Men’s Hockey Student Athlete Reflects on Earning Captain

Jared Cohen in the offensive zone reading a play.

Not many have the privilege of playing collegiate sports; fewer have the chance to earn the title of captain. A recent graduate of Rowan’s finance program, Jared Cohen of Wayne, NJ (Passaic County) wore the “C” after holding down the blue line for Rowan’s Men’s Hockey team for three seasons (2019-2020, 2021-2022, 2022-2023). Wearing a letter in two of the three seasons he played, Jared is a student of the game on the ice and in the locker room.

Jared bowing his head for the national anthem.
Jared bows his head for the national anthem before a game

The transition from being captain on a youth team to being a rookie on the next can be challenging. Yet Jared attributes a smooth transition to the team of veteran players around him, “I didn’t really know what to expect coming in but I was fortunate enough to meet some really cool guys my first year, some older guys who really took me under their wing.” His first-year season was about finding his role, allowing himself to take in the personalities of his new teammates before finding the confidence to be vocal with the veteran players on the team. Part of being a great leader was about being a great follower: showing up and doing your job, a concept that he executed on which lead to him becoming an assistant captian his junior year.

Going into his senior year, the obvious goal was to not just make the playoffs or make a run, but to bring home a championship. On an individual level, Jared strove to become the de facto leader on the team. Going into his senior year he was one of three players who was still wearing a letter on his jersey. Wearing the “C” was a responsibility he carried at every level. Wearing it at Rowan was the last step.

Captains come in a variety of forms, some are vocal while some lead by example, but when asked what his teammates would say if asked why he should be captain he had this to say, “I think mainly they’d say I’m smart. I’m not here to be everybody’s best friend as nice as that would be; I’m here to make sure everyone does their job for the team. That’s really what it’s about. I don’t think being the captain should be anyone’s best friend, I think they should have your best interests at heart instead. Sometimes tough love is called for, and other times it’s just a sit-down conversation. But I was always transparent with everyone.”

Jared stepping onto the ice.

Although he’s been a captain at every level, he acknowledges that he still had a lot to learn before wearing the C. When asked about what lessons he picked up on under different captains, he had this to say, “It’s definitely just keeping the team together. I mean it’s hard to get through to everyone. You have a bunch of different types of guys on the team, strong personalities, weak personalities, but it’s my job to blend those together to make it as successful for the team as possible. It’s almost like a chef making a recipe, sometimes you’ve got to do it by feel, so that’s what being a captain requires. Especially on a college team where we’re not going to play pro after this, but everyone still wants to win and have fun doing it.” 

Earning the captaincy was a season-long endeavor, but one that was worth it. Throughout the season Jared positioned himself to be the guy that both his teammates and coaches go to. He says, “I went into the season as the only returning player with a letter so that was really cool. I told  my coaches in the beginning, during training camp, ‘I want the ‘C’, I want to be the guy on this team.’” After handling extreme lows and highs during the season, carrying both extremes with grace and a leader’s stoicism, the coaching staff agreed that it was time to give him the job he earned. Getting the ‘C’ was a special moment, “It was me and two or three other guys with ‘A’s on our jerseys, no one had a “C”. But I kind of knew I was the guy and I acted like it and I think the team reciprocated that. Toward the end of the season, before our playoff run, at a random coaches meeting before practice he gave me the ‘C’. He took my jersey and put it on. It was pretty cool.” Navigating the good and bad of a long season exemplified what being a leader of a team was. 

Jared making a cross ice pass in the offensive zone to his teammate.

When reflecting on the better moments of his collegiate career, several moments stand out. However the memory that sticks out the most is from his freshman year, “All three years I played we won probably 70-75% of our games so I’ve definitely been on three good teams, three years of playing– we lost the COVID year. It was never really about the regular season, we always won a lot more games than we lost but come regionals times the closest we got was my freshman year. I was playing so hurt so I was just a shell of myself, we were on goal away from going to nationals. The way it works is you have to win three games in a row at regionals. We won two my freshman year, went to the third game, we gave it all we could and just fell short a little bit.” The taste of glory and being just shy of the national tournament put a fire in his belly to be better going forward. 

The somber moments of sports drive individuals to elevate their game, when reflecting on the lower moments of his career, games during his senior year stood out, “We had a couple tough games against Penn State and a few others, but we knew we had a good team, we knew our record would be good in the end. So we righted the ship there, we talked about it, we talked about whatever we had to do. Toward the end of the season, when things started to go south, in hindsight it might’ve been past salvageable at that point, it might’ve been that’s what it was. We had two really bad losses, one of them being on senior night. We blew a 2-1 lead, but ended up losing 3-2 in the final minute.” However, instead of sulking, he immediately followed up by watching film to see what went wrong to put a better effort, more effective team on the ice for the next game. His philosophy embodies learning from what you did well during your best games as well as your worst game.

Jared watching a play unforld in the offensive zone.

Many lessons have been learned through watching other leaders, thousands of hours of time on the ice both in game and practicing, but in the classroom as well. Being a finance major helped in a variety of ways. Some of the tools that he refined through projects in class have translated to an on ice setting, “I love to be extroverted and meet new people. I think being a leader has definitely done that. Communicating with so many guys over the years, I learned about their different styles, their likes, their dislikes. Being a finance major, it’s kind of funny, I learned to communicate with a lot of people and how to get stuff done for a team. I think that’s the most important thing I’ve learned– communication.” Embodying the spitting of a leader means drawing from a variety of lessons to apply in unconventional scenarios, something that Jared does very well.

After bleeding brown and gold for his team, after four years his collegiate and education career has come to close. Through his four years in class, 61 games and 41 points, and now a finance degree to his name, Jared Cohen has walked the stage into the professional world. 

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Story by Thomas Ubelhoer, international studies and political science major

Student Athlete Shares Advice on Balance and Planning

Stock image of close up of a runner's feet and hands on the track ready to run.

Marquise Young, a rising senior advertising major from Camden, NJ (Camden County) shares some tips about being a student athlete.

For about 90% of my life I’ve been in school in some kind of way and playing some kind of sports whether it’s for my school or for a club team. I’ve also been told since I was young that “you are a student-athlete” basically meaning that school comes first and my sports secondary, which makes sense because sports don’t last forever and there is a higher chance that a person will get a job for what they are studying in college compared to the low percentage of people that make it to the pro level. But in reality being a student athlete isn’t easy, especially in college! Being a student athlete in college is a big task. You have no choice but to make sure you maintain school and the sport that you are playing … It’s what you signed up for.

To use myself as an example I’ve played a lot of sports growing up from basketball, football, wrestling and track and field. But the sport that I decided to pursue at the college level is track and field. A lot of people may look at track and field and think or assume that it’s not hard or not a lot to have on your plate but in reality as a full time student it can be a lot to handle at times, but me being an experienced student athlete I’m going to give some tips on how I balance being a student athlete and student.

Image of Marquise Young running the 110 hurdles.
Marquise finishes his jump (pink sneakers).

As a student athlete, balancing my academic responsibilities with my athletic commitments can be a difficult task to juggle. However with the right mindset, dedication and approach I’ve been able to manage both for about 5 years now.

First and foremost, time management is key. I’ve learned so many different ways to manage my time throughout different experiences. What I do is try to do my homework weeks ahead of time, which gives me a lot of breathing space for me to either relax or prepare for track practice or even take care of my body by going to the trainers. I also try to visualize my schedule and the amount of time I have to do things which allows me to prepare for the week.

Communication is another important aspect of balancing my roles as a student athlete. I communicate regularly with my coaches and professors to ensure that I am meeting all of my obligations and not falling behind in either area. If I know that I will be missing a class or need to turn in an assignment late due to a track meet or practice, I make sure to let my professor know ahead of time and make arrangements to catch up on any missed work, and to let them know I’m going to be away for a track meet.

Group of students running.

In addition to managing my time and communicating effectively, I prioritize self-care. Being a student athlete can be physically and mentally demanding, so it’s important to take care of myself both on and off the track. This means getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, and taking breaks when needed. I also try to find a support system, whether it’s friends, family, or my coach to help manage the stress that comes with being a student athlete.

Lastly, I try to maintain a positive attitude and stay focused on my goals. It’s easy to get overwhelmed or discouraged when trying to balance so many responsibilities, but I remind myself why I am doing what I am doing. I also tell myself that I know my dad would want me to stick with my sports and education.

In conclusion, being a student athlete requires a lot of dedication and hard work, but with proper time management, communication, self-care, and a positive attitude, it is possible to balance both roles successfully. It takes discipline and perseverance, but the rewards are well worth it.

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Feature image courtesy of StockSnap on Pixabay

Mechanical Engineering Major Shares Juggling Academics and Being a Student-Athlete

Rowan mechanical engineering student Abby smiles in front of her engineering equipment in the lab.

Today we feature graduating senior mechanical engineering major and student-athlete Abby Hainsworth from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County). Abby shares her experience while being an engineering major and a member of Rowan’s Field Hockey Team and how she navigates academic workload with her involvement in collegiate athletics.

What is mechanical engineering?

Mechanical engineering is problem-solving different things in the world that have to do with moving parts. Within this field, you learn the science, math, and physics behind the way things work, and then you work to design new things or upkeep things that have already been designed to help keep the world going.

Why did you get an interest in mechanical engineering?

I chose mechanical engineering because it is such a broad field. You could really go into so many different professions with a background in mechanical engineering. Moreover, I have always been passionate about aerospace or sustainable energy, which are two areas that I knew mechanical engineering would help me get into as I progress into my professional career. I also knew it would be a secure field to go into.

I originally was a civil engineering major. As time progressed, I realized my sophomore year that I was more interested in mechanical engineering because it focused on moving things versus static things. 

Was there something specific whenever you were growing up that sparked your interest?

I was always interested in math and science. Outer space was the number one thing that sparked my interest. I was always interested in documentaries on TV, looking up at the stars, or just the possibility of working for NASA one day. That combination of things really inspired me.

Can you discuss the educational process? What is the major like when you first come in as a first-year up until your senior year?

In the first year, you usually go hands-on. We have a first-year and sophomore engineering clinic in which you combine with other engineering majors at Rowan and go through hands-on projects. Within these, students are creating different things, learning how to 3D print and 3D model, and learning how to use machines to manufacture things. In your first year as a mechanical engineering major, you take Intro to Mechanical Design, so you learn all the machines; you even build a mechanical clock in which you learn how to pick up a block and move it to a set position.

During sophomore year, you move more into more specific mechanical engineering courses. For example, you start taking your thermodynamics courses and Statics and Dynamics, which are more physics-based courses.

Junior and senior year, you switch to the junior and senior clinic, which are project-based courses where you pick something you’re interested in, whether in your field or another field of engineering.

You get to do a student-led project and something you are passionate about, which is a great experience. You learn a lot of hands-on things; about areas that you might not be more familiar with, and those skills transfer once you graduate.

I’m taking Internal Combustion Engines now as an elective, which I’ve always been interested in and wanted to learn more about. There is a lot of room to learn what you want to learn.

Abby Hainesworth headshot.

What does Internal Combustion Engines focus on?

Internal combustion engine is what really drives your car or anything that is moving nowadays. In the class we learn about the design of the engine, the fuel that goes in the engine, all the different components of your car that help make your car run and work.

Then, we get to research an engine at the end of it and give them back a report about what the engine is and applications of what we’ve learned in a car or something that we are interested in ourselves.

Throughout your career, what courses really stuck out to you in which you gained the most knowledge from?

I gained a lot of knowledge from my mechanical design course. This course really taught us about different ways to design linkages and moving mechanisms, but it also went into a Manufacturing and Measurement Techniques class where I was able to design a scale from scratch.

I had to learn Arduino to code a little controller and then build a kitchen scale that actually was able to measure something; I was even able to change the units on it. This course gave me a lot of experience that went into my junior and senior courses.

Additionally, I would say a lot of the physics courses. I’ve always been passionate about physics and what I do on a daily basis is primarily all physics. So I would say that statics, dynamics, thermodynamics are my most enjoyable classes.

Can you talk more about the faculty and how they help you get better in your field?

The faculty here are very supportive; they really want to see students succeed. I have reached out to my professors about classwork, I’ve gone to office hours where they work through my homework with me or talk with me about exams, but I’ve also reached out to them for personal things.

When it comes to career advice, looking for my job or an internship, or advice on how to even navigate the field after graduation, I’ve reached out to a lot of professors here and they are so willing to help students. They’re truly passionate about our successes. 

One of my biggest pieces of advice to other students is not to be afraid to talk to professors because that’s what they’re here for.

As you wrap up your final semester, what is it that you want to do?

I want to go into sustainable energy or clean energy. I am currently looking into going into nuclear power. However, even if I am not in nuclear power in the future, I want to do something clean for the earth.

I have a job lined up after graduation at the PSEG Nuclear Power Plant in Salem, NJ. I am looking into working there, probably in mechanical systems engineering. In my role, I will be helping upkeep the mechanical systems in the group. Many of the pumps, valves, and different parts help the plant work; our job is to ensure that they are running correctly to power New Jersey.

Abby Hainesworth utilizing equipment in mechanical engineering lab.
Abby Hainesworth utilizing equipment in mechanical engineering lab.

How did you find out about the job? Were there other jobs that you were looking out to?

I am still seeing what else is out there, but I basically had two internships there over the summer. One internship went from my sophomore year to my junior year. Then, I returned from my junior to senior year; I found the internship independently.

Many resources at Rowan help students find internships. With internship opportunities, there are multiple career fairs here at Rowan. I know PSEG has come to the career fairs before, so although I found it on my own, I have also attended these professional development things that Rowan to help me better my resume and assist me in networking.

Do you have a dream job? Is so, what is it?

My dream job is to work for NASA and aerospace. It has always been something that I have been interested in and passionate about ever since I was a little kid. So that is hopefully what I can do one day.

What was the what was the most difficult thing about being in this major?

The most challenging thing about being a mechanical engineering major and a student-athlete was balancing their individual requirements. A lot is asked of you as a student regarding your classes, homework, and exams. Additionally, the athletics requirements are like a part-time job with the amount of practice I have, games, and extra team commitments. Sometimes it can be challenging to do your classwork and still perform on the field.

How was being a mechanical engineering major during Covid-19?

Mechanical engineering during COVID was definitely difficult, but it was not impossible. Everything switched online, so I was learning Zoom from my bedroom, but it was okay. Many of our hands-on projects shifted to creating something on the computer, but I could still learn successfully.

Some professors did projects where you could pick them up and work on them at home. We also did things where if we were to do it at home, we would be given the supplies for it. Usually, we found ways to do it in our house with our own supplies.

Rowan mechanical engineering student Abby sits in an engineering lab surrounded by equipment.

As we transition to talk about your involvement with athletics, can you share the position you play as a member of the Rowan Field Hockey Team?

I am a goalie on the Rowan Field Hockey Team.

When did you become a goalie?

I was a little late to the game. I joined field hockey during my junior year of high school. I initially was playing a different sport, and when I joined the team, they also needed a new goalie. Something in my gut told me I should try it and could be good at it.

When I put on the pads and started making saves, I realized I wanted to be a goalie and did not want to be a field player.

What sport did you play before?

I originally played volleyball when I was in high school. I also played soccer when I was younger. Those sports were the perfect combination for me to be a goalie because I knew how to dive from volleyball, and I knew how to kick from soccer.

Can you talk about what the Elite 90 Award is? 

The Elite 90 Award is awarded to the student-athlete at the national championship with the highest GPA. It is called Elite 90 because there are 90 national championships across Division III athletics. One Elite 90 Award is given to one student at each school for each sport.

Abby Hainesworth standing behind the Elite 90 Award, presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade-point average participating at the finals site for each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.
Abby Hainesworth standing behind the Elite 90 Award, presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade-point average participating at the finals site for each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.

You won the Elite 90 Award back-to-back seasons. Can you share what this recognition means to you?

Winning the Elite 90 award back to back is an amazing feeling. I was not expecting to win it in my junior year when we went to the national championship in Connecticut. We had just gotten to the field to do our practice, and the NCAA commissioners came on the field and gave me the award in front of my whole team.

I remember being estatic and shocked; I did not see it coming. Senior year, I put a lot of pressure on myself because I wanted to win it again if we got back there. This past year we had a banquet with all Final Four teams, and they gave me the award in front of all the teams.

It was just a fantastic feeling to be there and receive recognition for what I have been doing on the field and in the classroom. To be there with my teammates to celebrate it was very special.

So one of the more difficult majors that you can pack on top of their starter every day for field hockey. How do you balance out life?

Balancing athletics and academics is challenging. It comes down to a lot of time management and looking at your schedule and knowing when you have class when you have practices or games, and when you can get your homework done between them. So a lot of it comes down to being very self-motivated.

Another critical key is finding a way to self-motivate and stick to a schedule. For example, I look at my week before my week starts and see when I am busy and my workload, then plan what I will do at the beginning of the week.

When you say you are going to do your homework and give yourself a rest when you say you are going to give yourself a rest, it is really easy to get burnt out and overwork yourself. However, you have to find a way to balance schoolwork, your other life, and other responsibilities and preserve your mental health.
There are resources, coaches, teammates, and classmates to support you through it; building a support system is very important as well.

What are the most memorable moments from your athletic career?

The most memorable moment of my career was winning the NJAC championship in my junior year against Kean in overtime. In my first year, we did not win; in my sophomore year, we did not have a season due to COVID. So, that was the first championship I had won with the team. It was such a surreal feeling; I remember when Rice scored, and everyone just ran on the field. The celebration was just an amazing feeling. Thankfully we were able to do it again during my senior year. However, the first time was just a surreal feeling.

Another great memory was making it to the Final Four back-to-back seasons. A lot of other teams do not get to experience that, and to reach that level and be one of the top four teams in the country, was really special. We truly put in the work for it and deserved it; I am so lucky to have had that experience with my teammates.

What did you learn by being part of a team?

Being on a team made me a better person throughout my four years here. I came into college, and I was really shy; I was afraid to speak to others and afraid to be judged. Being placed on a team with such supportive other athletes helped me develop into who I am today because they taught me that I should be myself and then I will be accepted.

No matter what is happening in my life, I can contact them for help. They motivate me on and off the field to be the best person I can be. I am eternally thankful for this experience and the relationships that I have made. I would not be who I am today without athletics or my teammates, my coaches, athletic trainers, and the whole support system I have been given here; I am so thankful for it.

Close-up of equipment Abby uses in mechanical engineering.
Close-up of equipment Abby uses in mechanical engineering.

Why did you decide to come to Rowan University?

I decided to come to Rowan because of our excellent engineering program here. In addition, I like the fact that the class sizes are small. Most class sizes only have about 20 students, and I knew I could not learn at a university where I was in a lecture-style classroom. If I was in a hall with about 100 other students, I knew that that learning experience would not be for me.

Furthermore, to be at Rowan and have relationships with my professors and to be able to speak to them, go to office hours, and utilize their resources is special. It helps me learn rather than just being another number because of that. At Rowan, you are not another number. Every student is valued and has the opportunity to cultivate relations with their professors.

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Story by: Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major

From Bulldog to Prof: How John Maldonado Found His New Home Across The Street

Dramatically colored sunset over the Rowan athletic field where John played football.

From across the street to across the goal line, John Maldonado’s journey from Glassboro High School to Rowan University proves that a great college experience might be in one’s own backyard. “I definitely think that Glassboro High School students overlook Rowan just because it’s across the street,” says John, but his own Rowan experience has proven otherwise. A recent graduate of Rowan University, John earned his bachelor’s degree in finance within the Rohrer College of Business. As a student-athlete he played wide receiver on the football team for all four years of his college career, where he received prestigious accolades such as being named to the All-NJAC First Team Offense in both 2021 and 2022. He has also been honored for his work in the classroom, and was named to both the College Sports Communicators Academic All-District Team and the PhillySIDA Academic All-Area Team during his career. Rowan football player John Maldonado poses for a portrait wearing a practice football jersey and holding a football.

Born and raised in Glassboro, along with his two older brothers, John was always a talented athlete. A three-sport athlete at Glassboro High School, playing football, basketball, and baseball, he found success in all three sports, winning multiple Glassboro Bulldog awards. He was even named to the All-Conference first team for football. Like most three-sport athletes who want to continue at the next level, choosing that one sport you love can be tough. “I originally thought I was going to be a college baseball player, you know baseball was bigger than football in high school for me, but it turned out to be football.”

Rowan football player John Maldonado in action during a game, running with the football against another university.
Photo courtesy of Nick Feldman

Picking a sport to continue throughout college would end up guiding John in his decision to attend Rowan University. Like most seniors out of high school, it’s tough to know exactly what you want to do with life at that point. As John faced the pivotal moment of choosing where to continue his football career, Rowan stood out to him. “I wasn’t 100% ready I guess to move an hour or two away and live on my own so I was like if I’m going to go to an NJAC school or D3 to play football, why not just stay right here.”

John recognized there is a less-than-great perception among Glassboro High students about attending Rowan. Despite the proximity of Rowan to Glassboro High School, John believes that many students disregard the university as a potential option, failing to realize the abundance of opportunities and resources it has to offer.

Rowan football player John Maldonado catches a touchdown pass while being blocked.
Photo courtesy of Nick Feldman

Reflecting on his time at Rowan, John is filled with gratitude for the endless opportunities and resources that helped shape his college experience. “My best advice would be to use the resources,” he emphasizes, “because there’s a ton. There’s a million different things going on at one time with a bunch of people that are trying to help you.” John’s academic advisors played a crucial role in his success off the field. Student-athletes sometimes need additional supports to balance their academic responsibilities with their athletic goals, to maintain their work-life balance and their academic performance. With the support of his academic advisors, John was able to stay on track and ultimately decide on a major in finance after entering as an undecided major (exploratory studies)

John continued his studies at Rowan, now pursuing a master’s in finance, while he simultaneously trains in hopes of making a professional football career a reality. John’s story is a testament to the university’s ability to offer a one of a kind college experience, even for those who already live in Glassboro.Rowan football player John Maldonado poses for a portrait wearing a practice football jersey and holding a football.

He recognizes the challenges that lie ahead of him. “The windows are short with this type of stuff, trying next-level football.” With the resources and opportunities available at Rowan, John is poised to make the most of every opportunity, both on and off the field.

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Story by:
Sean Humphrey, senior public relations major

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, sophomore dance and marketing double major

#PROFspective: Student Athlete Kristiina Castagnola on Her Record-Breaking Season and Graduate Assistantship

Kristiina Castagnola poses in front of James Hall.

Today we feature Rowan Global graduate student and student athlete Kristiina Castagnola (she/her) from Voorhees, NJ (Camden County). Off the field, Kristiina is a commuter studying for an MA in Higher Education and works as a graduate assistant for the College of Education. On the field, she has become one of Rowan’s most decorated student […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Students Look Forward to Clubs, Sports Teams, New Friends

Rowan University drone footage from above.

Today we feature incoming Exploratory Studies first year students Kelly Hector and Olivia Szumloz (she/her). Kelly is from Watchung, NJ (Somerset County) and will be living on campus. Olivia is from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County) and will also be living on campus.  Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking […]

Meet #Rowan2026: Incoming Profs from the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences, Education

Image of prof statue near Robinson and James Halls.

Today we welcome incoming first year students from the College of Education and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Rowan University. Haley Hill (she/they) is from Williamstown, NJ (Gloucester County) and will be living on campus as an Education and History major. Gianna Burgio (she/her) is also from Williamstown, NJ and will be […]

Q and A with Award-Winning Athletic Training Graduate Student Samantha Santos

Samantha stretches out an athlete's arm in the training room.

Today we feature Samantha Santos, a recent Rowan Global graduate of the M.S. in Athletic Training program. Samantha won the 2022 Athletic Training Medallion Award for her commitment to her major and passion for the athletic training field. She talks about her experience as an athletic training major, her experiences with her professors, and how working in the Rowan University Athletic Training Program has prepared her for her future endeavors.

How would you generally describe the athletic training major?
The easiest way to describe athletic training is that we are the sports medicine professionals who assist athletes in injury rehabilitation. We all specialize in the prevention and emergency care — we do a lot of paperwork — but we are the guys you see on the sideline of a football game. I feel like that’s the most of the easiest way to put it.

Samantha Santos going through medical bag in athletic training room.
Samantha Santos going through medical bag in the athletic training room.

Can you talk about what you do on a day-to-day basis?
When people think about athletic training, they instantly think of taping ankles or a specific body part before players attend a practice or play in games. We do tape ankles, and we tape a lot of everything, honestly, but what we do is way more than that.

Athletes come in to see us, and they may tell us that they don’t feel great today, and I don’t feel that well. We come in and assess their symptoms for general medical concerns like sicknesses or allergies for a doctor to then come and officially diagnose. There are also moments where players come in, and it’s related to their mental well-being. Sometimes we have to sit down and have a conversation with them. We want athletes to know that we are here for them in other ways other than just rehabbing their hamstring or ankle. The field setup and game coverage are the best part of the job and why I was drawn to the profession; but honestly, I think my favorite part of it is seeing an athlete that got hurt and went to rehab with your return to play and get back out on the field.

Why did you choose to major in athletic training? What made the field stand out to you?
I first got interested in athletic training in high school. We didn’t have an athletic trainer at my high school because I went to a small private school. So when I found out about the profession, I was like, wait a second…this seems like something that would fit me perfectly.

I love how the role athletic trainers play in the lives of the athletes they work with is continuous. I like to be there every step of the way. It’s not a job where I’m in an office all day. With this job, we are involved with initial symptoms and injury prevention and recovery, return to play, and the mental and physical components of being a player who came back from injury. I remember my junior year here when I started my clinical assignment; on my first day in the facility, I worked with women’s basketball and men’s and women’s swimming and diving and helped out with football because they were beginning preseason. I remember thinking that there were so many football players, and it was overwhelming.

I am not going to sugarcoat it, you do get thrown into the fire, but it was the best way to learn and be comfortable in this field.

Samantha Santos using an ultrasound machine on a baseball player's arm for active physical therapy.
Samantha Santos using an ultrasound machine on a baseball player’s arm for active physical therapy.

How was being an athletic trainer major different post-Covid-19 lockdown? After returning from lockdown, how do you handle the fast-paced, athletic training environment?
It is crazy how much has changed over the years. The other day, I was talking to Colleen, the head athletic trainer, about how we had to do temperature checks on every athlete and person who walked into the training room. We had to set scheduled time slots for teams and athletes to come into the training room to eliminate many people being in all at once. It is controlled chaos in the athletic training room. We would continuously keep up with patients via email and online too.

In Spring 2021, I was at Delsea High School, and when I was there, there were still some Covid-19 protocols and enforcements to follow, like wearing masks. But as time went on, it started to feel more and more normal. This past fall, it was the first time I thought we were genuinely seeing normalcy in the training rooms. We still were encouraged to wear masks; however, athletics in high school and college had no more restrictions. The most significant adjustment was definitely from Spring 2020 to Spring 2021. I saw a substantial change in regulations and accessibility from Spring 2021 to Fall 2021 and even Spring 2022.

Samantha Santos in athletic training room adjusting an athlete's shoe.
Samantha Santos in athletic training room adjusting an athlete’s shoe.

What is the best part of pursuing this major at Rowan?
The hands-on experience is the best part of the program. We learn so much in this program in and out of the classroom. For example, in my sophomore year here at Rowan, we learned so much anatomy about injuries, pathologies, rehabilitation, case patterns, how to reach a diagnosis, and so much more. I remember feeling like my brain was overloaded because we had obtained so much information. I was overwhelmed the summer before my first clinical because I was thinking, how will I apply everything I learned into actual practice on patients and athletes? But obtaining this clinical experience while being a student was unique and an excellent opportunity for learning and applying knowledge in real-life settings.

As previously stated, I have completed hours with Rowan University Women’s Basketball, Swim and Dive, Football, and Baseball teams which made my experience special. The opportunities that we get as athletic training majors regarding working with athletes in high schools are also fantastic for obtaining experience in the field. I got to work and complete hours at Woodstown and Delsea Regional High Schools.

Samantha Santos stretching out a baseball player's shoulder.
Samantha Santos stretching out a baseball player’s shoulder.

Can you talk about how working with professors and professionals like Head Athletic Trainer Colleen Grugan and Assistant Athletic Trainers Chris Pantellere and Steve Schultz have helped prepare you for your future endeavors?

Our professors are great. I worked with Dr. Sterner, Dr. Mann, and Dr. Pledger. My professors impacted my academic, professional, and even personal life in so many different ways. Classes were never easy. We were always learning a lot of material, and it became very overwhelming at times, and I was constantly studying. I had worked over 1,600 clinical hours, and I probably put equally the same amount of time just into studying. The work was non-stop, and it felt at the time that it was never going to end. But it always ended up being worth it. Thankfully, I did well in my classes, and it truly helped me clinically to be able to practice what I have learned. My professors made it easy because if I needed help, all I had to do was ask. My professors would go over anything ranging from quizzes, exams, material taught in class, and more.

I have had the same experience working with Head Athletic Trainer Colleen Grugan and Assistant Athletic Trainers Chris Pantellere and Steve Schultz. I have never hesitated to ask them questions on anything I was unsure of or wanted more guidance on. In my first semester, Chris was my preceptor. It was just one of those things where you are just thrown into the fire.

I remember it being the third week in August that we started, and we were covering the men’s soccer tournament. There was an emergency, and my partner and I just had to do what we were taught to do, and Chris was coaching us through it. We handled the situation exactly how we were taught to handle it in class; however, Chris guided us the whole time and really established for me that we are never alone. It was nice having Chris there because we calmly handled the situation quickly and efficiently. Colleen is so easy to talk to and one of my favorite people to work with. She taught two of my lab classes, and I instantly remember thinking that Colleen was a boss and an excellent person to be mentored by. She is knowledgeable, loves teaching, and truly wants us to learn from experience. Colleen, Chris and Steve all put us in situations where we are forced to figure it out, and I have learned to love expanding my knowledge within the field this way.

Colleen Grugan, Head Athletic Trainer (left), assisting Samantha Santos (right) with using an ultrasound machine on an athlete's hamstring.
Colleen Grugan, Head Athletic Trainer (left), assisting Samantha Santos (right) with using an ultrasound machine on an athlete’s hamstring.

What advice would you give to someone pursuing the athletic training major at Rowan?
Stay on top of studying because it is easy to fall behind in this field. Go to the library for an hour or two every day to familiarize yourself with the material. I felt like I lived in the library most of college because I was always studying or trying to obtain new material in a quiet space. It is essential to find people in your classes with whom you work well. These people can be great study partners and can help with collaborating ideas.

Can you sum up your experience at Rowan? Why was Rowan the best fit for you?
Rowan was my first and kind of only choice, to be honest with you, when I was in my college search. I was in a community college. I went there for two years and got my associate in Biomedical Science. I remember looking up athletic training programs one day, and I saw that Rowan had a top program, and I grew up in Vineland, so it was convenient for me. I knew coming into it that it would be difficult, but I knew that if I wanted to be successful, this was the route that I had to take. So when I started, I didn’t realize that it would be as difficult as it was, but I genuinely feel that I am now ready for work post-graduation and am confident that I will be fine.

But Rowan was definitely my number one choice for that reason, and I just knew that I just felt right, and it was so close to home, and then the program itself resonated with me. So Rowan was the right fit for me; there was no question about that.

Close-up of Samantha Santos using an ultrasound machine on a baseball player's arm for active physical therapy.
Close-up of Samantha Santos using an ultrasound machine on a baseball player’s arm for active physical therapy.

What are your plans post-graduation?
So as far as the job hunt goes, I have seen plenty of jobs up in North Jersey, which is fine. However, I don’t think I could do more than an hour commute, and I can’t move just yet, so I’m going to try to say more in the South Jersey area.

I would love to work in the college atmosphere. However, my dream job would be to work as a trainer in professional baseball. Right now, I am going to search for jobs in college or high school. I want my first job to be a huge learning experience to continue to build and grow. So I’m kind of open to whatever opportunities I find.

Rowan is excellent because you form these connections with professors and fellow students, and sometimes they know people that are hiring or are good referrals for job applications. I feel like people are always helping each other in some capacity, and it is nice.

Samantha Santos stretching out a Rowan baseball player's arm.
Samantha Santos stretching out a Rowan baseball player’s arm.

See our video with Samantha here.

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Story By: 
Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major

Men’s Track and Field Student-Athletes on Their Winning 4×400 Relay Season

Athletes celebrate win.

Today we are featuring Jah’mere Beasley, Nana Agyemang, and Amara Conte, three of the four Men’s Track and Field members who secured the national championship title in the 4×400 relay in their indoor season [editor’s note: the team would later finish second in the outdoor national finals]. 

Jah’mere is a junior Sports Communication and Media major from Camden, NJ (Camden County) and ran third leg for the 4×400 relay. Nana is a sophomore Exercise Science major from Parsippany, NJ (Morris County) and ran second leg for the 4×400 relay. Amara is a sophomore Accounting major from Jersey City, NJ (Hudson County) and ran anchor for the 4×400 relay. All three share their stories on leadership, camaraderie, and express how competing in Men’s Track and Field National Championship has shaped their university experience. 

How has your team’s camaraderie propelled you to success? What makes your team different from those around you?

Amara Conte: Our team camaraderie is what makes us a great team, our bond and trust in each other’s ability to perform when it matters most helped us to focus on our own individual part of the relay and perform to the best of our abilities. What makes our team different from other teams is that we are more than a team, we are family, we are brothers, and we always have each other back. Knowing this makes up for our individual flaws and makes us a strong team. 

Nana Agyemang: The team is like one big family. We go through so much pain and suffering at practice that it only makes us stronger and makes us care for each other even more. We keep each other accountable whether that’s making sure we are on time for practice or hitting the correct times for practice we just want to see everyone maximize their full potential. I think the difference from our team to other teams is that we’re really hungry and never satisfied. We always know we can improve on something so when we do good we smile, and celebrate it for the weekend but on Monday it’s back to work like we didn’t so we can always get better and moving forward. 

Going into the race, what emotions were you feeling? Were you guys considered to be an underdog or favored within the 4×400 relay at the meet?

Jah’mere Beasley: Going into the race everyone was laser focused and locked in. I had just taken third place in the 200m, so I brought that energy over to the other guys. We had been ranked #1 in the country all year, and we knew we had the chance to win it all. I would say we were the favorite to win, but there were a lot of other great teams who had solid chances as well.  

Nana Agyemang: I was excited going into the race because of what was at stake. We knew what we had to do and how we were the team to beat from being the National Champion in outdoor so I was thrilled and excited to just get the race underway. We had the #1 time going into nationals but going into finals we were ranked third so most teams probably thought they had us beat because we were running three new people who weren’t on the outdoor national championship (me, Marquise and Jah’mere). In my head it felt like we were the underdogs, but we also knew that we were still the team to beat so we had to go out there and rise up to the occasion. 

Teammates hand off the baton.

What are your team’s biggest strengths? What are your team’s biggest weakness?

Amara Conte: Our team’s biggest strength is the bond we have and our undying love for the sport of Track & Field. Our greatest weakness is that since we have such a diverse group when it comes to individual events, it becomes hard for us to put our all on the relay event, but we somehow make it work and compete at our best when we matter.

How do you prepare for an event like this before race day? 

Jah’mere Beasley: The day before a big race like this I try to stay off my feet as much as possible. I always make sure I eat a great dinner and snack the evening before. I take an ice bath and hot shower to help my legs feel rested. I roll out and stretch really well before bed. I always try to make sure I get 7-8 hours of sleep before a big race day. 

Nana Agyemang: How I prepare for meet day is I usually wake up and instantly play some gospel music because I am a big believer in God so when I wake up I just wanna praise him. Then I go head and brush my teeth and shower and I usually have talks with myself to get my mind right because you are only as strong as your mind. Then I made my breakfast which is usually brown sugar oatmeal, eggs, a water and a granola bar. When I hop on the bus I do a little meditation to get my full body right. Then as we head on the bus approaching to the meet I’ll switch my playlist, attitude, and focus to a more serious tone and lock in on the task ahead.

Beasley runs one leg of the race.

How do you prepare for an event like this on race day? Do you have any race day traditions, meals, or specific actions you swear by? 

Amara Conte: Once we get to the track on the day of the meet, I do my usual warm up while listening to my pre-made playlist that I have prepared just for track meet to help me stay focused and locked in. I don’t eat much on meet days because I run fast on an empty stomach. 

How does winning the [indoor] national championship for the 4×400 meter relay shape your experience at Rowan? How are your track experience in general shaped your college experience? 

Amara Conte: Winning the national championship in 4×400 meter twice now has made my experience at Rowan more pleasurable and has enhanced my experience in ways that I could only imagine. My track experience in general has taught me many life skills, for example: time management, networking, and discipline. Due to my experience as a track athlete, I’ve grown in more ways than I can possibly fathom and with more years these skills and experience will only sharpen and improve before I enter the real world. 

Jah’mere Beasley: Winning the national championship in the 4×400 has made my time here that much more special. This is one of the closest teams I have ever been a part of, and winning that national title brought everyone closer together. Having a brotherhood like this is unmatched. I always cherish the moments I have on the track and that national title is something I will always remember. Those moments always motivate me to get faster and better than I was before. My track experience has shaped my college experience in a big way. Track has helped me make lots of new friends here at Rowan. Most of the the friends I have made are people that play other sports. Track is helping me stay focused in the classroom as well. It motivates to keep my grades up and give max effort with each assignment. 

Nana Agyemang: It’s been cool seeing my friends repost it, having teachers come up and congratulate me has been a great feeling. It’s just made my Rowan experience better and more enjoyable. Track had taught me valuable lessons like when things don’t go your way you can either come back the next day and try again or quit. It has also taught me that life will get hard, like workouts, but if you keep going there is always a light at the end of the tunnel. It might look dark while you’re going through but sooner or later you will reach the end of the tunnel and be happy you did. We have had plenty of workouts that we feel like we aren’t gonna make it but we just gotta keep going and you gotta tell yourself your stronger than that you think.  

Conte runs one leg of the race.

Do you participate in both winter and spring track? What are the biggest disparities between the two? What the biggest challenges between the two different seasons? 

Jah’mere Beasley: I run both winter and spring track. The biggest disparity between the two are the size of the tracks. The winter track is 200m and the spring track is 400m. During the 4×400 in winter track, each person runs two laps, as compared to spring track where each person runs 1 lap. Events like the 4×100 and javelin are only during spring track. The biggest challenge is running on the indoor tracks. The lanes are smaller and the turns are tighter. It take a lot of getting used to during the season. 

Read our earlier interview with Jah’mere here.

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, senior public relations major 

Photos courtesy of: 
David Dermer/Rowan Athletics

#PROFspective: Computer Science Major, Basketball Player, International Student Marko Pantovic

Outdoor shot of Marko wearing a coat and backpack.

Today we speak to Marko Pantovic, a senior Computer Science major and basketball student-athlete from Belgrade, Serbia. Marko transferred to Rowan University from Maryville University in Missouri. Marko tells us about the chance experience that led him to Rowan and shares his advice for future international students. 

Marko standings holding the Serbia flag.

How did you end up transferring to Rowan?

In the summer of 2018, my brother was just getting married. He had been dating his girlfriend for eight years. They both met at Drexel. They had a wedding in Philly that summer. My family and I decided to look at schools around the area because they lived in Mullica Hill, NJ. I decided to look at Rowan. The school looked great, and they had the major I wanted to do. The D3 level doesn’t matter. Basketball doesn’t matter. Joe Crispin, the Rowan Men’s Basketball coach, set up a tour for me right after I email him. I did the tour, and then I committed right on the spot. I loved everything about Rowan. It was also great to be near my brother for the first time in years.

How did moving closer to your brother affect your college career?

My brother became more of a father figure towards me, which I didn’t expect. I really appreciated him because he’s been pushing me to be my best, not just in school, but also on the court and with everything else. He’s shown me how it looks like living life here. I loved every second I’ve been here.

Marko poses with his brother and his brother's wife after a basketball game.
Marko poses with his brother and his brother’s wife after a basketball game.

What was it like, transitioning to life in the United States?

Well, I know some people from back home who felt so homesick they had to go back home. I have never felt that way, but I think it was because my older siblings came to the United States as well. I did a prep year before going to college, and there were three or four Serbs there, as well as other international students. The next year, I felt by myself. The holidays and winter break were especially lonely. Winter break felt like it would never end. That was a big reason I wanted to transfer to Rowan. Now that I am living with my brother, his wife and my two little nephews, I feel at home. I don’t get as homesick as I did before. 

Do you have any advice for future international students on how to make yourself at home?

My brother was not the only person who made me feel at home here. I also give credit to Nick and Rob, two of the other seniors on the basketball team. They accepted me as soon as I came here. I would say finding a group of friends is important. You can find one on your team, in your major, or through other international students at the International Center.

The International Center here is great. They have banquets, meet-and-greets, and other events. They were especially helpful my first semester here when I was trying to see if there was anyone else from my country here. 

Marko is introduced before a game.

How did you choose your major?

Computer science is really vast. Cybersecurity, everything we do on our phones and computers, is all computer science. A cash register at a store is computer science. The vastness attracted me, and I wanted to explore it. My dad works at an IT company, so I have been exposed to it. Ever since I was a kid, I have always loved computers and loved working with them. I had never experienced software and programming, so I have been learning a lot in my courses. I learned how much I like computer science, and how vast it is.

What is your favorite part of computer science?

I’ve had a lot of software development classes the last two semesters, which have been amazing and I’ve had so much fun with them. I’d like to focus on software development, but I’m not sure if I want to do it in web apps or mobile apps.

Marko stands next to a sign with many countries on it outdoors.

Do you have a favorite moment with your basketball team?

In Serbia, we take basketball really seriously. The fans are passionate; they chant and support their team, and they yell at the other team. I love that kind of environment. We had a setting like that in Jersey City, and we won the game. It was awesome, and I’ll never forget it. 

What made you feel that you made the right decision, coming to Rowan?

The whole Rowan experience, I’m really thankful for it. I didn’t think school would be this great. I always knew I was going to stick through it. I always knew I would finish school with a degree in something. When I was here, I literally had a feeling I didn’t want to leave. Rowan has become a second home for me, and I’m really thankful for it.

See our video with Marko here: 

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Story by:
Rachel Rumsby, junior communication studies and public relations double major

Photos by:
Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major
Rowan Athletics

Family photo submitted by:
Marko Pantovic

Senior Reflects: Finance Major, Soccer Team Captain Bethany Sansone on Leadership and Mentorship

Today we speak with Bethany Sansone, who recently graduated with a degree in Finance and a minor in Marketing. Bethany is from Roxbury, NJ (Morris County) and is involved around campus as a member of the Women in Business Club, member of Rowan Athletics’ OWL (Outstanding Women Leaders) Group and as captain of the Women’s Soccer Team. She discusses her experiences within her major, her career aspirations, and she shares details on the job she will be starting this fall.

Why did you choose to study Finance? Have you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

The reason why I choose to major in Finance is because it’s challenging, fast-paced and exciting! I’ve always loved and excelled in working with numbers and math in general. Finance seemed to be the perfect fit for me. My parents are both in the accounting and finance field, so from high school I’ve always known I would be going into the business field in some way. 

Why did you choose Rowan to study Finance? How did Rowan stand out to you in your college search?

I ultimately chose to go to Rowan to play soccer. Luckily enough, Rowan happened to be a great school for business and my academic aspirations! Rowan’s campus and atmosphere also stood out to me compared to all of my other college visits. 

Who was your favorite professor and what class did you take with them?

Professor Singkamanand is my favorite professor at Rowan. I [took] Advanced Excel Applications with him. He truly cares about all of his students and wants them all to do well in school and at their workplace upon graduation.  

Bethany Sansone after graduation.
Bethany Sansone after graduation.

What advice would you give to incoming first year students and transfers about making the most out of their college experience? 

Advice I would give to incoming first year students is to go out and experience everything! Rowan has so many different events where you can truly discover what you’re passionate about. Not only that, but at these events you can meet new people, form new connections, and explore different things about yourself. Overall, Rowan offers so many clubs and activities that you should take advantage of and can lead to a whirlwind of opportunities — whether it’s a job connection, a new passion, new friendships, etc. 

Could you share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

I’ve had many great experiences in all of my classes at Rowan, but a time that truly took a turn for the better was when we were able to go back to in-person class opposed to learning remotely over the computer. All of my professors were amazing during the pandemic, but nothing compares to being able to learn face-to-face in a classroom with your peers. 

What are your career aspirations? How do you think Rowan has prepared you for your future endeavors?

I aspire to become a CFA or CPA in the future. One way Rowan really prepared me for my future is with the Finance Mentorship program it provided. I am so thankful for this program, as I believe it was the best thing to help prepare me for my career post graduation. My mentor helped guide me through everything I needed; through resume help, interview prep, to choosing what industry in finance fit me the best. 

Can you talk about being a female in a predominantly male field of study? What are some challenges you have faced? What do you believe your biggest strengths are as a student within this major?

Being a female student in a predominantly male field of study definitely had its challenges. First and foremost, I questioned whether this field was a fit for me personally and professionally and how I was viewed by my peers especially when working in group projects since I was typically the only female in the group. This definitely made me introverted and shy at first.

As I grew as a person over the years, I became more comfortable and confident in myself. One of my biggest strengths as a student is that I am always on top of my work; I make sure the quality of my work is high and I make sure that I have everything done before the deadline. 

Bethany Sansone pictured with her cap and gown.

Why is finance the best suitable major for the goals you would like to accomplish in your future?

Finance is the best suitable role for me because I enjoy problem solving in creative ways. My goal is to help the company that I work with in planning how to grow their revenue and maintain profitability. 

Can you talk about the position you have accepted post graduation? Can you talk about the process of applying and then accepting this position?

I accepted a full-time offer as an Analyst with WithumSmith+Brown upon graduation. My process for applying to this position started with a referral from a friend; from there I attended the career fairs that the firm was going to, and had multiple interviews with different people from the firm to then be able to accept the position.

Do you have advice or tips, in particular for females, that are trying to stand out within the job search and interview process? What do you believe were your biggest attributes to obtaining this position?

My advice for the interview process is to be yourself and don’t let your nerves get to you! Along with that, I suggest that you do a good amount of research on the company and to prepare questions to ask at the end of it. Additionally, make sure to mention your strengths and share previous professional experiences like internships. For me, I think I stood out in the interview process by highlighting my leadership roles in college, like being captain of the Rowan Women’s Soccer Team, along with sharing the clubs I am a part of. I also think my previous internship experience helped showcase my skills and knowledge. 

Is there anything else you would like to look back on and reflect on regarding your time at Rowan?

I am so thankful to have had a great college experience at Rowan. I gained so much knowledge, met so many great people, and explored many different interests. Rowan gave me all the tools and resources to be successful while in school and preparing for the real world post graduation. 

Bethany Sansone posing on Bunce Hall steps after graduation.

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Story by: 
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Photos courtesy of:
Bethany Sansone

#PROFspective: Life Behind the Camera with Sports Communication and Media Major Ashley Craven

Ashley holds a DSLR camera with a long lens inside Business Hall.

In this edition of #PROFspective we learn of junior Sports Communication and Media major Ashley Craven. Ashley is a transfer student from Camden County College who commutes from Sicklerville, NJ (Camden County). Showing great tenacity, Ashley is a single mother rising up to achieve her degree. Recently, Ashley was hired for Rowan Blog and exhibits a passion for photography. In this dialogue, we learn of Ashley’s own journey through academia as well as an inside look at her unique Rowan experience.

What drew you to your major? 

Being an athlete, I wanted a job in the sports industry. I was actually going to nursing school and when I got in, I realized it wasn’t for me; so, sports came to mind.

I recently discovered my passion for photography. I thought of connecting the two. Now, I am taking on more cinematography and production assignments for the Rowan Blog. It just feels right.

Ashley works on a laptop with her camera at her side inside Business Hall.

How does your field impact the world? What impact would you like to have on the world in your field?

Combining photography and cinematography is like conveying a story in silence, which I think is pretty powerful. It allows athletes to showcase their talents and emotions. Whether they’re winning a championship or so forth, I really want to emphasize the talents of other athletes. It is a form of storytelling, so those who weren’t at these events can see bit by bit.

On the professional side, I want to get a job with the NFL or WWE. I’d feel a big sense of accomplishment if I got to do that because I would see my photos being out there around the world. I want to be an asset to a company and provide them with quality pictures to benefit them as well. It’s cool to think that photos are one of the only ways you can actually look back at the past. 

Ashley sits and holds her knees on a bench inside Business Hall.

Describe for us an experience you’ve shared with a Rowan professor in which you felt like you were working with a visionary in your field. 

I have Neil Hartman to thank, without a doubt. I even kept in close contact with him even when I was still at Camden County College. It took me a year and a half to come here, and I still keep in touch with him. He has just been so influential. Neil Hartman provides all the students networking opportunities, keeps up to date with upcoming events and job fairs. He definitely wants me to succeed because he saw how passionate I was. He even reached out to ask me to do a lacrosse tournament just because he knew I was willing to do anything to succeed in the world of photography. He is definitely great with guidance and he is going to be the one I thank at my graduation speech.

What’s your fondest moment here at Rowan that involves your major?

The best would have to be when Brianna McCay, who is involved in The Whit, asked me to photograph the Brian Dawkins interview. Because of her, I was able to take some awesome photos of an icon. Two of my pictures made it into the newspaper, and I realized that I wanted to keep doing it.

I think photographing with the newspaper and seeing my photos published for the first time was one of the greatest moments. That was just an opening door to my future success. It’s still a new hobby of mine but it’s already got me here.

Ashley is smiling with her two kids around her.

Any words you want to give to someone interested in your major?

Really, when you talk about the sports industry it’s all about who you know. You have to network, you have to promote yourself, you have to preserve. Every no will lead to a better yes. Albert Einstein said, “Imagination is everything, it is the preview to life’s coming attractions.” That really resonates with me. What you put out into the universe is what’s going to attract to you.

How would you describe your academic journey so far? 

So I absolutely love school now. I actually did not complete high school. Then, about eight years later, it kind of just came to me that I wanted to go back to school again. I wanted to better my life my kids and for myself, so I got my GED. I have worked relentlessly ever since. I wanted to get the degree, and I’ve just been so motivated.

With my kids, it’s hard to get work done but I’ve always believed in self discipline and I think it’s huge. So I set up times where I wake up at five or six in the morning when they’re still sleeping just to get an assignment done. Or I’ll even get them to bed by 9:30 and stay up until midnight to do my work. It’s very challenging for sure.

Because of them and how I want to better myself as an individual, it encourages me to stay on top of my assignments, get things done and get good grades. I value that, especially from someone who originally hated school.

Ashley stands with her hand on her hip inside Business Hall.

Is there any specific club or organization that has helped welcome you here at Rowan? 

Pizza with the Pros, there you feel the togetherness. It’s just awesome the people that you get to meet. Everyone just wants to help — whether it’s a student, a professional in the industry or in my case, Neil Hartman. Those events are all about networking and hearing perspectives of people in the industry. The all give great advice. Those events really just make me feel welcomed and supported. 

What has been the biggest challenge in transitioning to Rowan? 

Learning where all of the buildings are located! I just think being new is the most challenging. Other than that, everything has been pretty easy to navigate, especially with Canvas. 

Any final words you would like to give? 

You’re never too old, and it’s never too late. Prioritize what’s most important to you and put self-discipline first. I’m huge on being mindful. I would also suggest writing everything down. It’s really important to write down all your thoughts and ideas just to reflect on them after. Don’t forget to date them as well!

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Story by:
Lucas Taylor, senior English education major

Photography by:
Valentina Giannattasio, first year dance and marketing double major

Rowan Fencing Club [VIDEO]

Two people fencing in full equipment.

Open to all skill levels, Fencing Club offers instruction for all three weapons: foil, épée and sabre, with two experienced coaches in the sport. Neither equipment nor prior knowledge about fencing is needed to join.

Learn more about student organizations at Rowan here.

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Video by:
John Hunter, junior Radio/TV/Film major
Brian Seay, junior sports communication and media major

Header photo courtesy of:
Pexels

Rowan University Geography Major Hopes to Create Change For Future Generations

A landscape photo of the fountain behind engineering pond.

Jaylen Shanklin, a junior Geography major from Gloucester County, shares why he chose his major and the environmental impact that he hopes to have.

Jaylen poses for a portrait outside Science Hall.“I’ve always had an interest in geography. My dad is a major history buff and we’d watch shows together and it drew me in,” says Jaylen.

His initial interest in the major drew him to the program, but the classes and professors are what made him know it was a good fit.

“I’ve been lucky! All of my professors I’ve had, no matter the subject or the class, have all gone above and beyond the call of being a professor,” Jaylen explains. “They’ve made sure everyone succeeds professionally and personally.”

Geography students research and present ways to build and manage resources in a more sustainable way. 

“I want to make a positive change and I know this major will get me there. I want to know that I put my imprint on our local community and made this place a better, more sustainable state for my kids and future generations. My favorite class so far has been Geography in New Jersey, because it focuses on what I can do for my community.”

Jaylen, a Rowan University geography major, looks at a globe.Jaylen is currently in his junior year and has been involved with extracurricular activities in addition to things related to his major. While he looks forward to the field work and internships, he finds a lot of value in networking and making friends.

“I play Rugby and I wrestle, so my advice is to just get involved. Take classes in your major, even out of your major. Dip your toe in everything and take a wide range of exploratory classes. Do a bunch of clubs, even if you think it wouldn’t be for you. It all helps and makes you a better person, and that’s what college is about after all.”

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First Person Perspective: Women’s Lacrosse at Rowan University With Natalie DePersia

Rowan Blog contributor, Public Relations major and student athlete Natalie DePersia shares her experience as a member of the Rowan University Women’s Lacrosse Team. 

Like many collegiate athletes, I developed a love for my sport in high school. However, I can easily say that I loved lacrosse in high school for a completely different combination of reasons than the reasons I love lacrosse now.

My high school lacrosse team was ranked amongst the top five teams in the state. My graduating class consisted of nine players, and seven of us continued on to play lacrosse or field hockey in college.

I loved lacrosse in high school for the social aspect, to fuel my competitive edge, because my team was simply … the team to beat. 

Natalie DePersia Playing Lacrosse.
Natalie playing lacrosse at Ursinus in spring 2020.

My love for lacrosse in college became way more than a social experience. Yes, I met friends I know I will have for a lifetime. However, Rowan Women’s Lacrosse gave me a fresh start. Many individuals have a variety of different experiences when they commit to a university to play a collegiate sport. Some experiences are bad, some average, some good, and some are the once-in-a-lifetime … amazing experiences.

As soon as I got to Rowan, I quickly realized I did not only love the sport, I loved the culture that was built up into the program. 

Practice picture from preseason 2021.
Full team picture after practice from preseason in spring 2021.

There are always pros and cons of playing a sport in college. Cons may include waking up prior to 6 a.m. for Breakfast Club (a conditioning and running workout our team was required to participate in), not having as much time as a regular college student, needing to take classes at specific times in order to attend lacrosse commitments … all the normal things which in the grand scheme of things are minuscule compared to the pros playing a sport has provided me.

I genuinely love practice, I love seeing my teammates, I love my coaches, I love being able to compete, I love how the sun sets as practice ends, and I love so many other things that lacrosse has given me. But simply enough, I mainly love lacrosse because I love the action of playing lacrosse. 

Last academic year, my sophomore year, I developed heart complications from Covid-19. This resulted in my inability to play lacrosse for most of the year. As a competitor, this was difficult and mentally defeating. However, this is where I learned that I loved lacrosse even more than I knew. I attended practice with a bright smile and a big spirit. I could not attend physically but I sure attended practice mentally. I listened, I learned to be a good teammate, I tried to help others, I observed. I dedicated myself to being a great sideline leader, which would not have been possible if I was fully cleared. 

Our lacrosse team volunteering at the Mens soccer games.
Rowan lacrosse team volunteering at the men’s soccer games in fall 2020.

As a member of the Rowan Lacrosse team, the past year from an outsider’s view could be looked at as a “wasted year” for myself. However, with the help of my coaches, teammates, trainers, and friends and family outside of lacrosse, my efforts were focused elsewhere, and I developed a deeper gratification toward the sport. I realized how much I care about the sport by not playing. I realized I how much I care about the program and the people around me by not being able to be on the field and by being on the sideline. 

My absence last year has only made me more excited to come back to the program this year. I may have been unable to play, but regardless, I learned more about myself as a leader, more about the program and our culture, more about the coaches and their compassion, and more about my teammates and their support. 

Rowan Lacrosse Team after the last fall season practice in 2020.
Rowan lacrosse team after last fall season practice in 2020.

You can follow the Rowan Women Lacrosse Team at the Instagram handle @rowanwlax.

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Story and photos provided by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

A Look Inside the Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team

An athletic field as seen through a fence on campus.

Today we feature three members of the Men’s Club Lacrosse team as they share their experiences and touch upon why Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse is a great extracurricular to participate in.

Participating in sports at the high school level is important to students as it fuels their competitive edge, allows individuals to make new friends, and simply teaches students about leadership and confidence. However, being recruited by collegiate sports teams and continuing to play at college can be physically rigorous, difficult to manage socially, and requires an immense amount of time. 

Team volunteering to help the youth players of Washington Township for a clinic.
The Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse Team volunteers to help the youth players of Washington Township at a clinic.

Rowan University does not have a collegiate Division III Men’s Lacrosse team; however, the university does offer a Men’s Club Lacrosse team. Today we feature several members of the team to hear their insights on the program. 

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse celebrating a tournament win in Spring 2021.

Ryan Meiluta is a senior long stick midfielder majoring in Civil Engineering from Delran, NJ (Burlington County).

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I wanted to continue playing lacrosse and compete.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

The bonds we have with our teammates. 

Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

I started because I love the sport, but the social aspect makes it a lot better.

How many days a week do you practice? 

Two days a week.

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse goalie and defenders walking onto the field for a game.

Christian Boylan is a senior midfielder from Hillsborough, NJ (Somerset County) majoring in Environmental Science and Sustainability and minoring in geology and environmental planning.

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I really enjoy playing lacrosse and wanted to continue to be a part of a team.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the men’s club lacrosse team?

My teammates.

What is a pro of playing for the team?

Winning games and winning the games without a coach is definitely a pro. 

If Rowan had an NJAC/ NCAA men’s lacrosse team, would you pursue that or try to walk on?

Yes.

Rowan Men's Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.
Rowan Men’s Club Lacrosse at their annual walk for one of their founding members, Donnie Farrell, in Glassboro.

Ryan Collins is a junior defender majoring in Marketing and is from Lacey Township, NJ (Ocean County). 

Why did you choose to play men’s club lacrosse?

I chose to play lacrosse at Rowan because I wanted to continue playing the sport after high school. I felt it was a good way to meet new people and to continue playing.

Do you travel and play other schools?

Yes, we travel to different tournaments and colleges playing other club teams from all different schools.

How competitive would you say the team is?

I’d say the team is very competitive. Every practice and game we have we all give 100%, and our goal is to be the best we can.

Do you play on the team more so for the social aspect or because you love the sport?

I’d say a little bit of both, they’re both great factors that come with playing on the club team. I’ve always loved lacrosse and have played my whole life so I knew I wanted to play in college. But, I think club lacrosse was the perfect thing to do because I am able to focus a ton on school while still playing the sport and spending time with teammates.

Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.
Face-off win by Dylan Ritchkoff during a scrimmage in Spring 2021.

To learn more, visit:

https://rowan.campuslabs.com/engage/organization/mensclublacrosse

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Story by:
Natalie DePersia, junior public relations major

Related posts:

Sports and Mental Health

First Person Perspective: Women’s Lacrosse at Rowan University With Natalie DePersia

#PROFspective: Natalie DePersia, Public Relations Major and Lacrosse Athlete

Natalie poses on the bridge in front of Mimosa Hall.

Today, we feature junior Natalie DePersia, a Public Relations major with minors in Psychology and Sports Communication and Media. Natalie shares her experience at Rowan as a student and lacrosse athlete.

Do you live on campus, or do you commute? 

“I live off campus in a house across from the football field.”

What are some likes and dislikes of your major?

“I was originally a Communication Studies major, but it was too broad for me. I enjoy writing because it forces me to come out of my shell. Since I just started in this field, I don’t have any dislikes yet.”

Natalie poses next to some greenery.

How is your experience at Rowan so far?

“All of my professors, especially Professor Cristin Kastner Farney, Professor Sherry Hicks and my coaches are genuinely caring and are very helpful. As a student-athlete, I started off as a defender even though I wanted to be a midfielder. Because of Covid, I could not play from September to February. Eventually, I progressed my way back to playing lacrosse, but it’s been inconsistent and challenging. I hope to start back up in fall 2021. Overall, I have had a good experience at Rowan so far.”

Why Rowan?

“I first looked into Rowan because my brother attended the school as a basketball athlete. I live pretty close, which makes it convenient as well. In my junior year of high school, I played lacrosse and wanted to play it at Rowan. Everything Rowan offered was convenient. I ended up liking the school after visiting.”

Do you have a job? 

“I’m a server at PJ Whelihan’s in Medford, and so far the job’s been cool.”

What do you like to do for fun? 

“I enjoy hanging out with friends, spending time with my dog, playing lacrosse and working out. I also like writing and singing my own songs, just not in front of people.”

Natalie sits in a gazebo near Bunce Hall.

What is one interesting fact about yourself?

“I have a twin brother, but we don’t share the same birthdays. I was born at midnight and he was born the hour before. I also have two older twin brothers.”

What is your dream job?

“My dream job is to travel, meet people, hear and write their stories.”

Do you have any life advice for Rowan students?

“You are capable of more than you think you are. Challenge yourself.”

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Story by: Nene Diallo, senior public relations major

Photography by: Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major, and Reshaun Timmons, senior business major

                               

#PROFspective: History Major Anthony Raisley on Living On Campus

Anthony sits on the grass in front of Bunce Hall wearing a yellow shirt.

Today we speak with recent graduate Anthony Raisley, who majored in History with a concentration in U.S. History and multiple minors in Entrepreneurship, New Media, International Studies as well as a CUGS (Certificate of Undergraduate Studies) in Italian! Anthony comes from Middletown, NJ in Monmouth County and has lived on campus all four years of college. Anthony graduated this past May.

Advice for incoming transfers or freshmen who want to live on campus?

It’s very exciting to see all the facilities Rowan has to offer and the new things that Rowan is developing. There’s great housing and great options for everybody. I’d definitely say to live on campus if you can because the experiences you get are certainly unique to being an on-campus resident. I very much enjoyed my time living on campus all four years.

What are some of the advantages of living on campus? 

It’s much easier to walk to class and to visit friends in other residence halls. Also if I have to meet up with other classmates to work on projects, it’s easy to meet in one of the academic buildings or in one of the resident lounges.

Anthony stands confidently in front of the Rowan arch.

What about practical tips for packing? Tips on what to leave at home?

Each year you get better and better with picking and knowing what you need to bring. To be honest, I never bring enough (lol). There are things where I’m like, “Oh, you really don’t need this.” But you can never have too many sweatshirts if it gets chilly on certain days. Don’t forget the rain boots or rain jacket. Those are things you forget because it’s a beautiful August day when you move onto campus and then you realize once it’s October: “Oh yeah, I need my boots and rain jacket!” Definitely prepare for all of the elements, but it’s great to see the campus change through all of the seasons!

How did you make friends as a resident? 

My freshman year, when I moved in, I started off running cross country and track. I was able to move in early. I met the guys on the team. Everyone from Rowan Athletics is fantastic, makes you feel welcome, and helps you with your transition from moving from home into college. My sophomore year I was still running. I [also] started working in admissions as an ambassador. Being able to meet a lot of my fellow ambassadors as a sophomore, junior, and senior, you get a great idea of what Rowan represents as far as all of the different backgrounds and different majors. It’s a great way to meet people that way. It’s a great environment to work in. In my junior year, I started working for the social media team, another great way to meet people and professional staff as well.

Anthony gazes into the sun in front of Bunce Hall wearing all light colors.

How did you get connected with Rowan Social Media? 

I saw an email or announcement online. Immediately, I was interested in it because on the side I take photos. Being able to be part of this environment, taking photos of campus, and getting to meet so many people has been fantastic.

What do you want to do professionally after graduation? 

After graduation, I’m actually going to Georgetown for grad school. I’m moving to Washington, D.C. because the program I got into was the Master of Arts in Communication, Culture, and Technology. It’s exactly what I love, all those subject areas even with the minors that I have here and also my major. It all fits together. I’m so glad I’m able to pursue that next year. It’s nice because you can pick what you want to focus on. That’s what’s in store for me this fall.

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Story by: 
Marian Suganob, public relations and advertising graduate

Photos by:
Stephanie Batista, junior music industry major

4 Out-Of-State First Year Students Share Why They Chose Rowan

Today we speak with four out-of-state first year students about why they chose a university further from home and their experiences here at Rowan. Abby Riley, a first-generation student and Exercise Science major from Elkton, Maryland, shares the value of attending an out-of-state university. Abby says, “I considered and chose an out-of-state university because I […]

Creating Change Through The Social Justice Action Committee [VIDEO]

Three students protesting for Black Lives Matter.

“We can’t let fighting for change become a fad, because it’s not a fad, it’s something that needs to happen,” says Ayanna Johnson, a junior women’s basketball player and Social Justice Action Committee member. The committee is a student-led, university-wide umbrella initiative for projects and programming that promote diversity and inclusion through sport on American […]

#PROFspective: ESS Major, Athlete and Activist Ayanna Johnson

Today we speak with Ayanna Johnson, a junior Environmental & Sustainability Studies (ESS) major under the School of Earth and Environment. She comes from Ewing, NJ in Mercer County and is the captain of the Women’s Basketball Team. She also participates in We Are One Team, Social Justice Action, and OWL (Outstanding Women Leaders) Group.

Ayanna smiles and leans against a tree outside on campus.

Why did you choose ESS? 

When I was a senior, I went on a trip to the Bahamas and studied at the Island School. I focused on environmental science and marine biology. We saw the coral reefs that were dying and how the Bahamas is being disproportionately impacted by global warming. It made me feel that this is a really important field more people need to study. 

What has been your favorite ESS class?  

My favorite ESS class was called Earth, People, and The Environment taught by Professor Richard Federman. I learned about the interconnectedness of people and their environment. 

What do you want to do in the future? 

Every company needs an Environmental Sustainability Specialist to make sure they’re following the rules and regulations from like the EPA. I want to do that in the future. 

Do you have a mentor on-campus? 

My mentor is Mandy Jiang, the former assistant coach of the Women’s Basketball Team. She helps me with school, studying, basketball and basically anything! 

Can you tell me more about the We Are One Team panel that happened in October 2020?  

The We Are One Team panel was an opportunity for me to speak on my personal experiences and also listen to different people from diverse backgrounds speak on social justice issues. We also discussed how we’ve been working to improve our communities by helping people become more educated and understanding about issues that are going on in modern-day America.

I was able to connect with other people that cared about these issues and also wanted to learn more. I made good friends with people who are dedicated to making a difference and speaking out. We bounce ideas off of each other about how we can do more to get our message across.

Ayanna smiles while sitting and leaning on a bench on campus.

What’s it like being the captain of the basketball team? 

It’s not much different than being a regular player. Everyone on my team is so awesome, and we all work together. It’s more about the responsibility of leadership. It pushes me to be more confident when speaking up and in my ability to lead. I never really looked at myself as capable of this, but it’s forcing me to face my insecurities and just do it. 

What advice would you give to newer college students? 

Appreciate the moment and enjoy it. Don’t keep thinking about the next thing. You’re going to waste your whole life thinking about the next step. You have to be in the present and enjoy the current moment. Appreciate life when you are happy because it’s not going to always last. 

If you spend your whole time stressing and not experiencing college, you’re going to regret it. You’re not going to be in your 20s forever. 

Make sure that you’re taking care of yourself because it’s a hard time for everyone. We don’t validate our own emotions or acknowledge things that we’re feeling inside. Everybody should take time to look inside yourself. 

What social justice issues are you most passionate about? 

I’m most passionate about educating people. A lot of what perpetuates injustice is people being ignorant to it. People not understanding how the small things are actually big things which allow for injustice to continue. 

On your busiest day, what academic, non-academic and social responsibilities do you juggle? 

I have practice, academics and work. I also juggle about 15 credits per semester along with basketball. This gives athletes room to stay above the 12-credit minimum and drop a class if necessary. 

How do you balance all of it?

I’m actually not very good at balancing or time management. I try my best to get organized and refocus. I try to make sure that I’m taking care of myself first because I can get caught up with so many different things. I’m not going to be able to do my best like mentally and physically if I don’t take care of myself.

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Story by:
Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

Photos by:
Joe Gentempo, senior art major

Alumni Success: Nah’Ja Washington Shares How Rowan Helped Her Succeed In The Advertising Industry

Rowan arch near Bunce Hall.

What are some of your responsibilities at DDB? I have a lot of different responsibilities. One of them is being aware of different trends and what’s going on in the market and creating a newsletter with my manager to keep her up to date on those things. I also, as the junior strategist, essentially do […]

Leadership #PROFspective: Eliya Bravo, Inspiring Community Action and Change

Bravo speaking into a horn.

Today we feature first-generation college student Eliya Bravo, a leader at Rowan University. Bravo is the founder and president of the Women of Color Alliance and vice president for both the Students For Caribbean Awareness and Rowan Universities Club Swim Team. Bravo is also the public relations rep for the United Latinos Association and a […]

Leadership #PROFspective: Ayanna Johnson on Speaking Up as a Woman in Sports

Ayanna sits down and leans against a bench on campus.
Ayanna wearing a yellow dress while posing against a tree.

Today, we speak with Ayanna Johnson, captain of the Women’s Basketball Team and an active member of We Are One Team, Social Justice Action Committee, and Rowan Athletics’ OWL (Outstanding Women Leaders) Group. Ayanna is an Environmental & Sustainability Studies (ESS) major from Ewing, NJ (Mercer County). 

This story is part of a series spotlighting campus leaders during Women’s History Month. 

What is your role in your organizations? What do your organizations do? 

We are One Team gives a voice to those in sports who are not always recognized and uses the power of sports to unify people. What’s special about sports is it unites people who all come from different backgrounds and walks of life and they have the same love for the game. It really represents who we are. We are activists, we care about social justice. We’re more than just athletes. I’m an athlete representative for the club. I speak for panels that they want to have an athlete representative for. I’m very involved in my team and the club!

(OWL) Group is Outstanding Women Leaders. It’s really about empowering women in sports and shedding light on women’s sports because it’s so underrepresented and under-publicized. It’s about leadership in women’s sports and how to be good to other women as a woman. I really love that club because it sheds light on issues that need to be brought to light. As athletes, we’re already in a man’s world.

I’m also a member of Social Justice Action. I’m not on the e-board, but you don’t always have to be the one out there and organizing things. As long as you can be there and have your voice heard, there’s a lot of value in that.

    Ayanna wearing a Rowan Basketball shirt.

    What have you learned in your role as a leader? 

    I’ve learned that your impact on people is way bigger than you realize. When you talk to that [first-year student], they will probably remember that conversation for the entirety of their college career. Just doing small things can change people’s lives more than you know.

    I need to realize how small acts of kindness can make a difference in people’s lives and just speaking up. If everybody felt like their voice didn’t matter, that’s what the people who want to keep you silent want you to feel like. Once you have knowledge and education about things, that’s power.

    Knowledge is power. When you’re educated about something, you can recognize when something isn’t right. When you’re used to being ignorant about things, you want even recognize injustice. So, I take every opportunity to educate myself on history. 

    What’s your favorite memory as a leader or at Rowan in general?

    Hands down, winning the NJAC (NJ Athletic Conference) championships! In 2019-2020, we beat Montclair who has won the conference for the past 10 years. We came back from being down and we won. I ended being the defensive player of the year and broke two records that year! 

    Who inspires you and why? 

    A lot of people inspire me. My little sister inspires me a lot because she’s one of those kids that is good at everything, and she looks up to me a lot. I have to do what I can to be a good role model for her. I know my little sister will root for me, just being able to see her blossom. I just love her so much. How she views me as a good big sister, makes me want to be that. I struggle a lot with self-confidence but I love both of my sisters so much. Your siblings see your whole life. You go through all the ups and downs with your siblings!

    Ayanna wearing a yellow dress while sitting on a bench and smiling.

    What’s the most significant barrier to women today? 

    Knowing that there’s a problem. In 2021, a lot of people are complacent with the way things are. There’s still discrimination and things we need to fight for. If we’re not educated about that, and still don’t see there’s still a problem, then we won’t fight it. If you think racism and sexism is a thing of the past, you’re never going to realize what you’re facing is injustice. 

    What advice would you give to the next generation of leaders? 

    Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Don’t be afraid to have your own opinions. Just because the majority feels this way doesn’t mean you do. If you feel like you should speak up about something, speak up about it! There   are probably other people who are hiding and feel the same way. If you’re brave, you’re probably being brave for so many other people who didn’t have the courage to say the thing you said. 

    Is there anything else you would like to share?

    Take care of your mental health. It impacts your whole life. It’s something I struggle with, it impacts sports a lot. It impacts everything. Just because you’re physically healthy doesn’t mean you’re mentally healthy. There’s a lot of stigma around it, and it’s something I’m really passionate about.

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    Story by:
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising double major

    Photos by:
    Joe Gentempo, senior art major

    Seniors Share: Women’s Club Lacrosse [VIDEO]

    View of the intramural field through the fence.

    Seniors Paige Ryan (white jersey), and Jeannie Corcione (grey shirt) share the positive impact that the Women’s Club Lacrosse team had on their college experience. Paige, captain of the team, is a double major in Biology and Psychology from Sparta, NJ (Sussex County). Jeannie is social chair of the team and is a Psychology major […]

    Meet #Rowan2025: Athletic Training Major Bobby Wietecha

    An action shot of Bobby playing basketball.

    Meet #Rowan2025 student Bobby Wietecha! Bobby is an incoming freshman Athletic Training major from Aberdeen, NJ (Monmouth County). He shares what sports he wants to continue in college and why he chose Rowan.

    Bobby wearing a Matawan high school track jersey.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

    Meeting new people and learning new things.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport, or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

    Weightlifting, basketball, and track and field.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport, or club?

    I want to better myself academically and physically by learning and continuing to work out and participate in sports.

    What majors are you considering and why?

    Athletic Training.

    Where are you going to live next year?

    On campus!

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    Yes, I toured and my sister is an Engineering student currently, so I have visited her and I was impressed by the campus.

    Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    Find something you like that interests you that you can build a career around.

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    The campus and the master’s program in Athletic Training.

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    Story by: Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

    Leadership #PROFspective: Alayna Harrison, VP Of WOCA And Women’s Field Hockey Club

    Alayna holding a megaphone.

    Today we feature Alayna Harrison, a leader at Rowan University. Alayna is the Vice President of Women of Color Alliance and the Women’s Field Hockey Club. She’s a senior, first-generation college student from Lindenwold, NJ (Camden County). Alayna majors in Writing Arts with a specialization in creative writing and a minor in Elementary Education. She […]

    Meet #Rowan2025: Incoming Biological Science Major and Field Hockey Player Isabel Weiner

    The Rowan intramural field.

    Today we feature Isabel Weiner, an incoming Biological Science major from Metuchen, NJ (Middlesex County). Isabel plans to live on-campus and will be a part of the field hockey team next year. 

    Isabel poses outdoors.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward to in college?

    I am enthusiastic about becoming a member of a community full of bright, young leaders. I look forward to surrounding myself with individuals who have the same interests and goals as me.

    Isabel poses while playing field hockey.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport, or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

    During high school, I was a member of a four-time conference champion field hockey team and had the honor to be captain for the 2020 season. I will be a member of the Rowan University Field Hockey program, and I hope to win an NCAA championship. Go Profs!

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college?

    I am hoping I grow as an athlete and as a student. I intend to become a member of the Applied Behavior Analysis Club so I can further my understanding of a potential future career.

    Isabel poses outdoors wearing a Rowan sweatshirt.

    What majors are you considering and why?

    I am considering a major in biological science, as well as a minor in psychology and neuroscience. I have always had a deep interest in STEM and psychology. I hope to one day publish articles on the brain and its impact on behavior and cognitive functions.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events?

    I toured the campus when I attended Rowan University for a field hockey prospect clinic. I was impressed by the coaches and the camaraderie of the players on the team. I attended the virtual, informative session about psychology and learned about the degree options.

    Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    Choose a school where you can see yourself thriving and contributing to your college community proudly.

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    I enjoyed the culture of the field hockey team. They have a competitive and hardworking nature, which makes Rowan Field Hockey such a highly-ranked program.

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    Story by:
    Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    Photos submitted by:
    Isabel Weiner, incoming freshman biological science major

    Alumni Success: Student-Athlete, Trailblazer Brad K. Leak

    Today, we feature alumnus Brad K. Leak ’94, who earned a bachelor of science degree in Business with a specialization in Accounting. He also led the men’s Track & Field team as captain from 1991-94. As a three-time all-American champion, Brad wisely balanced the many responsibilities of being a student, an athlete and a leader.

    Brad posing with a friend outside the track field while wearing a Glassboro State Track sweatshirt.

    Where do you currently work? 

    “I am the Associate Managing Director of Financial Aid at Kean University, but I still love my school [as Brad proudly shows he’s wearing Glassboro State College apparel]. Although it was awkward for me, accepting a job at one of my school’s rivals, my wife and I were excited at the opportunity for my kids to attend college for free. I’m also going to run the EOF program for Kean University! I was equally blessed that my fraternity brother is the first African American president of Kean University. He was putting together a diverse team [to lead Kean]; my name came to his mind as someone who would not only relate to the students of today but also knew how to go about understanding federal compliance as it relates to financial aid and helping students to graduate. Just three weeks previous, I was offered to be the first African American Director of Finance of Union Township, but the local politicians wanted to ensure they put all options of the table for the betterment of my career. I could not turn down the opportunity to assist in molding the future minds of society.” 

    What was your experience as an undergrad? 

    “I received a bachelor of science in business with a specialization in accounting. As an only child, my mother said I always [pretended] to have a business office and clients. I also excelled in mathematics in school. [Although] I wasn’t interested in the complicated formulas, numbers had always interested me. In the church, anytime the offering was going to be taken, I wanted to help manage the finances of the church.” 

    Eventually, somebody pointed Brad toward accounting. In high school, he took an accounting class, learning the concepts of debits and credits. From a young age, Brad “knew [he] wanted to study accounting, become an accountant, and build a whole career as an accountant.”

    Brad’s favorite class was Accounting 102 with Dr. Diane Hughes, one of the few African American teachers he met in his entire educational experience. Brad later became the president of the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) at Rowan from 1993-94. Brad earned the position by impressing IMA’s advisor at the time, Dr. George Romeo, through class and one-to-one basketball sessions. 

    Coming through the EOF program, built solid friendships and learned more about the campus environment. Brad credits his start in EOF in helping him make it through college because it was a major adjustment from his hometown in North Jersey. Living only six minutes from the Newark airport and 20 minutes from New York (on a good day), he remembers being surprised Glassboro only had one Wawa in the area.

    Brad posing for a group photo with his wife and daughter on a track field.
    Here Brad stands with his daughter Akayla (center) at her high school graduation, alongside his wife Kim.

    Can you tell me more about your extracurricular activities? 

    “I specialized in the 800-meter race and ran the anchor leg in the 4×400 relay. The anchor leg was tough, especially at nationals where everybody gets excited. I [also] ran run cross country because as a middle-distance runner, you have to be fast and strong. 

    “I am a member of the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. I pledged in the spring of 1990, and that network has led me to have a fraternity brother who is the president of a major university in the state of New Jersey. The model of our fraternity is focused on service for humanity. Phi Beta Sigma recruited you so that you could become a leader of the community. It was less about yourself and more about what you could do for other people. There’s a difference between aspiring to be a leader, and already being a leader who wants to serve people. I stayed active through the alumni ranks.

    “As one of the historically Black fraternities and sororities, the alumni portion of [Phi Beta Sigma] is as strong if not stronger than the collegiate ranks. [As an alumni], it’s less about college parties and more about community service, networking, and conferences; and, because of that, we’ve become an intellectual thinktank.” 

    Brad remembers being a social butterfly and recruiting members for Phi Beta Sigma, starting off with five to six members and gaining up to 25 new recruits. This experience helped shape Brad into the leader he is now. He believes that intentionally creating positive situations will lead to positive results and that “iron sharpens iron.” 

    Could you share with us a little bit about racial inclusion and the student culture while you attended Rowan? 

    “In my day, the only diversity that came through the campus was from the EOF/MAP programs. In 1992, the Rodney King verdict was released, and we marched down 322 onto the football field during a game. We tried to stop the game. After that, we immediately went to the President’s house [Hollybush Mansion] and camped out. I also went to NAACP events in Clayton and Camden as well as Black Cultural League once a month.” 

    Coming from North Jersey, Brad remembers driving back home and about 35% of the time he drove up the highway home, he was pulled over by NJ state troopers. It happened so often with one state trooper, he eventually remembered Brad as “the college kid.” 

    Brad posing with the Shady Rest Clubhouse sign and pointing to the name 'John Matthe Shippen'.
    Brad plays golf at the first African American-owned golf course in the world. John Shippen is the first African American golf pro recognized by the USGA.

    What advice would you give to students, especially Black students?

    “Always understand that you want to be the change that you want to see. The blessing is, with [the culture] today, I can comfortably speak about the Black Lives Matter Movement. Where in my day, you didn’t want to be so radical. We were being trained to assimilate to corporate America. You didn’t see a lot of African American CEOs or presidents of major corporations, you only really ever saw us in sports and entertainment. Now, we have had an African American president [and now a Vice President] of the United States. So, I would tell those students — especially the males — to understand that if Black Lives Matter then Black education MUST matter. I want them to value their education first and foremost.

    “Education is more than just the process of going to class and going back to your dorm and playing the PS5 or whatever kids are playing with today. Education means you have to join a professional organization. Make sure you not only do sports but also participate in academia and build a relationship with your professors. Ask them about their professional experiences. 

    “I challenge them, [especially] African American males, to set the example and change ‘perception.’ Make sure you’re holistically involved in the campus, be involved in the ENTIRE process of being a college student. You’re only going to be able to do that for four or five years. If I had the chance to do it all over again, I would do it all over again. I would do a couple of things differently and I could make my career that much greater just by the basis of my college education and experience at Rowan University.” 

    Brad has always appreciated the power of education, especially being the second person in his immediate family to attend college. His aunt, Dr. Violet Martin, was the first to go to college and also calls Rowan her alma mater. Brad and Dr. Martin now have six other collegiate-level students or graduates in their family. 

    Brad proudly stands with his son Kyndell, who graduated from college.
    Brad proudly stands with his son Kyndell, who graduated from college.

    What was your journey like after college? 

    “When I graduated from college, I had applied to a lot of the Big Six accounting firms. I wasn’t getting the opportunities I really wanted. Because, at that time, if you didn’t go to one of the Ivy League schools where the Big Six recruited on those campuses and where they have associations set up, they did not look at you. Being the president of IMA, I got sent to a three-day weekend at UPenn. [Even] being one of the most outgoing people in the organization and having a down-to-earth attitude (coming from Rowan), the only kids they were recruiting from were from UPenn, Drexel, or Villanova. I didn’t let it bother me. Long story short, I found out I have a second cousin, Walter Frye, who owns a CPA (Certified Public Accountant) firm. Walter brought me into his firm, and I’ve continuously worked with him for 25 years at the same time as my other jobs. The firm had a contract with KPMG to audit New York City. We made sure to send diverse accountants because the people auditing the city should look like the public. I received training by KPMG in Denver, Colorado. This opportunity set up my whole career. I became a top executive for Atlantic City Housing Authority. I began my own firm and worked with housing authorities all over America, traveling 80% of the time. I would not have believed a small kid from North Jersey would become a key figure in the housing authority. Now, I’ve pivoted back to college and higher education.” 

    What do you hope to see in the future of Rowan? 

    Brad appreciates the fact that the minority base at Rowan is growing. He hopes that everyone feels accepted at Rowan and that diversity will not be treated as just a statistic. He also hopes to see the faculty one day look like the people they are teaching.

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    Story by:
    Marian Suganob, senior public relations and advertising major

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    Beyond The Classroom: Entrepreneurship Major, Owner of Showtime Sneaker Boutiques, Christian Giannola

    Alumni Success: Michael A. Wilson Jr., Marketing Operations Specialist for SHI International Corp.

    Alumni Success: “What’s Good” with Isaiah Showell ‘15, Multimedia Journalist and Local Storyteller

    #PROFspective: Junior Biochemistry Major, Student-Athlete Caitlyn Cordell

    Catie poses, sitting on a bench.

    Today we speak to Caitlyn Cordell, a junior Biochemistry major with a Psychology minor from Middletown, Delaware. Caitlyn is a first-generation college student who lives off-campus. 

    Catie poses in front of a brick wall wearing a Rowan soccer shirt.

    What is a typical Rowan day for you?

    I typically start with breakfast, go to class anytime from 9:30-1:45, eat a snack between classes, I have soccer practice starting at 2, then I eat some dinner and do homework. After that, I will watch a movie or hang out with some friends if I am caught up on my work.

    Could you share with us one moment during your time at Rowan that made you feel inspired or confident that you’re in the right major for you?

    One time I felt inspired that my major was right for me was when I got accepted into a research program at Cooper Hospital. I felt like all my classes had prepared me well and I made the right decision.

    Catie poses by the Campbell Library wearing a Rowan soccer shirt.

    Could you tell us a little bit about your transition into Rowan as an incoming student?

    I was really excited to be living on campus for the first time, to make new friends, and study subjects I was interested in. I think my professors did a really great job of being accepting and creating a comfortable environment in their classrooms. This allowed me to connect with other students in the class easier and I made some of my best friends because of that welcoming feeling.

    What are your professional goals?

    I want to go to medical school and become a physician.

    Catie poses outside wearing a Rowan soccer shirt.

    How has Rowan helped to support you with your professional goals?

    The science department has prepared me for my medical school exam and given me an excellent foundation of knowledge. The Pre-Health Society at Rowan has been a very beneficial club, the meetings help keep me on track for success. They also host cool workshops on topics such as vital signs, suturing, or getting to view and touch different brains.

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    Story by:
    Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    Photos by:
    Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major

    Meet #Rowan2025: Nutrition Major and Future Field Hockey Player Kate O’Boyle

    Kate wears Rowan gear.

    Meet #Rowan2025 student Kate O’Boyle! Kate is an incoming freshman Nutrition major from Manahawkin, NJ (Ocean County). Kate is excited to come to campus next semester and will be joining the Rowan field hockey team.

    Kate smiling and lifting her leg for a photo while walking on a trail.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college?

    I am most excited for a new chapter in my life! I can’t wait to branch out, meet new people and have more freedom and responsibilities.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

    I have been part of the Southern Regional field hockey team since middle school, as well as several club teams. I will be playing on the Rowan field hockey team in fall 2021.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

    I am interested to see how well I can do on my own while being a part of Rowan’s nutrition program and field hockey team.

    Kate signs with Rowan University wearing a Rowan shirt.

    What majors are you considering and why?

    Nutrition because I have always been interested in how one’s diet and activity level will affect their body.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    I visited Rowan in February of 2020. Coach Andre brought me about campus, and I immediately loved it and knew it was the perfect college for me.

    Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    I would say that it is most important to listen to your gut and if you really like the campus and what the college can provide to you, then it is a perfect fit for you!

    Where are you going to live next year?

    On campus!

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    I loved that as I visited, I felt a sense of comfort.

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    Story by: Bianca Torres, Senior, Music Industry major

    Meet #Rowan2025: Chemical Engineering Major Emma Padros

    Exterior shot of Engineering Pond and Hall.

    Meet #Rowan2025 student Emma Padros! Emma is an incoming Chemical Engineering major all the way from New Milford, CT. Emma shares why she chose her major and what she’s looking forward to coming to Rowan.

    Emma smiling and wearing a Rowan t-shirt.

    Welcome to Rowan! Could you share with us one thing you are looking forward in college?

    I am really looking forward to all the events and activities that the Rowan Student Government plans such as their trips to Philly every Friday and their concerts once everything goes back to normal.

    What is one hobby, activity, sport or club you were a part of in high school that you’d like to continue in college?

    I will be joining Rowan’s Swim and Dive team. I have been swimming competitively for over 10 years now, and I am so excited to be a part of such an amazing team where I will be able to continue the sport that I love.

    Is there anything you’re hoping to discover about yourself in college? Grow a new skill? Try a new interest? Starting a new activity, sport or club?

    I am hoping that college will help to make me a more outgoing person as well as help me to become a more independent and self sufficient person. I am also excited to learn new skills such as learning how to use one of the many 3D printers on campus.

    What majors are you considering and why?

    I am going to major in chemical engineering. I have always been interested in engineering as a kid since both of my parents were engineers, so they exposed me to what the major was all about. In high school I took engineering classes, which really helped me realize this is what I want to do in the future. In high school I also found an interest in chemistry, and the more I looked into the major, the more I saw what I could do with it. I hope to go the environmental side of chemical engineering in hopes of developing more environmentally-friendly products for society.

    Emma posing for a picture while holding a certificate and wearing a blue dress.

    Did you tour Rowan or attend any virtual events? If so, which ones, and what did you think?

    I attended two virtual open houses: one for the College of Engineering and the other specifically for chemical engineering. I also went on campus and did a self-guided tour with the audio provided on the Rowan Spotify. All of these were so accessible and it made it nice since it’s all pre-recorded so you can look back at all the recordings to freshen up on any information that you may have missed or forgotten.

    Do you have advice for other high school seniors who haven’t committed to a school yet?

    My advice to any high school seniors who have not committed to a college is to utilize all videos and audio information that the college provides for you. It can be really helpful once you’re down to your top schools when deciding which schools have those differentiating factors that others don’t, no matter how similar they may appear.

    Where are you going to live next year?

    On campus!

    What is one thing about Rowan itself that you liked?

    One thing that I loved about Rowan was how there was an abundance of outdoor seating and areas to hang out, as well as how scenic the campus was — even in the dead of winter it looks beautiful.

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    Story by: Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

    The Best And Worst of Being A Collegiate Student-Athlete: Sophomore Women’s Lacrosse Natalie DePersia

    Rowan's Women's Lacrosse players huddle on the field.

    Today’s story is by sophomore Public Relations major Natalie DePersia. Natalie is from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County) and rents a house off-campus with friends.

    Natalie DePersia poses for a photo.

    Interdependent, focused, and self-motivated.  These are just three adjectives that I believe describe a successful student-athlete. Being a student-athlete is hard, time-consuming, and mentally and physically draining. However, I would not trade this college lifestyle of mine for any other college experience. This lifestyle comes with many perks, but also, some people would say, many sacrifices.  

    Natalie DePersia playing lacrosse.
    Natalie DePersia playing lacrosse.

    The positives of being a collegiate athlete consist of: gaining an instant community, the countless life lessons you learn from playing a team sport, the physical health benefits of playing sports, and of course, comedically, it is acceptable to wear sweatpants every day. As a member of the Rowan Women’s Lacrosse Team, our schedule on a day-to-day basis is very hectic and just simply, long. A typical day in my life during our lacrosse season, on a game day, is structured like so: wake up at 7 am, go to class from 8 am to 10:45 am, go to the locker room to get ready to leave for the game, leave Rowan by 11:30 am, arrive at the opponent’s field at 2:30 pm, start warming up at 3 pm, play the game from 4 pm to 5:30 pm, board the bus and get home by 7-8:30 pm (depending on how far the game was located), shower and start homework, lights out by 11:30 pm, and then repeat. This lifestyle was overwhelming but also led me to learn how to multitask so well. I also learned how passionate I was about playing a collegiate sport and was committed to becoming better every day. Personally, the positives definitely outweigh the negatives.  

    Natalie poses in the car.

    Being a collegiate athlete is not always as glamorous as it seems. Because of all the time spent on athletics, you may need to sacrifice your time and your experiences. Some of the negatives of being a student-athlete are: having less time to focus on your academics, having a limited social life, having an increased risk of injury because of your participation in athletics, and setting limits on extracurriculars.

    Being a student-athlete takes a lot of mental focus, commitment, and time management to balance between athletics and academics. Even though I do miss out on certain things that regular college students experience, I would not trade the lifestyle I have grown to love. Rowan University makes it more than easy to love being a student-athlete. 

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    Story and photos provided by:
    Natalie DePersia, sophomore public relations major

    TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Future Chemistry Teacher Trevor Jones

    Trevor outside.

    Today we feature Trevor Jones, a senior first generation college student majoring in chemistry education. Trevor transferred his junior year and is from Trenton, NJ (Mercer County). He is a resident assistant at the Nexus apartments and is involved with various clubs such as rugby, Men of Color Alliance (MOCA) and Student Organization for Caribbean […]

    TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Marketing Major and Rugby Player Chase Shebey

    Chase poses on the intramural field at Rowan.

    Today we feature junior Marketing major and rugby player Chase Shebey. Chase is an off-campus resident from Glen Gardner, NJ (Hunterdon County). Chase transferred to Rowan from New England College. 

    Chase poses on the intramural field with a rugby ball.

    How has a faculty or staff member here helped to connect you with the next step for your career? My advisor was very helpful in getting me on the right track for my major. A lot of opportunities after college have opened up through Alumni on the Rugby Team.

    Tell us about your transition into Rowan. Before transferring, I was nervous if I made the right choice to come to Rowan. I didn’t like my old school and wanted to make sure I got it right this time. After reaching out to friends that I knew went here, they reassured me that Rowan was definitely the right choice.

    Chase poses on the intramural field with a rugby ball.

    Could you tell us about pre-professional opportunities that you’ve become aware of (or involved in) that will help you to be better prepared to go into your field? Through playing rugby, I was given the opportunity to study abroad in New Zealand to not only get another schools’ perspective on my marketing major but to also play rugby for their school team as well. That will allow me to have a more diversified understanding of marketing, especially on an international scale.

    Chase poses with his Rugby teammates.

    How was transferring to Rowan the right choice for you? Rowan allows me to have a good balance of having fun with my friends and playing a sport, while still putting my education above all.

    Chase and his Rugby teammates pass around a rugby ball.

    How have you been able to make friends and have fun at Rowan? When I’m not in class or studying, before quarantine a lot of my free time was spent playing rugby. Now, my roommates and I spend most of our time playing backyard games or working out while enjoying the weather.

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    Story and photography by:
    Rachel Rumsby, sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    First Year Voices: Biology Major Analiz Santana and Exercise Science Major Mia Guerra

    Today, we speak with freshmen Analiz Santana and Mia Guerra. Analiz is a Biology major from Pennsauken, NJ (Camden County) who is currently residing in Mimosa and Mia is an Exercise Science major currently residing in Holly Pointe from Hasbrouck Heights, NJ (Bergen County). They tell us more about why they chose Rowan and how it is being a freshmen in college during a pandemic.

    Analiz and Mia hanging out on campus.
    Analiz (left) and Mia (right) hanging out outside!

    How did you two meet each other?

    Mia: They were just walking by one of my friend’s dorms and we had the door open and they just said “Hi,” and that’s how we met.

    Why did you choose Rowan?

    Analiz: My sister goes here too! She’s a sophomore. Last year, she would always invite me onto campus last year and she’s also a basketball player and I would always go to her games. I had to choose between here and TCNJ, and I chose here because I ended up really loving it here.

    Analiz and Mia talking outside on campus.

    Mia: I’m on the cross-country track team. I like the program here. I like the campus in general in comparison to other colleges as well. I was supposed to choose a campus in Indiana, but I ended up choosing here!

    How has it been being freshmen at college during pandemic?

    Analiz: It was helpful having that first week where we didn’t have to worry about classes. It was good to actually figure out where we need to put our masks on and figure out the rules around here. It was actually really helpful.

    Mia: Just learning the campus in general, too. Walking around and learning where our classes are and stuff was helpful, too!

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    Story by:
    Bianca Torres, senior music industry major

    Photography by:
    Stephanie Batista sophomore music industry major

    DE to NJ: Biochemistry Major Catie Cordell

    Catie sitting on a bench.

    Today we feature Catie Cordell, a junior Biochemistry major with a Psychology minor. Catie is a first-generation student from Middletown, DE. She is involved with the Women’s Soccer team, Flying First task force and Pre-Health Society. What are some fun off-campus things to do within 20 minutes of Rowan on this side of the bridge? […]

    5 Ways I’ve Gotten Involved on Campus

    Loredonna on bridge.

    College isn’t complete without getting involved to make campus feel like home. Here are 5 ways Loredonna Fiore, a junior Public Relations and Advertising major, did it.

    1. Joining Residential Learning and University Housing (RLUH).

    As a commuter during my freshman year, I didn’t know how to feel more connected to campus. A friend of mine who was an RA asked me to go to an information session to look further into the position. I applied, interviewed and thankfully got the RA position. As a sophomore, I found where I belonged on campus. I got to work with amazing student leaders, supportive professional staff and got to connect with wonderful freshman residents (shoutout to Chestnut Hall Class of 2023). I am now the Assistant Resident Director of Mimosa Hall, and I am learning and growing in this new role alongside my awesome team. RLUH has taught me the power of impact and how each of us can make a difference, big or small. 

    Loredonna stands outside on campus.

    2. Being an admissions ambassador. 

    When I applied to be an admissions ambassador, I learned so many things about Rowan that made me love it even more. Getting to learn about Rowan’s history, all of the resources we offer and working with the professional staff was an awesome experience. I loved helping prospective students and giving them a glimpse of Rowan.  

    3. Becoming an Orientation Leader. 

    Unfortunately, due to Covid-19, I wasn’t able to put all that I learned in PROS training to the test. I am looking forward to doing so next summer (hopefully). From what I did get to experience, I know that I am excited to go back to it. During training, I enjoyed learning about my staff and how we would operate as a team. I can’t wait to get to work with and help freshmen students. 

    4. Interning with Rowan Blog. 

    I was able to apply for my internship because of my Introduction to Public Relations professor. Professor Farney would always talk about real-life examples from her work with Rowan Admissions. I reached out to her in the summer to see if there were spaces available on her team, and she welcomed me with open arms. This is an awesome way to get involved on campus — using the connections you form in your classes and seeing them through to opportunities. Now, I get to meet so many great students and faculty members and expand my portfolio every week. Take advantage of these opportunities. 

    5. Attending Events. 

    Throughout my college experience so far, I have been able to attend events that make Rown feel like home. I love watching Rowan men’s soccer games and attending the live shows at the Bunce Black Box theatre. I also love going to the events put on by Rowan After Hours and the Student University Programmers. Some of my favorites are the Tuesday movie nights, $10,000 bingo and the food truck festival. You can meet people and have fun with your friend at these free Rowan events.

    Loredonna stands outside on campus.

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    Story by:
    Loredonna Fiore, junior public relations and advertising major

    Photography by:
    Stephanie Batista, sophomore music industry major 

    What It’s Like to Go to the Same College as Your Siblings

    Julia McAleavey and her brother that attends Rowan with her.

    Today’s story comes from frequent Rowan Blog contributor Julia McAleavey of Monmouth County, NJ. She recently graduated with a bachelor’s in advertising. Julia transferred to Rowan her sophomore year, from Eastern University in Pennsylvania. 

    College is a time where, usually, you live away from your family. You get freedom from your parents, and of course, your brothers and sisters if you have them. Your siblings might be older and left for college before you, or maybe you’re the first one to leave the nest. Either way, I’m sure you’re thinking that being at the same school as them would be a complete nightmare. They would always be bothering you and finding ways to embarrass you in front of your friends. They’d be ratting to you on your parents about stupid stuff. It’s easy to think this way; however, it might not My brother and I at Rowan.be as bad as you’d think.

    My brother and I are 15 months apart in age, and we both attended Rowan. Even though I’m older, he actually started at Rowan before me. I was at another four-year university that I didn’t like. I decided to transfer at the beginning of my sophomore year, and my mother persuaded me to look at Rowan because of how much my brother loved it. At first, I was hesitant. I thought it would be annoying to go to school with him, and I didn’t want to steal his life, but I went to an open house against my will. I ended up loving it and transferred in the spring. 

    My brother and I when we were little.
    When this photo was taken, we never would’ve thought that we’d end up at the same college.

    Naturally, as a new Rowan student, I didn’t have a whole lot of friends at the beginning. I was glad I had my brother to hang out with and show me the ropes. I knew I never was alone, whether it was to go eat, walk to Walgreens or go work out. We swam competitively our whole lives, so he helped me join the Swim Club and introduced me to all of my best friends. Sometimes, I felt like a burden to him, but he didn’t mind at all.

    Additionally, since we didn’t have cars on campus at first, it made it much easier for our parents to pick us up to go home on weekends and for breaks. They were very thankful to not have to drive in two completely different directions like many other parents do.

    Once I got settled and began to make a life for myself at Rowan, my brother and I barely saw each other at all. We had our own friends, school work and activities that we were involved in separately. There were times where I’d even forget that we went to the same school. Rowan is not exactly small, so I wouldn’t just see him on my way to class. Even though we were busy, however, we still saw each other at swim practice and would usually get dinner once a week. 

    My brother and I at a swim meet for the Rowan club team.
    My brother and I at a swim meet for the Rowan Club Team

    Going to the same college as your siblings may sound like a drag, but it really isn’t a bad gig. You may think you’re always going to see them and that they’re going to be up in your business, but that really isn’t the case at all. It’s like the best of both worlds: You don’t have to live in the same building as your sibling, but you can still easily hang out a few times a week without getting sick of each other. Our younger cousin ended up joining us at Rowan [my senior] year as well, so it became a whole family affair!

    Headshot of Julia, who is smiling and has long blond hair.At the end of the day, when you go to college with your sibling, you’ll have a piece of home away from home right there with you. 

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    Story and photos by:
    Julia McAleavey, recent advertising graduate

    Related posts:

    Siblings At Rowan: Madison and Sophia Agostini

    Sisters on SGA: Sarah and Madeline McClure

    Junior Major Moments: Law and Justice Major, Track and Field Captain Francis Terry

    Francis poses with a trophy.

    Today we feature Francis Terry, a Law and Justice Studies major from Laurel Springs, NJ (Camden County) who recently completed his junior year at Rowan. Francis, a first-generation college student, is a transfer student from Neumann University and lives off-campus. 

    Could you share your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

    My favorite moment with a faculty member was with my coaches on March 15, 2018 in Birmingham, Alabama at the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships. I finished 5th in the nation and earned my first All-American accolade. When they called my name I stepped on the podium and looked at the cameras, the crowd and my teammates cheering for me. My assistant coach, Coach Tate, handed me the medal. I remember hugging Coach Tate thanking him for everything he’s done for me.

    Francis poses with one of his assistant coaches.
    Francis poses with Coach Tate after getting his award.

    We took our picture and I had to get my pants and jacket back on and cool down because I had another race in about 2 hours. The 4×400 was the last event of the day and we finished 3rd in the 4×400. That placement would place us 3rd in the nation as a team. So after I hugged my teammates and congratulated the other teams I got back on the podium. When I got off the podium I saw my Head Coach, Coach Dimit, crying tears of joy so we hugged. We were all so excited to be ranked 3rd in the nation as a team. No, we didn’t win the National Championship, but we were all still proud of every single one of our teammates. 

    Francis poses with his team with their third place trophy.
    Francis poses with his team with their third-place trophy.

    Is there anyone who is a visionary in your field who inspires you and goes above and beyond for you? I wouldn’t say he’s a visionary in my field, but someone who has impacted me tremendously at Rowan University is Eddy. He’s one of the janitors at Rowan University in Esby Gym [editor’s note: this staff member was identified as Edward Garrison, senior maintenance worker for both Esby Gym and The John Green Team House]. Eddy is one of the loudest, but also down-to-earth men I have ever met. Every time I walk into Esby Gym I can just feel his presence. He always screams “Yo Francis,” then shakes my hand and asks how my day is going. Some days we just stand in the hall and talk about sports, life, or anything on our minds that day.

    No matter what, Eddy always makes time to say “Hi” to someone. He’s one of the hardest-working guys I know, and his attitude is always upbeat no matter what. I may not want to be a janitor in my lifetime, but I want to mimic the way he looks at life — his demeanor, work ethic, attitude and just his everyday life of bringing happiness to others. Eddy is one most influential people I’ve encountered throughout my life. Every day I’m blessed to have met a man like Eddy and have him to help shape me for the future. 

    What is the most amazing or interesting ​thing you’ve learned in your major this year? The most amazing thing I’ve learned in my major this year was in my Law Seminar Class with Professor Stone. Even though the majority of the class was taught online due to COVID, this class really opened my eyes. During the course of the semester, we had to use an Excel spreadsheet and take our 40 questions and ask every student who was enrolled in that class questions about their family life. We then had to compare all of our work and compare it to our thesis. We wrote about a 10-page paper on our thesis and results that we calculated throughout the semester. It was an awesome experience working with classmates and developing our own short theory.

    What pre-professional experiences are helping to support your growth? Due to COVID, I had one internship canceled, but two pre-professional experiences I have had would be being a Team Captain for the Men’s Track and Field team and working on the Board for S.A.A.C (Student-Athlete Advisory Committee). Being one of the Captains in the team I’ve definitely had to look at myself differently. Over the past 4 years at Neumann and Rowan, I’ve had many people to look up to and follow. Jeffery Tucker was one of the Captains in 2018, and he’s played a huge role in my life on and off the track.

    Being a captain you’re held to a higher standard. As a captain, I’ve been in difficult situations with my own teammates but we’ve worked past them together. I always try and make myself available for my teammates or even other student-athletes. We all have stuff going on in our lives and every day I’ve learned something new from being around other student-athletes. When you’re around 70+ teammates and being one of the leaders of the team it gets very stressful. Being a captain doesn’t make me higher than anyone else, we are all still on the same team representing the same school and athletic department. I strive to represent myself in the best way possible in the classroom, on the track and even within the community. I hope that I can impact someone’s life for the better the way Jeff did for me.

    Francis and three of his teammates pose with their individual awards.

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    Story by:
    Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    Public Relations and Advertising Double Major Olivia Clinkscale Shares Her Perspective on the Black Lives Matter Movement

    Today we feature Olivia Clinkscale, a Public Relations and Advertising double major with a minor in Sports Communication and Media from Galloway, NJ (Atlantic County). Olivia is an on-campus resident. 

    What is the most amazing or interesting thing you’ve learned in your major this year?

    The most interesting thing I’ve learned in public relations and advertising is that it branches out in so many different ways. I learned that PR can be media relations, government relations, investor relations, and used in crisis communication. Basically, the skills that I use in everyday life. Also learning what type of impact advertisements have on people and how the world perceives something has been interesting.

    What would you share with a future student interested in your major? 

    I would share that in the public relations/advertising field you will learn about all different things. It’s not just about PR, because this connects with plenty of other majors. You will learn about how to define the story and then make the story compelling to a broader audience. Learning along the way life skills that are useful not just for public relations.

    Olivia poses for a selfie.

    How have you gotten involved at Rowan? How has your involvement impacted your Rowan experience?

    Being a volleyball player here at Rowan has really gotten me involved on campus. It has ultimately given me an outlet and a break from the stresses of schoolwork. Volleyball also keeps me active and keeps me informed on other activities Rowan provides. This involvement in sports has definitely made my time here at Rowan more enjoyable!    

    What does the Black Lives Matter movement mean to you?

    The Black Lives Matter movement is people stepping up and fighting against racial injustice. People are waking up and seeing problems that need to be fixed, such as police reform and systemic racism. 

    Have you attended any Black Lives Matter rallies, protests or vigils?

    I attended one in Egg Harbor Township. It was more of a rally, but there was also a protest. The rally was filled with people citing poems, stating facts and speaking about what we are fighting for. The rally was organized by four moms. There were also some little boys that spoke. I am also planning to go to the one in Glassboro on Juneteenth. 

    Do you think that the demonstrations are effective?

    Yes, I think the recent demonstrations are effective. There are bigger audiences than before, so they cannot be ignored. We have support from all around the world, which helps a lot. 

    Olivia poses in her volleyball uniform.

    What do you think that Rowan can do to better serve the BLM movement?

    Rowan should educate everyone. There should be more of a class to inform students. We have Africana Studies, but … [W]e should have a course that reflects the fact that racism is still an issue today.

    Is there anything you want your fellow Rowan students to know?

    It all starts with our generation. We need to educate ourselves in order to educate our children and their children and also the people around us. We need to do better so that the world can change. 

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    Story by:
    Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    Photos courtesy of:
    Olivia Clinkscale
    Unsplash

    Julia’s Corner: How Athletic Involvement Helped Me

    a photo of julia sitting outside the Rec Center

    Headshot of Julia, who is smiling and has long blond hair.Recent grad Julia McAleavey shares guidance through this advice column for incoming students. A student with well-rounded experience, Julia earned a bachelor’s in advertising this spring. She transferred to Rowan her sophomore year, after another school wasn’t a great fit. While at Rowan she started as an exploratory studies major, unsure of what to major in. She’s lived both on campus and off campus, held student worker jobs and internships, and participated in clubs and sports.

    Okay, I understand that athletics are not for everyone. As someone who originally started college as a varsity athlete, I completely understand that. When I transferred to Rowan, I knew that the NCAA was not for me, but I still wanted some kind of sport in my life. They are a great option for those who are interested, but as other options Rowan also has many club sports and intramural sports for students to choose from. I had been a competitive swimmer for my whole life, so I decided to try out the club swim team. Joining the team was one the best decisions I have ever made, and there are several reasons as to why that is. 

    Me getting ready to race backstroke.It kept me busy: Having practice twice a week at night was the perfect way to occupy my time. It was a good amount of practice to still have time for school and a job, and it kept me moving and socializing instead of just laying in bed by myself. It was also the perfect workout before bed, I would always fall right asleep. Additionally, on weekends we had meets, it gave me something to do for that entire day. As a senior, I became an officer for the club. Fulfilling my duties kept me busy, and it also helped with my professional development. It may not seem like it now, but you will have times in college where you are bored. Joining a club or intramural sport will definitely solve that problem. 

    Kept me active: I was always an athlete growing up. Fitness and athletics have always had a huge impact on my life. Even though I didn’t want the full commitment of the NCAA, I still wanted some kind of fit, competitive lifestyle. After attending the first practice, I knew club swim would help with that no problem. Even though it is a club sport, we still compete and practice hard, and almost always get in a good workout. Most other club sports have the same type of dynamic. Intramurals, even though they are seasonal and only compete at Rowan, also helps to keep students active. 

    Gave me friends: My favorite part of course! In my eyes, a good social environment in club swim was just as important as the athletic aspect.

    Me (right) with some club swim friends
    Me (right) with some club swim friends.

    Although many varsity athletes make lifelong friendships on their teams, the social interaction is the main reason why many students join sports clubs and intramurals to begin with. I have made some of my forever friends from club swim, and I know many other athletes that have done the same. It is one of the best ways to make friends. 

    Like I said, athletics aren’t everyone’s thing, but getting involved in any kind of sport on campus is a positive thing. Rowan has several NCAA teams if you’re interested in competing on that level. You can explore these teams. A lot of people have great experiences on these teams, but if you don’t want that commitment, club sports and intramurals are great options. They are the perfect thing to keep you busy, active, and of course, give you some of the best friends you’ll ever have. 

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    #Rowan2020 Instagram Contest Winner Megan Miller

    Megan poses in front of the Rec Center in her graduation cap and gown.

    Today we feature #Rowan2020 Instagram contest winner Megan Miller. Megan is a recent graduate with a bachelor of fine arts in Biomedical Art and Visualization from Cherry Hill, NJ (Camden County). Megan lived on campus during her freshman and sophomore years and lived off-campus during her junior and senior years. 

    Please tell us about your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? 

    My favorite experience in a class was my Surgical Illustration class. Being able to go into surgery and stand right next to the doctor was incredible, especially being able to see what happens during a surgery first-hand.

    Megan wears a Rowan shirt outdoors

    What was your favorite or most meaningful personal moment at Rowan? 

    My favorite personal moment from Rowan was being on the Rowan University Swim Team and winning our fourth straight NJAC title and third straight Metropolitan Conference Championship!

    How did being a student-athlete enhance your Rowan experience?

    Being a student-athlete was the best decision I could have ever made when coming to Rowan. It took up a lot of time and was a lot of hard work, but all the amazing memories and friends that were made along the way made it all worth it. I would do it all again in a heartbeat. Rowan Athletics just feels like a giant family, and I can’t wait to come back and continue to support them as an alum!

    Megan poses in her graduation cap and gown.

    What are your career aspirations and how did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with those aspirations? 

    I aspire to be a medical illustrator. Being a medical illustrator will allow me to see and experience things I would never have the opportunity of seeing while being able to draw. I’ve always found the medical world very interesting but loved drawing and wanted to go to school for it. I was lucky enough to find out that Rowan has the Biomedical Art and Visualization program, which combines the medical world with drawing. 

    Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors, or mentors?

    I would like to shout of my parents for always being my # 1 supporters. I also want to thank my friends, I wouldn’t have been able to make it through the past four years without them!

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    Story by:
    Rachel Rumsby, rising sophomore communication studies and public relations double major

    #PROFspective: Javelin Thrower Daniel McAleavey

    #PROFspective: Daniel McAleavey

    Meet Daniel McAleavey, a junior community and environmental major from Howell, NJ (Monmouth County) who lived in Rowan Boulevard Apartments this past school year. Daniel throws javelin for men’s track and field.

    Daniel throwing javelin in action

    Take us to one typical day at Rowan for you: A typical Rowan day consists of me waking up in the morning to go to lift (as an athletic requirement), then class after, then afternoon javelin practice, and if I don’t have another class after practice I would go lift again. I usually do my homework at night.

    Daniel (second on right) with some teammates and coach after winning the NJAC title
    Daniel (second on right) with teammates and coach after winning the NJAC title.

    Why did you choose your major: I choose environmental planning as a major because I liked civil engineering but it was too much material. I found out that planning was a very similar field and they often work with civil engineers, so I thought it’d be a good fit for me. 

    What is the most interesting thing you learned in one of your classes this year: The most interesting thing I learned in my class is about transportation planning in urban areas.

    Daniel (right) with one of his close friends from Rowan
    Daniel (right) with one of his close friends from Rowan.

    Tell us one moment that made Rowan feel like home for you: Rowan made me feel like it was the right fit for me is when i first visited the school and met all the nice people, especially my friends on the track team. It also helped that a lot of my friends from home went to Rowan too.

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    Story by:
    Julia McAleavey, senior advertising major

    Junior Major Moments: Law and Justice Major, Student-Athlete Johnathan Nguyen

    Johnathan hurdle jumping for Rowan Track and Field.

    Today we feature Johnathan Nguyen, a Law & Justice major from Galloway, NJ (Atlantic County) and a member of Rowan’s Track and Field team. He is a first-generation college student who transferred to Rowan and commuted until COVID-19 shut down campus. 

    What is one of your favorite moments with a faculty/staff member or a favorite experience in one of your classes?

    One of my favorite moments with a faculty or staff member would have to be meeting Coach Dimit. He introduced me to the school and team and made me feel like family the moment I stepped on Rowan’s campus. 

    What is the most amazing or interesting ​thing you’ve learned in your major this year?

    The most interesting thing I learned about this year would have to be in my class “Treatment of the Offender.” You learn so much different material and it wouldn’t be the same without my professor Joel Friedman. 

    What pre-professional experiences are helping to support your growth?

    The internship I will be applying to in spring 2021 is helping me grow as a person and help guide me to be a better person in school. There are guidelines to make for the internship so I would have to keep my GPA up and make sure I have enough credits every semester. 

    Group photo of Johnathan (center left) with other track and field members.
    Johnathan (second from left) with a few of his track and field teammates.

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    Story by:
    Melanie Sbaraglio, public relations and advertising graduate

    Senior Reflects: Psychology Major Nicole Byrne Shares Her Favorite Rowan Moments

    Basketball court inside Esby Gym

    Today we feature senior Nicole Byrne, a psychology major and neuroscience minor from Brick, New Jersey (Ocean County) who used to walk to campus everyday from her home she called “Lil Bed.” She originally transferred from Stockton University.

    Please tell us about your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? My favorite experience with a faculty member during my time at Rowan was being Dr. Martinez’s learning assistant (LA) for an entire semester. I had her as a professor and I loved how she taught. When I became her LA, our relationship expanded to something more. She was there for me through graduate school applications and through bumps in the road. I learned so much from her and I am beyond grateful for the relationship we established. She was a mentor that listened to me whenever I needed it. I loved hearing her hilarious stories about her kids and she loved my crazy stories about my family. It was an amazing experience to be able to open up to my professor.

    What was your favorite or most meaningful personal moment at Rowan? I was able to volunteer and be a ref at the Unified Sports this last semester. I had a blast. Being able to hangout and ref my favorite sport was one of the most memorable moments that I was able to receive while my time here at Rowan. The Green Team thought I was hilarious with the random and weird moves I would do with the basketball during time outs. It was the purest and the most fun I have had in a long time! 

    What are your career aspirations and how did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with those aspirations? I was fortunate enough to be a student researcher at Rowan University’s Schizophrenia-Spectrum research lab. My fellow classmates, graduate students and Dr. Dinzeo taught me so much and helped me realize that I have a passion for research. I wouldn’t have gotten the necessary tools to get into my dream graduate program if it wasn’t for that lab and the members in it. They will always have a special place in my heart!

    Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors? I want to give a HUGE shout out to my little sister Brittany who is still at Rowan University and my other sister Chelsea who has inspired me every single day. I want to thank my friends, teammates, my “B-Town” longtime friends and Jeremy Brown. Without the love and support they all give me each and every day, I wouldn’t be where I am today!  

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    Senior Reflects: First-Generation Law & Justice Major Ashley Bermudez-Villacis

    Ashley in her cap & gown near the Engineering Pond.

    Today we feature first-generation senior Ashley Bermudez-Villacis, a Law & Justice major from Lyndhurst, NJ (Bergen County). Before leaving campus due to COVID-19, Ashley lived in the 220 Rowan Blvd Apartments

    Could you tell us about your favorite moment with a faculty member or a favorite experience in one of your classes? My favorite moment with a faculty member was this past February with Penny McPherson Myers and Amy Ruymann and the rest of the Flying First committee, preparing for the Annual First Generation Symposium. I had the opportunity to meet everyone, and they helped me practice for my welcome speech that I had the chance to give this year. 

    Ashley and her parents a the First-Generation Symposium.

    What was your favorite or most meaningful personal moment at Rowan? Besides all the amazing moments and great friends I made these last four years, my most meaningful personal moment at Rowan was being a part of the club swim team. I had so much fun being a part of a great team that loved to get competitive but also have fun. Swimming was a sport I’ve done since I was very little, and I’m happy I was able to continue it in college.

    Ashley with Rowan's club swimming team.

    What are your career aspirations, and how did the people or programs at Rowan help to support you with those aspirations? I plan on working at a prosecutor’s office to eventually become a detective in the SVU unit. My advisor Rachel Budmen was a huge help in guiding me into the right direction. I’m the type of person who has many questions and I was able to get the answers thanks to Rachel. 

    Do you want to give a thank you shout out to your family, friends, advisors or mentors? Most importantly I would like to thank my parents and family for always supporting me throughout my college career. As a first-generation student I faced many battles, but I was able to overcome them thanks to my loved ones. I would like to thank my advisor once again for always helping me and make me understand that sometimes plans can change and that’s okay. Lastly I would like to thank my friends I’ve made throughout the years. I had the opportunity to create so many memories that I will forever be grateful for, along with lessons that will help me be a better person in the future.

    Graduation photo of Ashley.

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    First Year Voices: Casey Hofacker Reflects On Her Year

    Today we feature freshman (soon-to-be sophomore) Casey Hofacker, a psychology major from Lindenwold, NJ (Camden County), who lived in Holly Pointe Commons until COVID-19 shut down the campus. 

    Casey poses for a selfie.What did you most enjoy your freshman year at Rowan? What I enjoyed most about my freshman year was meeting my awesome friends and exploring my major.

    How do you create the “away at school” feeling if your home is close to Rowan? The way I create the away at school feeling at home is by acting as if I were still at school and sitting at my desk to do my homework or when we could still go out is going to a local coffee shop to sit and do my work.

    What clubs or activities are you involved in on campus? I play club field hockey and I love my team. It’s awesome they are amazing people who are accepting of everybody.

    Casey with her field hockey team.

    What advice do you have for future freshmen looking at colleges right now? Some advice that I have for incoming freshmen is to make sure that you manage your time wisely but also make sure to relax and have fun and to get involved on campus.

    What are you most looking forward to next year at Rowan? I’m going to start taking classes for my minor and also take a sign language class – I have always wanted to learn it. 

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    #PROFspective: Degree in 3 Grad Now Earning MBA

    Victoria Ieradi: Graduate student MBA

    Today we feature Victoria Ieradi, a third-generation Rowan student (her paternal grandfather, maternal grandmother, father, brother and cousin all attended or currently attend Rowan). From Mount Laurel, NJ (Burlington County), Victoria is a graduate student in the master’s in business administration (MBA) program with a management concentration, after earning a bachelor of science in marketing in three years through our Degree in 3 program. Before the campus closed in response to COVID-19, Victoria lived in 220 Rowan Boulevard. 

    Victoria (second on the left) with her family members who attended Rowan with President Ali Houshmand.
    Victoria (second on the left) with her family members who attended Rowan, with President Ali Houshmand.

    On-campus job? I worked at the Rohrer Center for Professional Development as a marketing intern for three years. Currently I’m a part-time graduate coordinator for the College of Business and the Wellness Center.

    Clubs/Organizations: I was a ProjectNest competition winner. I pitched free colon cancer screening tests at the Rowan Medical Clinic in Lindenwold. I also compete with Rowan club swim, and was a part of the American Marketing Association and the Outdoors Club during undergrad.

    Take us through one typical Rowan day for you.
    My typical day at Rowan usually starts with waking up, then getting dressed and ready for the day while I make a cup of coffee. I grab a quick breakfast and walk to either Business Hall or the Wellness Center, depending on what job I am reporting to. I work from 10 – 3 then go back to my apartment to get some homework done. I make dinner in my apartment and walk to class. The MBA program has all night classes, online, or hybrid, so it is really convenient to those who work full time.

    If my class is one of the hybrid courses, you can find me driving to my hometown where we meet for the class in person for half the semester at the RCBC campus in Mount Laurel. I’ll spend the late evening with my parents and then drive back to my on-campus apartment. If it is a Monday or Wednesday, I take my swim bag with me to class and go to the Rec Center to go to club swim practice. Here, I hang out with my teammates and get a great workout in.

    Victoria competing at a club swim meet
    Victoria competing at a club swim meet

    Once I am settled into the apartment for the night, I make a cup of tea and watch Netflix or the news with my roommates (it seems like it is the only time they get to see me as I am out most of the day). Having a schedule that is pretty much full actually helps me focus on my homework, assignments, papers, and studying for exams. If I had too much time to myself, I would get distracted. Being busy may not work for everyone, but it definitely keeps me on task. During the weekends, I try to spend time with my friends and boyfriend outside if the weather is nice! We like to go hiking, skiing, rock climbing (at a gym or outside), and kayaking.

    Why did you chose your major?
    I chose this major because I want to work in product/brand management, where you develop the voice of a brand and how consumers perceive it. I also have an interest in healthcare management, and I knew that an MBA would be really beneficial for me to get into that field if I wanted to later on in my career. 

    What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned this year in one of your classes?
    The most interesting thing I have learned in my classes this year has been through my class Managing Organizational Strategy. My professor uses a lot of real time examples and helps teach us using current topics as to how not only internal, but external, factors can affect the success of a company. Especially as times are rapidly changing for corporations big and small right now, I am able to see what we learn in class being applied to companies every day. 

    Victoria (second from the right) with some of her closest friends that made Rowan feel like home.
    Victoria (second from the right) with some of her closest friends who made Rowan feel like home.

    Tell us about one moment that made you feel that Rowan was the right fit for you:
    One moment that made Rowan feel like the right college for me was freshman year on my birthday. My birthday is early in September, so I didn’t think I had close enough friends yet to celebrate. I called my mom a little sad that I wasn’t going to have a good time as I was walking to my statistics class that night. I got back to Holly Pointe and sat on the floor to wallow in self pity. Then, my roommate at the time (now forever friend), came bursting through the door with people from our pod and people I knew from high school with a cookie cake and chocolate covered pretzels! It made me feel so welcome I was grinning ear to ear knowing I was a Prof, had a new family, and belonged at Rowan University! 

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    Story by:
    Julia McAleavey, senior advertising major

    Meet #Rowan2024: Full Ride to Rowan

    Stock image of pennies spilling out of a jar.

    Today we feature Analiz Santana, an incoming freshman from Pennsauken, NJ (Camden County) who will live on campus. Analiz will be a biological sciences major, with a pre-med track

    Why Rowan?
    I chose Rowan because I was offered a full ride because of my academic achievements. It is also close to home and my sister is a student at Rowan as well and lives on campus so I will be around her more. On top of that, Rowan made me feel most comfortable, without any worries. Rowan allows for me as a student athlete to be able to have an academic life, social life and still be an athlete if I chose to be.

    Analiz smiles proudly wearing her new Rowan shirt.

    Why or how did you choose your major?
    I chose my major after talking to my guidance counselor about options. I plan on being a OBGYN and this major will lead me in the direction of my intended career path. 

    What are a few things you’re looking forward to next year at Rowan?
    I am looking forward to experiencing living in a dorm and handling an on-campus life. I also look forward to making friends at social functions like football games. 

    What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan? (Or a new one you’d like to try?)
    I have played high school basketball all four years. I am not committed to playing at Rowan but am planning on either trying out for the women’s team or playing club basketball. 

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    Meet #Rowan2024: Exploratory Studies Major Keeps Doors Open

    Stock image of a yellow door and a blue door side by side.

    Today we feature incoming freshman Renna Manno, from Blackwood, NJ (Camden County), who will commute to campus. Renna is choosing to start her Rowan career as an exploratory studies major to keep her options open, but feels she may go into a field related to psychology or sports. 

    Classic senior portrait of Renna, wearing a black off the shoulder gown.

    What are a few things you’re looking forward to at Rowan next year?
    I am looking forward to pursuing my academic and soccer career at Rowan. Rowan feels like home so I am very excited to be in that environment!

    Why did you choose a university close to home?
    It works out perfectly for my family and I can get my education, play soccer, and get the college experience all while being close to my family. My family plays a big role in my life. 


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    Meet #Rowan2024: Student Athlete Shane Vostenak

    A stock image of a close up of running feet.

    Today we feature Shane Vostenak, an incoming freshman from Delran, NJ (Burlington County) who will live on campus and major in mechanical engineering.

    Shane stands holding a homemade sign that says Rowan2024.

    What are a few things you’re looking forward to next year at Rowan?
    Next year I’m looking forward to meeting my new teammates on the cross country and track team and getting to know all my professors and classmates. I’m really excited to be on my own and have a sense of self-sufficiency. I think it will be a challenge but one that really brings excitement. I’m also looking forward to learning new and interesting things about my major and about how the world around me functions. 

    Why did you choose your major?
    I chose mechanical engineering because I have always been the kid that wanted to tinker and find out how and why things worked in a mechanical/physical sense. I would always take apart random things in my house to see what made them tick. Most times I couldn’t get them to go back together the right way but it was the interest that made me choose this major.

    Why did you choose a university close to home?
    The fact that Rowan is close to my house is comforting but it was too major of a factor for me. I plan on staying on campus most of the time and really enjoying the new freedom and trying to really soak up the college experience. However it’s nice to know that if need be I could be home in less than an hour.Shane wears his cross country uniform.

    What is one activity, club, sport or hobby that you did in high school that you’d like to continue with at Rowan?
    As I said above I will be running for Rowan’s cross country and track team and I’m really hopeful to grow a lot as a person and as a runner in my four years. Another club however I might like to join is an investment club if one is available. At my high school we didn’t have one of these but in the past year I have become more and more interested in the stock market and how money circulates the country and the world.

    Why Rowan?
    Rowan for me was the right school because of its value. I see it as the right bang for my buck sort of. It’s is one of the top engineering schools that I know of and it is half the price of most other colleges I looked at. I also fell in the love with the new updates that the school has made to the engineering building and all the advancements that have been made to increase the technology and modernity of the supplies.

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    First Year Voices: Football & Friendship

    A candid photo of four male freshmen laughing together.

    “We’ve been playing football together since we were 6,” says freshman Jared Armitage, a business management major from Estell Manor, NJ (Atlantic County) of his Magnolia Hall roommate, Chris Doughty of Buena, NJ (Atlantic County). 

    Four freshmen males goofing off, with one trying to get the others to pick him up.
    From left: Jeron “Smooth”, Pavneet, Chris and Jared.

    “We both played for Rowan this year,” Jared continues. It was fun living with someone he’s known since childhood, he says. “It was never boring. We just goof around with everyone in the dorm, playing poker. My favorite memory from this year is goofing off in the dorms. Our whole floor in Magnolia – and someone brought water guns. We started spraying each other, and getting water bottles and throwing them at each other. (We cleaned it up, of course.)”

    At orientation, Jared’s randomly assigned roommate was Pavneet Singh, a freshman entrepreneurship major  from Carteret, NJ (Middlesex County.) 

    Jared shares, “We didn’t really talk much to each other at first. But, then we were both sitting there bored at 1:00 in the morning and said, ‘Hey, do you want to do something funny?’ and we ran around the hallways.”

    Along the way, the friends met Jeron, known as Smooth (on left). Jared says, “Chris met him here, but he lives close to us at home. Pretty sure we played football against him in school, but we didn’t know it. “

    Next year Jared and Chris will commute from home, instead of living on campus. “I’m going to carpool with Chris,” says Jared, “because I’ll drive past Chris to get to school.”

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    Women’s Ice Hockey Team Invites Us to Practice [VIDEO]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2UJ_eiBArI

    Danielle Felicioli, a junior from Glen Rock, NJ (Bergen County) and Erin Campbell, a sophomore from Jackson, NJ (Ocean County) give us an inside look into the Rowan women’s ice hockey team during their practice.

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    Video by:
    Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

    Music by:
    Donald DeWitt, junior music industry major

    Alumni Success: Health Promotion and Wellness Management Major Cory Bennett

    Gym equipment in the Rowan Fitness Center

    “Rowan was actually my transfer institution. I went to another school for my first three semesters,” says Cory. “It was a liberal arts school, so I realized that it wasn’t the right place for me.” Cory had friends who attended Rowan and were raving about how they liked it. Since it was an in-state school, […]

    Psychology Major “Breaks Labels” with Academic Success Center

    Rowan Psychology major Matt Corsi outside Esby Gym

    Spend just five minutes with Matt Corsi, and it’s impossible not to smile — this Psychology major’s positivity and enthusiasm are infectious. 

    Rowan Psychology major Matt Corsi stands outside Esby Gym
    The transfer student from Deptford, NJ (Gloucester County) arrived on campus one week early this semester as part of College Compass, a program that provides students with disabilities with a transition into college life through early housing, workshops and campus tours. 

    Matt has cerebral palsy and epilepsy, but for him, helping others plays a far more important role than his own disabilities. 

    “I’m here to rip the label off, break the label. We’re more than that with hard work, with a heart, with passion,” he says. 

    A new student himself, Matt actually served on College Compass as a peer mentor. He received accommodations as a student at Rowan College of South Jersey (RCSJ), which referred him to Rowan’s Academic Success Center (ASC, also known as the Disabilities Resource Center) when he enrolled at the university.

    When he arrived at Rowan, he met with ASC Director John Woodruff, who said, “‘I want to have you on our peer mentoring team,’” Matt recalls. 

    In this role, Matt guided freshmen and fellow transfer students starting out at Rowan. He reveals he didn’t have to know everything on campus to be a good mentor; it was counseling students in areas where they struggled and helping them grow where he felt he could be most useful. Matt says he left the group with this quote: “Maximizing your potential will lead to your success.” He sees himself reflected in this message.

    “If I can implement that to them, and they can see that I’ve done it, then I hope they’re more willing to do it, because they can, if they’ve really put everything into it,” Matt says.

    Matt looks forward to joining Unified Sports, an inclusive, competive sports club that partners with the Special Olympics.
    Matt looks forward to joining Unified Sports, an inclusive club where both Rowan and Special Olympics athletes compete and play soccer and basketball.

    Matt hopes to grow his leadership skills through Unified Sports, which he was part of at RCSJ for multiple years and for one as president. 

    “Unified Sports. That is my heart. I know Rowan has a championship school. It grows them socially and in so many aspects than in just sports. I have seen students who had anger issues who are now helping other students out,” Matt says. 

    Matt wants to be a mental health counselor post-grad, working with those with issues who he says “can [still] contribute” despite a social “stigma.” 

    So how does Matt stay so positive? He draws strength not only from helping others, but from defying the odds. 

    Rowan Psychology major Matt Corsi stands outside Esby Gym

    “Doctors told me my whole life I wouldn’t make it through college, and if I did, I would barely make it,” he shares. “And I graduated RCSJ and represented the whole class when I graduated.

    “A lot of times we don’t know how much we can do. But when we say we’re going to give it our best and we do it — it doesn’t matter, that’s a victory.”

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    Best of Both Worlds: International Student Merges Love of Marketing & Basketball at Internship

    Rowan international student and marketing major Marko Minic outside Business Hall

    For senior international student Marko Minic, a Marketing major from Serbia, (basket)ball is life! He came to the United States in 2016 to pursue an education in business and to continue playing the sport he loves. 

    “It’s business-oriented in America, and I felt that I could prosper here with an education in some sort of business, but I didn’t know what I wanted to study specifically,” he says. “I came to the conclusion that marketing was a good fit for me because I enjoy communicating and interacting with new people. I don’t just want to do the behind the scenes work; I want to be in the field of action.”

    Marko spins a basketball while standing in the grass outside the Rec CenterMarko decided to look into the Sports Communication and Media minor, which was brand new at the time, to combine his passion for sports and his knowledge in marketing. Dr. John Giannini, founding director of Rowan University’s Center for Sports Communication and Social Impact, was a mentor of sorts to Marko throughout his first year in the program, guiding him to find his niche in the industry.

    “I got to know Dr. Giannini through my involvement in the Sports Communication Club, and he introduced me to an organization called Hoop Group. We decided it would be a great fit for an internship for me because of my interests. He connected me to the group and encouraged me to reach out for an opportunity he knew of, and the rest is history.”

    This past summer, Marko accepted an offer as a marketing intern for Hoop Group, a renowned basketball training camp located in Pennsylvania. He spent his days capturing all that Hoop Group has to offer through its prestigious programs — photographing training sessions, managing the company social media accounts and staying in touch with camp alumni. He conducted player interviews each week for spotlights on the company blog, dabbled in Lightroom and Photoshop and weighed in on web design decisions.

    Rowan marketing major Marko Minic studies outside by the Rohrer College of Business.
    When the weather allows, Marko studies outside by the Rohrer College of Business.

    But for Marko, the best part of the internship was the hands-on involvement with both basketball and marketing. “Being able to watch the games and be part of the action in an environment that I’ve grown up around, and being able to provide valuable materials to the company was the most rewarding part for me,” he says. “I learned a lot about editing and content design and had a nice mixture of both behind-the-scenes work in the office and being out in the action, photographing players and getting to know people. To see things from the other perspective, being on the production side of things, was pretty cool for me, since I had never thought about the detailed work that goes into events like this.” 

    As Marko enters his senior year, his schedule is brimming with a combination of academic and athletic commitments: “Nowadays, I have less time to dedicate solely to sports, so luckily Rowan has so many options to still play on club or intramural teams while balancing everything else in life.”

    Marketing major Marko Minic stands outside the Esbjornson (Esby) GymnasiumThe “everything else in life” just happens to consist of more great opportunities for Marko, such as an internship this semester with the Rowan Recreation Center and with Rowan Athletics next semester!

    “I’ve learned that my professors are really here to support my career. That small positive word of mouth really put me on top and helped me stand out among the rest of the applicants [for Hoop Group],” he reflects. “Everything I’m doing is pretty exciting and rewarding right now, so I’m looking forward to the future.”

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    Story and photography by:
    Nicole Cier, senior writing arts major

    Alumni Success: William Moylan, Special Education Teacher

    Unified Sports members posing for a photo

    William Moylan graduated with his bachelor’s degree in Subject Matter Education/Math (2013) and master’s in Special Education (2015). From Park Ridge, NJ (Bergen County), William chose Rowan because he liked the small school feel and the respected education program. The distance was also perfect for him — Rowan was close enough for it to be “close to home” but also far enough away so he could “get away.”

    William Moylan (top row, second from left) credits his on-campus experience with Unified Sports with his own work as a special education teacher.
    William Moylan (top row, second from left) credits his on-campus experience in Unified Sports with inspiring his career as a special education teacher.

    Bill worked in the Recreation Center when he attended Rowan. He says that many of the essential skills that helped him then and later in life were provided by the Rec Center, such as resume building, social skills and figuring out where he wanted to take his career. 

    Bill also worked with Unified Sports, a program where Special Olympics athletes and Rowan students come together to play competitive games; it also offered students volunteer coaching opportunities. This experience led Bill down the career path he’s in now in special education. It helped him realize how important working in a positive atmosphere is, and he wanted to instill that feeling to more students.

    Bill recalled his idea to have he and the other coaches start wearing suits to their games. Along with suits, they’d wear different outfits for certain events, like pink for breast cancer awareness and Hawaiian shirts for the Hawaiian Invitational event. This tradition, along with others started by Bill and his friends, carries on to this day. 

    Bill said the most exciting thing he’s currently doing is working with the Special Olympics and Unified Sports, “being able to make an impact on individuals with intellectual disabilities and how that environment around Unified and the atmosphere can trickle into every day life and society,” he explained. 

    The most fulfilling part of his career now is working with the intellectually disabled, being able use his youth right now to show that he’s been in their shoes and that their struggles are OK. He shows them a perspective from an inclusive atmosphere to help them be able to grow.

    Rowan alumnus William Moylan speaks at a Unified Sports event
    Moylan speaks at a Unified Sports event.

    Bill teaches math at Whippany Park High School, where he says he always talks to his students about the positive environment you can find in college and in general how valuable the experience of college can be.

    This is Bill’s fifth year teaching, and the first year that he’s seeing students he’s been with throughout their high school experience graduate and move on to college. He says 12-15 of his students are coming to Rowan for the class of 2023.

    When asked if he had any advice for students interested in his career path, Bill believes the biggest thing that made his application stand out from others was his involvement with the Rec Center, Unified Sports and the Special Olympics. Bill urges any student to start joining clubs and getting these valuable experiences as soon as they can. He mentioned that he started working with Unified Sports during his junior year and wishes he had started even sooner.

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    Story by:
    Dean Powers, sophomore radio/TV/film major

    Photos courtesy of:
    William Moylan

    How to Avoid the Freshmen 15

    Several students working out on treadmills in a fitness center

    Today we feature advice from Catharine Rybeck, a junior public relations major from Barrington, NJ (Camden County). Catharine shares the lesson she’s learned on how to avoid the dreaded “Freshman 15.”

    So many students find themselves struggling to stay healthy while living on campus. We hear over and over again, “Watch those Freshman 15!” We know logically that to avoid them we need to eat healthy and An opened planner with a cup of coffee next to itstay active, but how do we manage to do so while juggling classes and a social life? To begin, it is of the utmost importance to schedule your time and hold yourself accountable. I strongly recommend investing in a planner and sitting down on Sunday nights and taking the time to write out your responsibilities.

    When you see what you have to accomplish written out, it is much easier to see what days are best at the gym or on a run. Another great way to stay active is finding a good gym partner or someone who will help make sure you meet your exercise goals; anything is easier to do when you have someone to do it with you. When you think about staying fit and active, most people immediately think they have to go and put in hours at the gym, but that’s not the case! Find something you enjoy to do and utilize A woman going up a rock-climbing wallRowan’s clubs and activities such as rock climbing club, spin classes, intramural sports, and many more!

    Now we all know how easy it is to go down to Domino’s and use Rowan Bucks on a pizza, but consider spending your money at the local ShopRite. They accept our Rowan Bucks all the same and when you sit and plan out what items will give you the most for your money, the meal ideas are endless. Options such as instant rice, frozen vegetables, eggs, oatmeal, and meats that have already been cooked such as rotisserie chicken are all great items at a low cost that make it easy for you to get several meals out of them.

    A plate of chicken over rice with vegetablesWhen Rowan Bucks run low, however, using the school’s cafeteria, such as the Marketplace in the Student Center or Glassworks Eatery in Holly Pointe Commons, is another easy option. There are a variety of nutritious options to help you stay healthy. Treating yourself is always okay but be sure to use moderation and keep your health in mind. And if you’re having trouble, Rowan’s nutritionist can always offer tips and advice.

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    First Year Voices: Thomas Julia

    Tom Julian wearing a background hat sitting in the Student Center

    “Being so far from home I wondered how I would fit in, but Rowan has done so much for me. I never had a problem since starting in September; my teammates and professors really made this campus my home.”

    Tom Julian wearing a backward hat sitting in the Student Center

    “I feel most at home during practices and games for club lacrosse. My teammates and I compete for the same goal and have fun while playing a sport that, for most of us on the team, been playing since we were little kids.”

    Thomas Julian, freshman exploratory studies major from Coventry, Rhode Island.

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    Photography by:
    Jelani James, senior journalism major

    TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Matt Isaacs

    Rowan University sign showing on the athletics field
    Matt wearing a black hoodie sitting in the Student Center pit

    Meet transfer student Matt Isaacs, a junior advertising major from East Brunswick, NJ (Middlesex County) who transferred from Georgian Court University.

    “When I decided to transfer I knew where I wanted to go was Rowan University because all of the great things I have heard about its communication programs and lacrosse team. I knew it would be the perfect fit for me.”

    “I wake up knowing that what I accomplish today will make me a better person tomorrow.”

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    Story and photography by:
    Jelani James, senior journalism major

    First Year Voices: Joey Coyle

    Joey Coyle of Rowan University looks upward toward the sky

    “Being part of the track and field team is a plus – the more people you know on campus, the more you get involved in activities. Being a part of the track team was the best decision I have ever made. I was shaky about joining but glad I made the right decision in joining such a close-knit organization that has that winning mentality. Everyone looks out for each other – it’s a great feeling.”

    “Rowan has been absolutely amazing so far, as my first year comes to a close. All of the great things I heard about this university were true – everyone is like one big family.”

    Joey Coyle, freshman Chestnut Hall resident and Human Performance in Clinical Settings major from East Brunswick, NJ (Middlesex County.)

    Joey Coyle laughs while holding onto the straps of the bookbag on his back

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    Story and photography by:
    Jelani James, senior journalism major

    TRANSFERmation Tuesday: Francis Terry

    Francis Terry stands in front of a tree for a portrait, wearing a black Rowan zip up

    Meet Francis Terry, a Law and Justice junior who commutes from Laurel Springs, NJ (Camden County) and is captain of the track and field team. Francis is a first-generation college student and transferred to Rowan last fall from Neumann University in Aston, PA. 

    Francis Terry stands in front of a tree for a portrait, wearing a black Rowan zip up

    “Just knowing that I’m one of the first in my family to go to college and pursue my dreams of getting a degree is what gets me out of bed. The work that I have put in and my family that are now looking up to me telling me that they’re proud of me. It just gives me the confidence I need to get up in to morning and do what I have to do. 

    “I chose Rowan because of how familiar I was with it. I just knew coming back home to Rowan was the best choice for me. I also chose Rowan because of how dominant our sports teams are. Being able to do what I love, while being able to be around great individuals all around campus, just makes the decision I made to come to Rowan even better.”

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    Story and photography by:
    Jelani James, senior journalism major

    Megan’s Home Away From Home: Volleyball Court [VIDEO]

    https://youtu.be/NBBOnuCRdTA

    Meet Megan Jacobi, a junior from Nazareth, PA (Northampton County) who lives off campus. Megan feels most at home with her teammates on the volleyball court in Esby Gym. She is an outside hitter for the Rowan Women’s Volleyball Team, and a co-captain.

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    Video by: Nicole Cier, junior writing arts major
    Music by: Bianca Torres, sophomore music industry major

    Soccer Player Scores Off the Field

    Ryan Campbell, senior liberal studies major, transferred to Rowan after one comforting visit. He immediately associated Rowan as home, even though his real home is two hours away in Wyckoff, NJ (Bergen County.) For the past two years, Ryan’s contributions to the Rowan community go far beyond the soccer field. Ryan is a forward for […]

    Engineer Furthers Her College Experience

    Kelly outside Rowan College of Engineering sign outside

    Like a proton, Kelly Yorke has a positive charge, driving her to go above and beyond in her field. The New York state resident, a chemical engineering major, became president of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at Rowan as a sophomore, a remarkable feat, and continued on through her junior year. Heavily involved with […]

    Shane’s Home Away From Home: Soccer Fields [VIDEO]

    White male student standing in foreground on turf soccer field with soccer net in blurred out in background

    Take a look at Shane Doherty’s home away from home on Rowan University’s soccer field. Shane is a senior physics major from Delran, NJ (Burlington County.) UPDATE: Congratulations to Shane, who signed with Galway United, to play soccer professionally with the League of Ireland first division.  Like what you see? Come visit us! VISIT CAMPUS​ Enter […]

    #PROFspective: Supply Chain Management and Logistics Major Rachel Breuninger

    Rachel outside business building with silver sign in background saying Rohrer College of Business

    Today, we speak with Rachel Breuninger, a senior supply chain management and logistics major who lives off campus in a rented house. Rachel will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she got the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Rachel Breuninger Major: Supply […]

    #PROFspective: Marketing & Management Major Kylie Kieffer

    Kylie standing on soccer field, picture taken from bleachers

    Today, we speak with Kylie Kieffer, a senior marketing and management major from Hamilton, NJ (Mercer County) who lives off campus in a house with Rowan athletes. Kylie will share her#PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she got the most out of her college experience as a […]

    #PROFspective: Business Management and Human Resources Dual Major Elizabeth Nelsen

    Elizabeth stands in front of the business building, leaning on a post

    Today, we speak with Elizabeth Nelsen, a junior business management and human resources major from Edison, NJ (Middlesex County) who lives on campus at 220 Rowan Boulevard. Elizabeth will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience […]

    #PROFspective: Nutrition & Dietetics Major Brianna De la Cruz

    Today, we speak with Brianna De la Cruz, a freshman Nutrition and Dietetics major from Hillsborough (Somerset County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Brianna will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience […]

    Compare/Contrast Freshman Housing

    Scott Timko is a resident assistant in Mullica Hall, wearing a yellow sweatshirt that says Glassboro State

    Chatting with Rowan University on campus residents on a frigid, hectic morning just before finals (seriously, is it really spring yet?!), one thing was clear: the sense of community within their residence halls is what they love most. However, what “community” means in each residence hall is different. I learned that Evergreen is known for […]

    #PROFspective: Psychology Major Olivia Scattergood

    Today, we speak with Olivia Scattergood, a freshman Psychology major from Kendall Park (Middlesex County), NJ, who lives on campus in Willow Hall. Olivia will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: […]

    #PROFspective: Civil Engineering Major Sidney McLeod-Whitener

    Sidney in track pose outside the track field at Rowan

    Today, we speak with Sidney McLeod-Whitener, a freshman civil engineering major from Philadelphia (Philadelphia County), PA, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe. Sidney will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: […]

    #PROFspective: Writing Arts Major Nicole Cier

    Today, we speak with Nicole Cier, a sophomore writing arts major from East Brunswick (Middlesex County), NJ, who lives on campus in Rowan Boulevard. Nicole will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan […]

    Sidney, Video Tour Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering at Rowan University

    Sidney stands on the outside balcony of the new engineering building at Rowan University

    Hey! I’m Sidney, a freshman at the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering. Welcome to my College, and to Rowan University. Like what you see? Register for a tour or open house.  Video Created By: Alexander Belli, public relations and advertising double major Vanessa Vause, public relations major Jayce Williams, music industry major

    #DearRowan: a storytelling event

    Two students sit at a table speaking to each other about the event.

    Nationally recognized Dear World, a portrait and storytelling organization, came to Rowan. Featured on USA Today, NBC, CNN, and Buzzfeed, Dear World focuses on uniqueness and individualization. The event was split into two different parts. The first was an informational session that provoked students to think about the story they’d like to tell. Each participant was […]

    Vanessa, College of Communication & Creative Arts at Rowan University [VIDEO]

    vanessa sitting in a college of communication and creative arts classroom

    Hey! I’m Vanessa, a junior at the College of Communication & Creative Arts. I’m thrilled to introduce you to my College, and to Rowan University. Like what you see? Register for a tour or open house.  Related stories: Carlo’s Day at Rowan University [Video] College Essay Advice [Video] Roommates Reflect: What It’s Really Like to […]

    #PROFspective: Computer Science & Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Josiah Bell

    Today, we speak with Josiah Bell, a freshman electrical & computer engineering and computer science double major from Pemberton (Burlington County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Josiah will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of […]

    #PROFspective: Athletic Training Major Maribeth Novsak

    Maribeth outside the Rowan field

    Today, we speak with Maribeth Novsak, a freshman athletic training major from Cape May Court House (Cape May County), NJ, who lives on campus in Willow Hall. Maribeth will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience […]

    #PROFspective: Art Education Major Melissa Glenn

    Rowan student Melissa holding her drawing outside Westby art building

    Today, we speak with Melissa Glenn, a recent graduate this fall with a bachelor’s degree in art education from Randolph (Morris County), NJ, who lives in a rental house off campus. Melissa will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she got the most out […]

    #PROFspective: Chemical Engineering Major Dylan Regan

    Today, we speak with Dylan Regan, a freshman chemical engineering major from Toms River (Ocean County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Dylan will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a […]

    #PROFspective: Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management & Political Science Major Kevin McCarthy

    Rowan student Kevin standing outside Rowan EMS building

    Today, we speak with Kevin McCarthy, a freshman disaster preparedness and emergency management, and political science major from Cranford (Union County), NJ, who lives on campus in Willow Hall. Kevin will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his […]

    Top 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before College

    academic advisor at Rowan University sits with a student to review her schedule

    1. Know that it’s not like high school You’re now responsible for the coursework, and it’s easy to delay assignments in favor of more fun opportunities. In high school, everything was set at a certain schedule. When you get to college, your life is already consumed by other responsibilities, and now, classes which could be […]

    #PROFspective: Computer Science Major Brian Chesko

    Thumbs up for Brian

    Today, we speak with Brian Chesko, a freshman computer science major from Hamilton (Mercer County), NJ, who lives on campus. Brian will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Brian Chesko […]

    #PROFspective: Accounting Major Kyle Perez

    Kyle in front of Rohrer College of Business sign

    Today, we speak with Kyle Perez, a freshman accounting major from Robbinsville (Mercer County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Kyle will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. […]

    #PROFspective: Mechanical Engineering Major Alexa Aulicino

    Alexa standing outside of Engineering building

    Today, we speak with Alexa Aulicino, a freshman mechanical engineering major from Cinnaminson (Burlington County), NJ, who lives on campus in Holly Pointe Commons. Alexa will share her #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how she’s getting the most out of her college experience as a Rowan […]

    #PROFspective: Radio, TV & Film Major Nasir Nichols

    Nasir spinning the basketball on his finger at the courts

    Today, we speak with Nasir Nichols, a freshman radio/TV/film major from Paterson (Passaic County), NJ, who lives on campus in Laurel Hall. Nasir will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan Prof. Name: Nasir Nichols […]

    #PROFspective: Secondary Health and Physical Education Major Joe Frascella

    Joe with football outside of Rec Center

    Today, we speak with Joe Frascella, a freshman secondary health and physical education major from East Windsor (Mercer County), NJ, who lives on campus in Willow Hall. Joe will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as […]

    #PROFspective: Environmental and Sustainability Studies Major Ryan Hamblin

    student stands on rowan football field holding a football

    Today, we speak with Ryan Hamblin, a senior environmental and sustainability studies major from Hillsborough (Somerset County), NJ, who rents a house off campus. Ryan will share his #PROFspective with us on what it’s like to be a Rowan University student and how he’s getting the most out of his college experience as a Rowan […]