Bhatt, the AVP of University Advancement for Student Government. Riya is a sophomore Biological Sciences major who also minors in Public Health and Wellness. Riya discusses her involvement in SGA (Student Government Association) and her future plans as a biological sciences major.

Rec Center Confessions: Student Workers Share

Rec Center student worker checks on gym equipment in one of the fitness rooms.

The gym can be an intimidating place. Lucky for the students of Rowan, student workers at Campus Recreation are doing everything they can to make staying active an enjoyable experience for everyone!

Campus Recreation, better known to students as the Rec Center, offers a safe and welcoming facility for students to maintain happy and healthy active lifestyles.

Built on the foundations of inclusivity and skill development, the Rec Center is the perfect place for anyone to work on being their best self. Don’t believe us? Let’s ask the students who spend more time there than anyone else on campus: The student workers!

Stevie Payne, a Building Manager and senior Health and Wellness Promotion major, and Katie Baker, the Lead Building Manager and senior History major, have both been with the Rec Center since the beginning of their Rowan journeys.

Katie Baker lifting weights
“I’m a part of a lot of different activities in the Rec Center like Women in Rec and the student advisory council. These activities benefit different groups of people and really work to make the Rec center better and more inclusive. It’s one of my favorite parts of working here.” – Katie Baker

“At first,” Stevie shares, “the Rec Center was a job, but after being here since freshman year I’ve slowly realized it was more than that. It’s a community.” 

“Yeah,” Katie agrees, “I understand why people were telling me to work here because it’s just such a good environment. There’s so many good people who come in.” 

Many other student workers share the same sentiments. To them, the Rec Center isn’t just a place to workout or even just where they work. It’s a place that feels like a second home and the professional staff work hard to maintain that feeling for their workers. 

Stevie fixing a weight at the bench
“The professional staff aren’t just good at being bosses. They help us grow into better students and people. They’ve helped me with envisioning my life after Rowan and planning my future goals.” -Stevie Payne

Chris Mapitigama, a sophomore Biochemistry major who doubles in helping the facility and working as lifeguard, expresses similar feelings about the professional staff stating, “They’re super chill. If you ever need to talk about anything work related or even personally, they’re always there to listen.”

For Chris, his transition into life at Rowan wasn’t an easy adjustment. Starting his college career off at the height of the pandemic, Chris was not only looking for an on campus job but for people to call friends. 

“I was lonely when I first got here,” he tells us, “I was holed up in Holly Pointe alone most of the time as most of my classmates had switched to online learning due to the pandemic. When I started working here, I began to build relationships and make friends very quickly. I almost instantly formed connections with my coworkers and I know everyone that works here!”

Chris on lifeguard duty by the pool
“I like being in the building regardless of the job. The people here are the best. My favorite place in the building is the weight room. I definitely spend the most time there.” – Chris Mapitigama

Chris’s experience isn’t uncommon at the Rec Center. Many student workers share about how something in the air just seems to make friendships form quicker. Jessica Rodriguez, a sophomore Public Relations major who works at the Center front desk, describes the environment as welcoming, stating, “The first time I came here, I felt like I had already known everyone for months.” 

Jessica has been a huge part of spreading positivity to all students who come to the Rec. As the first face you see when you walk in, greeting people, helping with their memberships, answering phone calls, and other things of that nature. “If people have questions, they come to me.”

Jessica gets ready to check out a basketball to student at the front desk
“My favorite part of Rowan is my job. This is where I work out. I’m actually the President of the Girls Basketball Club so I’m here all the time.” – Jessica Rodriguez

It’s difficult for many college students to stay active while dealing with the pressures of higher education. It’s important to have student workers like Katie, Jessica, Stevie and Chris who work to create and maintain an environment that helps to inspire students to get involved while not feeling pressured or judged.

Are you a Rowan student who wants to be a part of Campus Rec? Congratulations! By being a Rowan student, you already are. So come down to Campus Rec. We can’t wait to see you there!  

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Story by:
Bianca Gray, recent English graduate

Photos By:
Nick Flagg, senior theatre and advertising major 

Rowan Dance Major Gabrielle Langevine, Front and Center

Gabrielle dances with two spotlights shining on her from either side.

Dancing since she was 10 years old, sophomore Gabrielle Langevine of Middlesex County continues to study her craft at Rowan University’s College of Performing Arts. She is part of the Dance Extensions group and the university’s NAACP chapter. As a Black artist, she hopes to encourage future dancers of color not to “shrink themselves” but […]

How I Found My Place at Rowan University

College of communication and creative arts building.

Today’s Rowan Blog guest contributor, Burlington County’s Matthew DuBas, reminds us that students don’t always stay in their first college major — and that’s ok! Matthew, a sophomore advertising major and photography enthusiast, shares his story as well as some of his own campus images. 

I started in the spring as a confused first-year student at Rowan University, wanting to go into the sales field, but not knowing where I belonged in the grand scheme of things.

I began my adventure as a marketing major; however, I quickly realized that marketing wasn’t the program I expected it to be. I wanted to be more on the creative side of the sales experience. After experimenting in a technology-based major, I landed where I am now, as an advertising major.

So far, the advertising program at Rowan has been far more beneficial to me personally. Learning about ways to inform target publics about new products, learning about public relations practices, and working on assignments about things I enjoy are just a few of the ways the advertising program has assisted me in my projected career path.

Snowy path by Rowan Townhouses at night.
Rowan University Townhouses in winter at night. Photo taken and edited by Matt DuBas.

I also went into my college career not thinking about what I wanted to sell, only that I wanted to sell. Through some personal exploring, I discovered a love for craft beer, and my new career goal is to become a sales representative for a microbrewery. When I tell my professors this, they encourage me to do my assignments on things related to this field, whether that’s writing a marketing plan for a local brewery, discussing how Budweiser has switched to sustainable practices,  or discussing a public relations strategy with a brewery owner.

As a student who struggles with ADHD, working on assignments that interest me makes my college career that much easier, as I find it easier to stay focused on my studies.

While I walked into Rowan without knowing a thing about my future, my professors have assisted me with furthering my education and my career path. I applied to Rowan due to its proximity to home; however even if I were farther, I wouldn’t reconsider my decision!

A Rowan walkway at sunset.
A view of the sunset from the Rowan University Campbell Library. Photo by fellow student Peter De Celie, edited by Matt DuBas.

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Story and photos by:
Matthew DuBas, sophomore advertising major

 

#PROFspective: Theatre Major, Texas Native and Longboarder Maria Dixon

Maria sits with her longboard in front of a brick building on campus.

Today we feature Maria Dixon, a sophomore Theatre major with a concentration in acting from Wylie, Texas. Maria is also the Senator for Rowan’s chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, the theatre honors society, an Admissions Ambassador, and a Theatre department student advisory board member. She discusses her major and goes into detail about her experience at Rowan.

Why did you choose Rowan to study Theatre?

It was really important for me to go to a college near Philadelphia and New York, given my interests in theatre, and because those two cities are the main hubs of stage theatre.

Rowan’s Theatre and Dance program is well known in the community, and the program is great at marketing and recruiting. I also learned very quickly that Rowan valued movement in theatre and acting and did not just value script and straight play-acting. The program emphasizes using your body as an instrument when you perform, and I really appreciated that. I truly appreciate how Rowan valued certain aspects of theatre. 

Maria sitting outside on lawn chair.
Maria holding her one of her paint-by-numbers landscape pieces. 

Why did you choose to study Theatre?

I come from a very musical background and was involved in different theatrical and musical arts growing up. In high school I did a bunch of different activities and extracurriculars like band and color guard and track.

Initially, theatre was just for fun. I started theatre two years after playing music and I had awful stage fright. For plays and productions I was always in the ensemble. Senior year came around and it was common from where I live Texas to audition for a bunch of different opportunities and schools and just see what scholarships are accessible to you. In this process, I went to a mass audition, and Rowan was one of the first schools to call me back and offer me a scholarship. I quickly decided I liked to do theatre and wanted to explore it more throughout my collegiate journey. 

What are your future plans and what is your dream profession for working as a Theatre major?

I am used to being behind the scenes within theatre rather than the star actor or performer. However, in the fall play this year, I was the star and throughout this experience I realized that I love working behind the scenes and would prefer stage management. I am looking to pursue an M.A. in arts administration here, and my dream job could involve managing a venue to schedule tours and events. 

Maria posing next to her longboard in front of Wilson Hall.

What professor has stood out to you in preparing you for your future?

I took Professor Ross Beschlur’s Intro to Acting class last spring over Zoom. His class focused a lot on breathwork, and it was the first class that educated me on using my body and movement as an instrument in theatre. This class set the foundation for me in my theatre studies. 

What class at Rowan have you found most challenging, interesting, difficult?  

One of the more challenging classes that I have taken has been my Script Analysis class. This class challenges me to look at script in new ways. Our professor teaches us different terminologies to use when analyzing script. 

Maria sits outside Business Hall.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

I am a pretty avid longboarder. I skate to class around campus, and I am always trying to improve my skating skills. I will say that gravity is not my friend … and I do fall occasionally; however, I do love longboarding. I have recently started enjoying paint-by-numbers. 

What is your favorite part about your major?

My major is very fun. It is challenging in completely different ways that other majors are challenging. I think my major and the courses I need to take are all interesting to learn about. I also appreciate I think it is so cool that there is a mental side of acting … It sometimes feels like I have a psychology minor.

What does a typical day in your life look like?

I have most of my classes on Tuesday’s and Thursday’s. Therefore, on Monday and Wednesday, I usually have some free time to meet my work and hour requirements for my Admissions Ambassador job. In the rest of my time I either usually have rehearsal for theatre or I am participating in events for Alpha Psi Omega. 

Maria smiling on one of the steps at Bunce Hall.

See our video with Maria here. 

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Story by: 
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos by:
Jack Maisonneuve, senior communication studies major

Studio Art Majors Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger Featured in Philadelphia Art Show

Philadelphia skyline.

Today we feature Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger, two Studio Art majors who recently displayed their work in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia. We interviewed Taylor and Abby on their experiences as young artists at the show and on how they developed their interests in creating art. 

Taylor Brown, junior Studio Art major from Perry Hill, Maryland

Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

In high school I went to a magnet school in Maryland, which is a high school completely dedicated to the arts. They have classes focused on dance, acting, and the arts like painting. While I was at school there I focused on art so I developed a passion for creating artwork throughout those four years. Studio art was a great option for me because I did not fully know what I wanted to do, and studio art gives room for exploring your interests through a variety of classes. 

Taylor Brown's setup at the art show.
Taylor Brown’s display at the 2021 Rittenhouse Art Show.

How did you first get interested in art? 

In middle school I felt like I started excelling in art. I overall genuinely enjoyed attending art class and it was something I looked forward to on a daily basis. This is when I decided to go to high school at the magnet school and focus on art throughout my high school career. 

What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

I really like sculpture, graphite and oil painting. 

Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.
Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch graphite drawing of a lion.

Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life? 

I like to create a mixture of everything. I love working with different mediums and get my inspiration from anywhere. Instead of thinking about creating art as a project or as “work,” I like to think I am creating something because I enjoy the process. My pieces are never the same, and it makes the process very interesting for me.

How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

I basically received an email in my student email sent to all art majors explaining there was an art show if I was interested. I immediately thought it could be a cool experience, so I made an application and submitted some art work. I then received an email that I was accepted and that’s how it all started!

What is your favorite part of producing art?

I really enjoy the process of producing art. 

Taylor Brown's 14 x 14 in canvas oil painting of a plant.
Taylor Brown’s 14 x 14 inch canvas oil painting of a plant sold at the art show.

How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out art shows in the future?

It was such an amazing experience. I got to speak to other artists where they gave me feedback on how I could grow and what I could work on. It was the first time I had my artwork in a show where attendees could buy my work. I sold six pieces and I think it is so cool how someone has my artwork in their house somewhere. I will definitely seek out future art show opportunities. 

Taylor Brown's 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car.
Taylor Brown’s 22 x 30 inch canvas oil painting of a car sold at the art show.

Abby Leitinger, sophomore Studio Art major from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

Why did you choose Rowan to study Studio Art?

I toured a bunch of schools junior year of high school. Rowan was actually the last school I toured because I did not have serious intentions of going there. I ended up touring Rowan because it was local and I have friends that went there. It wasn’t until I went on my tour that I realized Rowan was where I needed to be. My tour guide happened to be a Biomedical Art and Visualization Major, which I thought was very interesting. But Rowan was one the only school that thoroughly discussed art on my tour. I felt instantly that art was important and prominent on campus. 

Why did you choose to study Studio Art?

My advisor placed me in this major. I was informed that this major was a basic art major that would let me explore my options. I picked this major so I could eventually find what I love to do and select a concentration that best fits that.

Abby Leitinger in her booth, engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.
Abby Leitinger engaging with a few customers inquiring about commissions at the Rittenhouse Art Show.

How did you first get interested in art? 

From a young age I was always interested in art. I was constantly drawing and I always had a box of Crayola crayons at an easy reach. I never thought of majoring in art until senior year of high school. I always thought I had to pursue art as a pastime on the side. My art teacher was the person that encouraged me to pursue art. She simply cared so much about art. She was the first person that looked at my art and then decided to put it in an art contest. She told me art is everywhere and I can be involved in so many different professions while being an artist. 

What mediums do you like to work with when producing your art?

I really like to use pen and ink. However, I do like to explore different mediums and I find myself using watercolor, acrylic, and charcoal as well. 

Abby Leitinger's Great Dane", a pen and ink drawing part of her pets series.
Abby Leitinger’s “Great Dane,” a pen and ink drawing, part of her pets series.

Do you follow any themes when producing your art? Do you like to paint or illustrate landscapes? People? Still life?

I am an exploratory artist. I love trying different things and alternating between different subjects. I think I would get bored if I only created the same types of pieces. I like to keep ideas fresh.

How did you find out about the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? How did you get involved? 

I received an email that I believe was distributed to all art majors. I am extremely grateful that I saw this email because this led me to this amazing experience. This is another reason of why I believe Rowan was the place I was meant to be — because of opportunities like this that are offered through Rowan. 

I ended up submitting a portfolio for this process, which was looked over and judged. I later got notification that I was approved for the spot. 

Abby Leitinger's "Cranes", a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.
Abby Leitinger’s “Cranes,” a white colored pencil drawing on black paper.

What is your favorite part of producing art?

I love looking at the final result. I can be a perfectionist at times, so when I get to the final process of looking at what I accomplished and thoroughly enjoying it, it is really rewarding.

How was your experience as an artist featured in the Rittenhouse Art Show in Philadelphia? Will you continue to seek out Art Shows in the future?

It was stressful leading up to the show because of the constant preparation. I had to price my pieces out which was shockingly challenging. When I actually got to the show and got to just sit and observe, I began to relax and appreciate the moment. I ended up selling a lot of pieces which is more than I could have asked for. It is really cool to think about a person having my artwork in their house right now. 

Abby Leitinger's booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.
Abby Leitinger’s booth at the Rittenhouse Art Show featuring her boyfriend and his little brother.

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Story By:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos provided by:
Taylor Brown and Abby Leitinger

Related posts:

Inside the Studio Art Major and Apprenticeship Program with Hannah Healy

Beyond the Classroom: How Two Students Blend Art and Science

Alumni Success: Felicia Brown Talks Career, Future Goals and Her M.A. in Arts Administration

The Journaling Journey

Brianna journals on the lawn next to the Campbell Library.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Brianna looks down on the Campbell Library from above.

Journaling has always been something of a joke to our society. We make it out to be something that only teenage girls with crushes and secrets should be doing. But truthfully, journaling, which can also be described as a form of “affect labeling” (putting words to emotion), has been shown to be a great emotional regulation technique, according to Dr. Marianna Pogosyan in her article “Put Your Feelings Into Words, You’ll Feel Better” (Pogosyan, 2021). 

But what is emotional regulation, and why should it matter?

Understanding what you feel and being able to label it is a great way to make someone feel more in control of themselves, as well as in a seemingly impossible situation.

When a person can journal about a situation and express how they are feeling in a more controlled manner, they can be introspective on it later. Also, at the moment or directly after, journaling can help by being a distracter from the intensity of emotions. This is important because it can teach a person to act more rationally rather than acting on an impulse they might regret in the future.

Brianna sits in the Campbell Lbrary, in front of book stacks, on Rowan's campus.

Even outside of high-stress situations, journaling can be a very helpful tool. Not only can a journal be a place for one to keep their personal thoughts, it can also be an asset to any organizational tool box.

When journaling, typically people will discuss the highlights/events that have occurred over a span of time. When organizing, someone who journals can use the past information to find patterns in their life in order to help set up for future events or times to be flexible.

Brianna journals on the lawn by the Campbell Library.

In almost all forms, journaling is a great idea. From writing down goals to working through stressful experiences, the act of writing things down can benefit our lives. And, while labeling is not something we should do all the time, affect labeling might just help us through some stressful times.

References: 

Sussex Publishers. (n.d.). Put your feelings into words, you’ll feel better. Psychology Today. Retrieved September 18, 2021, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/between-cultures/202109/put-your-feelings-words-youll-feel-better.

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Story by:
Brianna Broadwater, sophomore psychology major from Bel Air, Maryland, Wellness Center intern

Photos by:
Jack Maisonneuve, senior communication studies major

Music Industry Major Pharaoh Freer’s Big Break

Pharaoh sits on a bench near James Hall.

Today we feature Pharaoh Freer, a sophomore Music Industry major from Jamesburg, NJ (Middlesex County). Over the summer, Pharaoh had the opportunity to work on a movie set as an extra! Pharaoh shares his experience on set with us and how it has impacted his life. 

Can you tell us a little about yourself?

My name is Pharaoh Freer, and I’m a sophomore Music Industry major. I went to a school in Philly before I came to Rowan. Before going there I didn’t really know what I was doing when it came to school. That school was my chance to show myself and others that I can do school. Prior to that, I didn’t really think I would end up at Rowan. I’m still living in the “Wow, I’m really here!” Other than that, I’m an artist and a rapper. My goal for right now is to make my mark on Rowan.

Pharoah smiles in front of Wilson Hall.

You were recently in a movie! What was the experience like for you?

My aunt works for Turner Broadcasting in Atlanta. Somebody she knew was a movie director and he let her know that they needed a few extras. My parents flew me out the next week. It was so fast. The movie was filmed at my aunt’s house. You had to see it! Her house is so big and modern, which is why they asked to film there.

I get there and all the movie stuff is set up: microphones, cameras, all of it. I’m just thinking, “Wow, this is really a movie.” All the stuff behind the scenes was almost like a movie itself.

The scene they needed me for was a church scene. I had to wear certain attire and I needed a haircut. But I was doing more than just my scene. I was helping the director, I was taking COVID temperatures, and doing other stuff like that. It was super crazy!

Pharaoh walks on a path near James Hall.

Would you ever do something like that again?

I definitely would! I’m already a musician. Music, acting, fashion, all of that comes hand in hand. After my experience in Atlanta, all I thought about when I got back to New Jersey was, “I want to make a movie! I need to direct my own movie!” I’m the type of person where if I see something and I feel like I can accomplish it then I want to do it! 

Did you go to the premiere? 

Yes! There were two premieres. One in Atlanta that I went to see and a premiere in Michigan. There weren’t a ton of people but enough people to show that the director really had a lot of support. It’s not a crazy big movie, but seeing the community really come out in support made me want to move to Atlanta. 

Pharaoh looks ahead near James and Wilson Halls.

Tell us a little bit about “Broken Covenant: The Movie.” 

I’ll sum it up in a nutshell. It’s basically all about family, love and trust. I’m telling you, the movie is crazy! 

Has the experience made you want to get more involved in the film industry?

I want to do it all! One thing about me is I try to do everything I set my mind to. I want to do movies, music, fashion, everything! After my first experience in Atlanta I told myself, “The next time I come out here to do a movie, I’m going to have a bigger role.” I’ve always loved acting and I’ve started to take becoming an actor more seriously along with my music. 

Read Pharoah’s first-person take on the lessons he’s learned on his journey to becoming a Rowan Prof here

Pharaoh sits and smiles with Wilson Hall in the background.

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Story By:
Bianca Gray, senior English major

Photos By:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major 

Moods: Where To Go On Campus When You Feel A Certain Way

Rowan Boulevard and the Glassblower statue.

Rowan students and alumni reveal popular spots to eat, hang out and socialize on campus.

Where to go on campus when you want to socialize with friends

“When I want to socialize with my friends on campus, I like to go downtown to different restaurants like Playa Bowls and LaScala’s Fire.” – junior Supply Chain & Logistics and Marketing major Jenna Scarpa

“When I am on campus, I love going to sporting events and the Student Center to get together and socialize with my friends!” – senior Psychology major Lucille Villani

Richard Wackar Stadium where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track events take place.
Richard Wackar Stadium, where football, lacrosse, field hockey, and track and field events take place

“I enjoy going to Holly Pointe Cafe to socialize with friends because the atmosphere gives off very welcoming vibes through the music and staff. Plus who doesn’t love to get something to eat while they are chatting?” – senior Math Education major CJ Barrett

As you can see above, Rowan offers many different places to socialize with your friends. From sporting events and walkable restaurants to Holly Pointe Commons Cafe, there are so many communal spaces to sit back and enjoy quality time with friends. 

Holly Pointe Cafe.
Glassworks Cafe located in Holly Pointe Commons

Where to go on campus when you want to study/sit in a quiet space

“Whenever I need a place to study or somewhere quiet, I love going to the Campbell Library on campus or Barnes and Noble. It helps me focus and I find that I get a lot more work done when I’m there!” – sophomore Athletic Training major Hannah Lombardo

Outside of Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard.
Barnes and Noble on Rowan Boulevard

“Being a commuter, I would sit in my car and study in between classes. The best lot is by Bunce Hall because it’s small, less traffic, and there’s a nice view while working.” – senior Theatre and Advertising major Nick Flagg 

“If I have a lot of work to get done or need to study for a test, I usually go to Campbell Library or a study pod in the Science [Hall] building. I work really productively in places that are quiet and aren’t that busy!” – junior Biological Sciences major Harley Rosenzweig 

Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library.
Study areas available in the Rowan Campbell Library

Rowan has many options when seeking out a quiet place to study or have some alone time. Many students enjoy the library or Barnes and Noble downtown to tackle some work, and students can even find a good spot to relax on the lawn chairs in front of Robinson Hall and next to Wilson Hall. 

Where to go on campus when you want to grab a bite to eat

“Freshens was always a go to spot. Being able to customize a healthy option along with the convenience of being able to order on my phone made it a staple.” – alumnus and Liberal Studies major Daniel Corvo

Student Center Cafeteria.
Student Center Cafe

“Freshens in the Student Center is my go-to place for food in between classes or after practice! The food is SO good and filling!! LaScala’s on Rowan Boulevard is also really good.” – senior Elementary Education and Biological Sciences major Johanna Diehl

Lascala's Fire on Rowan Boulevard.
Lascala’s Fire on Rowan Boulevard.

“Whenever I need a healthier option I love going to Fresh off the Grill [Grill Nation] and ordering grilled chicken sandwiches. They have a ton of topping options so you can really make it yours.” – alumnus and Mechanical Engineering graduate Frank Cianciotta

“The Boulevard has so many options of different restaurants to choose from! There’s such a great range of different kinds of food, no matter what I’m in the mood for they have it!” – senior Finance major Bethany Sansone

Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard.
Dawn to Dusk on Rowan Boulevard, a local favorite for breakfast, lunch and dinner

There are many options available when students are looking for a bite to eat. Students can use a meal swipe at Glassworks Dining Hall located in Holly Pointe Commons, the Student Center, or Rowan Boulevard to restaurants like LaScala’s Fire, Dawn to Dusk, El Mariachi and more. 

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Story By:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Select photos by:
RJ Wentzell, senior exercise science major

Sneak Peak into the Theatre – Design/Technical Program and its Stagecraft Class

Someone measures a line on a piece of wood.

Today we share moments from our conversation with College of Performing Arts students Michael Landolfi and Jenna Hope during a session of their Stagecraft Fundamentals class. We asked them about their favorite parts of their majors and the course itself.

Michael Landolfi is a sophomore Theatre major with a concentration in Theatre – Design/Technical

Why did you come to Rowan?

“I recently just transferred from the Music Industry program so it was actually the major that made me want to come to Rowan. I also like that it is fairly close to home but not too close. It was important to me to be close enough to home where I could see family but still be able to explore a new area.”

In the Stagecraft Fundamentals course, have you found anything you are particularly passionate about that you did not think you would like? 

“I definitely have taken an interest in woodwork and carpentry more than I thought I would have.”

Michael in class.
Michael Landolfi

Can you tell me about the relationships you have between the staff here? 

“Especially the staff in the theatre department and the staff in the music program … [t]hey all have been pretty open with communication. Several professors have helped me figure out what trajectory I am taking in terms of what I am learning here and what I want to do in the future.” 

What made you change your major?

“I personally did not like taking business classes … [t]here were quite a few of those classes I had to take. Also I have also always loved live sound, and that is mainly what I am trying to get a career in because those jobs are more secure than trying to land a job as a music producer or a performer in general.” 

A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals.
A student working in Stagecraft Fundamentals

What is your favorite class so far?

“Stagecraft Fundamentals is pretty great. Starting to get involved in the theatre department and stuff has been a really good experience. I also enjoy a Social Problems class I have taken that is completely not related to my major. I just needed to take it for credits, but I heavily enjoyed it.”


Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.
Stagecraft Fundamentals student, Jenna Hope, using power tools in class.

Jenna Hope is a transfer junior Musical Theatre major; however, she will be switching to the Theatre – Design/Techical major. 

What made you want to change your major?

“What made me change my major was the fact that I felt like I was not able to use my hands as much, and getting to take classes like Stagecraft Fundamentals in my first year was something that really made me realize that design and tech is something that makes me really excited. Things like carpentry and costuming are so interesting and also simply fun for me.”

A picture of a power saw used in Stage Craft Fundamentals.

Out of all the elements in design and tech, what would you say your favorite is?

“Out of all of them I would say carpentry, but I really have a soft spot for costuming even though I have not gotten to do it yet.”

Can you tell me about some things that you have made in your Stagecraft Fundamentals class?

“We made a couple of different things … sadly most of the things we make in class are for productions we are holding in the semester, but with Covid we were unable to put on the amount of productions that we would have liked to so we did not have that many sets or props to make. With that being said, we have been making birdhouses this semester as a little project for everybody.”

What advice would you give to a person who is interested in the major but unsure of design and tech?

“I think they should just take Stagecraft because it gives total insight to the major. Asking for help is also so important. Just because you need assistance or help does not mean you cannot partake in something you enjoy.”

Stage Craft Fundamentals students using a power saw.
Associate Professor Tom Fusco (left) works with Jenna (center) and another student using a power saw.

See more from the Stagecraft Fundamentals class in this video. 

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Story By:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Roommates Reflect | Anthony and Nasir | Holly Pointe Commons [VIDEO]

Exterior shot of Holly Pointe Commons.

Roommates Reflect is a series highlighting campus living, how new students bond together and the stories they share.

“The reason I like it here is because it’s very close to home,” says sophomore Civil Engineering major Nasir Brown. “It’s good to get the experience of living on your own and having the real college experience despite all the difficulties.” 

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Video By:
Brian Seay, sophomore sports communication and media major

Professional Goals of Engineering Entrepreneurship Majors

Kenyon looked to the side outside of Rowan Hall.

Today, we feature the long-term and short-term goals of two students in the Engineering Entrepreneurship program. 

Kenyon sits inside the Engineering Bridge.

Kenyon Burgess, a sophomore from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County), is taking advantage of the programs Rowan has to offer to reach his goals.

Currently, Kenyon is on an engineering research project and is also attending events held by the College of Business for networking and personal development. These are all steps he’s taking to be prepared for his next steps after graduation.

His long-term goal is to own his own business where he can utilize his engineering experience. 

Michael sits by Engineering Pond and Rowan Hall.

Senior Micheal Lampasona, from South Plainfield, NJ (Middlesex County), is taking charge of his future by actively expanding his network, self-educating through reading books and watching videos, and reaching out to business professionals to ask them questions regarding his interests in different industries.

In his last semester, Micheal wants to continue to search the technical and business fields to see what industries he gravitates towards for his career. His long-term goal is to own and develop real estate by investing in and developing multi-unit (30+) properties.

He says: “Engineering entrepreneurship will support my dreams and goals because it gives me the best of both the technical and business world. I know that the world of technical sales, product development, project management, technology commercialization, and operations in manufacturing is what I was born to do.”

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

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Quintin Stinney, sophomore radio/TV/film major

#PROFspective: Victoria Collinsworth And Esports At Rowan

Victoria standing outside near some branches.

Today we feature Victoria Collinsworth, a first-generation sophomore who studies Chemical Engineering. Vic is from Mantua, NJ (Gloucester County). How did your love of video games start?  When I was younger, my brother used to play on his Gameboy a lot, and I would watch. As we grew up, I started loving games more and […]

6 Residents Share Why They Like Mimosa Hall

an upward pan view of the broad side of Mimosa Hall.

Mimosa Hall is a traditional residence hall for predominantly freshmen, located in the center of campus, closest to the Student Center, Recreation Center, intramural fields, the library and academic buildings. Six residents have shared why they like living here.  Nickvens Delva, a freshman Psychology major from Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County) says he likes how Mimosa […]

Lambda Theta Phi Fraternity, Inc.’s Community Service Efforts

Chris Acevedo poses in a wooded, snowy area.

Today we speak to Chris Acevedo, president of Rowan’s Omicron Chapter of the Lambda Theta Phi Latin Fraternity, Inc. Chris is a sophomore Management Information Systems major from Winslow, NJ (Camden County). Chris lives off-campus and is a first-generation college student. Chris is also a student veteran. Chris tells us about Lambda Theta Phi’s community service work they have done recently.

Chris poses inside Business Hall.

Can you tell me about the community service Lambda Theta Phi is doing?

Since Rowan is located in Glassboro, we like to focus a lot of our community service on either Camden or Atlantic City, because those cities need help. There are many people who need help in those cities, and we want to help as many people as we can. We collaborate with other chapters such as the chapters at Rutgers – Camden, Temple and Stockton. S

Some of the community services we have done include feeding and giving away items to homeless people in Philadelphia, Camden, and Atlantic City. Sometimes we do smaller engagements such as clean-ups of towns and people’s backyards, but we try to do big events serving 150 families or more. We try to help as many people as we can. Recently we have held four community outreach events. Near Thanksgiving, we gave away Thanksgiving baskets that consisted of items such as turkey, cornbread, cranberry sauce, and other traditional Thanksgiving foods. We were able to drive food to some families as well.

Near the holidays, we had a holiday-themed event that helped around 300 families. We had a brother dress up as Santa Claus and we gave away toys donated by the Heart of Camden and Total Turf, as well as hats, coats, and gloves. We did a similar event in January, handing out hats, coats, gloves, scarves, and toys. We have also done an event where we walked around Walter Rand in Camden, giving away hand warmers, gloves, and other winter items. 

Chris and some of his brothers from other South Jersey and Pennsylvania chapters pose at a community service event they put on together.
Chris (second from left) and some of his brothers from other South Jersey and Pennsylvania chapters pose at a community service event they put on together.

Why is the Lambda Theta Phi Fraternity so focused on community service?

The root of our organization is based on service. Our principles and ideals emphasize catering to the communities that many of us come from. As we progress in our endeavors as individuals and as a collective, we always aim to uplift the very community that has raised us.

What would you say the benefits of being involved in Greek life are? 

Greek life advances networking. There are many reasons that people pursue Greek life; i.e. a sense of family/belonging, making friends. But the biggest positive is networking. You meet people from all walks of life and all different ages. Sometimes you’re able to meet people who have similar interests and can offer guidance, or you can meet someone that’s gone down a different path and offers different perspectives on life. Whatever your reason for joining a Greek organization, you are always going to meet someone new. 

Chris poses outdoors in a snowy, wooded area.

What else does the Lambda Theta Phi Fraternity focus on besides community service?

Lambda Theta Phi is big on community service but it isn’t our only task. We are big on the connection / social aspect. We enjoy the presence of our brothers making a lot of bonding events, whether it’s our chapter here at Rowan or any other schools. Connecting with other Greek organizations makes your networking bigger and more relationships that last forever.

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Community service photo submitted by:
Chris Acevedo, sophomore management information systems major

#PROFspective: Biomedical Engineering Major Ashleigh Jankowski

Ashleigh sits on a ledge outside of Engineering Hall.

Today we speak to Ashleigh Jankowski, a sophomore Biomedical Engineering major with a minor in Chemistry from Catonsville, Maryland. 

Ashleigh poses outside of Engineering Hall with her face reflected on a reflective surface.

What is a typical Rowan day for you?

In the morning, I go to do research in Engineering Hall. I do research for Dr. Byrne’s biomedical engineering lab. Usually, after that, throughout the day I have various classes, and I usually grab a quick lunch from the Student Center. Typically, a nap fits in there somewhere. I work in the evenings as a Classroom Support Technician for Rowan’s IRT Department. After I get off work, I either do homework or hang out with my housemates. We watch movies together, play games, bake, and more.

Could you share with us one moment during your time at Rowan that made you feel inspired or confident that you’re in the right major for you?

In doing research with the Byrne Lab, I have realized that majoring in Biomedical Engineering was definitely the right choice for me. We have weekly meetings where fellow teammates present their work. It was in the first of these meetings that I attended where I realized that being a BME is something I genuinely enjoy and can get excited about.

Ashleigh poses outdoors in a wooded area.

Could you tell us a little bit about your transition into Rowan as an incoming student?

I was very nervous but super excited. At first, my transition was rough, but it was self-inflicted. I kept my head down and didn’t go out. But, with the coaxing of my wonderful roommate, I began attending RAH and SUP events, which is where I came out of my shell and met some of my best friends.

What are your professional goals?

I intend to pursue a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering once I complete undergrad, and after that, I intend to pursue a research career in biomedical engineering.

Ashleigh poses by the pond at Engineering Hall.

How has Rowan helped to support you with your professional goals?

Rowan offers so many opportunities to help support me in achieving my educational and professional goals. I am a part of multiple student organizations, including the Society of Women Engineers, Women in Engineering (WIE), and Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), that provide networking opportunities as well as workshops for academic growth. Professors are more than supportive, offering help when needed in class and advice on career-based matters. Getting the opportunity to do research starting my freshman year has also been a big help in supporting my goals. I am learning through experience how to do hands-on research, how to work in a lab team, how to formally present data, and how to write a paper for publication. All of these things are going to benefit me in the long run as I pursue a Ph.D. and a successful biomedical engineering career.

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Valentine’s Day Birthdays

Red gift box with bow.

Valentine’s Day is not reserved for strictly couples. Here are some Rowan students who feel some extra love on their birthday. 

Mackenzie Campbell, a sophomore Law and Justice major from Great Falls, Virginia, was meant to be born on the holiday. “My mom actually had a scheduled labor for Valentine’s Day, but her water broke that morning and she had me and my twin brother naturally.” To celebrate, even though they go to different schools, Mackenzie and her brother always make it a point to call each other to wish each other a happy birthday. 

Mackenzie Campbell sitting inside on her phone looking at the camera.

Senior Emily Johnson, also a Law and Justice major, from Menifee, California, says holiday birthdays are common in her family. “I was born two weeks early, my sister’s birthday is two days after Christmas and my dad’s birthday falls on Easter some years!” Emily embraces the uniqueness of her special day. “Having a birthday on a holiday is unique but double the fun! I absolutely love everything heart-shaped and enjoy the traditions of Valentine’s Day! I typically celebrate my birthday on the 14th and celebrate a “Valentine’s Day” dinner with my boyfriend the following day.” 

Emily Johnson poses for a selfie.

Ashley Edwards, a Law and Justice major, says having a birthday on Valentine’s Day is “actually pretty nice. Haven’t come across anyone who has tried to jip me of a birthday present so that’s a good thing! The only con is that I can never make last-minute dinner plans … it’s nearly impossible.” The junior from Central Jersey came early and surprised her parents “with the most romantic gift … childbirth.”

Ashley Edwards sitting on a couch.

Emma Knoll, a dual major in Early Childhood Education and American Studies, embraces her unique birthdate to the fullest. “I always loved having my birthday on Valentine’s Day, even more so because I am also a twin! When I was a child, my twin and I never felt like the holiday was taking over our birthday. My parents and family always made it a point to celebrate our birthday as well as Valentine’s Day. As an adult, my boyfriend continues to shower my birthday with love and presents but still celebrating Valentine’s Day, so I get extra treated on my birthday!” The senior from Cape May County, NJ would recommend “celebrating the birthday as well as the holiday. Your birthday is something worth celebrating even if it is on a holiday!” 

Selfie of Emma Knoll.

Senior Anthony Sokolowski, a Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management major from Berlin, NJ (Camden County) has mixed feelings about having a birthday on Valentine’s Day. “A pro is that it’s unique since no one that I know has a birthday on a holiday, let alone Valentine’s Day, and when I was a child I sometimes got both Valentine’s cards and birthday cards at school. A con is that my birthday is on a holiday that’s meant to be about love and relationships, so I feel like that can take away from my birthday sometimes.” His advice for having a birthday on a holiday would be “to ask that person whether they enjoy having their birthday on a holiday and if they would like it to be celebrated on the day or would prefer that it be celebrated before/after.” 

Selfie of Anthony Sokolowski in a green hoodie and glasses.

Audry Feltner, a junior Biological Science major with a concentration in pre-med and minors in Chemistry and Spanish, is from Chesapeake, Virginia and she loves having her birthday on Valentine’s Day. “You get lots of candy when your birthday is on Valentine’s Day, mostly chocolate. When I was a kid I would walk into the store and see the Valentine’s Day stuff for sale and I would tell my mom that they were decorating for my birthday because I didn’t understand Valentine’s Day. Scheduling dates now is actually easier for me because it’s a birthday and Valentine’s.” To celebrate, Audry “usually has a birthday party just like anyone else. I’ve had a few Valentine’s Day-themed parties just because it’s easy with all the decorations in the store (pre-Covid of course).” 

Selfie of Audry Feltner.

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

Black STEM Majors Share Advice for Black High School Students Interested in STEM

Ylanda sits outside campus near Campbell Library.

Today, we’re highlighting Black STEM majors as they share some advice on where to start when looking into STEM.

Ylanda wearing a Rowan shirt and posing outside the Campbell Library.

“Attend as many events as you can to meet new people that has the same interests as you and to also carry out with your interests,” says Ylanda Souffrant, a sophomore, first-generation college student and Math Education major from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

Josephine wearing a lab coat and posing in the Science building.

“It’s alright if you know you’re interested in STEM, but you don’t know what you want to do with it in life. Carefully choose the school/program you join because that is how you will position yourself and expose yourself to experiences and individuals that will guide you along your journey,” says Josephine Babatunde, a senior Biochemistry major and transfer student from Union County College (Union County, NJ).

Dévon sitting and posing for a photo while wearing a dotted dress shirt and blue dress pants.

“One major key of advice I would give for high school STEM students is to not give up. I know this sounds a bit cliché, but you’re going to run into many obstacles and people who try to hold you down or stop your progress, but you can’t let nothing stand in your way. The road is going to be rough and tough but like my family always used to preach to me, ‘If someone already did it, you can too,'” says DéVon Malloy, a junior, first-generation college student and Biomedical Engineering major from Hillside, NJ (Union County)

Briana sitting and posing on the fountain stature outside Campbell Library.

“Hold your head up high! The courses may seem rigorous and tedious, but you are more than capable. You are just as competitive as anyone else around you; don’t give up! Ask for help if you need it, take advantage of programs that cater to your major whether it is directly or indirectly correlated with the unrepresented, be sure to make connections any chance you get, and try to get some some volunteer experience in the field if possible.” — Briana Davy, junior, first-generation college student and Biological Sciences major (planning on receiving a CUGS in Spanish), Honors Concentration, transfer from RCSJ Cumberland, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Akil leaning against the bridge and smiling outside Engineering Hall.

“Start early. Time flies really fast and you never know what the next day will bring you. Get involved in programs, especially offered by the schools you go to, because it not only looks fantastic on your resumé but also the skills and knowledge you acquire from it goes a long way. Get involved early too, don’t be afraid of clubs and participating, and don’t be afraid to reach out to people in college now and ask questions.” — Akil DeBruhl, junior Biological Sciences major with a minor in Psychology, South Orange, NJ (Essex County)

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Story by: Bianca Torres, senior Music Industry major

Photography by: Stephanie Batista, sophomore Music Industry major and Joe Gentempo, Senior Art major

Keeping Houseplants In Your Dorm or Apartment

Close up of houseplants on a windowsill in Willow Hall.

Today we speak with three Rowan students about living on campus with plants in their living spaces.

Two green plants inside of small pots. The pot on the left looks like a cat. There is also multiple other items on the table.
Tara’s plants

Tara Lonsdorf, a senior Geology major from East Windsor, NJ (Mercer County) has three plants, all of which were given to her from different people. She says she has, “a tiny air plant given to me by my dad, an aloe plant given to me by my boyfriend, and a jade plant given to me by Lindsay Johnson at the Wellness Center after completing counseling with her.” Tara’s reasoning for her having those specific plants are that they are convenient for her. She explained, “All of the plants are small, easy to transport, and super low-maintenance.” Tara also advised, “Don’t get a plant just to have a plant. Get a plant that will be meaningful to you and fit your lifestyle.”

Three green plants sitting on a brown table. There is also a "groot" holding one of the plants.
Kalie’s plants

Kalie VanDewater, senior Journalism major from Mt. Holly, NJ (Burlington County) said, “I have three plants: an aloe, a cactus, and the other one is a vine plant.” Kalie said, “I just got them because I thought they were cool. I honestly can’t remember why.” Kalie’s advice is, “I recommend a cactus because that’s my most resilient plant and does well without a lot of water.”

Small green bamboo plant with mini pumpkins around it.
Rachel’s bamboo

Rachel Rumsby, a sophomore Communication Studies & Public Relations double major from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County) said, “I have one bamboo plant. My roommate, friend and I went to a Rowan After Hours event because we heard they were giving away pumpkins. They ran out of pumpkins so we were not able to get one. However, they had these bamboo plants so we each got one of those instead.” Rachel’s tip was, “Buy something easy to take care of and small to start off.”

Among the three of them they all are happy and enjoy living with their houseplants.

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Story by: Luke Garcia, junior music industry major

Thriving In My Faith As A College Student

The word "faith" written using stones.

Today we hear from Rowan students and how they are involved in their faith on campus. They are involved in clubs such as Catholic Campus Ministry, Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship, and Hillel.

Amanda poses with a bouquet of flowers.

Amanda McNally is a freshman Athletic Training major from Tabernacle, NJ (Burlington County). Amanda is involved with Catholic Campus Ministry. She says that “just going to the meetings alone, and the student masses every Saturday, I have had the opportunity to hear from speakers, such as religious sisters and a married couple, and talk with a bunch of other students who are my age and share the same beliefs as me. It is really nice to be able to talk about my faith with other people my age and go to mass with other people away from home. I have noticed in this first semester that all of the members are there by choice. In high school, people went to my youth group and their parents made them go, but it’s great to be with people who want to be there and follow their faith.”

Morgan poses in front of a garage door.

Morgan McRae a junior Music Therapy major from Forked River, NJ (Ocean County), is also involved with Catholic Campus Ministry. Morgan says that it was nice to connect and bond with people over something deeper than surface level. “I never really had Catholic friends before, I went to a public school, so that was a big change for me. I feel like I can talk about different aspects of my faith and feel accepted.” She also discusses the different kinds of activities and discussions they have. “Before March, we used to have different activities. When March came, everything moved online. Rebekah Hardy, our Director of Campus Ministry, and Father Rossi, the pastor at Saint Bridget’s University Parish, did a great job of picking topics that are just as impactful online as in person.”

Carley Robinson poses in her apartment.

Carley Robinson a junior Psychological Sciences major with a neuroscience minor from Marlton, NJ (Burlington County) is involved with Catholic Campus Ministry, as well as Chi Alpha. “Catholic Campus Ministry has meetings every week to discuss different topics in the Catholic faith. We learn about one sacrament, belief, or doctrine in the Catholic faith in each meeting. We usually have a retreat every semester for a weekend, as well. On the retreats, we have many more Catholic activities such as mass, adoration, listening to talks, and getting to know other Catholics in the Rowan community in a special way. There is a college student mass on Saturday night at 4:30 pm at Saint Bridget’s University Parish. There is a bible study every other Thursday as well. I also am involved with the Christian club Chi Alpha. They have bible studies, and praise and worship every week.” She says that over quarantine, she was able to take time and make sure her foundation was in God. “During 2020, I was able to have the perception of it being a challenge, rather than something to destroy your faith, and I think that helped me. As a Catholic, you want to have God as your foundation, so being alone and separated from people is a good opportunity to work on that and see where your priorities really are and see if your foundation really is on God.”

Brianna poses near some trees and on a pathway.

Brianna Broadwater is a freshman Psychology major from Bel Air, Maryland, and a new Catholic. She completed the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) over the summer at a church in her hometown, and now she loves being part of the Rowan Catholic community. “Catholic Campus Ministry has honestly helped me make the most friends and helps me get to do a lot of things, especially during the pandemic. We haven’t gotten to do as much, but there is still Newman Night every Wednesday, and we have group chats. We have a whole freshmen group chat dedicated to freshmen from the club, and we all talk and eat good food. We get to help each other with anything we are going through and tell each other stories and make each other laugh. It is amazing.” I have gotten to thrive more in my faith this year because I have been able to go to Newman every Wednesday, and I go to the bible studies on Thursdays sometimes. I also go to the student mass on Saturdays, and I have been able to cantor for that. I have been very involved in church, and I have been able to have more of a prayer life. I have started a prayer journal about things that are important to me, and goals. I have started getting more involved in my faith.”

Steven poses against a white wall.

Steven Douglass a sophomore Chemistry major from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) is also involved in Catholic Campus Ministry. “Catholic Campus Ministry gives me a community of like-minded people and it helps to have a good friend group that has the same beliefs as you.”

Alex poses outdoors on her deck.

Alex Herschman is a junior Management and Marketing major from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County). She just finished her term as vice president of Hillel, and began serving as president. “I began going to Hillel as a freshman and loved it ever since attending my first event, which made me eager to join Hillel’s executive board. I started off as the organization’s social media chair, then served as the vice president and now president.” She says that Hillel gave her a sense of belonging at Rowan. “Hillel gave me that Jewish community and sense of belonging on campus. We are all super close, and I feel comfortable with them, and it is nice to have something in common with each other. If I am on campus and not at home, I can celebrate the Jewish holidays with the community at Hillel. During Passover, we do a seder, and for Yom Kippur, we were able to do an outside break fast event, which was very nice, because it was on a Monday and I was not able to go home. It was great to spend the holiday with my fellow Hillel members when I couldn’t go home and spend it with my family.” 

Christa poses in front of some trees.

Christa Ouellette a senior Civil and Environmental Engineering major from Delanco, NJ (Burlington County),  is also a part of the Catholic Campus Ministry. “Catholic Campus Ministry has opened up so many doors for me. One of the greatest things that Catholic Campus Ministry has done for me spiritually is the group discussions and retreats we do. These guided retreats we do one weekend a semester are just us and we get to step away from the world for a bit and reconnect spiritually. We also do different trips sometimes. In 2018 or 2019, we went to the border in Texas and we volunteered with the Humanitarian Respite Center, and we got to help refugees that were recently released by ICE. That was really awesome.”

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo courtesy of:
Pixabay

Molecular & Cellular Biology Majors: Professional Goals

Today we hear from three Molecular and Cellular Biology majors about their professional goals. They talk about both their short- and long-term goals, as well as how Rowan prepares them to achieve those goals. “My short-term professional goals include securing an internship as a research assistant and going to a graduate school with an accredited […]

One Great Thing About Living Away (Even During a Pandemic)

Sunset at Rowan with stark red sky against black silouette of buildings and trees.

“The atmosphere. Your mind is in the school mindset. It would be harder to do homework in your room, because at home your mind thinks you’re at home and resting. But being here you see the buildings, the professors, the students and you still think it’s school first and relax later,” says Jaylen Shanklin, a sophomore […]

5 Geology Majors Share Their Short-Term Professional Goals

Kelsey and her friend talking about a fossil.

We spoke to five Geology majors about their short-term professional goals and plans.

A portrait photo of Kelsey.

“I am currently working on applying for summer internships. The internships I am looking into are research-based and field-based, but all revolve around Paleontology. I am set to graduate with my BA in Geology in the fall of 2021, and will be off to the graduate school I finally decide on in the fall of 2022.” – junior Kelsey Barker, a Geology major working toward a Certificate in Paleontology Foundations and transfer student from Rowan College of South Jersey (Gloucester Campus) from Hackettstown, NJ (Warren County)

Justin wearing a Jurassic Park t-shirt.

“In the short term, I would like to get into the Ph.D. program for Paleontology.” – junior Justin Vieira, a Geology major from Beachwood, NJ (Ocean County)

Mallory sitting and wearing a brown coat.

“I think this major at Rowan is really helpful in achieving my goals and will play such a huge role. We’re such a small major and we’re able to really be on good terms and close with all of our professors, which ends up leading us to great opportunities through their connections in the career field!” – first-generation college junior Mallory Osmun, a Geology major and transfer from Rowan College at Burlington County whose hometown is Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

A selfie of Cooper.

“My short-term goal is finishing my research project I’m doing for Rowan. I’m using mass spectrometry to figure out if 2 bone beds in Wyoming are the same. I’m looking at turtle, Hadrosaur, and Triceratops bones.” – sophomore Cooper Caputo, a Geology major with a concentration in Paleontology from Washington, DC

Zachary smiling and wearing tan outdoors gear.

“Currently, I’m only taking classes on Geology and, soon, Paleontology. Before the summer I plan on looking for internships that might help me. I am a member of the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society. I do have two family friends who are retired paleontologists whose advice I’ve taken.” – junior Zachary Armstrong, a Geology major with a concentration in Paleontology from Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

How to Adapt To Being Away From Home: Advice From Sophomore Jordan Perkins

Jordan poses outside.

Today’s story is written by sophomore Advertising major Jordan Perkins. Jordan is from Mount Olive, NJ (Morris County), and lives on campus at 114 Victoria Street. Jordan is a first-generation college student.

August is coming to an end and it hits you that you are moving away from home in just a couple of days. You are worried about all the possibilities, being alone, not knowing where to go and how to feel comfortable away from home. Although you may think you are the only one feeling this way, just know you aren’t because so is everyone else whether they say it or not! Below I will be listing 5 important tips to help you adjust to the college lifestyle and to help get rid of homesickness.

Jordan poses, sitting in front of a building.

Know Your Resources

It is important to learn and have an understanding of the resources around you. Rowan University offers a Wellness Center on campus where you can go online and easily make an appointment. If a student is dealing with any sort of mental health issues, Rowan has counselors on hand ready to talk to you when you need it. A library, computer rooms, study rooms, lounges, and tutoring are also available all year round to help you stay on top of your work.

Explore Campus

One easy way to become comfortable with where you are living is to understand and know everything around you. Taking a walk around campus, signing up for events, reaching out to your dorm neighbors, and connecting with your professors are great ways to help you feel more at home while being away. Rowan offers many clubs and activities all year around campus and either joining a club or attending activities allows you to personally connect with campus.

Jordan poses outside.


Stay On Top of Work

Getting into the hang of a study routine and making sure you lineup your responsibilities are very important.  Although there is the idea that college is all about going out, parties, and staying out all night, there are times you need to give that up to study for a test. Many students struggle with managing their time and finding the time in their day to sit down and complete homework but you should make a set schedule for when you need to do so. It is the student’s own responsibility to figure out what they need to prioritize. Finding a quiet place, such as the library, or setting up a homework group can help you a ton with adjusting to the college environment.

Take Care of Yourself

While making sure all your work is completed and handed in, it’s also important to make sure you make time to take care of yourself. Balance is very important when coming into college since stress and work can become overwhelming so take some time to sit back and recharge or even meet up with some friends. Rowan University has many sports games so on a Friday night if you need to get out of your same old boring room, maybe think about attending a football game with a group of people!

Jordan poses in front of a building.

Make Friends and Stay in Touch

Creating new friendships can be hard when you are pushed into an unknown setting. You are not sure how to find people, how to form a bond, or how to even come about starting a conversation. What helps the most is joining a club because you automatically meet new people right off the bat. Another way is knocking on your dorm neighbors’ door and getting to know them. Every freshman around you is feeling the same way about making friends so everyone you talk to will be more than happy to get your number, text you and hang out with you throughout the week. Creating these friendships helps keep your mind off the fact that you are far from home and away from the people you grew up with, and the relationships you form in college are super important and make campus feel like home. Remember to also keep in touch and update your friends and family back in your home town but keep in mind it’s best if you don’t make frequent trips home and stay on campus for one to two months straight before you decide to take a trip home.

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Story by:
Jordan Perkins, sophomore advertising major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

The Best And Worst of Being A Collegiate Student-Athlete: Sophomore Women’s Lacrosse Natalie DePersia

Rowan's Women's Lacrosse players huddle on the field.

Today’s story is by sophomore Public Relations major Natalie DePersia. Natalie is from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) and rents a house off-campus with friends.

Natalie DePersia poses for a photo.

Interdependent, focused, and self-motivated.  These are just three adjectives that I believe describe a successful student-athlete. Being a student-athlete is hard, time-consuming, and mentally and physically draining. However, I would not trade this college lifestyle of mine for any other college experience. This lifestyle comes with many perks, but also, some people would say, many sacrifices.  

Natalie DePersia playing lacrosse.
Natalie DePersia playing lacrosse.

The positives of being a collegiate athlete consist of: gaining an instant community, the countless life lessons you learn from playing a team sport, the physical health benefits of playing sports, and of course, comedically, it is acceptable to wear sweatpants every day. As a member of the Rowan Women’s Lacrosse Team, our schedule on a day-to-day basis is very hectic and just simply, long. A typical day in my life during our lacrosse season, on a game day, is structured like so: wake up at 7 am, go to class from 8 am to 10:45 am, go to the locker room to get ready to leave for the game, leave Rowan by 11:30 am, arrive at the opponent’s field at 2:30 pm, start warming up at 3 pm, play the game from 4 pm to 5:30 pm, board the bus and get home by 7-8:30 pm (depending on how far the game was located), shower and start homework, lights out by 11:30 pm, and then repeat. This lifestyle was overwhelming but also led me to learn how to multitask so well. I also learned how passionate I was about playing a collegiate sport and was committed to becoming better every day. Personally, the positives definitely outweigh the negatives.  

Natalie poses in the car.

Being a collegiate athlete is not always as glamorous as it seems. Because of all the time spent on athletics, you may need to sacrifice your time and your experiences. Some of the negatives of being a student-athlete are: having less time to focus on your academics, having a limited social life, having an increased risk of injury because of your participation in athletics, and setting limits on extracurriculars.

Being a student-athlete takes a lot of mental focus, commitment, and time management to balance between athletics and academics. Even though I do miss out on certain things that regular college students experience, I would not trade the lifestyle I have grown to love. Rowan University makes it more than easy to love being a student-athlete. 

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Story and photos provided by:
Natalie DePersia, sophomore public relations major

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Writing Arts & Spanish Major Helaina Parejo

Helaina sitting on a bench outside.

Today we feature sophomore Helaina Parejo who double majors in Writing Arts and Spanish. Helaina is from Barrington, NJ (Camden County) and transferred from Ursinus College the spring semester of her freshman year. She has an internship with the Writing Arts department and is a part of the Writing Arts Club. Why did you choose […]

#PROFspective: Accounting and Finance Double Major, Debate President Allison Gould

Allison stands outside of Business Hall.

Today we speak to sophomore Allison Gould, who double majors in Finance and Accounting. Allison is from Whippany, NJ (Morris County) and is a part of the Financial Management Association and the Law and Justice Debate team. What is your favorite thing about a typical day at Rowan? I actually like the food a lot […]

English Majors Share What They are Reading over Winter Break

Snowy scene on campus.

Rowan students and English majors from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences suggest some good reads for Winter Break.

Senior Superia Ryan from Pittsgrove, NJ (Salem County) recommends “Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin. She thinks the book “shares a powerful story that I believe others should hear.” To read, Superia enjoys sitting and reading in Starbucks with a cup of coffee.

Superia Ryan pictured outside.

Senior Fatima Khalid from Brooklyn, NY recommends “For One More Day” by Mitch Albom because it is one of the only books to make her actually cry! Fatima’s spot to read is her room with a candle lit. 

Selfi of Fatima Khalid.

Junior Brianna Benfield from Gloucester County, NJ recommends “A Darker Shade of Magic” by VE Schwab. Brianna describes the book as a “fantastic new adult/adult fantasy novel with a well-developed new world and magic system and ample LGBTQIA+ representation. This is the first book of a trilogy that keeps you hooked until the very end!” Brianna’s favorite way to read is in bed with headphones in. 

Brianna Benfield sits on a stone bench outside.

Senior Chris Finnegan (seen below, left) from Wyckoff, NJ (Bergen County) recommends “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury because of its prescience and relevance in regards to today’s digital culture. To read, Chris needs natural lighting and a hot drink! 

Chris Finnegan and friend on campus.

Senior Dominique DiGiacomo from Atco, NJ (Camden County) recommends “The Wind Up Bird Chronicle” by Haruki Murakami. Dominique has begun reading the book in Japanese! Dominique thinks the book is super interesting and that there are translated versions of it as well! To read, Dominique gets in a quiet area and wears her favorite loungewear.

Dominique in front of bridge

Junior Hannah Roselli from Bordentown, NJ (Burlington County), recommends “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott. Hannah loves Little Women. She explains: “While it is a timeless classic, it also brings the reader into a time before the world went crazy.  It is a sweet and endearing novel with an amazing meaning. It may seem to be too old for our generation to read, but when they say that this book is a timeless classic, they mean it.” Hannah enjoys reading while snuggled up with a cup of tea in the evening and my dog and fiancé by my side.

Selfi of Hannah Roselli.

Sophomore Sam Grasso from Sicklerville in Camden County, NJ recommends “Inkheart” by Cornelia Funke. “If you really want to get lost in a fantasy world where characters from your favorite books can plop into the real world, this is the perfect book to dive into,” she says. To read, Sam tends to wait until she’s alone, usually at night, curled up on the couch with her puppies right beside her. 

Samantha Grasso

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major




  

PA to NJ: Theatre Major, Education Minor Elliot Colahan

Elliot stands in a wooded area on campus.

Today, we speak to PA native Elliot Colahan! Elliot is a sophomore Theatre major with concentrations in Acting, Musical Theatre and Theatre Education with a minor in Education from Malvern, PA. Elliot tells us more about why he chose to cross the bridge over to Jersey.

Elliot posing and standing outside Robinson Hall.

What are some fun off-campus things to do within 20 minutes of Rowan on this side of the bridge?

This is a very “theatre major” answer, but bear with me — I really love going to all the different theatres in the Glassboro area! There are so many different ones close by, and it’s always super cool to see what shows are being performed each year. I also love going to grab a bite to eat before going to see a performance! There are a ton of super cute and fun restaurants nearby, with a special shout-out to The Pop Shop in Collingswood. Looking for some super great pancakes? That’s the place to go!

Why did you choose to leave PA for college?

One of the biggest things I wanted out of college was a new, fresh start. Originally, I hadn’t planned that a different state would be part of that fresh start. In fact, Rowan was one of two colleges on my list that wasn’t in Pennsylvania. But as I did some more research and started to tour colleges and audition at various places, it kinda hit me that there’s something super magical about getting to say you go to school in a completely different place than where you live. At the same time, I’m never too far away from home when I start to miss my mom’s garlic bread or my dad’s movie collection. It’s the perfect mix for me!

Why did you choose Rowan?

I really fell in love with the environment here! I came for a shadow day to see what it was like to be a student in classes, and I had an absolute blast. I met some really amazing people that I’m still close with today, and got to check out some classes that I’m still looking forward to taking in my next few years here. Rowan is truly a second home, and I’m really happy with my choice to come here.

Elliot sitting on a rock outside on campus.

What is one thing about South Jersey that was a happy surprise for you or different than you expected?

I don’t think I ever realized how often people go to the beach around here! Back home, we would always have to plan our beach trips weeks in advance, and make sure we’d have enough time to have a good day at the shore and get back before midnight. Here, people will randomly say “Hey, let’s go to Ocean City!” And then they just do it! It’s so weird to see, but I for one am not complaining about it at all. 

Have you adopted any “Jersey” tendencies?

Hmm, this is a tough one. Nothing that I’m aware of? I’m certainly more aware of New Jersey culture than I was before — specifically that I should never get into an argument about whether Central Jersey exists or not. I’ve also gotten a lot more used to New Jersey traffic over the past year. Crosswalks are now my new best friend, but don’t tell Pennsylvania that.

Elliot smiling and sitting outside on campus.

How has choosing to move out of your hometown area for school benefited you?

Moving to a new state that’s completely separate from my hometown has made me feel very free and open! Everyone in my college life only knows me from here, so I don’t need to think about who I was in middle school, in clubs, in any of that. I’m still myself, but I can be me with a lot less stress. It’s a really wonderful feeling.

What advice do you have for Pennsylvania residents leaving PA to go to school in NJ?

Go into things with as much of an open mind as you can! Some things are going to be identical, and others are going to be bizarrely different. Go with the flow and don’t forget to be you! And yes, Wawa’s still exist in New Jersey, so you’ll be fine.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Healthy New Year’s Suggestions from Health-Related Majors

Close of Hannah's face surrounded by fruit.

As we finally kiss 2020 goodbye, enjoy this advice from our health-related majors on some New Year’s suggestions that can hopefully make 2021 a better year! 

Amanda poses wearing a red dress.
Amanda Murphy

Amanda Murphy, a senior Nutrition major specializing in Exercise Science from Tinton Falls, NJ (Monmouth County) shares a great New Year’s resolution to encourage healthy eating habits. She challenges you to “rely less on convenience foods and more on whole food sources.” Healthy eating is possible on a college campus, you just have to be committed to finding the foods that work for you! 

Erica pulls her hair back, while standing in the woods with a lake behind her.
Erica Walsh

“You only have one life to live – make changes now to help your quality of life later,” says Erica Walsh, a senior Health & Exercise Science major from Somerdale, NJ (Camden County.) She suggests putting your mental health first, getting activity every day and taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Close up of Heather's face and comfy, casual hair.
Heather Tomaselli

Heather Tomaselli, a sophomore Nutrition major with an Honors Concentration from Bound Brook, NJ (Somerset County) challenges you to take the stairs rather than the elevator to promote physical health. “The choices we make now determine our long term health!”

Tyler Weiss poses at a tourist destination, with a city behind him.
Tyler Weiss

“Not only will exercise and a healthy diet improves your physical health, but it will also have a positive impact on your mental health as well.” This advice about the importance of exercise comes from Tyler Weiss, a senior Nutrition major Specialized in Exercise Science from Winfield Park, NJ (Union County.)

Jocelyn holds onto her mustard yellow jacket, looking slightly off to her right. She is wearing blue lipstick.
Jocelyn Reuben

Junior Athletic Training major Jocelyn Reuben from Burlington, NJ (Burlington County) doesn’t drink any soda, unless it’s ginger ale for a stomach ache, and she walks everywhere she goes. She shares that, “Making healthy changes can help you see and carry yourself more confidently.”

Hannah shares a smiling selfie.
Hannah Holzhauer

A few healthy practices that you can try are “Going on walks outside to center yourself, listening to podcasts to motivate and inspire, using art as a form of self-expression.” These are some suggestions from Hannah Holzhauer, a junior from Nutrition major, Dietetics Master Program from Green Township, NJ (Sussex County.) 

Krishna stands leaning on a tree with his hands in the pockets of his hoodie.
Krishna Mansukhani

Although it may be difficult  “you simply can’t buy a bottle of soda and label it ‘self-care’ … you need to actually make the decision to upgrade your life, make it your number one mission to become overall happier, more positive than ever  and take steps every day to get that result.” so “ leave a toxic relationship, say daily positive affirmations, forgive  yourself for past mistakes and try to disconnect from stress by going  for a walk.” These are all great suggestions from Krishna Mansukhani, a senior Health Promotion & Wellness Management major with a minor in Psychology Sports, and Exercise from Sayreville, NJ (Middlesex County.)

Danielle Holroyd shares a selfie taken inside her car.
Danielle Holroyd

Danielle Holroyd, a senior Health Promotion and Wellness Management major from Barrington, NJ (Camden County) shares a few ways she stays healthy while in college. She is committed to “eating healthy, exercising, and keeping up with her school work.”

Caroline Lippincott sits on a Jeep wearing her sorority's t-shirt.
Caroline Lippincott

Caroline Lippincott, a senior Nutrition and Exercise Science major from Columbus, NJ (Burlington County) suggests taking daily walks in the new year to promote physical and mental health. 

Brianna stands arms outstretched mimicking the tree branches behind her.
Brianna De la Cruz

To stay healthy, try to “remember to take breaks. Yes, school is important, but so is mental health.” Brianna De la Cruz, a senior Nutrition and Dietetics major from Hillsborough, NJ (Somerset County) tries to “exercise most days of the week, eat well, and hang out with my roommates to help destress.” 

Haley sits in a chair smiling for a portrait.
Haley Bencivengo

“One small healthy change you can make is taking 10-15 minutes out of your day to meditate. This can help give your mind a break and relieve stress from school and work.” This advice comes from Haley Bencivengo, a sophomore Nutrition major from Hamilton Township, NJ (Mercer County).

Emily looks over her shoulder, with a view of sand, beach and palm trees in the background.
Emily Nicholson

A small, healthy change you can try to make in the new year comes from Emily Nicholson, a sophomore Nutrition major from Turnersville, NJ (Gloucester County). “Instead of sugary coffee every morning, try green tea!”

Sal poses in a tuxedo with brick behind him.
Sal Murphy

In the new year, try “Spending 30 minutes less on electronics to be outside and enjoy the fresh air! This is good for mental health and can also be beneficial to physical health if you decide to go on a walk or perform any physical activity.” This advice comes from Sal Murphy, a senior Health Promotion & Wellness Management major from Gloucester County, NJ. 

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Story by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

Brighter Days Ahead: What Rowan Students Are Looking Forward to with Longer Days

Tree branch covered with snow.

We ask Rowan students what they’re looking forward to after the Winter Solstice!

“I’m looking forward to my bedroom having natural light longer into the day as I find myself more productive with my curtains open and having the sun illuminate my room.” – Tommy Bell, senior, Music Industry major, Brigantine, NJ (Atlantic County)

Keianna taking a selfie.

“I look forward to spending my longer days working and getting in tune with myself. There will include many self-care days, which I highly recommend everyone do. I also plan on spending my days with family and friends that are close to me. This year has been a roller coaster but what I have learned was to appreciate and spend time with the people you love the most, tomorrow is not promised.” Keianna Williams, sophomore, Law & Justice & Political Science major, first-generation college student, Essex County, NJ

Ashley smiling and posing for a picture wearing a pink sweater.

“With longer days ahead, I am looking forward to having more sunlight. It not only means spring is slowly approaching, but it also symbolizes a new beginning and offers a strand of hope. As we gain a little bit of sun each day, surely the levels of productivity and positivity will also increase.” Ashley Chan, sophomore, Communication Studies major, West Windsor, NJ (Mercer County)

Sheridan smiling for a selfie.

“I am looking forward to longer days so I can be more productive and be outside more. Longer days means it is starting to be warmer out, which is my favorite time of the year. ” – Sheridan Kapuscinski, senior, Elementary Education and Liberal Studies dual major, Andover, NJ (Sussex County)

Angelica sitting on the giant chair on Rowans Bunce field while wearing a yellow shirt to match.

“What I’m looking forward to with longer days ahead is being able to take a break from school and relaxing with family and friends. This fall semester has been very difficult and stressful, even more so with the pandemic, so it’s nice to be able to take time for myself and focus on bettering my mental health. I’m excited for the holidays that are coming up and being able to spend quality time with my family. I’m looking forward to sleeping in and having my schedule open to doing anything I want.” – Angelica Petroche, sophomore, Advertising major with a Strategic Communication minor, Maplewood, NJ (Essex County)

“I look forward to being around family and friends who support me and push to succeed at my highest potential. ” – Keshawn Porter, sophomore, Law and Justice major with a Psychology minor, first generation college student, Newark, NJ (Essex County)

Teresa posing for a portrait shot outside the Engineering building.

“I’m looking forward to catching up on some sleep and spending more time with my family.” Teresa Sroczynski, sophomore, Civil Engineering, Bel Air, MD

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Take Control

Marco stands in a wooded section of campus.

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

In a simplistic way, we are all conscious beings. It is what differentiates us from all other life forms and is the reason we can imagine ourselves in a situation before it becomes a reality.

But what happens when our moral guide no longer exists, the voice in our head seizes to separate right from wrong and instead criticizes the very existence of everything.

The authors at PsychAlive view this as the “critical inner voice” and explain it as “a well-integrated pattern of destructive thoughts toward ourselves and others.”

Marco stands in a walking path along campus.

The critical inner voice is often the result of a maladaptive childhood. It is when the child does not meet the adequate necessity of self-recognition, therefore the child’s self-concept begins to match a false perception of what important others think, for example, Mom and Dad. This often leads to the concoction of feelings experienced by the archetypal villain: arrogance, deceit and resentment. But instead of plotting the very destruction of the world, there is an alternative pathway that leads to the halt to the internal destruction within.

According to PsychAlive: “In order to take power over this destructive thought process, you must first become conscious of what your inner voice is telling you so you can stop it from ruining your life. To identify this, it is helpful to pay attention to when you suddenly slip into a bad mood or become upset, often these negative shifts in emotion are a result of a critical inner voice.”

Marco smiles while standing on campus.

Understanding the difference between conscience and the critical inner voice is vital in gaining control over one’s actions, thoughts and behaviors, therefore acquiring the ability to stop and analyze the situation can mean the end to damaging unwanted thought processes. Take control.

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Story by:
Marco Imperiale, sophomore psychology major, Wellness Center intern

Photography by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore public relations and communication studies major

Reference Page 17th, L., 16th, W., 12th, P., 4th, W., 21st, L., 15th, S., . . . 23rd, S. (2018, April 02). The Critical Inner Voice Explained. Retrieved September 16, 2020, from https://www.psychalive.org/critical-inner-voice/

Music To Listen To While Studying, According to 7 Music Majors

Study area with earphones, laptop and notebook.

Need some study music recommendations? Let students from Rowan’s music majors give you some suggestions.

A selfie of Mia.

I really enjoy listening to NCT and Day6 when I study.

They have both nice songs for background music (ballads calm songs) and songs that are upbeat and fun to keep you awake and feel more energized.

How It Was Discovered: I’ve been listening to the K-Pop genre since 2011 so I knew about NCT since they debuted as a group and Day6 was one of the first groups I listened to when I got into the genre.

– Mia Visconti, Freshman, Music Therapy major, Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County)

The Chopin "Ballade no.1 in g minor Op.23" album cover.

Ballade no.1 in g minor Op. 23 by Chopin

Chopin was an amazing romantic composer and pianist whose pieces are very emotional and well written. It is great background music for studying or doing something important. I use it for tests all the time.

How It Was Discovered: From the movie “The Pianist”

– Anthony Jimenez, Freshman, Music Education and Music Performance major, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Samuel smiling for a photo on the Bunce Hall steps.

I suggest listening to Aladdin – Not3s.

This song has a very soothing vibe to help you vibe but still focus, with a little bit of Afro-beat tunes to groove to, very nice to study with.

How It Was Discovered: I discovered this song through the music streaming app AudioMack.

Samuel Poku, Freshman, Music Industry major, Old Bridge, NJ (Middlesex County)

The album cover for "Locket" by Crumb.

Plants – Crumb

It’s not too distracting and it’s soothing to listen to even when you aren’t doing homework.

How It Was Discovered: On my recommended songs in Spotify.

– Katie Alvarez, Sophomore, Music Education major, Passaic, NJ (Passaic County)

Nayyirah smiling for a selfie.

Darlin’ – Tobi Lou

It’s slow and I like his voice.

How It Was Discovered: From a friend

– Nayyirah Wood, Freshman, Music Education major, Philadelphia, Pa

The single cover for "walk but in the garden" by LLusion.

“walk but in the garden” – LLusion

Off the bat, you can recognize the chord progression remains in a major key. The melody has aspects of suspense and resolution, making it pleasing to the ear. A unique aspect about this song is that the melody and chord progression repeat consistently throughout the piece, easily making it uplifting background noise.

How It Was Discovered: I was editing a Spotify playlist of mine, and this song popped up in the recommended songs section. I find a lot of new music through this feature of Spotify’s playlists.

– Arianna Granda, Freshman, Vocal Music Education major, Bantiviglio Honors Concentration, Rockaway, NJ (Morris County)

The Nelson Rangell album cover "Blue."

Sweetest Somebody I Know – Nelson Rangell

The song just has a really chill vibe to it that you can just listen to in the background while doing other things.

– Tyler O’Shaughnessy, Sophomore, Music Education – Instrumental major, Atco, NJ (Camden County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Header photo courtesy of:
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3 Easy Holiday Cookie Recipes College Students Can Make On Campus

Different kinds of cookies in different kinds of shapes.

Today’s story is written by sophomore Communication Studies and Public Relations major Rachel Rumsby from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County). Rachel is an on-campus resident currently living in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Here, she shares with us some of her favorite, easy holiday cookies, and how she makes them in her apartment. 

The holidays are my favorite time of year. There is a special kind of magic, no matter what holiday you celebrate. It fills my heart with joy, love and warmth. This time of year reminds me of cheerful memories with family and friends. It is a time of helping others and enjoying certain traditions. 

One amazing tradition in my family during the holidays is baking. Every year, my mom and I bake cookies and make little bags of them for some of our neighbors. Some of these recipes are super easy to recreate in my apartment. Here are three easy holiday cookie recipes that you can make where you live.

123 Cookies. 123 cookies are one of my favorites, yet easy to make. We call them 123 cookies because there are only three ingredients in them.

You will need: 1 and 1/4 sleeves of graham crackers (count how many are in one sleeve and use 1/4 of that), 1 can of sweetened condensed milk, and 1 1/2 cups of chocolate chips.Ingredients for 123 Cookies.

Directions: 

  1. Put the graham crackers in a plastic bag. Pound them into crumbs.Graham cracker crumbs and a cup. 
  2. Mix all of the ingredients together and pour into a greased, square baking pan.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
  4. Cut into squares.123 Cookies finished product.

Peanut Butter Blossoms. My mom loves this kind of cookie. The Hershey kiss gives it a nice finishing touch, especially for the holidays!

You will need: 1 cup of creamy peanut butter, 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, and Hershey Kisses.Peanut Butter Blossoms ingredients.

Directions:

  1. Warm peanut butter in the microwave for 1 minute, stirring often.
  2. Beat and stir in the egg and sugar, mix well.Peanut Butter Blossom "dough".
  3. Form the “dough” into 1 inch balls and place on a greased cookie sheet, then flatten with a fork.
  4. Bake for 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees.
  5. press Hershey’s kiss into the middle of the cookie while it is still warm.Peanut Butter Blossoms with Hershey's kisses.

Bark. This is another one of my favorites! I love the sweet and salty flavors in this treat. 

You will need: 1 sleeve of saltines, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 bag of milk chocolate chips, 1 stick of butter or margarine, and red and green sugar (optional for the holidays). Ingredients for bark.

Directions:

  1. Lay out the saltines on a greased cookie sheet.
  2. Microwave the butter and sugar together until the butter melts.
  3. Pour over the saltines.
  4. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes or until the saltines are light brown.
  5. Spread the chocolate chips on the saltines, and put them back in the oven for one minute to melt.Bark that is halfway finished.
  6. Spread the melted chocolate over all the saltines, sprinkle on the colored sugar, and refrigerate until it is cold.Bark after it has left the fridge.
  7. Break the bark into pieces.Bark that has been broken into pieces.

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Header photo courtesy of:
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Have You Checked On You Today?

This article is part of a running series with Rowan University’s Wellness Center. This collaboration aims to educate students about personal well-being options. For further updates, follow @RowanUWellness on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

M'yonna sitting on the steps outside the Wellness Center.
Author My’yonna Boyd

The infamous phrase of “Work now, rest later” has been ingrained into everyone’s mind in order to enforce a productive work week. This saying is obsolete and no longer provides the benefits one once thought they reaped.

A constant cycle of working hard with little to no sleep is detrimental to your mental health and overall well-being. When juggling work, school and everything else in between, life becomes increasingly overwhelming.

Achieving such success, sometimes requires our mental health to be put on a back-burner. Granted all your affairs are in order now, but your most important priority, you, has been left compromised. With that said, answer this question: ¨Have you checked on yourself today?¨ 

The question posed may seem silly, but it is essential one is cognizant of their own emotional welfare. Incorporating a weekly mental check-in will help people persevere through many hardships and prompt them to analyze if they’re effectively managing through life or if they have a “survive not thrive mentality” as I like to call it.

People believe the notion that a productive day equates to how much work they´ve completed. Discard this idea! It is unhealthy to think this way because one’s happiness will solely rely on how much they’ve accomplished. This is how the vicious cycle of work now, rest later becomes habitual. Take a time out and find things that help alleviate stress and bring fulfillment. Remember you are one person and will have ample opportunities to reach goals. Be kind to yourself and forgiving when everything does not go as planned. There is always tomorrow.

Here’s two mental health check-in tips Mental Health America says boost well-being.

Practice forgiveness: Even if it’s just forgiving that person who cut you off during your commute. People who forgive have better mental health and report being more satisfied with their lives.

Do your best to enjoy 15 minutes of sunshine: Sunlight synthesizes Vitamin D, which experts believe is a mood elevator.

My'yonna stands outside the Chamberlain Student Center.

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Story by:
My’yonna Boyd, sophomore biological sciences major, Wellness Center intern

Photography by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore public relations and communication studies major

Source: https://www.mhanational.org/31-tips-boost-your-mental-health

Today I am Grateful for…

With the holiday season upon us, we spoke to Rowan students about what they are thankful and grateful for this year. This is what they had to say.

Jenna Fischer, a senior Public Relations major, says she is thankful for her family who supports her in every phase of her life. She says that no matter what dream and goal she has, she knows they will always stand by her side.

Jenna poses with her family.
Jenna (center) and her family.

Chase Shebey, a junior Marketing major, says that he is grateful for all the opportunities that Rowan University has given him.

Chase poses on the intramural field with a rugby ball.

Jessica Newell, a junior Communication Studies major, is grateful for her roommates who remind her that every accomplishment, no matter how small, is to be celebrated and that every problem can be somewhat improved by ordering pizza.

Jessica poses on the side of 301 High Street building.

Mya Calderon, a junior Journalism major, is grateful that she didn’t have to work on Thanksgiving again this year.

Mya sits next to flowers in front of the student center.

Jasmin Jones, a junior Law and Justice Studies and Sociology double major, is grateful for her loved ones and for all the opportunities she has been given. 

Jasmin poses outside of the Rowan Boulevard Apartments.

John McCleery, a sophomore Civil Engineering major, is thankful for his siblings and how close they have become during COVID.

John poses in front of a waterfall wearing a Rowan shirt.

Lianna Johnson, a sophomore Vocal Music Performance major, is thankful to have been able to live on campus so far this semester. She is grateful to see old friends, make some new ones and even have an in-person class!

Lianna poses in front of Mimosa Hall.

Erwin Lopez, a sophomore Health and Exercise Science major, says that he is thankful for his family and the support they give him, especially during these uncertain times. He is also thankful for all of his friends that give him moral support.

Erwin poses in front of some trees.

Nickvens Delva, a freshman Psychology major, is thankful for many things, but he is most thankful for both his family and his health. He says that the most important thing to him is his family, so the health of his family and him during these unusual times is truly the biggest blessing to him.

Nickvens poses in front of Mimosa Hall.

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Story and photos of Chase, Jessica, Mya, Jasmin, Lianna and Nickvens by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photo of Erwin by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Photo of Jenna provided by:
Jenna Fischer, senior public relations major

Photo of John provided by:
John McCleery, sophomore civil engineering major

Header photo courtesy of:
Unsplash

5 Early Childhood Education Majors Share How Their Major Interests Them

College of Education student Cheyenne holds a pennant on campus.

Today, five Early Childhood Education majors tell us why their passion lies in teaching and why their major interests them!

Jordyn posing for a picture in front of a scenic waterfall.

“I’ve always wanted to major in special education. My cousin has Asperger’s Syndrome, a form of ASD. I began working in a special services school district and realized how much I loved doing what I do. Once I fully made my commitment, I transferred to Rowan.” – Jordyn Briner, senior, Early Childhood Education major, Psychology minor, transfer from RCBC, Burlington Twp., NJ (Burlington County)

Cheyenne holding a Rowan flag outside on Rowan's campus.

“I knew I wanted to be a teacher when I began working in a daycare center and felt like I was in the right place. It was then that I wanted to learn more about this field.” – Cheyenne Smith, senior, Early Childhood Education major with a Africana Studies and American Studies dual minor, transfer from Camden County College, Somerdale, NJ (Camden County)

Alicia posing for a selfie.

“I’ve always been interested in early childhood education!” – Alicia Bramble, junior, first-generation college student, Early Childhood Education major, transfer from Camden County College, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Tyra sitting on a yellow bench on Rowans campus.

“For my whole life, I have been surrounded by early childhood education from my mother. After babysitting and looking after my neighbors and friends, I fell in love with helping children learn.” – Tyra McCombs, sophomore, Early Childhood Education and Liberal Studies major, Swedesboro, NJ (Gloucester County)

Grace posing for a photo outside Robinson Hall.

“I have known I wanted to be a teacher since I was very little. I would always play ‘teacher’ in my basement and would write on the walls as if it was a classroom.” – Grace Badillo, senior, Early Childhood Education and Literacy Studies major, Orangeburg, NY (Rockland County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos not submitted by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Five Reasons the Rowan Boulevard Apartments are Great

View of the Rowan Boulevard Apartments from the courtyard.

The Rowan Boulevard Apartments (RoBo) are upperclassmen dorms. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors can live there. Here are five reasons why students love living there.

1. The rooms. Quintin Stinney says he was pleasantly surprised by the size of the rooms. He is a transfer student, and he says the rooms in RoBo are larger than those at his previous college.

Erwin Lopez, another resident, loves that he, and everyone else in RoBo, is able to have their own rooms while still having the “college experience.”

Quintin poses outside of RoBo.
Quintin Stinney

2. The community. Jasmin Jones, an RA at RoBo, says the community in RoBo, especially the staff, is great. She says that RoBo probably has the most diverse group of students living on campus. Everyone always says “Hi” and holds the door for each other.

Jasmin Jones poses outside of RoBo.
Jasmin Jones

3. Living in an apartment. Jasmin also says she likes being able to live in an apartment instead of a dorm room. Jon Colon, another RA in RoBo, speaks about this further.

“I like living at RoBo because it really does encapsulate what being an adult is. Getting up in the morning, making my own breakfast, and leaving my apartment in the morning to just go outside and live my life feels so surreal,” Jon says.

Apartment living definitely feels more like being an adult rather than living in a dorm. 

Jon Colon poses outside of RoBo.
Jon Colon

4. The windows. Leeranie Vazquez loves that the window screens open up all the way. She says that this is great, especially because she lives on the first floor.

Leeranie Vazquez poses outside of RoBo.
Leeranie Vazquez

5. The proximity to Rowan Boulevard. Erwin Lopez likes that RoBo is so close to Rowan Boulevard. Jon Colon also likes that RoBo is so close to the restaurants, stores and common areas on Rowan Boulevard.

Erwin Lopez poses outside of RoBo
Erwin Lopez

Check out the Rowan Boulevard Apartments here:

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Story and photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

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What is Rowan Boulevard?

20 Minute Radius: 7 Delicious Coffee Stops

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PA to NJ: 7 Pennsylvanians Share If They’ve Adopted Any “Jersey” Tendencies

Exterior shot of Kailey Booth sitting on campus.

Today, 7 Pennsylvania native students reveal what New Jersey sayings, mannerisms or other traits — if any — have rubbed off on them. 

Delaney posing outside the Campbell Library on campus.

I think I’ve picked up a little bit of the South Jersey accent. I’ve started saying “caw-fee” instead of coffee. Also, I miss being able to order pork roll whenever I go home. – Delaney Molnar, senior Theatre major with concentrations in Musical Theatre and Acting and a Spanish minor from Pittsburgh, PA

Kendall posing for a picture in a green shirt.

I’m originally from Jersey, so I always have it! – Kendall White, senior in  Applied Sociology, Lumberton/Burlington, PA

Daniella posing outside Robinson and Wilson Hall on campus.

No way PA wins in this! – Daniella Emrich, sophomore, Elementary Education and History major from West Chester, PA

Brendan posing outside the Engineering building.

I’ve started calling it “pork roll.” – Brendan McGrath, junior Mechanical Engineering major with a concentration in Automotive Engineering from West Chester, PA

Kailey sitting on the Rohrer College of Business outdoor steps.

Pork roll, egg and cheese and cheesesteaks. – Kailey Booth, senior Marketing major from Easton, PA

Lindsay posing outside Holly Pointe Commons.

No, I think the Taylor ham/pork roll debate is as stupid as PA’s Wawa/Sheetz debate! – Lindsay Tobias, junior, Radio/TV/Film and Creative Writing major from Wayne, PA

Haley posing for a selfie.

I’ve gotten a slight accent! – Haley DiMezza, senior, Music Industry major with a specialization in Music Business, transfer from Chestnut Hill College and Des Moines Area Community College, from Montgomery County, PA

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos not submitted by students taken by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

9 Elementary Education Majors Share What Excites Them About Their Major

Elementary education student poses outside on campus.

Just what excites Rowan’s Elementary Education majors about their program? Today, 9 majors from five counties reveal their answers for Rowan Blog. 

Sandra posing with her graduation cap that says "Ms.Dominguez".

“The thing that excites me the most about my 2 CUGS is being able to create a welcoming and supportive environment for my students. It makes me happy to know that I will be able to value their culture and language in a way that they might have not experienced before. I also enjoy teaching others about the value of emergent bilinguals and how to better support them in all types of settings.” – Sandra Dominguez, senior, Elementary Education major with dual majors in English & Writing Arts, CUGS in Bilingual Education and ESL, Transfer from RCBC, Willingboro, NJ (Burlington County)

TJ sitting on a bench outside on campus.

“What excites me most is being able to go back and teach in my hometown in Camden.” – TJ Jones, senior, Elementary Education and Liberal Studies Major and Writing Arts and American Studies minor, transfer from Camden County College, Camden, NJ (Camden County)

Sara sitting with her family on the steps of Bunce Hall.

“Being able to inspire others to reach their goals, just as I have. I am a first-generation student who was considered an “at risk” student. My parents were immigrants from Mexico who had no education and worked as field workers trying to survive and support their family of ten. I was an emergent bilingual learner and struggled with my academics and had no support at home. School was challenging for me, and I now know how to help other students who share the same background as I did. I want to support them in their journey in school and help them set high goals and achieve them.” – Sara Giron, senior, first-generation, transfer from Cumberland County College, Elementary Education and Literacy Studies major, Bilingual CUGS, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Tyler sitting outside Wilson Hall.

“Field Experience. There is nothing I love more than being in a classroom and working with students. It is a great change of scenery from a typical college class and I get to learn directly from my experiences.” – Tyler Davis, senior, First-generation, Elementary Education major with a minor in American Studies, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County)

Catherine posing for a picture on a boat dock.

“I love feeling like I have all of the knowledge to support and understand the people I am surrounded by. This CUGS program gives me the tools to actually be able to support future emergent bilingual students with real, substantial tools and suggestions instead of just basic “support” that doesn’t always help as much as it could be.” – Catherine Klinger, sophomore, Elementary Education and Literacy Studies major, Moorestown, NJ (Camden County)

Michael posing for a photo outside on campus.

“I’m excited to take courses pertaining to instruction, specifically, my choice of CUGS, which is ESL education. To gain the knowledge to teach ESL students excites me!” – Michael Keser, junior, first-generation, Elementary Education major, transfer from RCSJ at Cumberland Campus, Vineland, NJ (Cumberland County)

Cameron posing for a photo outside on campus.

“The idea of meeting both students and their families and being one of the biggest factors in the beginning stages of their lives. There are many challenges that are presented to kids during the course of their educational careers, but for some, it is more diverse and harder than others. Some have special needs and special experiences in which they can bring valuable perspective to the table. I was one of the kids. I have Auditory Processing Disorder, so I know the ins and outs of both the 504 and IEP experiences. I know where especially these kids are, and their challenges that both they and their parents may be still trying to explore together. I have been in their shoes, and I can easily relate to them and derive strategies that can work for everyone.” – Cameron Dubrow, senior, first-generation, transfer from Camden County College, Elementary Education and Writing Arts major from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County)

Ashley posing for a photo outside on campus.

“The incredible sense of community! I formed a Rowan family of preservice teachers once I completed my general education courses and moved into core classes. We’ve been able to lean on each other through coursework, Praxis test prep, and the student teaching process. Education is truly a major that will make you feel at home.” – Ashley Mosley, junior, Elementary Education and Literacy Studies (Salem County)

Cait posing for a photo at the Sugar Factory restaurant.

“I’m most excited about being able to teach and also helping kids grow.” – Cait Braun, Sophomore, Elementary Inclusive Education with a minor in Psychology, Hammonton, NJ (Atlantic County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography, if not provided, taken by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

My First Apartment: Rachel Rumsby in Rowan Boulevard Apartments

Exterior shot of Rowan Boulevard Apartments.

Today we feature sophomore Communication Studies and Public Relations major Rachel Rumsby from River Edge, NJ (Bergen County). Rachel is an on-campus resident currently living in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Here, she shares with us her experience living in an apartment for the first time.

Rachel in her kitchen in her apartment.
Author Rachel in her Rowan Boulevard Apartments kitchen.

Before I lived in an apartment at Rowan, I visited my friends at theirs. I got to see what it was like to have a kitchen and living room on campus, and not just a dorm room. This taste of life with a common area made me excited to live in one of my own. This year, I was finally able to live in my first apartment. 

Even though I picked housing in the sophomore housing round, I was still able to get a room in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. I love the set up of the kitchen and living room, and I especially love having my own room. It is great to have my own space, even though I am living with three other girls. The residences are set up with four single rooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen, and a living room. 

Rachel sits in her bed at the Rowan Boulevard Apartments.

Living in Mimosa Hall last year, I did not have my own kitchen or living room areas. It is really nice to be able to cook whenever I want since I have the 10 meals a week meal plan! I also love having the extra space in the living room to hang out with my roommates, do homework or just chill. Having air conditioning and a thermostat in my apartment is also a welcome amenity. 

Moving into my first apartment, there were a lot of things I needed that I did not need in my dorm room in Mimosa. I needed pots and pans, utensils, plates and cups, and more kitchen supplies. My roommates brought a toaster oven and a microwave, and I brought a blender. Since I am in upperclassmen housing now, I am allowed to have kitchen appliances! 

Before moving into my accommodation, I was worried about whether or not my roommates and I would get along. Turns out, I had nothing to worry about! I randomly selected two of my roommates and my third roommate is my friend that I met last year in the Crew Club Team. We all get along great, and we communicate well with each other. Everyone is very easy going, and we feel comfortable discussing household conditions.

Our RA met with us to establish a roommate agreement, and the process was very smooth. Each of us having our own rooms made the process a lot easier. We all agreed that we should keep our common area clean and do our part in cleaning. 

Exterior shot of Rowan Boulevard Apartments.

All in all, living in my first apartment has been great so far! I have been able to cook, and I have my own room! My roommates are awesome, and I feel like I have more independence than I did while living in Mimosa. I love living in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments! 

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Story and interior photos by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Exterior photos by:
Anthony Raisley, senior history major

9 Radio/TV/Film Majors Share How Their Major Supports Their Professional Goals

Today, we speak with 9 Radio/TV/Film (RTF) majors on how their major will advance their future careers. 

Lauren smiling and posing for a photo.

“This major supports my professional goals because it helps me succeed in my field and prepared me for when I go into the professional scene.” – Lauren Kilroy, senior, transfer, RTF major from Cinnaminson, NJ (Burlington County)

Jabreeah posing for a selfie.

“It teaches me all about the behind the scenes work in movies.” – Jabreeah Holmes, senior, RTF major from Camden, NJ (Camden County)

Emily smiling and posing for a selfie.

“It supports my professional goals because I already know hands-down I want to be a part of the television industry. I’ve already started floating possible job ideas in my head once I graduate Rowan. I am also taking a minor in advertising just in case I want to apply my RTF skills in a more commercial type of way. The fact is there are so many job opportunities with this major it’s still hard to know which one you will wind up taking once you graduate!” – Emily Sayles, sophomore, RTF major, Advertising minor from Somerdale, NJ (Camden County)

Jerry posing for a picture while wearing sunglasses.

“It teaches me a lot about the industry and how to get my foot in the door.” – Jerry Libert, junior, transfer, first-generation college student, RTF major and Creative Writing minor from Beachwood, NJ (Ocean County)

Corey posing for a selfie.

“It teaches me about the process of making films, television, and radio which allows me to see what things I like about each. It gives me access to equipment I can use to make my own projects.” – Corey Peoples, senior, transfer from RCGC, RTF major from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County)

Julia smiling and posing for a selfie in front of a world map.

“This major teaches me the skills I will need to get into the industry. By educating us on Radio, Tv, and Film, we are able to get our foot in the door easier because we have so many skill sets.” – Julia Faupel, junior, transfer, RTF major, Theatre minor from Collingswood, NJ (Camden County)

Ally smiling and hugging an orange cat.

“It helps me to get into NASCAR or the NFL to pursue the career I want.” –  Ally Bruce, freshman, RTF major from Woolwich Twp., NJ (Gloucester County)

Gary smiling for a photo while wearing headphones.

“I learn from a lot of people who i respect and are professionals in my desired fields.” – Gary Erdelyi, senior, first-generation college student, RTF and Journalism major from Brick, NJ (Ocean County)

A picture of a flyer of a production written by Joe.

“I want to be a screenwriter, and the classes have helped me learn more about the craft while Cinema Workshop has given me real life experience in writing for the screen.” – Joe Pidgeon, junior, transfer, RTF major and Creative Writing minor from Swedesboro, NJ (Gloucester County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

8 Chemical Engineering Majors Share the WOW Moment in Their Majors

Chemical engineering student works in lab.

Today, eight Chemical Engineering majors share their “WOW! I’m in the right major for me!” moments.

Dylan sitting on the steps of the engineering building.

“Well, it turned out my physics teacher was right. Most of everything that I’ve learned is intuitive to me, whether it is in engineering or chemistry. Quite honestly, I catch myself accidentally memorizing equations and information before I go to study.” – Dylan Snyder, sophomore Chemical Engineering major from Wilmington, Delaware

Tori posing with a sign that says "AlChe".

“Once I visited Rowan and heard about the program I knew it was right for me.” – Tori Vanduren, senior Chemical Engineering major from Kutztown, PA

Margot smiling and wearing lab gear.

“Learning about how the healthcare industry and engineering can intersect in a chemical engineer’s career fascinated me.” – Margot Clarke, senior, Chemical Engineering major with a concentration in Biomedical Engineering and Honors Studies, minor in Chemistry, and CUGS in Spanish, from Delran, NJ (Burlington County)

Alyssa posing in a scenic area on a bridge.

“I love science and math.” – Alyssa Grassie, senior, first-generation, Chemical Engineering major and Mathematics minor, Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

A black and white photo of Jenna smiling.

“I knew this was the right major for me by making friends in my major that love and get excited about the same weird things as me. Just when you walk outside and the humidity makes you think about the topics discussed in class, your mind goes on a tangent, and then you stop yourself (and think ‘Wow I am weird’). But the next day a friend tells you how they did a similar thing. When that happens, it just makes you feel understood and at home.” – Jenna Wyshinski, Senior, Chemical Engineering major with a minor in Business Administration, from Pennsville, NJ (Salem County)

Courtney posing with a Rowan shirt inside the Wilson Hall building.

“Sophomore year, I had the opportunity to work as a research assistant in Dr. Stanzione’s lab. Getting to experience so many applications of chemical engineering and material synthesis was such a cool experience and made me realize that I am right where I am supposed to be.” – Courtney Lemasney, junior, Chemical Engineering major, Sicklerville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Rebecca sitting and smiling on the floor.

“When I started taking classes my freshman year and genuinely enjoyed what I was learning.” – Rebecca Hansson, senior Chemical Engineering major from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

A chemical engineering lab.

“Actually making alum in chem lab.” – Evan Harper (not pictured), sophomore Chemical Engineering major working toward minors in Chemistry and Mathematics, Bridgewater, NJ (Somerset County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Prof Style: Computer Science Major Matthew Kresge Shows Off His Colorful Hair

Today, we feature sophomore Matthew Kresge, a Computer Science major with a minor in Mathematics from Douglasville, PA. Matthew tells us more about his fashionable hairstyle.

Matthew smiles while wearing a mask.

Why Rowan?

Honestly, I knew I wanted to go a little bit away from home. I kind of wanted to go to a school that I knew a lot of classmates weren’t going to go to, so I thought this would be the right school for me.

What did you use to get your hair color?

 I use Arctic Fox for my hair. 

How did you decide on the color?

So, when I first dyed it, I bleached my hair because it was a brown. It turned blonde, then when I dyed it again, it turned into a darker blue. This is like two weeks of fading so it turned into this shade of green! At first, my parents were very hesitant to let me dye my hair, but now they don’t really care.

Have you dyed your hair before?

Before this, I dyed my hair red, like a very bright red, and then it faded into orange.

Profile shot of Matthew's hair while wearing a mask.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

5 Accounting and Finance Majors Tell Us Their WOW Moment in Their Majors

Exterior shot of Business Hall.

Today, five Accounting and Finance majors from the Rohrer College of Business reveal that magic moment they discovered their major was clearly the right fit. 

Matt smiling for a photo while wearing a suit.

“My ‘WOW’ moment was when I was looking at job opportunities that I can try to get with my major/experience.” – Matt Cangemi, senior, Finance major and Economics minor from Hunterdon County

David smiling while wearing a suit.

“The moment I realized that I could apply what I’m learning in the class room into my daily life of trading and running a business, I knew I was in the right major.” – David Nicolas, senior, first-generation college student and accounting major, Trenton, NJ (Mercer County)

Brian (left) posing with his two friends
Brian (left) posing with two friends.

“You’ll know you’re in the right major when you meet people outside the classroom who are just like you only to later find out they’re also finance majors. People who care about finance and economics generally tend to gravitate towards each other.” – Brian Vechesky, senior, transfer from Rowan College of South Jersey, Finance major from Burlington, NJ (Burlington County)

Jonathan smiling outside Business Hall.

“This major was the right major for me in the beginning because I knew that Rowan had an awesome business college, and the amount of networking events that they offer here is invaluable.” – Jonathan Phan, sophomore, Accounting major and Management Information Systems major, commuter from Mullica Hill, NJ (Gloucester County)

Matthew standing next to an "Intern Day" sign.

“Throughout my first classes each topic sparked my interest. I fell in love with accounting ever since I switched majors.” – Matthew Knox, senior, Accounting major, South River, NJ (Middlesex County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

#PROFspective: Music Education Major Austin Kurbansade

Austin sitting outside on stairs.

Today we feature Austin Kurbansade, a sophomore Vocal Music Education major from Roxbury Township, NJ (Morris County). He is an on-campus resident and is involved in the National Association of Music Education, American Choral Directors Association and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He tells us today about his student experience and how connected he has felt at Rowan. […]

3 Sports Communication and Media Majors Share Why They Became Interested in Their Major

Center field at Wackar Stadium.

“This major combined my two biggest passions: sports and cameras. I’ve always been a huge sports fan, and I’ve always known I wanted to work in sports. During high school I knew I wanted to work around cameras doing photo/videography. So, when I found out about Sports CAM at Rowan, it was the perfect match.” […]

#PROFspective: Sophomore Health and Exercise Science Major Erwin Lopez

Erwin sits outside Science Hall.

Today we feature Erwin Lopez, a sophomore Health and Exercise Science major from East Windsor, NJ (Mercer County). Erwin, a first-generation college student, lives on campus in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. He’s a member of the Pre Physician Assistant ClubCrew Club Team and the Exercise is Medicine Club, for which he’s Fundraising Chair. Erwin also works for the Office of Orientation and Student Leadership Programs

Erwin stands on a footbridge wearing a Rowan t-shirt.

Why did you choose your major?

I chose Health and Exercise Science as my major because at first, I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do. I knew I wanted to go to graduate school, and I knew I wanted to be part of a health-related field. Health and Exercise Science gave me a broader spectrum of things that I can do, such as medical school or PA school or PT and OT, and so on. 

What would you share with a future student interested in your major?

The major is fun and you can do a lot with it. It is very versatile and there isn’t only one thing you have to do with it. It is very flexible in regard to what you can do with it.

Erwin stands in front of a brick wall with his "Profs" mask on.

How does your field impact the world? 

It’s helping people, no matter what field you go into after completing the Health and Exercise Science program. No matter what you do with it, there’s always going be that aspect of helping people and providing a service to people. 

Erwin stands outside wearing a Rowan t-shirt.

Have you had any professors that you felt really cared about your wellbeing? 

This isn’t major-specific, but my College Composition professor, Professor Mandi Dorrell, was a really great professor. She understood that you’re also a person and not just a student. She was very helpful and understanding of people’s problems. She was very caring in that aspect. 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

9 Biomedical Art & Visualization Majors Tell Us Why Their Major Excites Them

Biomedical Art and Visualization student draws for a project.

From new mediums to emerging technologies, 9 Edelman College of Communication & Creative Arts students in the Biomedical Art & Visualization program share why they are passionate about their major. 

Isaiah holding a dog in the middle of a flower field.

“Learning new techniques and nuances of drawing and illustration that I was entirely unaware of prior. That and the steady and consistent addition of new mediums to explore and develop skills with.” – Isaiah Reese, senior, first-generation college student, Biomedical Art and Visualization major with a Biology minor from Newton, NJ (Sussex County)

Rose sitting at a table filled with Rowan souvenirs.

“I love that I’m getting a great education in the sciences and methods of educating others, while also still be held to the esteem of a studio artist. Though I’m not a studio art major, I’ve still been taught all of the same skills you would expect a studio art major to have. This way I can make beautiful anatomical and scientific drawings as well as traditional fine art.” – Rose Price, senior, first-generation college student and Biomedical Art Visualization major with a minor in Biology, Sicklerville NJ (Gloucester County)

Terry posing in a portrait photo.

“The BMAV program is much more diverse than you would expect. Students are able to choose their topic of choice to research and to build their portfolio. There might be a student who enjoys studying scientific processes next to you and another student who likes exploring prosthetics on your other side. A student sitting across from you might like studying animals and another likes examining medical conditions. I am never bored in class because there is always something interesting to learn and do. Everyday is exciting and worthwhile.” – Terry Nguyen, junior, majors in Biomedical Art and Visualization and Music, Pre-medical minor from Moorestown, NJ (Burlington County)

Mariele smiling outside wearing a drawstring backpack.

“The atmosphere in our major is what excites me most. We are a small family, so we support each other. We all have our different interests and learn from each other as well.” – Mariele Ford, junior Biomedical Art Visualization major with a minor in Biology, Brigantine, NJ (Atlantic County)

Hannah holding a her associate degree diploma.

The future of my possibilities [is] in the arts.” – Hannah Knight, senior, transfer, first-generation college student and Biomedical Art and Visualization major with a minor in Art History and an associate degree in Biology from Medford, NJ (Burlington County)

Sofia sitting and smiling wearing glasses and earphones.

“The thing that excites me the most about my major is the ability to portray what I want while it’s still very informational and well-researched. Creating infographics about animals or plants is definitely what captivates me the most. But not only that, but the ability to also use newer technologies such as 3D modeling and even a chance to experiment with VR excite me to no end!” – Sofia Monaco, junior Biomedical Art and Visualization, CUGS in Game Media Design from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County)

Diana posing for a selfie wearing glasses and a pink sweatshirt.

“All the possible choices I will have for jobs in the near future and the fact that you build your own way.” – Diana Lahr, sophomore, first-generation college student and Biomedical Art and Visualization major from Elmer, NJ (Salem County)

Harley sitting outside and smiling.

“I am excited to learn more about the anatomy of humans as well as plants and animals along with how to properly illustrate and explain them. I am also excited to be able to communicate these aspects of life with others.” – Harley Modestowicz, sophomore Biomedical Art and Visualization major, Franklinville, NJ (Gloucester County)

Veronica posing and smiling on a stair case.

“What excites me most about Biomedical Art is how much I realize I’m being prepared for my future. I feel as if all my classes are geared toward strengthening my talents as an artist and creating artwork just as I would when dealing with clients in the future.” – Veronica Cava, junior Biomedical Art and Visualization major, Marlton, NJ (Burlington County)

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Psychology Major, Admissions Student Worker Latifah Tilus Tells Us About Work-Life Balance

Latifa sitting in the admissions office.

Today, we speak with Latifah Tilus, a sophomore Psychology major from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County). She’s an on-campus resident who lives in 220 Rowan Boulevard Apartments and works as an admissions assistant in Rowan’s Admissions office. She tells us more about how she started working for Admissions and how she maintains a work-life balance.

“I like everything about this job! I really love it,” Latifah says. “I enjoy helping people when they’re applying or helping people when they come to the desk. Even though a lot of people aren’t coming in right now because of COVID and everything, I really like helping people out.” 

Latifah has worked in the Admissions office for a year. She says she heard about the position from her professor in her Rowan 101 course and decided to apply. Luckily, she got the job and has loved it ever since.

Latifa sitting in the admissions office wearing a mask that says "Profs" on it.

“I feel like this is a great job to have because I’m learning a lot of clerical [skills], and I get experience for any other jobs I would want in the future. I’ve never had a job before this, so I think this is a great first job to get!” Latifah says. 

When she’s not greeting people at the desk or helping out students with their applications, Latifah answers questions through the chat box on the Admissions site and assists with Rowan’s text system.

When asked about the best part of the job, Latifah says: “It’s a pretty easy position to have, as long as you do what you’re supposed to and show up on time! I also really like my coworkers. I don’t see them much because we all have different hours right now, but I really enjoy seeing them.” 

Latifah hopes to become a therapist in her post-grad future so she can continue to help others. “I want to help people with their mental health. I’ve been through some stuff, and I want to help people get through things too,” she says. 

Latifah left us with some words of advice and why she finds it helpful to have a job while being a student. 

“It’s really beneficial to have money while you’re in school. I’m paying off my interest while I’m in school! That’s where my money goes to.”

Latifa sitting at the front desk of the admissions office.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photography by:
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Advice from the Joes of Rowan

Exterior shot of Joe in a black hoodie

Ten Joes of different majors and eight counties share their advice for incoming and current Rowan students. 

“Study more than you sleep, sleep more than you have fun, and have as much fun as possible.” – Joe Gummere, senior Mechanical Engineering major from Vernon, NJ (Sussex County, pictured above)

Joe Frascella standing outside in front of trees.
Joe Frascella

“You’re going to fall down. College is humbling for many people, you just have to be willing to accept the lessons you gain and learn from them.” – Joe Frascella, senior Communication Studies major from Hightstown, NJ (Mercer County)

Joe Gentempo sitting under an umbrella with a drink.
Joe Gentempo

“Don’t over stress but don’t under stress. Take it easy and just get assignments done on time. It also helps immensely to befriend your professor[s].” – Joe Gentempo, senior Art major from Middletown, NJ (Monmouth County)

Joe D'Intino playing ultimate frisbee.
Joe D’Intino playing ultimate frisbee.

“Put yourself out there, try something new. I know going in I was really quiet and shy. Then I found the best on-campus job (Rec Center), became a part of a sport club (Ultimate Frisbee) and now I’m president of the organization.” – First-generation college student, Joe D’Intino, junior Chemical Engineering student from Medford, NJ (Burlington County)

Headshot of Joe Kayal
Joe Kayal

“Be open to making new friends at any time and in any place, this will lead you to try new things and join new clubs.” – sophomore Joe Kayal, Civil Engineering major from Mahwah, NJ (Bergen County)

Joe Sansone standing next to a woman holding pink raffle tickets.
Joe Sansone

“My advice would be to never compare yourself to anyone and never be discouraged by a missed opportunity. Take your life in college day by day, set goals and never be afraid to lean on your peers/professors for support.” – Joe Sansone, senior Business Management and Marketing major from Howell, NJ (Monmouth County) 

Joseph Breymeier standing in sunlight looking down at his phone.
Joseph Breymeier

“Making friends is scary for EVERYONE. Don’t be afraid to ask to sit with strangers. You may just get a best friend out of it! The advisors at Rowan are invaluable resources. Ask them for information on clubs the campus offers and show up. The busier you are, the better your college experience.” – Joseph Breymeier, MBA student from Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County)

Joe Carriero is playing Hockey.
Joe Carriero

“The best thing that you can do is get involved! In spite of the current situation, Rowan is still offering plenty of clubs and activities that are easy to join and give you a great way to meet new friends and feel more comfortable with taking this big step in your life. I was nervous about going to Rowan and not knowing many people, but once I joined the Roller Hockey Club, I felt right at home!” – Joe Carriero, sophomore Finance major from Swedesboro, NJ (Gloucester County)

Joe Hunt taking a selfie.
Joe Hunt

“Don’t play it safe with choosing your major. I used to be a Bio major because it was the ‘safe’ option. The only problem with that was … I hate biology. I love movies, writing and storytelling. So I picked a major that reflects my passions. When I enter my career field, I’ll get a job that I enjoy, and not just make money at; and if you enjoy your job you’re not really ‘working,’ are you? Do what you love, and good luck, class of 2024.” – First-generation college student Joe Hunt, senior Radio/TV/Film (RTF) major from Audubon, NJ (Camden County)

Joe Hammer standing with two friends.
Joe Hammer (right)

“Be outgoing and make friends in your major! You will be in the same classes a lot and getting to know them will help with homework, studying and making your classes enjoyable. A friend that I met on my first day at Rowan ended up being my roommate senior year. Maintain a balanced workload by taking an easy or fun class each semester. If you think you are overdoing it, it’s okay to drop a class; summer classes helped me stay on pace.” – M.S. in Computer Science major Joe Hammer from Toms River, NJ (Ocean County)

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Header photo: Joe Gummere, senior mechanical engineering major

Story by: 
Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

Sophomore Reflects: Musical Theatre and Public Relations Double Major Erica Gerold

Erica sitting with friends on the Bunce Steps

Meet sophomore Erica Gerold, a Musical Theatre and Public Relations double major from Philadelphia. She’s also an on-campus resident who resided in Magnolia Hall this past year. Erica tells us more about what she enjoyed most about her first year at Rowan and shares advice for future freshmen.

Erica sitting with friends on the Bunce Hall steps.
Erica sitting with her roommates (from left to right: Mattie Millet, Hannah Kittrell, Erica Gerold and Emilia Weiss).

What did you most enjoy your freshman year at Rowan?Erica taking a selfie.

Something I enjoyed most here at Rowan were the amount of on-campus artistic opportunities I was able to have as a freshman! This past year I have been in directing scenes, written/done voiceover work at the art exhibit, “The Sister Chapel,” performed in our annual Holiday Celebration, “The Vagina Monologues,” devised cabaret “(di$) conn3cT*d” and “Urinetown: The Musical.” I have made amazing friends through our college and learned so much through its chances to create. I truly do not think I would be happier anywhere else.

Could you share with us one happy moment you had with friends, professors or other members of the Rowan community that made you realize Rowan felt like “home”?

Among many things I am beyond grateful to have been involved in this school year, the first that made me feel at home was rehearsing “(di$) conn3cT*d.” I was cast within my first month of moving to college when unfamiliarity was around every corner. Right away not only were the cast/creative team eager to hear the ideas of us freshmen, they were eager to make us feel welcome. I became so close with the people involved with that production, including my new best friend Elliot Colahan. The support the people of Rowan (my profs and classmates alike) have for us is nothing like I have seen anywhere else. Especially as a freshman, their care for me and the rest of my peers filled me with motivation and happiness. They make me feel lucky to be a part of this community.

Erica alongside the cast of a production called The Vagina Monologues.
Erica alongside the cast of The Vagina Monologues (directed by Robin Purtell and Chelsea Sharp, 2020).

What advice do you have for future freshmen looking at colleges right now?

Shadow! Leading up to College Decision Day, I actually had my mind set on committing to a different school. Once your choices are narrowed down, seeing a day in the life of your options really puts things into perspective. Once I shadowed my now dear friend Marisa Pelikan, the decision could not have been clearer that Rowan was the right fit for me (note: If you cannot shadow due to COVID-19, research schools to the best of your online abilities. Also, do not be afraid to reach out to their current students/profs!).

What are you most looking forward to next year at Rowan?

I am most looking forward to honing my skills as a double major! I currently combine my passions of PR and theatre as a member of the social media team for RUTD, a publicity officer for our Lab Theatre organization and the creator/writer for my school blog highlighting the Rowan University Department of Theatre & Dance, RUTDInsider. All of that being said, Public Relations students typically do not start taking major-based classes until their sophomore year. This fall I will be taking three of those classes and I am super excited to put all forthcoming knowledge into my current projects. I will be the first to admit learning/creating in the upcoming school year will be difficult due to the coronavirus, but I hope to push forward in making it happen any way I can.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos provided by:
Erica Gerold

TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Meet Music Industry Major Stephanie Batista

Stephanie at Wilson Hall with greenery and flowers

Stephanie posing in front of the Campbell libraryMeet Stephanie Batista (she/her/hers), a transfer Music Industry major from Toms River, New Jersey (Ocean County). She will graduate with the Rowan Class of 2023. She tells us a little more about herself and why she chose Rowan!

What is one goal you have this semester?

To make friends despite difficulties with Covid and online classes. 

Why did you choose your major? 

I am a Music Industry major with a concentration in Business. It was something I knew I would be very happy doing and it would never feel like work because I love it. 

What are you most excited for this semester?

 I am most excited for the live shows. 

What club/activity do you want to join on campus?

I want to join the Rowan Alternative Music Club!

Why Rowan?

Rowan has a great music scene and is very close to Philadelphia.

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Story and photos by:
Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major 



Sophomore Reflects: Navya Kunigal Shares Tips and Her Top 5 Reasons She Chose Rowan

Rowan Boulevard at night.

Today we feature Navya Kunigal, a rising sophomore Community Health major from Hillsborough, New Jersey (Somerset County). Here, Navya writes about her on-campus, first-year experience and gives future Profs her best Rowan tips. 

As a freshman, I lived in Chestnut Hall, and I loved it! It is a wonderful dorm with so many wonderful people. I lived in a double by myself there.

Community Health major Navya poses in a Rowan shirt.

Get involved. I am [involved] on Rowan’s campus in so many different ways. I’m a member of the National Wellness Institute (NWI) (Rowan Student Chapter) and the Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC).

I am also part of the Get Fit program that the Health and Exercise department manages. Get Fit is a program where we help people with intellectual and learning disabilities and work with them to benefit their health. It is such a rewarding experience. I look forward to this every day of the week.

I am usually quite occupied on campus. When you get involved in stuff, you will never be bored, every day will be a new adventure.

Where to go when you first arrive on campus. When I first came to Rowan, I had no friends. The Chamberlain Student Center is a great place to meet people. Try to have a friend in every class so you have an additional resource other than the professor.

Rowan After Hours (RAH) is how I made most of my friends. Rowan After Hours has night activities every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night. Activities include cooking, arts and crafts, dancing and a food bar. Sometimes we play video games too. It is really fun, and it is such an easy and cool way to meet new people. Definitely, go to RAH!! 

Navya poses at a table at a restaurant.

Check out Rowan Boulevard! They have delicious restaurants and really cool places to visit. There are a lot of jobs on Rowan Boulevard as well. It is a really cool place to spend your time. 

The Rec Center has something for everyone. Yoga, Zumba, Pilates, you name it! They got it! I go to yoga there once in a while, and they have so many different levels and types of yoga. I go to beginner yoga and it is so calming. It releases so much stress for me. Definitely go to the Rec Center when you have a chance!

Advice for choosing a major: It’s okay to be undecided (Exploratory Studies) when you go to college! Rowan gives you a chance to explore and find what you’re good at. Always consult with your advisor before choosing a major. They can help you narrow down your choices. 

Moving in tips (do’s and don’ts): Moving into campus can be confusing, here is what to bring and what not to bring. 

  1. Enough clothes. 
  2. Hygiene products.
  3. Decorations to spruce up that room. 
  4. Shoes, of course.
  5. And some coats, for the chilly days.

These five things are mandatory to bring on campus — most importantly, shower shoes! 

What not to bring: 

  1. Candles, because they can set off fire alarms. 
  2. Not too many bags, they can cause clutter. 

Navya poses with her friend.

Five reasons why I love Rowan: 

  1. The people
  2. The buildings
  3. Diversity
  4. Kindness
  5. Friends 

I chose Rowan because not only was it a great fit for me, but it was a great experience being a freshman! I hope incoming freshmen have such a wonderful experience, too. Rowan had everything I was looking for and more. I cannot wait to go back and start a new chapter as a sophomore. 

Enjoy campus as much as you can! 

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Story and photos by:
Navya Kunigal, rising sophomore community health major

Organized by:
Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major




Prof Style: Mask Up!

An assortment of masks made by a Rowan engineering student

“This mask is better than other brands. I found it in Walmart for a decent price. It’s very fitting, does not suffocate and its re-washable.” — Max Husar, Junior, Civil Engineering major and on-campus resident from Middletown, NJ “My mom runs a health store in Berlin, NJ. She gets shipments with masks in a variety […]

Sophomore Reflects: New Hampshire’s Hilda Barrioz Tells Us What She Learned About Coming to South Jersey

stock image of a laptop, map and a camera

Meet rising sophomore Hilda Barrioz. Hilda is an Athletic Training major all the way from Farmington, New Hampshire! She tells us more about how Rowan became her home away from home and how she adjusted to living on campus in South Jersey.

Tell us a about the change from New Hampshire to South Jersey:

South Jersey was a huge change for me because not only was it far from home but also New Jersey is wildly different than New Hampshire.

Rowan is roughly a 7-hour drive from my house, so making Rowan a home away from home was really important to me. I made sure to print out a bunch of pictures of my friends and family and of course my pets. I hung all them on a set of string lights so that I’d be able to see them every time I went back to my dorm. I also made sure to bring an air freshener version of my favorite candle and some other little decorations from home. 

Living in the dorm wasn’t a new experience for me because I had gone to prep school for part of high school, but New Jersey was a bigger change than I realized. Even the trees and flowers were different than the ones I had at home. I had to get used to the lack of wild animals, like deer and the occasional bear. Rowan mainly has geese. I also have an off-campus job so I needed to get gas. Getting gas for the first time was a weird experience because my whole life I grew up pumping my own gas, and then suddenly I was in a state where people did it for you.

How have you made Rowan your home away from home?

Rowan really has become a home away from home to me and I’ve met some of the most amazing people here and made friends that I don’t know what I would do without. This community is a place where I can be myself, meet new people everyday, and support my friends from other teams. I didn’t realize I could fall in love with a place that’s an hour away from the beach, but South Jersey and Rowan really has my heart.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photo provided by:
Hilda Barrioz, sophomore athletic training major

Header photo courtesy of:
Unsplash

How I Chose My Major: Exploratory Studies To Psychology Major Sydney Basis

Stock image of a student writing in a notebook

Today, we speak to rising sophomore Sydney Basis. She is from Marlboro, NJ (Monmouth County) and is an on-campus resident. Sydney is a former Exploratory Studies major who then made the decision to become a Psychology major. She’s going to tell us a little more about her experience as an Exploratory Studies major and how she eventually chose the right fit for her!

Sydney smiling and sitting on a beach, wearing a Rowan sweatshirt.

How and why did you find Rowan?

When the time came to start applying for colleges, I had not heard of Rowan yet. Some of my friends were talking about applying to Rowan because they had heard great things about it, so I decided to look into it. After looking around Rowan’s website, I decided to book a campus tour and immediately loved the campus environment. Before my freshman year started, I was still concerned that I could have made the wrong choice but after going to Rowan, I knew that it was the perfect choice for me and I couldn’t have picked a better school.

Why did you originally choose Exploratory Studies?

I chose Exploratory Studies because going into my freshman year, I had no idea what I wanted to do. I was really excited to try out all different areas of study because I knew I would eventually find the perfect major for me, which I did. This program was so amazing because it really gave me the freedom to try out everything I was interested in and I was not stuck to just one subject matter.

Drone photo of Rowan's Glassboro campus
After looking online and taking a tour, Sydney “immediately loved the campus environment.”

What has been your favorite experience as an Exploratory Studies major?

My favorite experience as an Exploratory Studies major has definitely been meeting people throughout all of the different classes I have taken. Since you are taking so many different classes to find your interests, you meet people from all different majors and all different career paths. I also enjoyed the Exploratory Studies seminars that Rowan held to give students an idea of what each major at Rowan was like and it gave us the opportunity to speak with the advisors in charge of the majors. This was very helpful to me.

What major are you going into?

I decided to become a Psychology major because I realized that I would like to become an occupational therapist in the future. Although Rowan does not have an OT program, their Psychology program and other classes outside of this program will prepare me for graduate school, which is something I am very excited about.

How did you figure out what major was “the one”?

I was always very interested in psychology, but never really knew what could be done with this degree. I looked at the program guide on Rowan’s website and I loved the classes that it offered. I then looked further and researched the different career opportunities in the field. I found occupational therapy through my research and knew that’s what I wanted to do in the future. Searching around Rowan’s website helped a lot through this whole process.

Any advice to Exploratory Studies majors? Or general advice to Rowan students?

For any Exploratory Studies students, I would definitely tell you that this program is not just about finding what programs you do like, it is also about finding ones that you do not like. It may be disappointing when you do not enjoy a class that you thought you would be interested in, but it is ultimately bringing you closer to a decision because you were able to rule out that field. This will break down your choices and find the perfect major and career for you which is the main goal.

Also, if there are any fields of study that you do enjoy already, I would look into what careers you can do with that kind of degree. This is what helped me find my major and dream job. The Rowan website is very helpful, so you should check it out! 

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photo provided by:
Sydney Basis, sophomore psychology major

Header photo courtesy of:
Unsplash

5 Things I Learned My Freshman Year

Drone photo of Rowan's Glassboro Campus

Today we feature Ashley Chan, sophomore Communication Studies major from West Windsor, NJ (Mercer County). Ashley reflects on five major lessons she’s learned during her first year at Rowan.

Photo of Ashley Chan.
  1. Stay Organized 
    It’s important to stay organized as a college student. Forgetting to submit an assignment might show your professor you’re either unprepared or don’t care. However, writing down to-dos and important dates in an agenda, you’ll be on track with everything that needs to be done. 

  2. Join Clubs and Associations 
    Joining different clubs and associations will not only allow you to meet more people, but it will also acclimate you to Rowan. Last year, I was on the Hall Council E-Board and Communication Studies Club, which was a great way to bond with fellow residents and people within my major!
    Ashley Chan and friend posing with instruments.

  3. Study the Map 
    Getting lost on campus happens to all of us at one point. Make sure to look over your schedule and find the location of each class
    before the semester begins, so you don’t get lost on the first day. 

  4. Time Management 
    From classes, clubs, to meals, almost every day will be pretty hectic. Scheduling everything out based on the hour will keep you even more organized and will also allow you to make time for yourself. Me-time is just as important!

  5. Textbooks 
    Wait until you receive the syllabus before purchasing/renting a book; you don’t want to end up with a textbook to find out it’s the wrong one! Also, try comparing prices to find the best deal. I tend to rent my books from Barnes & Noble on-campus since it has textbooks for every class and it’s convenient to return them at the end of the semester. 

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Story and photos by:
Ashley Chan, rising sophomore communication studies major

Beyond the Classroom: Up in the Air with Mechanical Engineering Major and Pilot Jay Petersen

Jay posing next to a small private plane.

Today, we speak to Jay Petersen, a sophomore Mechanical Engineering major from Edison, NJ (Middlesex County). Jay is an on-campus resident and a fourth-generation college student! Jay tells us more about himself, his major and when he’s not in the classroom, his passion for flying.

How did you find Rowan?

My parents had me work with college counselors my Junior year of high school and they really encouraged me to focus on a school that matches my personality and interests. I had the chance to attend Purdue but being born and raised in NJ, I’m very rooted here. Rowan also felt more like home. The campus wasn’t overwhelming, the staff was incredibly nice and welcoming.  It was an experience that made me feel very comfortable. I didn’t experience that same attention and sincereness from the other big schools.  At Rowan I’m not just a number but I’m a member of a community — especially with the honors program I’m in!

Why did you choose your major?

Ever since I was young I knew I wanted to be an engineer like my dad. It’s all I’ve been around my whole life and his work motivated me to explore this option further. I contemplated a focus in medicine but in the end, engineering just aligned more to my interests.

How did you come to find your interest in flying? Did anyone push you in the right direction?

It all really started with a test flight that my parents gifted me for my 17th birthday but aeronautics has always fascinated me. Whether it’s figuring out how they put a plane together or actually getting it in the air, the whole process is intriguing. Who knows, I may end up using my degree to get into that field long term, but flying just seemed like a natural skill to obtain. Something about knowing you’re in control of this machine and figuring out how to get yourself off the ground is amazing. 

Mechanical engineering major Jay flying a plane over New York City.

Do you fly over campus often?

Yes, I try to fly by about once a month. I also try to do as many cross-country flights as possible. That’s when you fly from one airport to another that is at least 75 miles away. This gives me practice in my communications with air traffic control for neighboring commercial airports.  The further you can fly in one trip, the more confident you feel.

A picture of Rowan's campus taken from Jay's plane.
Jay captured this aerial view of Rowan’s Glassboro campus.

What’s the best part about becoming a pilot?

It’s a sense of accomplishment and the freedom to go wherever I want without the Jersey traffic! Knowing I can achieve this and pass a six-hour FAA exam makes me feel like I can do much more in life. Sky’s the limit! (pun intended).

Any advice to students or those looking into getting a private pilot license or learning to fly?

Find the right school. Having an instructor that is committed to you and your goal is very important. Also make sure you are going to be able to invest the time and money. I was very fortunate to have my parents support me financially and mentally so that really did help me get through it. It’s not easy to balance this goal with school so try to do it in your summer months.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos provided by:
Jay Petersen, sophomore mechanical engineering major

Rising Sophomore Advice: Law and Justice Major Dynasty Suarez

Dynasty posing with her roommate in their dorm room.
Dynasty posing for a selfie.

Meet rising sophomore, Dynasty Suarez. Dynasty is a Law and Justice major with a minor in Psychology from Woodbridge, NJ (Middlesex County). She is planning on living on campus this upcoming year and is proudly a part of the Rowan Dance team, where she met some of her best friends. Here, she shares advice on how to adjust to living with new roommates and how to make friends on campus.

Any advice on living with a new roommate?

I was so fortunate to have an amazing roommate, we instantly became best friends and never had any issues regarding anything. We did everything together, and still do, even though we aren’t on campus as of right now. One major thing is communication between the both of you and things will go smoothly. I can’t wait for the next three years to live with my roomie!

How did you go about making new friends at Rowan?

By joining the Dance Team, I met my first set of lifetime friends that I can share on and off the dance floor. I also started engaging in conversations with people in class and furthering that to meeting up and then meeting their friends. It starts great friendships! 

Being active on campus and going to different events that Rowan has to offer is also a great start. Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. Find a group of people that make you feel like yourself. You may not meet them on the first day, but explore different people because eventually you will find the best group of people. I sure did!

Any advice for incoming freshman or transfer students?

Last thing I can say to incoming freshman is to not take the time you have at Rowan for granted. As you know, our [2019-2020 academic] year got cut short because of COVID-19, and we didn’t get to experience a full spring semester. All I could think about was how much I missed the environment at Rowan and all the amazing people I’ve met there. I can’t wait to return back to campus for another year.

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Story by:
Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

Photos provided by:
Dynasty Suarez, rising law and justice major

Rowan Commuters: Kayla Santiago [VIDEO]

Welcome to our new “Rowan Commuter” series, where we take an inside look at the lives and experiences of Rowan University commuters and how their overall college experience is without living on campus.

In this video, Edelman College of Communication and Creative Arts double-major Kayla Santiago talks about how she balances a busy schedule with being a commuter student here at Rowan. 

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Video by:
Tom Copsetta, radio/TV/film graduate

Rowan Commuters: James Milward [VIDEO]

James Milward sits on the green next to Wilson Hall

Welcome to our new “Rowan Commuter” series, where we take an inside look at the lives and experiences of Rowan University commuters and how their overall college experience is without living on campus.

In this video, Geology major James Milward talks about how he balances Rock Climbing Club and spending time with his group of Geology majors with being a commuter student here at Rowan. 

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Video by:
Tom Copsetta, radio/TV/film graduate

Sophomore Reflects: Tips from Computer Science Major Frank Ziegler

Photo of Frank Ziegler wearing a hooded sweatshirt sitting in a graffiti-covered room

Meet Frank Ziegler, sophomore computer science major, who commutes from Gibbsboro, NJ (Camden County). Frank reflects on his years at Rowan and shares what he has learned.

When I first started school at Rowan, I didn’t understand how the online system (i.e. Blackboard, Self-Service, Starfish) worked. It took me some time to figure out the flow of things. For incoming freshmen, I’d suggest to look over these platforms before the semester starts or ask someone for help. Usually 9 times out of 10, they’re happy to help if you ask politely.

From my experience, people in the Rowan community are generally friendly and helpful. I’ve actually created friendships here by asking for help whether for an assignment or lesson I was struggling with. 

Photo of Frank Ziegler wearing a hooded sweatshirt sitting in a graffiti-covered room

Choosing a major for me was hard. My passion is making music, but I also really enjoy solving code. For me it was a decision of how to balance my passion with my career or turning my passion my career. For someone dealing with the same problem, I would suggest to consider what you enjoy and see yourself doing in the future. I’m happy with my major and hope you will be too.

If possible, I definitely would recommend living on-campus to fully immerse yourself in the culture, especially if you’re more of an introvert. Commuting hindered my social life, but I joined some clubs and found like-minded people I enjoy hanging out with.

Join Rowan Vocals if you can sing. Seriously. That’s how I made friends. I’ve never felt more comfortable with a group than I do with them. They are such great people. And if you can’t sing, join a group that fits your interests. It’s the best thing I did for my college experience. 

Frank with his friends from Rowan Vocals group

My biggest piece of advice is to understand that going to college is a lifestyle change. I had a really hard time at first because I was dealing with mental health issues and lacked motivation. I wish I had more time to prepare and understand how to best manage my time. I work part-time, commute and do a lot of music production work, so every semester I adapt to the workload and class schedule.

College is in no way like high school, it’s like a full-time job. You need to fully commit to it and and learn how to manage your time to make the best of it. The faster, the better.

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Story by:
Frank Ziegler, sophomore computer science major

Photos courtesy of:
Frank Ziegler

#PROFspective: Sophomore Health Promotion and Wellness Management Major Brianna Bentley

Brianna poses for a photo outside Business Hall.

Today we feature sophomore Brianna Bentley, a first-generation college student. She is a Health Promotion and Wellness Management major with a minor in Psychology. Brianna commutes from her home in Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County). We were able to speak to her just before she was getting ready to leave campus because of social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19.

What academic and social clubs are you a part of?

I am a part of  UnifiedBrianna poses for a photo outside Business Hall. Sports, Pre-Allied Health Club, and American Sign Language Club.

Do you have any on-campus jobs?

When the campus reopens, I will be working at the Rec Center!

Why did you choose a university close to home?

I couldn’t imagine being too far from my family, and Rowan was the only college I toured that felt like “home” away from home.

How do you get that “away” feeling while close to home?

Hanging out with friends on campus, whether that is to study or have fun.

What is the most interesting thing you did on campus this year?

I helped out at the Unified Sports Championship game.Brianna poses for a photo outside Business Hall.

What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned in a class this year?

All of the material I learned in Psych of Human Sexuality! I highly recommend this course to anyone; I left each class feeling like I learned something new about myself.

What advice do you have for incoming freshmen?

Enjoy every moment, get involved, study hard, and make memories you’ll never forget!

What’s the best decision you’ve made since you got to college?

Volunteering with the Get Fit program.

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Story and photography by:
Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

#PROFspective: Sophomore Health Promotion & Wellness Management Major Hajah Carpenter

Hajah walks around campus.

Today we feature sophomore Health Promotion & Wellness Management major Hajah Carpenter. She is a first-generation college student from Somerdale, NJ (Camden County). Before campus closed due to COVID-19, Hajah lived in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments.

How are you getting the most out of your college experience? 

I’m getting the most out of my experience at Rowan by trying to participate, get involved and take walks on beautiful days. I really appreciate Rowan’s campus and how beautiful it is. 

Hajah leaning up against a tree

What are you learning socially and academically about yourself?

I am learning about how much I love to work and communicate with people! I love to help others, whether it’s with schoolwork or being someone to talk to!

How have you grown as a person since coming to Rowan? 

Rowan has helped prepare me for the outside world and has made me very excited for my future! My ideas for the future have grown and I’m excited to continue in my education! My major has inspired me to hopefully open up my own gym one day!

What experiences have you enjoyed the most at Rowan?

I love all the events Rowan runs in the Student Center!

Hajah walks around campus.

How do you get involved on campus?

I get involved by attending events on campus, and being a part of the Club Lacrosse team!

How have you made friends and continue to make friends?

I have many many friends at Rowan who I love dearly. I have met some friends from Willow Hall, where I lived my freshman year! I also like to keep in contact with people I have done group projects or been in classes with! I have made a good amount of my friends in study groups I join for my classes too.

How do you create that “away” at school experience while close to home?

My friends have become my family here at Rowan, so I feel at home here.

Why Rowan?

Rowan has always had a good reputation while I was growing up! My family is from Glassboro, and watching the ‘boro be built up to what it is now has been amazing!

Exterior photo of Hajah leaning up against a tree

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

Quarantine at Home Workouts

stock image of woman planking

Today we feature sophomore Lynzie Morgan, a Public Relations major with a minor in Marketing. She is from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County) and lived in 230 Victoria before COVID-19 shut down campus. 

Welcome to Rowan at Home workouts! This is a great opportunity to get your heartbeat pumping and inherit a new great beginning in a rough time like this.

Getting a good workout can help lower cholesterol, burn fat cells, improve heart health and decrease chances of mental health issues.

Among these issues that we try to prevent by working out, there are several unknown positives to working out and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The science behind it in a nutshell has to do with adrenaline. This is a hormone released that helps your body react in a faster manner, causing the body to make sugar to use for fuel.

Lynzie doing a "HIIT" workout in her driveway.
Lynzie sets up her HIIT workout with a yoga mat and a jump rope.

With gyms being closed, it’s difficult to find motivation to continue working out at home. However, there are specific workouts titled “HIIT” that make it super easy to get moving and burn a lot of calories. “HIIT” stands for high intensity interval training, which consists of short, 45 seconds to one minute intervals with complete cardio and then usually a shorter interval of a rest period.

These workouts can be done so easily outside and they don’t require any equipment, making it super convenient to do. No money is needed, which makes this also very convenient. “HITT” is located on YouTube for free access whenever you want.

Lynzie and her friend Maria.
Author Lynzie and her friend Maria on a socially distant walk.

My friend Maria and I have been working out together, at the local park or in her driveway six feet apart. Our workout includes a 3-mile run, “HIIT” and driveway circuits we make up with the equipment we already have. We use 8 lb. weights, resistance bands, jump rope and a yoga mat. From there we make up a circuit and rotate to each station after one minute.

Being stuck in the house all day has resulted in us trying new things and working out outside has been keeping us busy. It’s something everyone should try and do, even if it’s for a short amount of time a few days a week!

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Story by: 
Lynzie Morgan, public relations major

Header image courtesy of:
Pexels



4 Pieces of Advice For Incoming Students From Sophomore Jaterrin Wharton

The Rowan welcome gate.

Today we speak to Jaterrin Wharton, a sophomore Health Promotion and Wellness Management major who commutes to Rowan from Camden, NJ. She transferred from Rowan College of South Jersey with an associate degree in in Applied Science in Health Sciences. Here is her advice for incoming Rowan students.

Jaterrin poses against a wall for a photo.

1. Make wise choices – stay focused on your end goal.

2. DO NOT procrastinate – time waits for no one. make sure you are turning in your work on time. 

3. Get to know your professors. If you need help, ask! NEVER be afraid to ask your professor for help, remember they are here to help you reach your goal.

4. Remember that studying is your best friend!

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, freshman communication studies and public relations double major

Pandemic Profs: Working at a Pizza Place in Bergen County During COVID-19

Bags at pizzeria lined up on a counter ready for pick up.

Welcome to our series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story is from Jess Squilanti, a sophomore advertising major who is spending the rest of her semester at home in Riverdale, NJ. (Bergen County.) While on campus, Jess lived in 114 Victoria.

Jess stands for a portrait, wearing a black top and ripped jeans.I live in Bergen County which has become the most populated area in NJ with the COVID-19 virus in a very short amount of time. Personally, my town has about 40 cases and that keeps increasing every single day. It is crazy but life still needs to go on, so I started doing what I would be doing while I’m home normally: working.

I have two jobs; one I acquired this past summer at TJ Maxx, which is currently closed due to the virus, and the other a job I’ve had since high school at a local pizza place. The restaurant and pizza parlor, Della Cucina in Hillsdale, NJ, is still open for takeout and delivery, with the restaurant side closed. I enjoy working there and have made relationships with all my coworkers that make it not even feel like work. 

Storefront of pizza place.Since the virus has started to spread more rapidly, a state curfew has been issued and lockdown put in place, altering our hours. Now, we need to be very cautious; I am always washing my hands when leaving to take a delivery or even after a customer comes in to pick up food.

We get new customers every day which is great, and we are also doing things to help the community. We are preparing meals such as our special family dinner deal for people who cannot leave the house to even go to the grocery store because they are at risk. A minister from our local church has helped us with delivering these to families, and even to hospitals in our area. It’s been really nice to be involved in something that is helping my community during this insane time period.

Since this is a time that local businesses may not be not be doing well, last week at work I took public relations and advertising photography of the dinners packed up and sitting on the counter in the pizza area for my boss to upload to the website to promote business.

Row of square pizzas coming out of the oven.My experience recently at Della Cucina has also opened my eyes to how serious and scary this is right now, from seeing people come in with gloves and masks on to doing no-contact deliveries and curbside pickup. It has changed everything as far as how we do things at the pizza place.

It is obviously crazy to be living in this situation, but working at my job and getting this experience is making me grow as a person. I’m always looking at it in a positive light. 

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Pandemic Profs: New Routines and Calming Views

Laurence Harbor views as taken by Lauren Repmann

Welcome to our series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story is from Lauren Repmann, a sophomore relocated to her house in Middlesex County, NJ, for the rest of the semester. 

Hello! My name is Lauren, and I am a sophomore biomedical engineering student at Rowan.

Buddy begs for salad
Buddy begs for salad

Since coming home, I’ve spent lots of time with my 2-year-old cat, Buddy. He is very cute, but quite the handful.

For the past week, I’ve been eating chopped salads for lunch. While I eat, Buddy sits next to me and begs for little pieces of chicken and cheese. He even puts his nose right up to my bowl!

When I am not at Rowan, I live in Laurence Harbor, a little New Jersey shore town directly across from New York City.

I enjoy waking up early in the mornings to take walks on the boardwalk and watch the sun rise. I use these morning walks as opportunities to improve my photography skills!

Laurence Harbor views
Laurence Harbor waterfront

I’ve been taking pictures of the Laurence Harbor waterfront since I was about 10 years old, and each morning I get to add new pictures to my collection. These pictures make up the slide show home screen on my laptop. When I’m away at Rowan, I look back at these pictures for a little taste of home. 

In addition to photography, I also enjoy playing piano! Now that I have more time on my hands, I plan to learn many new songs. I learned to play two songs over spring break, Dancing in the Moonlight and Bless the Broken Road. 

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Story and photos by:
Lauren Repmann, biomedical engineering sophomore

#PROFspective: Dietetics Major Hannah Holzhauer

Hannah smiles, wearing a gray Rowan sweatshirt.
Hannah lays on the ground with colorful fruit and vegetables surrounding her head like a halo.

Meet Hannah Holzhauer, a sophomore dietetics major from Sussex County, NJ who lives on-campus in the Rowan Boulevard Apartments. Hannah is on track for a 5 year master’s program to support her future career in nutrition.

Name: Hannah Holzhauer
Year: Sophomore
Major: Dietetics major (5 year master’s program)
Hometown: Green Township, NJ (Sussex County)
On campus resident or commuter: On-Campus resident in Rowan Boulevard Apartments
Academic or social clubs you are a part of: I am a member of the Exercise is Medicine Club, Nutrition Care Club, and the Culture in Green Club. I am also in the National Honor Society fraternity Phi Sigma Pi as the scholarship chair.

Why did you choose Rowan University?

“I chose Rowan because it is the perfect fit for me. It is the right distance away from my home; far but not too far. It has a big campus with lots going on, but at the same time, it feels safe and inviting. It is reasonably priced for in-staters like me. The biggest deciding factor, however, was that it offers the field I so badly wanted to study … Nutrition.”

Hannah smiling and posing in front of a yellow shed with a purple door wearing a Rowan University hoodie.

What inspired you to choose your major?

“I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease at 7 years old. For most of my life, my body had been at war with itself. I was tired of being a victim to my condition and accepting that my pain, frustration and sadness were inevitable. I knew there had to be some way that I could help myself, but never did I imagine ending up where I am today. After doing extensive research on the impact diet has over disease, I decided to try it out myself. I changed my diet overnight and stuck with it out of hope and pure desperation that it would do some good. It not only did some good, it put me in full remission. This is something no pill, injection, or procedure has ever been able to do for me. I knew from this point on that I had found my purpose; to help others heal their bodies and regain control of their lives.”

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

“The field of nutrition is ever-expanding, with new discoveries and research coming out every single day. I am living proof that food is medicine and that what you put into your body matters. If we shift our perception and start treating food more like fuel, we have the potential to improve the wellbeing of our nation and change the way health care is looked at for good.”Hannah sits criss cross apple sauce surrounded by colorful fruits and vegetables while holding a pineapple.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a Rowan professor in which you felt like you were working with a visionary in your field.

“One of the best people I have had the pleasure of knowing at Rowan has to be Dr. Leslie Spencer. She teaches the Health Behavior Theory and Counseling class that I am in this semester. Never have I met an educator so dedicated to her work, her students, and the university as her. She is incredibly smart and passionate about health and wellness, which makes being in class with her such a joy. The life skills and personal growth I have attained from her class has turned me into a better human being with a greater understanding of those around me. I have no doubt that the things I have learned from Dr. Spencer will stay with me forever and benefit me in my professional career. I honestly believe that everyone, regardless of what you are studying, should take this course with her. She has so much to teach you.”

Any advice for students interested in Dietetics or any advice in general?

“Nutrition is an exciting field to study with endless career opportunities. The biggest thing when choosing a career path, whether it be Dietetics or something else, is to establish your “why”. If you can’t effortlessly answer why you are studying what you are, then maybe you are not where you are meant to be. Find your why.”

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Story by: Bianca Torres, junior Music Industry major

Pre-Quarantine 20 Questions with Faith Diccion [VIDEO]

Faith poses for a photo outside on a spring day.
https://youtu.be/1IaI7GBb_4c

Welcome to Rowan at Home, our new series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story features Faith Diccion, a sophomore isolating in her house in Atlantic County, NJ. A double major in Theatre and Radio/TV/Film Faith shares what it’s really like to be a Rowan Prof while answering 20 questions strolling on Rowan Boulevard. Rowan Blog captured this footage pre-quarantine.

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Video by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major

Rowan at Home: Glassboro Native Builds Sports Career in Her “Own Backyard”

Kayla smiles and stands in front of Wackar Stadium

Welcome to Rowan at Home, our new series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story features sophomore Kayla Santiago, and was captured by senior Nicole Cier, writing arts, before quarantine. 

Sophomore Kayla Santiago, of Glassboro, NJ (Gloucester County), had never considered applying to Rowan, though it was just a five-minute drive from home — “it’s practically in my backyard, and I didn’t want to commute.” She feared she would miss out on the typical college experience of living in a dorm, but soon discovered that Rowan was the perfect missing puzzle piece in the search for her future career. 

Kayla stands in front of the Prof statue by the Rowan University team house.“I originally didn’t even apply until the day of the [application] deadline, and then I found out about the Sports Communication and Media (Sports CAM) major, and realized it was perfect for me,” she reflects. “It brought me back to the passion I’ve had for sports since my childhood, when my dad would take me to the Phillies batting practice and I’d be chanting players’ names at three years old.”

Taking on the Sports CAM and Journalism majors, with a minor in Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Kayla dove into the world of Rowan athletics. She asked her advisor for advice on getting involved in the major as a freshman and found her place with Rowan Television Network right away as a football sideline reporter. 

“RTN allowed me to get experience right away. I mentioned that I was interested in sideline reporting, and they needed a sideline reporter that weekend for football and asked if I could do it,” she says. “I had never done it in my life, and it was a really great learning experience to just be thrown into it right away and have to figure it all out.”

Kayla commentates on a Rowan Athletics game.The following year was a whirlwind of experience, as Kayla found more ways to get involved with sports communications and strengthen her resume. She jumped into play-by-play, color commentating and sideline reporting for Rowan Athletics, as a TV broadcaster. She even broadcasted the first football game of the fall 2019 season against Widener by herself! “We usually don’t [broadcast without a partner], but we were first getting into a groove for the season and figuring out our roles. It was definitely difficult, but it was cool to have that pressure and experience to get me started,” Kayla recalls.

Since her first year as a Prof, Kayla has expanded her athletic commentating experience to include football, basketball, baseball, softball, soccer, lacrosse, hockey and more! Broadcasting allows her to study team rosters, examine player records and statistics and interview coaches — tasks that allow her to implement the journalism skills she learns from her second major. Kayla even made Rowan Athletics history as the first female play-by-play commentator for football and basketball on TV!

Kayla holds a microphone up for basketball coach Demetrius Poles during a sideline interview.
Kayla interviews head coach of the Rowan Women’s Basketball Team, Demetrius Poles.

“It’s not just about being a sports broadcaster; it’s also about making relationships with the coaches and players. You develop a gain of trust, and they want to give you good answers [to your interview questions] and tell you what’s going on as much as they can,” she says.

“For me, [Sports CAM] is more than just being a fan. I want to keep growing my knowledge and passion about sports and see where it can take me. Now, my whole course load is sports, and how could I not love that? It’s exactly what I wanted to do.”

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Story and photography by:
Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

Pandemic Profs: Geocaching

Eddie crouches in the woods, holding a walking stick.

Welcome to our series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story is from Eddie O’Melia, a sophomore relocated to his house in Warren County, NJ, for the rest of the semester. Eddie is a mechanical engineering major. 

Hello Profs! Normally during the school week, I would be either be working on a project in the engineering lab or hanging out with my fraternity brothers. However, since we are all being restricted to certain quarantine measures I have decided to go geocaching with my family. Eddie and his brother crouch in the woods to examine a geocache find.

Me and my little brother Greg decided to go to one of the local parks in Warren County and geocache. Geocaching is where someone hides a box full of different treasures along a path and when/if you find it you log when you did and can take one of the treasures inside, replacing it with your own. Going out in nature is a great way to prevent the spread of the virus and has endless possibilities. It gets you out of your house while not putting yourself or anyone else at risk. It was also a great way to spend time with my family while I am home. 

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Pandemic Profs: Writing Arts Club Suggested Reading List

Stock image of an open book fanned against an orange background.

Welcome to our series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story is from Paige Stressman, a sophomore writing arts major holed up in her house in Mount Ephraim, NJ (Camden County).

Hi, I’m Paige Stressman, secretary of the Writing Arts Club on campus. Our executive board decided to create this suggested reading list together to help the Rowan community combat boredom during social distancing. The books are a mix of young adult, graphic comics, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction – there is something for everyone. Happy reading!

Barnes & Noble on Rowan Boulevard may be closed, but you can visit any book retailer online for delivery. Side note: support your local, independent book sellers!

Her by Pierre A Jeanty
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur 
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The perks of being a wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
Arc of a Scythe series (Scythe, Thunderhead, and The Toll) by Neal Shusterman
1984 by George Orwell
The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough
The Infernal Devices (Clockwork Angel, Clockwork Prince, and Clockwork Princess) series by Cassandra Clare
The Book Thief by Markus Zuzak
Memory Man by David Baldacci
Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder
The Remnant Chronicles (Kiss of Deception, Heart of Betrayal, and Beauty of Darkness)
Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim
Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao
Intensity by Dean Koontz
The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett (second in series)
Splendors and Glooms by Laura Amy Schlitz
A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, illustrated by Jim Kay
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Comics/Graphic NovelsMan sits on a couch reading a book with a red cover.
All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison
Seven Soldiers of Victory Vol 1-2 by Grant Morrison 
The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller
Kid Eternity by Grant Morrison 
Watchmen by Alan Moore

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Pandemic Profs: Bonding with My Dog

Riley the golden retriever stands in the middle of large yard.

Welcome to our series to give you a glimpse into Rowan University, our campus culture, and the lives of our students, while we’re practicing social distancing to protect society from the spread of COVID-19. Today’s story is from Jason Russack, a sophomore isolating in his house in Warren County, NJ. Jason is a civil and environmental engineering major who normally lives in Whitney Apartments during the school year. 

Jason and Riley pose for a selfie. Hello Rowan Profs! Normally I’d be in Whitney Apartments, hanging out with friends and going through my engineering homework. However, being stuck at home, I have decided to take some extra time to bond with my beloved golden retriever, Riley!

Riley is 10 years old and doesn’t like the cold much, so she definitely needs to get outside more than ever this spring. I have made it my duty to play with her on every sunny day for at least an hour, even if that means we are just sitting and catching rays in the lawn!  It has proven to be very rewarding being that I love nature. Not only has it helped my boredom, it is definitely healthy to soak up vitamin D and breathe fresh air, while physically distancing myself from others. Stay healthy and get outside when possible, it can make your day.

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Story and photography by: 
Jason Russack, sophomore civil & environmental engineering major

Recovering Philanthropy at Rowan University

Sam smiling for a portrait outside Engineering Hall.

Sam Bollendorf poses in Engineering Hall.Meet Samantha Bollendorf, sophomore biomedical engineering major from Sewell, NJ (Gloucester County.) She shares her passion for volunteering with the Food Recovery Network and encourages students to deepen their volunteer experiences on-campus. 

“What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?” – George Eliot

There are few feelings, as a college student and human being, that rival the sensation of giving back to a cause, any cause, that matters to you. Giving all that we can do individually to better the lives of those that we empathize with is just about as rewarding as it gets, and it’s safe to say that we all wish we could participate in philanthropic efforts a little more than we already do.

It’s easy to be philanthropic when you’re a well-established gajillionaire, but as an undergraduate 20-something scraping together loose change to do your laundry and buy discount cereal from Aldi, donating to your favorite non-profits is an act easier said than done. Money is tight, and some days, starting a personal GoFundMe to keep your Spotify subscription afloat doesn’t seem all too crazy. All of this begs the question: “How can I give back on-campus in a way that works for me?”

As a student who actively volunteers and is constantly searching for ways to be more immersed on campus, I can assure you that Rowan offers a plethora of opportunities for students to give back. The breadth of volunteer efforts on campus reach a scope far beyond the bounds of our school — philanthropic efforts tend to reach the Glassboro community, as well as greater national causes.

That being said, it can be difficult to weed through the zillions of opportunities provided by our university to find the activities that really resonate with us as individuals. After a full year (and one semester) here at Rowan, I’ve found my own personal unsung hero of philanthropy in the form of Rowan’s Food Recovery Network.

Rowan’s Food Recovery Network is a small, student-led organization on campus that works on a weekly basis to source unused, otherwise wasted food from Rowan University’s dining halls. Students and faculty transport recovered food to local shelters in the Glassboro community. Food Recovery Network redirects food waste to a worthy cause, and gives students a chance to positively impact their surrounding community in a way that’s meaningful, and of course, doable.

Food Recovery Network logo Being a part of something like Food Recovery Network at Rowan, a university that encourages sustainability and practicing sustainable habits, is extremely rewarding. Being able to give back to those that have lent a hand in building beautiful Glassboro — the town that us Profs get to call home — is an opportunity I’m beyond grateful to have.

The best part? I don’t have to dip into my Spotify subscription fund to give back — all that I need to donate is my time, energy and my drive, shared by everyone at Food Recovery, to make the lives of those around us just a little less difficult. That’s the case with most volunteer efforts at Rowan University — so enhance your college experience, and lend a hand!

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Story by:
Samantha Bollendorf, sophomore biomedical engineering major

Photos by:
Alyssa Bauer, senior public relations major